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View Full Version : What Drinks Automatically Confer Credibility?


StusBlues
11-10-2010, 03:13 PM
I think we've established that Long Island iced tea and and the various -tini drinks automatically peg the drinker as someone of poor taste (or something - if you like 'em, I won't hold it against you). Are there any drinks that, when you see someone order them, automatically make you take notice and think "Hey! There's someone who knows what they're doing?"

Years ago I ordered a White Russian in a casino bar. Two young guys (who had never even seen The Big Lebowski, it turns out) immediately perked up and began treating me with a certain deferential awe. Not sure that qualifies considering the source, but you know what I mean.

Mr. Excellent
11-10-2010, 03:16 PM
Good single malt scotches, probably.

I've always thought the of gin and tonic as a moderately classy drink - it's the beverage of Empire, after all.

KneadToKnow
11-10-2010, 03:16 PM
Jack, black.

kasuo
11-10-2010, 03:17 PM
As a guideline any drink that doesn't have a childish name, isn't colorful or overly sweet would confer some credibility.

DCnDC
11-10-2010, 03:19 PM
Clarification: any drink ending in -tini that does not start with mar- is a girl drink. Additionally any drink served in a martini glass which is not a martini is a girl drink.

However a martini is traditionally the mark of an experienced and serious drinker. A gibson may also be acceptable.

Omniscient
11-10-2010, 03:35 PM
Ordering the liquor you want by name goes a long ways towards showing that you know what you are doing. Saying I want a "beer" makes you look like an idiot. Saying you want a "whiskey shot" makes you look like an idiot. Even if you are fine with well liquor to save a buck be specific, say well whiskey. Don't make me guess.

Straight drinks like scotch, bourbon or tequila ordered neat or on the rocks tend to be legit, but make sure you know what you want. "Your best scotch" tells me that you are probably faking it.

Mixed drinks aren't always a bad thing. Ordering a Captain and Coke or a Sapphire and Tonic is perfectly acceptable. Know the difference between a double, a tall and a double tall though. If you don't want a garnish or want a non-traditional garnish specify it. Don't make me double back to fix drinks that you ordered improperly.

Fruity drinks aren't inherently bad. Bartenders understand that some people have low tolerances or simply aren't looking to get drunk. Some fruity drinks plain old taste good. They are fine, just be specific. If you want an Amaretto Sour or Stone Sour go ahead and order it, but be clear and know what you want. "Something girlie" is not an acceptable drink order. An "amaretto sour, but strong!" is not acceptable.

If you want a Bud Light, that's fine too, but be specific about draft or bottle. Have a preference and communicate it, that shows that you know what you are doing.

Long Island Iced Teas and Appletini's however and Buttery Nipples or Blowjob Shots are universally a bad idea. They can't be helped.

Little Bird
11-10-2010, 03:35 PM
I always get insta-cred when I order a bourbon old fashioned or a rye manhattan. Especially if I have a chance to request a good whiskey.

The Hamster King
11-10-2010, 03:38 PM
Anything that includes more than two ingredients (not counting garnishes like olives or lime wedges) is NOT A SERIOUS DRINK. You take some liquor, and you mix at most ONE THING with it (soda, tonic, lime juice, bitters). The mixer may not be Coke or some other flavored soda. (So no rum & coke or 7 & 7.) And, in general, the name of the drink should say what the ingredients are, although some classics like martinis and gimlets get grandfathered in.

Labrador Deceiver
11-10-2010, 03:47 PM
No drink confers credibility. I know total douchebags who like to spend 10 minutes hovered over a list of bourbon (or wine, etc.) before making a big show of ordering their drinks. Not to say there is anything wrong with drinking 12-year-old Laphroaig, but most of those "liquor aficionados" bore me to tears.

StusBlues
11-10-2010, 03:54 PM
I always get insta-cred when I order a bourbon old fashioned or a rye manhattan. Especially if I have a chance to request a good whiskey.

The old fashioned has the same problem as pinot noir had a few years ago: its association with a trendy pop culture figure. Doesn't make it bad, but it's become hard to order without someone remarking about Don Draper.

A few years ago I was buying a bottle of wine for an outgoing boss and asked my local vintner for something that would express great respect. The first thing he suggested, given that my boss wasn't a huge wine guy, was pinot. I gave him a sideways smile, and he nodded and moved on.

Athena
11-10-2010, 03:56 PM
I got mucho respect in France once for ordering a bottle of wine.

Mr. Athena and I went to a moderately decent restaurant for lunch. It had been recommended to us by a winemaker we had visited a few days previously, and he'd told us they carried his wines.

Upon entering the restaurant, we got the stereotypical French snob treatment. Nobody spoke English, they seated us but barely talked to us, etc. etc. Which was fine, we speak enough French to be OK in restaurants, and we really wanted to eat there so we put up with their slight snobbery.

It kept up until we ordered the wine. The waiter gave us a slightly odd look when we ordered it, then ran off and conferred with the hostess. Hostess looks at him, looks at us, and marches over. Suddenly, she speaks English. "Do you know about this wine you ordered?"

"Oh yes," we reply. "We visited Monsieur Tempe the other day, and are big fans of his wine. We are very excited and lucky to have found this particular bottle and are very much looking forward to it."

Suddenly, we are the best friends of everyone in the restaurant. They all speak English! We are fawned over and lovingly served and everything is just great for the entire lunch. All because we knew to order that bottle of wine.

drastic_quench
11-10-2010, 03:56 PM
Anything that includes more than two ingredients (not counting garnishes like olives or lime wedges) is NOT A SERIOUS DRINK. You take some liquor, and you mix at most ONE THING with it (soda, tonic, lime juice, bitters). The mixer may not be Coke or some other flavored soda. (So no rum & coke or 7 & 7.) And, in general, the name of the drink should say what the ingredients are, although some classics like martinis and gimlets get grandfathered in.

Bunk. There's plenty of solid cocktails that defy this. White Russian, for one. Manhattan for another.

Omniscient
11-10-2010, 03:57 PM
I always get insta-cred when I order a bourbon old fashioned or a rye manhattan. Especially if I have a chance to request a good whiskey.

Tread lightly. Often the obscure old time drink tends to look like some douchey hipster trying to hard to be quirky. They are ordering a drink because it sounded tough when the Googled it one time. These people can typically be exposed when you ask them what's in it. If they aren't specific about the liquor it's made with they get a crooked look, like they think they are going to one-up me.

Jack Batty
11-10-2010, 04:00 PM
According to Steve Martin, it doesn't matter as long as it has a little umbrella in it.

Baron Greenback
11-10-2010, 04:01 PM
Just drink what you like. If you can carry off drinking some lurid concoction with a paper umbrella sticking out the glass, more power to you.

Baron Greenback
11-10-2010, 04:03 PM
Woah, simul-brella.

Snickers
11-10-2010, 04:06 PM
I love, love Old Fashioneds. And I was drinking them long before Mad Men came on TV. Draper can suck it.

But, if it means I no longer have to order it as a "Bourbon Old Fashioned," I'll be happy. Stupid Wisconsinites and their love of brandy - every bartender around here thinks I want brandy when I order one. No! No brandy!

Bosstone
11-10-2010, 04:07 PM
The mixer may not be Coke or some other flavored soda. (So no rum & coke or 7 & 7.)If a Captain & Coke is wrong, I don't want to be right.

Labrador Deceiver
11-10-2010, 04:09 PM
Bunk. There's plenty of solid cocktails that defy this. White Russian, for one. Manhattan for another.

Men who drink White Russians in public are typically mocked, which is why they used it in the Big Lebowski.

DonLogan
11-10-2010, 04:10 PM
Credibility with whom?

Bartenders? Strangers? Sex targets? Drinkers?

I agree no drink confers credibility. I drink whatever I feel like drinking at the time, be it a shot of Jack or an Alabama Slamma.

And nobody's ever impressed me with a drink order.

Although I can think of some drink names that would make me prick up my ears, like Cat Piss, or Pussy Juice.

StusBlues
11-10-2010, 04:10 PM
Men who drink White Russians in public are typically mocked, which is why they used it in the Big Lebowski.

That may have been true at one time, but I'm not sure it is now.



Although I can think of some drink names that would make me prick up my ears, like Cat Piss, or Pussy Juice.

That would probably confer the opposite of credibility, IMHO.

sachertorte
11-10-2010, 04:13 PM
This thread baffles me. Then again, I don't drink.

There is a restaurant we like to frequent that makes very nice apple martini's. They use real apples and lemon. Given the season, I think its quite nice. (Obviously, I don't drink it, but hubby does).

I also don't see the point in trying to impress a bartender. If someone googles an old drink and decides he wants to try one, why the hell should he commit the ingredients to memory? Isn't that what a bartender is for?

I guess we just aren't the type to try and gain credibility based on what we drink. (Water is fine, thanks). My husband gets much farther by simply being nice to his bartender. The one that knows him well offers him cool stuff when it pops up. And hubby never orders anything with 'cred.' At least, not that I'm aware of.

So I guess my question is why does a certain drink make you change your opinion of someone? What information is it conveying?

KneadToKnow
11-10-2010, 04:15 PM
Strangers? Sex targets? Drinkers?

You're repeating yourself.

villa
11-10-2010, 04:15 PM
Anything that includes more than two ingredients (not counting garnishes like olives or lime wedges) is NOT A SERIOUS DRINK. You take some liquor, and you mix at most ONE THING with it (soda, tonic, lime juice, bitters). The mixer may not be Coke or some other flavored soda. (So no rum & coke or 7 & 7.) And, in general, the name of the drink should say what the ingredients are, although some classics like martinis and gimlets get grandfathered in.

I generally agree with you, but tonic is a flavored soda. And it is credible.

blondebear
11-10-2010, 04:18 PM
If the bartender happens to be a Beatles fan, scotch and coke or lager and lime.

StusBlues
11-10-2010, 04:19 PM
Sachertorte and DonLogan, I don't really care about myself. I don't drink much, and what I typically order at a bar (Diet Pepsi, no ice) doesn't turn many heads. This is just a discussion thread. We've had threads discussing drinks that are disgraceful (to some) when ordered in public; I'm just looking for the attendant antitheses. That's all.

Omniscient
11-10-2010, 04:19 PM
There''s a difference between a person exploring booze and a person trying to put up a facade. Acting like you are a know-it-all when you really aren't is generally considered to be a bad trait.

As for judging people's drink orders, well half of it is tongue in cheek. But, since booze tends to turn people into raging idiots it's often helpful to be able to identify them ahead of time. Inexperience and a priority on "getting wasted" over drinking something you like are big red flags. How you order tells the staff a lot about what to expect.

fjs1fs
11-10-2010, 04:20 PM
I think we've established that Long Island iced tea and and the various -tini drinks automatically peg the drinker as someone of poor taste (or something - if you like 'em, I won't hold it against you). Are there any drinks that, when you see someone order them, automatically make you take notice and think "Hey! There's someone who knows what they're doing?"

Years ago I ordered a White Russian in a casino bar. Two young guys (who had never even seen The Big Lebowski, it turns out) immediately perked up and began treating me with a certain deferential awe. Not sure that qualifies considering the source, but you know what I mean.

If you're trying to earn CREDIBILITY by ordering a certain drink, you may have issues.

Labrador Deceiver
11-10-2010, 04:25 PM
That may have been true at one time, but I'm not sure it is now.

.

In my experience, it's just as true now as it ever was. Your mileage obviously varies, which is fine by me.

etv78
11-10-2010, 04:27 PM
Cape Codder, of course! ;)

LawMonkey
11-10-2010, 04:33 PM
Anything that includes more than two ingredients (not counting garnishes like olives or lime wedges) is NOT A SERIOUS DRINK. You take some liquor, and you mix at most ONE THING with it (soda, tonic, lime juice, bitters). The mixer may not be Coke or some other flavored soda. (So no rum & coke or 7 & 7.) And, in general, the name of the drink should say what the ingredients are, although some classics like martinis and gimlets get grandfathered in.

"You need three ingredients to have a cocktail. Vodka and Mountain Dew is an emergency." -- Peggy Olson.

True, so far as it goes; the classic recipe for a cocktail is a spirit, a sweetener of some sort, and bitters. E.g.: Rye, sweet vermouth, angostura bitters = Manhattan. Plus, I think some classic tiki cocktails are respectable and classy in their way, though I wouldn't order them in anything resembling a business situation. But if you actually know them, and you know that the bartender knows 'em and actually has all of the stuff to make them, it'd earn you a point or two with me. And then I'd order one, 'cause I've always been curious about 'em. :D

Stranger On A Train
11-10-2010, 04:42 PM
Anyone who judges your credibility on any topic other than dipsomania based upon the drink that you order needs to get some perspective.

Stranger

Markxxx
11-10-2010, 05:04 PM
So what about when Fred Sanford walked into a bar and wanted some ripple? :D

Huerta88
11-10-2010, 05:08 PM
However a martini is traditionally the mark of an experienced and serious drinker. A gibson may also be acceptable.

May I argue that a "vodka martini" does not enjoy the same status? Esp. when ordered "very dry?" If you wanted a glass of vodka, why not order it?*

*I recall various predatory bartenders in Joseph Wambaugh's cop novels rubbing their hands with glee when a vodka drinker came in, on the certain knowledge that "vodka drinkers are serious drunks who you'll get rich off, at least till they die."

The Hamster King
11-10-2010, 05:12 PM
I generally agree with you, but tonic is a flavored soda. And it is credible.Let's put it this way -- if it would ever occur to you to drink the stuff by itself without liquor, it's not a credible mixer.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
11-10-2010, 05:15 PM
So what about when Fred Sanford walked into a bar and wanted some ripple? :D

If it was a classy joint, he'd order a champipple.

Peremensoe
11-10-2010, 05:15 PM
Club soda is not a credible mixer either, then. Nor water.

Hamster King is really cutting down the menu.

digs
11-10-2010, 05:27 PM
If the bartender happens to be a Beatles fan, scotch and coke or lager and lime.

Explain...?

pulykamell
11-10-2010, 05:29 PM
Anything that includes more than two ingredients (not counting garnishes like olives or lime wedges) is NOT A SERIOUS DRINK. You take some liquor, and you mix at most ONE THING with it (soda, tonic, lime juice, bitters).

Totally disagree. Bitters are usually an aromatic component, not one of your "ONE THING"s that should be mixed with your drink. Take, for example, a manhattan or an old fashioned. For me, a cocktail should be at least a spirit + a mixer + an accent. For example, gin & tonic = gin + tonic + lime twist or slice. It's not a complete gin and tonic for me without that lime accent. Manhattan = rye + vermouth + dash bitters.

I used to have a rule of "don't order drinks that don't contain the ingredients in the name," but there were too many exceptions to that rule. Then I thought, "okay, drinks with one spirit and a mixer plus an accent" That rule works better, but still has too many exceptions.

Doesn't really matter, since I just generally order scotch or rye neat if I'm drinking something other than a beer.

GargoyleWB
11-10-2010, 05:34 PM
Archaic old-school drinks.

"I'll have a Harvey Wallbanger, my friend will have a Singapore Sling".

(ed. I really do love Harveys and order them often to :dubious: looks from bartenders)

Fenris
11-10-2010, 05:34 PM
How about this: "Immature people have no credibility. How do you tell a grown-up from an immature person? The immature person orders what s/he thinks looks cool. Grown-ups order what they want."

I have never gotten the faux prestige that some people think your choice of beverage carries.

aceplace57
11-10-2010, 05:35 PM
Tequila Sunrise best drink in the house. ;)

Sitnam
11-10-2010, 05:36 PM
No drink confers credibility. I know total douchebags who like to spend 10 minutes hovered over a list of bourbon (or wine, etc.) before making a big show of ordering their drinks. Not to say there is anything wrong with drinking 12-year-old Laphroaig, but most of those "liquor aficionados" bore me to tears.
My 8 years of bartending experience agrees with you wholeheartedly.

For mixed drinks if you want to avoid being a douchebag at a bar do the exact opposite of a Soccer Mom at Starbucks.

Der Trihs
11-10-2010, 05:41 PM
What Drinks Automatically Confer Credibility?
You know that drink from old Daffy Duck cartoons? That is mixed while wearing gloves and a welder's mask, produces a small mushroom cloud and dissolves spoons?

That drink.

silenus
11-10-2010, 05:44 PM
Explain...?

Items ordered in Beatles movies. "Two lagers and lime, and two lagers and lime" is the bar order just before Ringo drops into the tiger pit in "Help!"

dzero
11-10-2010, 05:50 PM
No drink really conveys credibility, but an obscure beer says that you are a curious person who is willing to explore.

If I want something as a conversation starter, I would order Tsingtao or maybe an imported Japanese beer. The label announces to the world what you're drinking so you don't have to be a douche bag about it by yelling your order to make sure everyone hears. And if you can then mutter a couple sentences about the origin of the beer and it's flavor, that closes the deal.

Of course I don't actually believe anything I just wrote, but it's fun to babble.

Smeghead
11-10-2010, 05:50 PM
Chocolate milk, baby. Ice cold.

Baron Greenback
11-10-2010, 05:54 PM
Pan-Galactic Gargle-Blaster for me please, barman!

NoCoolUserName
11-10-2010, 06:19 PM
I'm just looking for the attendant antitheses. That's all.Anyone who can use "attendant antitheses" in a sentence has 'cred' with me!

The Second Stone
11-10-2010, 06:19 PM
Smile and say "Louis 13" and you will impress all the chicks with your credibility.

MeanOldLady
11-10-2010, 06:41 PM
I often get drink cred when I'm out, and I think it's hilarious. At the bar I'm usually ordering a whisk(e)y of some sort (can be bourbon, scotch, Irish, rye, depending on the bar and its selection) usually neat, at times with very light rocks, or gin on light rocks. Occasionally a gimlet, and even more occasionally, if the bar has a decent rum selection, which most American bars unfortunately do not, a dark rum neat or with light rocks. People seem to think I'm srs bizns because of this, and I'm almost certain it's because I'm a woman, and particularly because I am a woman who isn't old yet.

Pointless story: Some months ago I went to the bar and ordered a Beefeater light rocks while a bartender was training a(n ostensibly new) bartender. New guy pours some precisely measured jigger over ice, when old guy says, "Make that a real pour. Someone ordering gin on rocks doesn't want no wuss drink." I don't know that guy, but I like him.

Clarification: any drink ending in -tini that does not start with mar- is a girl drink.Further clarification: anything called a martini that doesn't comprise of gin and vermouth should be called something else.

Ordering the liquor you want by name goes a long ways towards showing that you know what you are doing. Saying I want a "beer" makes you look like an idiot. Saying you want a "whiskey shot" makes you look like an idiot. Even if you are fine with well liquor to save a buck be specific, say well whiskey. Don't make me guess.Fair enough, regarding not ordering something stupid like "beer," but I always assumed that when ordering a mixed drink, you were accepting well unless otherwise stated. When I order a gin gimlet (and I bristle that I have to make that distinction considering a gimlet is made with gin, and the vodka intruders have forced me to specify), I always assume I'm getting rail. Occasionally they will ask if I have a preference, and I'll say rail is fine. When I have a preference, however, I will say so.

Credibility with whom?

Bartenders? Strangers? Sex targets? Drinkers?All of the aforementioned.

"I'll have a Harvey Wallbanger, my friend will have a Singapore Sling".Wait. I knew Harvey Wallbangers were out of style, but Singapore Slings are too? Fuck if I know anything.

msmith537
11-10-2010, 06:44 PM
I have never gotten the faux prestige that some people think your choice of beverage carries.


Yeah, we get it.:rolleyes:

You still look like a weirdo or a girl drink drunk for ordering a cosmo or some sort of fruity umbrella laden concoction. If you don't care, that's your business.

Any woman ordering a cosmo looks like she's trying to be Sex And The City superfan number one.

You don't walk into a Belgian beer bar or microbrew bar and ask for a "Bud Light". First of all they typically won't have it. Second, why would you order the crappiest possible beer?

The_Peyote_Coyote
11-10-2010, 06:46 PM
30-year-old single malt scotch

Or drinking a banana daiquiri with 151 Bacardi

MonkeyMensch
11-10-2010, 06:50 PM
Smile and say "Louis 13" and you will impress all the chicks with your credibility.

I only hope that you're saying "Louis Treize" and not "Louie Thirteen"!:)

Bosstone
11-10-2010, 06:54 PM
I don't always drink beer. But when I do, I prefer Dos Equis. :cool:

Baron Greenback
11-10-2010, 07:10 PM
Yeah, we get it.:rolleyes:

You still look like a weirdo or a girl drink drunk for ordering a cosmo or some sort of fruity umbrella laden concoction. If you don't care, that's your business.

Any woman ordering a cosmo looks like she's trying to be Sex And The City superfan number one.

You don't walk into a Belgian beer bar or microbrew bar and ask for a "Bud Light". First of all they typically won't have it. Second, why would you order the crappiest possible beer?

This kind of thing genuinely mystifies me. What kind of person gives a flying fuck what kind of drink another person likes to drink, much less judge them? Hint: good pubs have a range of drinks to suit every taste and pocket.

Omniscient
11-10-2010, 07:28 PM
Fair enough, regarding not ordering something stupid like "beer," but I always assumed that when ordering a mixed drink, you were accepting well unless otherwise stated. When I order a gin gimlet (and I bristle that I have to make that distinction considering a gimlet is made with gin, and the vodka intruders have forced me to specify), I always assume I'm getting rail. Occasionally they will ask if I have a preference, and I'll say rail is fine. When I have a preference, however, I will say so.

It's primarily applicable to shots. Cocktails aren't so finicky. Ordering a "whiskey shot" is the same as ordering a "beer". Ordering a whiskey and coke is traditional, though I somewhat question folks that will drink well to save 50 cents over Jack or Makers.

Tangent
11-10-2010, 07:31 PM
According to Steve Martin, it doesn't matter as long as it has a little umbrella in it.

"Be Somebody!"

drastic_quench
11-10-2010, 07:53 PM
I often get drink cred when I'm out, and I think it's hilarious. At the bar I'm usually ordering a whisk(e)y of some sort (can be bourbon, scotch, Irish, rye, depending on the bar and its selection) usually neat, at times with very light rocks, or gin on light rocks. Occasionally a gimlet, and even more occasionally, if the bar has a decent rum selection, which most American bars unfortunately do not, a dark rum neat or with light rocks. People seem to think I'm srs bizns because of this, and I'm almost certain it's because I'm a woman, and particularly because I am a woman who isn't old yet.
Right on. My liquor tastes are similar, but even as a guy, I still get the odd drink cred when none is sought. I'm flying a lot these days, and it's something of a pre-flight ritual to order a scotch neat. I like the drink, and it puts me in a good mood for commercial air travel, but it nevertheless draws a nod of approval or compliment from bartenders and patrons.

I always assume I'm getting rail. Occasionally they will ask if I have a preference, and I'll say rail is fine. When I have a preference, however, I will say so.
Absolutely standard practice in my view. If I just say a generic type of liquor, I expect the rails. Bartenders at nicer places do sometimes ask if I have one in mind, but they don't mind asking.

pulykamell
11-10-2010, 08:03 PM
OK, quick question fellow Doper alcoholics *cough* I mean spirit connoisseurs *cough* ...

I'll fess up. I'm not a big gin drinker, but I do like my gin & tonics in the summer (as well as gimlets, or what is known redundantly as "gin gimlets" these days). I also like the regular Bombay gin. The Sapphire is fine, but I like my gin & tonics with just the bog standard Bombay gin (the one in the clear bottle). What's the accepted way of specifying this? It seems if I say Bombay & tonic, the Sapphire is assumed. I even just checked "Bombay gin" in Wikipedia, and it redirects to the Sapphire.

Or should I just order them with Beefeaters and not be troubled with this conundrum?

fruitbat
11-10-2010, 08:09 PM
I will turn this into a 'ask people who drink' thread.

I don't drink often, and I don't care for strong alcohol. I have discovered a drink I love, to the point where I always have supplies on hand at home. The Dark and Stormy is the perfect drink, but I am getting generally blank stares when I attempt to order it. I assume this is because most bars aren't stocking ginger beer. Is this an obscure drink? Is there a more common version with ginger ale?

I don't really want ginger ale, but I love the drink with Barbancourt rum and I would be willing to accept substitutions.

davidm
11-10-2010, 08:12 PM
So what can a non-drinker order to confer credibility?

Siam Sam
11-10-2010, 08:17 PM
Pan-Galactic Gargle-Blaster for me please, barman!

I knew a bartender in Wichita Falls who actually created one. Nasty stuff, a guaranteed sick if you drank more than two.

MeanOldLady
11-10-2010, 08:18 PM
OK, quick question fellow Doper alcoholics *cough* I mean spirit connoisseurs *cough* ...:)

I'll fess up. I'm not a big gin drinker, but I do like my gin & tonics in the summer (as well as gimlets, or what is known redundantly as "gin gimlets" these days). I also like the regular Bombay gin. The Sapphire is fine, but I like my gin & tonics with just the bog standard Bombay gin (the one in the clear bottle). What's the accepted way of specifying this? It seems if I say Bombay & tonic, the Sapphire is assumed. I even just checked "Bombay gin" in Wikipedia, and it redirects to the Sapphire.You I like. I also prefer original Bombay to Sapphire. When I need to make the distinction, I ask for "Bombay Original."

pulykamell
11-10-2010, 08:24 PM
:)

You I like. I also prefer original Bombay to Sapphire. When I need to make the distinction, I ask for "Bombay Original."

Ah, "Bombay Original." That makes sense. I'll keep that in mind when summer rolls around.

Hunter Hawk
11-10-2010, 08:51 PM
So what can a non-drinker order to confer credibility?

Serious bars and restaurants have started doing stuff like house-made sodas and the like, so just take a look at the drinks list and see if there's anything nonalcoholic already on there. Alternatively, I sometimes ask for "something nonalcoholic but interesting".

If all else fails, ask for a glass of tonic water.

Hunter Hawk
11-10-2010, 08:57 PM
I have discovered a drink I love, to the point where I always have supplies on hand at home. The Dark and Stormy is the perfect drink, but I am getting generally blank stares when I attempt to order it. I assume this is because most bars aren't stocking ginger beer. Is this an obscure drink? Is there a more common version with ginger ale?

I don't really want ginger ale, but I love the drink with Barbancourt rum and I would be willing to accept substitutions.
Legally, if it's not made with Goslings, it's not a Dark & Stormy...

It's not that common a drink, and it's only worth ordering if the bar either stocks a good ginger beer/ale or makes their own. Realistically, I'd suggest picking another drink to fall back on if they don't know what you're asking for.

dzero
11-10-2010, 09:13 PM
Realistically, I'd suggest picking another drink to fall back on if they don't know what you're asking for.
This going to sound daft and it probably is, but if you're out at different places often enough, get some business card stock for home printers (8.5x11 with perforations) and print up a few cards indicating how the drink is made and what your 1st and 2nd choices are for the key ingredients. It will save much agro and you will probably be able to get what you really want more frequently.

Stranger On A Train
11-10-2010, 09:29 PM
So what can a non-drinker order to confer credibility?Knowledge and wit?

Stranger

Fenris
11-10-2010, 09:29 PM
Yeah, we get it.:rolleyes:

You still look like a weirdo or a girl drink drunk for ordering a cosmo or some sort of fruity umbrella laden concoction. If you don't care, that's your business.
:rolleyes: yourself.

Fact is, a real man or woman orders what they want and a pussy worries about what some stranger standing next to him in the bar thinks about "O noes! What if he doesn't think I'm MACHO enough for him?!" Geez. What kind of wimp actually spends time wondering "Gosh! Did the bartender think my drink was manly enough for me? What about that drunk two seats down. Maybe I should order something else!" You go to a bar to get a drink and hang with friends unless you're a poseur trying to impress strangers. And really...if you are? Get a life.

Order what tastes good.

In any case if anyone's seen the movie "Destry Rides Again"? Jimmy Stewart: one of the toughest guys in the movies AND in real life walks into a bar and orders a milk. Why? Because he's not a fucking sissy who lives in terror of a stranger's disapproval of him not conforming.




Any woman ordering a cosmo looks like she's trying to be Sex And The City superfan number one.
Or...y'know...she likes cosmos.

Argent Towers
11-10-2010, 09:33 PM
I knew a bartender in Wichita Falls who actually created one. Nasty stuff, a guaranteed sick if you drank more than two.

Mr. Turnkey, it's 10 PM in Wichita Falls
August 16, 1969 and I'm in some bar

Your name wouldn't happen to be Zager or Evans, would it?

My standby drink is J&B on the rocks. Drink of choice for Shelly "The Machine" Levine.

Hunter Hawk
11-10-2010, 09:38 PM
Or...y'know...she likes cosmos.

The ironic thing is that if you make a cosmo according to Toby Cecchini's recipe, it's actually a pretty hardcore drink. It's not very sweet, and is aggressively sour.

running coach
11-10-2010, 09:39 PM
According to Steve Martin, it doesn't matter as long as it has a little umbrella in it.

"Be Somebody!"

"And no more of that old stuff. Bring us some fresh wine."

missred
11-10-2010, 09:40 PM
Back when I was tending bar (25+ years ago), it was anything that didn't reek of fruity mixer (it was a college town bar - beaucoup strawberry margharitas and banana daquiris - blech) or make me use the blender when I was backed up with drink orders. Also, anything that didn't involve a bunch of college kids drinking shots and getting really stupid really quickly.

Like MOL, I tend to get instant cred as a woman by ordering a good bourbon, Scotch, rye or Irish whisk(e)y neat with water back, light rocks or in the warmer months, with water. A non-rail gin and tonic gets the same look.

I think that ordering alcohol that has a distinct characteristic, not covered up by mixers that have a stronger flavor, usually does signify that you actually like the liquor itself and not just the effects.

davidm
11-10-2010, 09:44 PM
Serious bars and restaurants have started doing stuff like house-made sodas and the like, so just take a look at the drinks list and see if there's anything nonalcoholic already on there. Alternatively, I sometimes ask for "something nonalcoholic but interesting".

If all else fails, ask for a glass of tonic water.Perrier, maybe? Or would that sound pretentious? :p

Maybe it works for you, but for me I can't imagine myself saying "something nonalcoholic but interesting" without sounding like some sort of pretentious fop. :D

Maybe something totally off the wall like "an unsweetened espresso with Ceylon cinnamon." When they say they don't have Ceylon cinnamon (or espresso), roll your eyes and say "never mind, just get me a Vernor's ginger ale with a slice of Vietnamese persimmon.

Hunter Hawk
11-10-2010, 09:47 PM
A while back, I was sitting at the bar of the Zig Zag when a young woman walked up and ordered a shot of Old Raj gin neat. As she walked away, Murray and I had the interchange:

Hunter Hawk: :eek: I think I'm in love.

Murray: :D Man, she's welcome here any time!

pulykamell
11-10-2010, 09:49 PM
Luckily, my tastes align towards "manly" drinks, so I don't have to worry. ;)

Still, if I were one to prefer the more so-called "girly" drinks, I would take great pride in unapologetically ordering them, but in a specific, "manly" sort of way.

running coach
11-10-2010, 09:52 PM
davidm, you're evil. :D

davidm
11-10-2010, 09:58 PM
Luckily, my tastes align towards "manly" drinks, so I don't have to worry. ;)

Still, if I were one to prefer the more so-called "girly" drinks, I would take great pride in unapologetically ordering them, but in a specific, "manly" sort of way.Slam your fist down - "gimme a goddamn peach daiquiri, in a dirty glass!"

davidm
11-10-2010, 10:00 PM
davidm, you're evil. :DI guess I'll take that as a compliment.

Martini Enfield
11-10-2010, 10:14 PM
Archaic old-school drinks.

"I'll have a Harvey Wallbanger, my friend will have a Singapore Sling".

I can assure you that there's nothing archaic about a Singapore Sling. :)

Swords to Plowshares
11-10-2010, 11:02 PM
Luckily, my tastes align towards "manly" drinks, so I don't have to worry. ;)

Still, if I were one to prefer the more so-called "girly" drinks, I would take great pride in unapologetically ordering them, but in a specific, "manly" sort of way.

This was from another forum:

A guy came up to the bar and complained to me that he wanted to order some fuzzy navels, but he always felt like a huge wuss asking the bartender for a drink with such a ridiculous name. I told him I agreed, and said that a drink that sweet needed an extra-masculine name to balance it out. And since "screwdriver" manages to sound like a masculine drink despite having orange juice, I suggested that we'd start calling peach schnapps + orange juice a "chainsaw". For the rest of the night he would come up and drunkenly yell "CHAAAAAAINSAAAAW" at me, confusing the other wedding guests. I put up with it and yelled it right back at him, because he was tipping $20 every time.

After that night I started using the "chainsaw" schtick on every guy who ordered a fuzzy navel, and it ALWAYS brought in good tips. Yay booze!

Siam Sam
11-10-2010, 11:37 PM
Your name wouldn't happen to be Zager or Evans, would it?

My tale was from the 1970s, not in the year 2525. ;)

I am reminded of one time when I was 16 or 17 in West Texas, proud possessor of a new fake ID at a time when the drinking age was 18. I confidently sat down at a table in a restaurant and perused the drinks menu to see if any drink name took my fancy. Making my selection, I masterfully told the waitress: "I'll have a highball." She said: "Okay, what kind?" Kind?!? Damn, all pretense of credibility flew right out the window. (She helpfully named a couple, and I desperately chose one.)

Siam Sam
11-10-2010, 11:44 PM
I can assure you that there's nothing archaic about a Singapore Sling. :)

The Singapore Sling was invented at the Long Bar (http://www.raffles.com/EN_RA/Property/RHS/Restaurants_Bars/Long_Bar.htm) of the Raffles Hotel in Singapore, in the 1920s. The wife and I have actually drank Singapore Slings there. Interesting place. Serves you complimentary unshelled peanuts in baskets, and you're supposed to toss the shells onto the floor. Nowadays they make the Singapore Slings up in batches, because all the tourists want to have one in its birthplace, but it's still kind of neat.

The same bar may be where the last wild tiger in Singapore was shot, in 1902. Most stories peg it in the Pool & Billiard Room instead.

Johnny L.A.
11-10-2010, 11:54 PM
I'd like two pints of lager and a packet of crisps, please!

Martini Enfield
11-11-2010, 12:24 AM
The Singapore Sling was invented at the Long Bar (http://www.raffles.com/EN_RA/Property/RHS/Restaurants_Bars/Long_Bar.htm) of the Raffles Hotel in Singapore, in the 1920s. The wife and I have actually drank Singapore Slings there. Interesting place. Serves you complimentary unshelled peanuts in baskets, and you're supposed to toss the shells onto the floor. Nowadays they make the Singapore Slings up in batches, because all the tourists want to have one in its birthplace, but it's still kind of neat.

The same bar may be where the last wild tiger in Singapore was shot, in 1902. Most stories peg it in the Pool & Billiard Room instead.

I've had a Singapore Sling at the Long Bar, complete with lots of delicious complimentary peanuts. In fact, the Long Bar is probably my favourite bar anywhere in the world because it's just so... Colonial. :)

And I think we can agree it says a lot about the sort of place Colonial Singapore was when people in respectable hotels kept rifles handy just in case they had to shoot some of the local wildlife. ;)

dzero
11-11-2010, 12:29 AM
One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer
One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer
Hey mister bartender come here
I want another drink and I want it now

My baby she gone, she been gone two night
I ain't seen my baby since night before last
One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer


Source (http://blueslyrics.tripod.com/artistswithsongs/john_lee_hooker_2.htm#one_bourbon_one_scotch_one_beer)

Inner Stickler
11-11-2010, 12:31 AM
I can't think of any drink that makes me think one way or the other about a person, other than that they probably like the drink.

congodwarf
11-11-2010, 12:49 AM
I rarely go to bars and I rarely order or drink alcohol.

However, the last time I was in a bar, I ordered coffee. The time before that was Grey Goose neat. I got the same looks for both orders. I don't know what that says about cred but I don't really care what anyone else thinks about my drinking habits. The only things that concern me are that the vodka doesn't taste like nail polish remover and that the coffee isn't chewy.

Jennyrosity
11-11-2010, 02:56 AM
Let's put it this way -- if it would ever occur to you to drink the stuff by itself without liquor, it's not a credible mixer.

I drink tonic water on it's own sometimes. Admittedly, this is largely because my social circle tends to be big drinkers, and if I'm having a night off the booze it's easier to drink that and have them assume it has gin in it than deal with all the questions about why I'm not drinking.

And surely the "credibility" referred to is your credibility as a drinker? I don't judge people for drinking very sweet, fruity drinks, but I do assume they don't actually like the taste of alcohol and are just drinking to get drunk. Most of us start out like that - when I first started drinking I drank Southern Comfort and coke, or peach schnapps and lemonade. Now I couldn't bear anything sweeter than a G & T.

Ellis Dee
11-11-2010, 02:59 AM
I like to keep it simple. I have three go-to drinks that I typically stick with:

Captain & Coke
Jack & Ginger
Vodka Tonic (Either Absolute or Grey Goose, depending on who I'm with.)

So what can a non-drinker order to confer credibility?If you're looking for a drink you can nurse that doesn't act like a neon sign saying "this guy ain't drinkin!", order 7-up, ginger ale or in a pinch coke (light sodas are better) in a rocks glass. The rocks glass is the key, and definitely don't use a straw. heh.

Fact is, a real man or woman orders what they want and a pussy worries about what some stranger standing next to him in the bar thinks about "O noes! What if he doesn't think I'm MACHO enough for him?!" Geez. What kind of wimp actually spends time wondering "Gosh! Did the bartender think my drink was manly enough for me? What about that drunk two seats down. Maybe I should order something else!" You go to a bar to get a drink and hang with friends unless you're a poseur trying to impress strangers. And really...if you are? Get a life.Yes, yes, we're all impressed with your awesomeness. All hail Fenris.

Weedy
11-11-2010, 03:13 AM
So what can a non-drinker order to confer credibility?

My preferred drink is mineral water, but if I think that is going to sound too pretentious, I order lemon, lime and bitters. I don't know if that actually gives me any cred or not.

Kyla
11-11-2010, 03:45 AM
So a glass of milk is right out?

Martini Enfield
11-11-2010, 04:30 AM
So a glass of milk is right out?

What's the point of going to the pub and ordering water or milk or whatever? Why not just go a cafe somewhere instead?

BigT
11-11-2010, 04:46 AM
I like to keep it simple. I have three go-to drinks that I typically stick with:

Captain & Coke
Jack & Ginger
Vodka Tonic (Either Absolute or Grey Goose, depending on who I'm with.)

If you're looking for a drink you can nurse that doesn't act like a neon sign saying "this guy ain't drinkin!", order 7-up, ginger ale or in a pinch coke (light sodas are better) in a rocks glass. The rocks glass is the key, and definitely don't use a straw. heh.

Yes, yes, we're all impressed with your awesomeness. All hail Fenris.

Why wouldn't the same response be appropriate for msmith537? his post was a response to say that he was awesomer than Fenris.

As for me: no drink makes you look credible, but they can make other people seem trustworthy...

Horatio Hellpop
11-11-2010, 06:02 AM
I think martinis are due for a critical re-evaluation. Sure, Bond drinks them, but the number 2 martini connoisieur is Jo Anne Worley, and it takes a pretty steep drop after her. Number 3 might be David Niven or one of the ghosts from Topper, I dunno. They're all more famous for other stuff.

Mean Mr. Mustard
11-11-2010, 06:29 AM
Room-temperature buttermilk. Everyone in the establishment sits up and takes notice, yessir. Instant cred.

Test it some time.


mmm

davidm
11-11-2010, 06:54 AM
If you're looking for a drink you can nurse that doesn't act like a neon sign saying "this guy ain't drinkin!", order 7-up, ginger ale or in a pinch coke (light sodas are better) in a rocks glass. The rocks glass is the key, and definitely don't use a straw. heh.Yeah, those are usually the ones I go for. I've been really partial to ginger ale lately. I never thought to order it in a special way and it's always annoyed me that they automatically stick a straw in it. Why? Liquid is liquid and it all goes down the same way. Do people prefer a straw in soft drinks but not in liquor? Is the bartender trying to embarrass you into ordering something more expensive? :confused:

MegaBee
11-11-2010, 06:58 AM
What's the point of going to the pub and ordering water or milk or whatever? Why not just go a cafe somewhere instead?

Designated driver.

Dangerosa
11-11-2010, 07:06 AM
Slam your fist down - "gimme a goddamn peach daiquiri, in a dirty glass!"

When we vacation, I will sometimes order drinks along the line of an Old Fashioned (with bourbon, but I'll concur on the "Wisconsin brandy thing") or a vodka martini (sorry gin drinkers, juniper ain't my flavor), and my husband will order something rummy with a fruit garnish on it.

(I was drinking cosmos out of college, which according to wiki may or may not be before they were invented. But I live in the Twin Cities where they may have been invented in the 70s. Still like them).

I'm not sure if its credibility, but it sure is fun and we've done it a few times at quiet bars. Sit down at the bar. Start talking "flavor profiles" with the bartender. Have him or her "invent" you something based off what you agree on. Often, the bartender (and this is at the sort of place where the bartender likes mixing something with St. Germain and Canton in the same glass), will start mixing and pouring his or her "inspirations" into very small glasses for you - and we've had the pleasure of returning to find it on the specialty drinks menu. Our favorite is rye, Canton, orange bitters and lemon.

Fenris
11-11-2010, 07:11 AM
Yes, yes, we're all impressed with your awesomeness. All hail Fenris.

At last, the recognition from a total stranger I've craved for so long.

Huerta88
11-11-2010, 07:28 AM
As conversation has veered in part to non-alcoholic drinks:

Club soda with a dash of bitters has been my choice on occasion. (a) it looks like some serious drink, even kind of smells that way; (b) it's got a kind of interesting taste to distract you from the fact it's got no booze.

Sigmagirl
11-11-2010, 07:39 AM
I like a glass of pineapple juice.

msmith537
11-11-2010, 08:13 AM
At last, the recognition from a total stranger I've craved for so long.

It's mindbottling to me that people on this board can spend a hundred pages criticizing the minutiae of some bullshit movie but get all indignant when people have the same level of discussion about real-life stuff.

Lighten up Fenris. It's not that serious a topic.




Why wouldn't the same response be appropriate for msmith537? his post was a response to say that he was awesomer than Fenris.


Because I actually am awesome.

EvilTOJ
11-11-2010, 08:33 AM
Give me some of that Old Janx Spirit.

KneadToKnow
11-11-2010, 09:26 AM
Mindbottling?

Freudian Slit
11-11-2010, 09:56 AM
"You need three ingredients to have a cocktail. Vodka and Mountain Dew is an emergency." -- Peggy Olson.

They had Mountain Dew in the early 60s? I guess they did (per wiki, they had it in the 40s) but somehow I associate Mountain Dew with sweaty guys at scifi conventions or for computer programmers before Red Bull came along. Not for the suave, pencil skirted set on Mad Avenue!

villa
11-11-2010, 10:14 AM
I'm kind of with people on the idea that no drink can convey credibility, simply because anyone can buy anything if they have the money. I've seen utter knobheads order Louis XIII in bars, because they want people to think they have taste (tasty but nowhere near tasty enough for that price).

But the counter isn't true - what you drink can destroy credibility. Generally speaking, go with what you want. But sometimes a drink (and how you order it) will scream "no talent ass clown." A bar I worked in had a very large range of Scotches. If someone came in and asked what scotches we had, I'd ask them what they liked, and make suggestions (we had 50 or 60 so I wasn't going to list them). This one guy looks at me and simply says - "give me the most expensive." I offer him a choice of three that were all the same price, and he waved me off, telling me just to pick one. He took them (with ice :rolleyes: ) back to his date (who probably cost more than the scotch per hour), and 5 minutes later came back and asked for coke in them both.

His choice of drink showed him to be an ass, and destroyed any credibility he might have had in my eyes. Nothing wrong with drinking whisky and coke, but if you specify a particular single malt and put coke in it, I am going to think you are a poseur. Asking for a white wine spritzer - no problem. Asking for a white wine spritzer with sprite not soda - no problem, your choice. Asking for a white wine spritzer with sprite and can you make it with the 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru exposes you as an ass.

msmith537
11-11-2010, 10:19 AM
Mindbottling?

Yeah. You know, when things are so crazy it gets your thoughts all trapped, like in a bottle.

dzero
11-11-2010, 10:21 AM
His choice of drink showed him to be an ass, and destroyed any credibility he might have had in my eyes.
Yes, but it wasn't your pants he was trying to get into. :D

villa
11-11-2010, 10:22 AM
Given the girl he was with, the $60 for two drinks would have bought him at least 30 minutes of half and half anyway.

msmith537
11-11-2010, 10:51 AM
I'm kind of with people on the idea that no drink can convey credibility, simply because anyone can buy anything if they have the money. I've seen utter knobheads order Louis XIII in bars, because they want people to think they have taste (tasty but nowhere near tasty enough for that price).

But the counter isn't true - what you drink can destroy credibility. Generally speaking, go with what you want. But sometimes a drink (and how you order it) will scream "no talent ass clown." A bar I worked in had a very large range of Scotches. If someone came in and asked what scotches we had, I'd ask them what they liked, and make suggestions (we had 50 or 60 so I wasn't going to list them). This one guy looks at me and simply says - "give me the most expensive." I offer him a choice of three that were all the same price, and he waved me off, telling me just to pick one. He took them (with ice :rolleyes: ) back to his date (who probably cost more than the scotch per hour), and 5 minutes later came back and asked for coke in them both.

His choice of drink showed him to be an ass, and destroyed any credibility he might have had in my eyes. Nothing wrong with drinking whisky and coke, but if you specify a particular single malt and put coke in it, I am going to think you are a poseur. Asking for a white wine spritzer - no problem. Asking for a white wine spritzer with sprite not soda - no problem, your choice. Asking for a white wine spritzer with sprite and can you make it with the 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru exposes you as an ass.


Agreed. What we are trying to do here is help people from looking like some sort of poseur douche or unsophisticated goon.

Walking up to a bar and asking for "your most expensive scotch" just makes you look like an idiot trying to impress people. I took a liking to scotch a few years back during a vacation in Scotland with my girlfriend. I'm hardly an expert on it, but I have to think you look like less of a jackass describing what sort of scotch you like as long as you aren't like "uh...I'll have a scotch on the rocks, please. Any scotch will do, as long as it's not a blend, of course. single malt, Glen Livet, Glen Galley, perhaps, any glen."

And who gets an expensive scotch and fills it full of ice? Just get a Dewars on the rocks if you want that "scotchy" tasting water flavor.

villa
11-11-2010, 11:10 AM
I drink my scotch neat, but if you want it with rocks, again, I have no problem. If you like Glenmorangie 18 year old with a glass full of ice, that says nothing about you other than my tastes differ from yours. However, if you are ordering Glenmorangie 18 despite not liking it, and put the ice in because it makes it more palatable (but still not enjoyable), you're a knob.

The only thing I drink I actively dislike (and it is very rare) is tequila. And I only do it because it is literally the only way of shutting one friend up. I love you Jeff, but you are a freaking pain in the ass every time I tell you that I don't like that crap.

TruCelt
11-11-2010, 11:19 AM
A Dry Rob Roy or an Olde Fashioned.

davidm
11-11-2010, 11:25 AM
What's the point of going to the pub and ordering water or milk or whatever? Why not just go a cafe somewhere instead?Maybe you want to be with your friends but can't drink or don't want to.

mrklutz
11-11-2010, 11:49 AM
I like sazeracs, but I'll only order them in a bar that's serious about its cocktails. They're kind of obscure and a bit of a production to make, but they always seem to make the bartender take an interest. At a place in Boston called "Drink", the bartender's face immediately lit up and she said "That's my favorite drink to make!" It's often a conversation starter.

In most places, I'll go for a Manhattan or maybe a sidecar if I'm in a cocktail mood.

Dangerosa
11-11-2010, 12:13 PM
Asking for a white wine spritzer with sprite and can you make it with the 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru exposes you as an ass.

Fine ingrediants make or break a dish - or a drink - as every chef knows. I'm sure that there is a discriminating palate out there that can tell if their white wine spritzer is made with Sprite and the 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru or made with 7 up and the Jacques Bourguignon Chablis sold by Trader Joes for $10 a bottle - and yet still enjoyed the soda pop version of the white wine spritzer.

(Our house drink is Woodford Reserve and Coke - but it has to be Mexican coke with the sugar. Yeah, could just pour Jack, or Beam with Pepsi, but it isn't the same drink. Besides, sometimes you want straight bourbon, and then you'd have this bottle of Beam.).

I used to date a wealthy guy a gazillion years ago - and he'd order $200 or $300 bottles of wine to impress me - who was 22 and had a wine palate sophisticated enough to enjoy a really good Lambrusco. Since I didn't care, and he was doing it merely to impress me - he was drinking something else - he was sort of a tool.

(At the time I did drink single malt scotches enough to be able to know what I liked there, but since he didn't, he couldn't impress me with his knowledge of single malt scotches - so I never increased my knowledge on his dime on that topic. And he kept insisting on widening my wine palate in ways I never enjoyed. 20 years later and champagne is still too yeasty for me and I still prefer reds)

Jack Batty
11-11-2010, 12:23 PM
Personally, I don't give a shit what scotch I should drink to make myself seem credible. Show me what you have on tap and I'll have one of those and go about my business of having fun at a bar instead of trying to impress some one with my choice of Glenwhatevers ... umbrella or no.

joebuck20
11-11-2010, 12:23 PM
I don't always drink beer. But when I do, I prefer Dos Equis. :cool:

You have to order it in a grizzled Montalbanesque accent, though.

Peremensoe
11-11-2010, 12:25 PM
There was some discussion earlier about specifying liquor brands in mixed drinks, but no mention of the quality of mixers and garnishes. A mixed drink's quality depends as much upon those, and yet many bars and drinkers put far more concern and expense into liquors.

Bosstone
11-11-2010, 12:26 PM
Man, now I want to try a Manhattan.

villa
11-11-2010, 12:38 PM
Fine ingrediants make or break a dish - or a drink - as every chef knows. I'm sure that there is a discriminating palate out there that can tell if their white wine spritzer is made with Sprite and the 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru or made with 7 up and the Jacques Bourguignon Chablis sold by Trader Joes for $10 a bottle - and yet still enjoyed the soda pop version of the white wine spritzer.


Well.... OK, I'll admit this one in a million person exists. And if someone comes in and doesn't look at the wine list, and asks if we have a bottle of 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru, and asks for a glass of ice and a pitcher of Sprite to go with it - have at it, hoss.

If, however, someone comes in, gets the wine list, and orders the most expensive white wine (which happens to be, in this example, the 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru) and asks for it to be made into a spritzer with Sprite, I'm going to go out on a limb and say they aren't this miracle of discernment to whom you are referring. :D

Which reminds me of my friend who ran a fine wines store. A woman came in whose husband was a contractor. She was holding a very dusty bottle of over 100 year old port he had found behind a wall. When he bought it off her for a fair, though hard nosed price, she said they had found two bottles, but had drank the first. He almost cried when she said "it was a bitty funny, it had all these bits in the bottom, but it tasted right special with a drop of lemonade."

Suburban Plankton
11-11-2010, 12:54 PM
My drink of choice is a single-malt Scotch, neat. More often than not that means Glenlivet because I like the taste and it's common enough that most bars have it on the shelf. My reason for settling on this as my go-to drink had nothing to do with gaining credibility, though. It's because a shot of whisky in a glass is almost impossible for a bartender to screw up.

silenus
11-11-2010, 12:58 PM
Man, now I want to try a Manhattan.

2 parts good rye (Try Sazerac or Russell's Reserve, although I've made decent Manhattans with Old Overholt)
1/2 - 1 part sweet vermouth
2-3 dashes Angostura bitters

Stir with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry.


Plankton, it's the "almost" that will get you every time. I once had a bartender in San Antonio serve me, at a very fancy place, 18 year old Macallan on the rocks!

Words were spoken.

Dangerosa
11-11-2010, 01:02 PM
Well.... OK, I'll admit this one in a million person exists. And if someone comes in and doesn't look at the wine list, and asks if we have a bottle of 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru, and asks for a glass of ice and a pitcher of Sprite to go with it - have at it, hoss.

If, however, someone comes in, gets the wine list, and orders the most expensive white wine (which happens to be, in this example, the 2008 Brocade Chablis Grand Cru) and asks for it to be made into a spritzer with Sprite, I'm going to go out on a limb and say they aren't this miracle of discernment to whom you are referring. :D

Which reminds me of my friend who ran a fine wines store. A woman came in whose husband was a contractor. She was holding a very dusty bottle of over 100 year old port he had found behind a wall. When he bought it off her for a fair, though hard nosed price, she said they had found two bottles, but had drank the first. He almost cried when she said "it was a bitty funny, it had all these bits in the bottom, but it tasted right special with a drop of lemonade."

Yeah, if I were going to judge, I'd say "tool" - but again, you never know. And I have to defend my Woodford and Coke. There is probably someone out there who really does LIKE cement mixers and isn't it it for the "gross" and "sloppy drunk fast." Not that I've met them, but if that is what they actually like. I think a lot of scotch tastes like "peaty lighter fluid" myself. Not that I haven't - on occasion - enjoyed a glass of peaty lighter fluid.

We did a port tasting a while ago, and discovered we liked "middle aged" ports best.

villa
11-11-2010, 01:14 PM
I have no problem with Woodford and Coke. You're drinking it because you like it. You are asking for Woodford and Coke, not asking for "your most expensive bourbon" and Coke. And Bourbon is better with coke. Or whatever else Americans and small children drink.

I kid. I kid because I love.

msmith537
11-11-2010, 01:15 PM
I used to date a wealthy guy a gazillion years ago - and he'd order $200 or $300 bottles of wine to impress me - who was 22 and had a wine palate sophisticated enough to enjoy a really good Lambrusco. Since I didn't care, and he was doing it merely to impress me - he was drinking something else - he was sort of a tool.


That's so tacky. If you are going to spend that kind of money to impress a girl, you should just find yourself a nice respectable prostitute.



Personally, I don't give a shit what scotch I should drink to make myself seem credible. Show me what you have on tap and I'll have one of those and go about my business of having fun at a bar instead of trying to impress some one with my choice of Glenwhatevers ... umbrella or no.


The quote is actually from the movie Swingers. Jon Favereau's character is trying to look sophisticated by ordering a scotch (from the free drink waitress in a crappy Vegas casino). He clearly has no idea what he's talking about and is just babbling scotch sounding buzzwords (I don't think there is anything actually called a Glen Galley).

Omniscient
11-11-2010, 01:29 PM
And who gets an expensive scotch and fills it full of ice? Just get a Dewars on the rocks if you want that "scotchy" tasting water flavor.

I'm going to disagree with you on this one. A bit of water open up the flavors and smooth out a single malt. It's got to be good water or a couple cube of pure ice, but there's nothing wrong with enhancing a good scotch or bourbon with a bit of ice.

There was some discussion earlier about specifying liquor brands in mixed drinks, but no mention of the quality of mixers and garnishes. A mixed drink's quality depends as much upon those, and yet many bars and drinkers put far more concern and expense into liquors.

From the customers point of view you generally have only one option and no control.

Ellis Dee
11-11-2010, 02:15 PM
Why wouldn't the same response be appropriate for msmith537? his post was a response to say that he was awesomer than Fenris.That isn't remotely what msmith said. Unlike Fenris, he isn't waving his e-penis going on about how awesome and secure he is, but instead is addressing the topic in a thoughtful way. Again, completely opposite of Fenris.

drastic_quench
11-11-2010, 02:20 PM
I've always had good luck ordering doubles. Double Maker's, neat. Double Lagavulin, neat. Good luck meaning a pour that's more than fair. I think the bartenders either figure I'll be a good tipper, perhaps respect the order, or have less experience counting to six than three. Regardless, a fat pour is always worth it for the bartender if I'm the guy on the stool - though perhaps the owner is getting screwed out of a few bucks.

The nice thing about a double is that I know I'm going to order two anyhow, so I have the potential of getting the above perk plus not having to wait a second time at the bar.

Nzinga, Seated
11-11-2010, 02:49 PM
I've got drink cred for you mofos.

Triple shot of Patron silver, neat, in a brandy snifter. If there is a heat lamp, I'll take it fresh off the light. Omniscient, I double dare you to tell me I don't bask in the drink cred of the gods.

I just started drinking again after many years of not drinking. As a kid, I drank Domsky Vodka and Wild Irish Rose. No one can tell me I haven't graduated to the snob leagues!

Peremensoe
11-11-2010, 02:53 PM
There was some discussion earlier about specifying liquor brands in mixed drinks, but no mention of the quality of mixers and garnishes. A mixed drink's quality depends as much upon those, and yet many bars and drinkers put far more concern and expense into liquors.From the customers point of view you generally have only one option and no control.

Right, exactly. It's silly to spend more on a top-shelf liquor when it's to be mixed with, say, corn-syrup soda or orange juice from concentrate anyway.

Dangerosa
11-11-2010, 03:07 PM
That's so tacky. If you are going to spend that kind of money to impress a girl, you should just find yourself a nice respectable prostitute.



Wouldn't put that past this one.

Ura-Maru
11-11-2010, 04:13 PM
Straight drinks like scotch, bourbon or tequila ordered neat or on the rocks tend to be legit, but make sure you know what you want. "Your best scotch" tells me that you are probably faking it.

You know, keeping a bottle of Johnny Walker Blue (The blue is the one that’s $60 a shot, right? or is that green?) behind the bar would prevent people from doing this more than once . . .

So, is cider sufficiently manly, or not? (Outside of the UK, that is. I'm relyably informed it considered sufficiently manly there) It is sweet and sticky, but most kids don't know it exists, so that might make it ok.

How about Sambuca? Black if possible. Also sweet and sticky, but you've got that whole Godfather thing going for you. Maybe if you ask for it with 'Do you have any anisette?'

I have learned that if you must order a non-beer in a microbrewery, (and I must, as I've always found beer to taste rather like the broth that would result from boiling Stron Thurmond's ass for several days) it's best to be a visibly apologetic.

Also, (and this is from observation, not experience) a Red Death ordered anywhere but a goth club will come with a free look of withering contempt from the bartender. After he goes and looks it up.

And a second for the pineapple juice. I mean, where else do you find it that's not a bar?

but somehow I associate Mountain Dew with sweaty guys at scifi conventions or for computer programmers before Red Bull came along. Not for the suave, pencil skirted set on Mad Avenue!

Hey! Just because I'm a geek, doesn’t mean I can't rock a pencil skirt if the need arises!

Though finding them in my size is difficult.

--
"Ok, what do you have that's light and sweet? Just get me whatever you'd get a 13 year old Japanese schoolgirl."

Dangerosa
11-11-2010, 04:41 PM
You know, keeping a bottle of Johnny Walker Blue (The blue is the one that’s $60 a shot, right? or is that green?) behind the bar would prevent people from doing this more than once . . .


You aren't even in the ballpark: http://www.lazylightning.org/525-dollar-scotch-at-the-st-paul-grill-republican-national-convention

Ura-Maru
11-11-2010, 04:54 PM
Oh, I know there’s more expensive stuff available, but a bottle of JW blue is a moderate investment, and shares a name with much more reasonably priced stuff. So when you reply “Well, we have Johnnie Walker Blue. It’s a bit pricy, though.” The douchebag won’t realize what trouble he’s in until he’s like $300 bucks in the hole.

--
‘Douche’ is in the spellchecker. ‘Douchebag’ is not. Which is odd, as it’s a much more common word.

WordMan
11-11-2010, 04:56 PM
A couple of thoughts:

- Everyone who says "drink what you like" and "order what you want to drink without shame" makes sense to me.

- This means: invest some time trying a few things and go through a process to decide what you like. Then see point #1 above

- However - while all of that R&D is going on, you should have two different "automatic drinks" that you have rehearsed and can order:

A Work drink - something straightforward and easy that you feel comfortable rattling off without fumbling in a stressful work-dinner situation. For example "vodka martini - Kettle One (or some brand you like) - olives - dirty" or "a cab you offer by the glass" or "a Sam Adams" (or some other beer). Here you want something that is easy to say, not flashy, and sounds like you know what you are talking about in a way that does not draw attention to yourself - you need a drink, so order it and get back to the business talk

A Date drink - something you enjoy that minimizes your stress. You like Rum & Coke? Order a freakin' R&C/Cuba Libre and be done with it. You want something that is NOT a statement - it should be something that is simple, easy and not a focal point of the conversation or crafting your image. It's just a drink - pay attention to your date.




My $.02

Hey MeanOldLady - since I look to you for all of my anonymous message-board approbations when it comes to alcohol ;) how'd I do?

Dangerosa
11-11-2010, 06:45 PM
Very nice. Your work drink should not be "cute" or have a reputation of getting you drunk. You don't do shots for your work drink.

You may also choose to have a "hanging out with friends" drink which may be your coworkers. If that involves a blender, or six shots of various liquor or 4 Loco - go for it. Your friends are your friends, if they like you any less because you drink appletinis, they really weren't your friends to start with.

drastic_quench
11-11-2010, 06:54 PM
For all my talk of top shelf neat booze, I walk into a new (to me) bar late this afternoon and inquire about any specials/happy hour.

"mumble mumble pitchers of Genesee Cream Ale." (a quaffable C+ beer)

"How much?"

"$1."

Well, that's the only time I'll have been know to tip 200%.

MeanOldLady
11-11-2010, 07:16 PM
Hey MeanOldLady - since I look to you for all of my anonymous message-board approbations when it comes to alcohol ;) how'd I do?Sweet. My (apparent?) reputation as town drunk is finally paying off. Now then, if you are in the rare situation in which you must order a drink -- and really (I'm going to interrupt myself now), how many times have you been in a position where you have to order an alcoholic beverage? No one is going to sneer at you for ordering something else. If you are so unfamiliar with the happy sauce that you can't order a simple drink, then don't order one. Coffee is fine. Yes, there may be that rare Power Dinner where everyone is ordering scotch or gin, and you don't want to be That Guy who gets the Shirley Temple, but for the most part, if you seriously drink so little that you can't come up with a drink to order that doesn't make you look like a weirdo, then don't drink. Get water or tea or something. You'll be fine.

Now, if you have to order a drink, I'd say the date and work rule should be the same: just order something that doesn't make you look like a complete douche. Don't order the most complicated, expensive, fruity, or whatever else drink on the planet. Don't ask for "wine." Know what you want, and if you don't know yet, just order a G&T and be done with it.

So in short, I'd say your suggestions are fine.

davidm
11-11-2010, 07:21 PM
It's interesting to me that people put so much thought into something like this. Even when I could drink it didn't interest me much. It never would have crossed my mind to have such an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject or worry about the impression my choice would make. (Okay, I would've felt silly with some girly drink with an umbrella, but that's an extreme.)

I barely know about different types of liquors let alone brands. I guess I'm weird. ;)

MeanOldLady
11-11-2010, 07:32 PM
It's interesting to me that people put so much thought into something like this. Even when I could drink it didn't interest me much. It never would have crossed my mind to have such an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject or worry about the impression my choice would make. (Okay, I would've felt silly with some girly drink with an umbrella, but that's an extreme.)

I barely know about different types of liquors let alone brands. I guess I'm weird. ;)I don't see how this is any different than deciding on, say, what to wear for an occasion. It doesn't require "encyclopedic knowledge" of fashion to have an idea of what your attire should be given the event. There are some fairly established rules (e.g. don't wear denim to a job interview), but even the least flexible of rules ultimately depend on context. The mores of drinking aren't much different in that regard. There are some Drink Rules. Feel free to ignore them, as freely as you would ignore whatever else social customs that don't suit you.

davidm
11-11-2010, 07:59 PM
I don't see how this is any different than deciding on, say, what to wear for an occasion. It doesn't require "encyclopedic knowledge" of fashion to have an idea of what your attire should be given the event. There are some fairly established rules (e.g. don't wear denim to a job interview), but even the least flexible of rules ultimately depend on context. The mores of drinking aren't much different in that regard. There are some Drink Rules. Feel free to ignore them, as freely as you would ignore whatever else social customs that don't suit you.I wasn't criticizing anyone for it. I just said that I found it interesting. It wasn't something that I was exposed to growing up and it never seemed worth the effort to me personally, but to each his own.

even sven
11-11-2010, 08:06 PM
I'm not sure what the mystery is here.

If I go on a date with someone to a nice steakhouse, and he orders chicken nuggets and fries, I'm going to raise my eyebrows.

As you grow into adulthood, you are expected to try a variety of things and expose yourself to new experiences. Somewhere along the lines, presumably you will find things you like outside of the "stuff I liked as a kid" range. If you don't, that makes me suspicious that you are unwilling to try new experiences (unattractive) or not willing to put in the work to acquire an acquired taste (not attractive...shows a certain lack of fortitude.) If you are drinking the same drinks we drank in college, that's a sign that you are not very sophisticated. And I'm a pretty sophisticated lady. They say a woman decides if she's going to sleep with you during the first ten seconds. You don't want to spend those ten seconds holding a glass of Puckers.

What you do on your own time is your thing. But do you think I like walking around in heels? Do you think I love the feel of mascara? Bars are social situations where usually many people are competing for sexual partners. Like any mating dance, there is a bit of ritual that goes with that. Some of it's bullshit, but a lot of it's just shorthand displays. If you want to win the game, you gotta play the game.

Freudian Slit
11-11-2010, 08:53 PM
Lucky my college drink was the ever classy gin and tonic. Yay for never having to change ever!

Siam Sam
11-11-2010, 10:34 PM
I think martinis are due for a critical re-evaluation. Sure, Bond drinks them, but the number 2 martini connoisieur is Jo Anne Worley, and it takes a pretty steep drop after her. Number 3 might be David Niven or one of the ghosts from Topper, I dunno. They're all more famous for other stuff.

The excellent Sticky Fingers Bar (http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g293950-d990171-Reviews-Sticky_Fingers_Cafe_and_Bar-Vientiane.html) in Vientiane, the Lao capital, makes a special "Tom Yum Martini" that contains some special herbs and spices and, instead of an olive, one of those long, thin, extremely fiery bright-red chilli peppers on a toothpick. It really is spicy! A spicy martini. Very good.

I don't know why I remember it, funny the stuff that pops up in your head, but this thread reminds me of a small news item I saw in the 1990s, about Ethan Hawke when he was just becoming famous. It said he walked into a New York City Bar and ordered a wine cooler. A table of guys started ragging him about it, so he switched the order to tequila shots for him and the guys.

Martini Enfield
11-12-2010, 02:46 AM
Maybe you want to be with your friends but can't drink or don't want to.

In which case drink Coke/Lemonade/Fanta. But milk? In a pub? People would think you were taking the piss or pulling some sort of prank on them. It's Just Not Done.

Horatio Hellpop
11-12-2010, 04:25 AM
I don't know why I remember it, funny the stuff that pops up in your head, but this thread reminds me of a small news item I saw in the 1990s, about Ethan Hawke when he was just becoming famous. It said he walked into a New York City Bar and ordered a wine cooler. A table of guys started ragging him about it, so he switched the order to tequila shots for him and the guys.

Jeezis, what a pussy!

davidm
11-12-2010, 04:47 AM
Maybe you want to be with your friends but can't drink or don't want to.In which case drink Coke/Lemonade/Fanta. But milk? In a pub? People would think you were taking the piss or pulling some sort of prank on them. It's Just Not Done.Well, you did say water or milk. It wouldn't be too strange to order water, at least not something like Perrier. I'd order a soft drink or maybe OJ myself.

WordMan
11-12-2010, 06:31 AM
Sweet. My (apparent?) reputation as town drunk is finally paying off. Now then, if you are in the rare situation in which you must order a drink -- and really (I'm going to interrupt myself now), how many times have you been in a position where you have to order an alcoholic beverage? No one is going to sneer at you for ordering something else. If you are so unfamiliar with the happy sauce that you can't order a simple drink, then don't order one. Coffee is fine. Yes, there may be that rare Power Dinner where everyone is ordering scotch or gin, and you don't want to be That Guy who gets the Shirley Temple, but for the most part, if you seriously drink so little that you can't come up with a drink to order that doesn't make you look like a weirdo, then don't drink. Get water or tea or something. You'll be fine.

Now, if you have to order a drink, I'd say the date and work rule should be the same: just order something that doesn't make you look like a complete douche. Don't order the most complicated, expensive, fruity, or whatever else drink on the planet. Don't ask for "wine." Know what you want, and if you don't know yet, just order a G&T and be done with it.

So in short, I'd say your suggestions are fine.

Yep - all makes sense. And even sven - yep, there's a social ritual aspect to it. Everybody wants a sense of credibility in a given social situation. You have two options: 1) learn without realizing you're learning over the years; or 2) make some conscious choices and practice.

Sleel
11-12-2010, 08:06 AM
No drink confers credibility. I know total douchebags who like to spend 10 minutes hovered over a list of bourbon (or wine, etc.) before making a big show of ordering their drinks. Not to say there is anything wrong with drinking 12-year-old Laphroaig, but most of those "liquor aficionados" bore me to tears.

Especially if they order 12-year-old Laphroaig when the standard 10 and 15 year releases are rated more highly. (I prefer the sister distillery Lagavulin's 16-year release, myself, though the Laphroaig 10 has a certain ass-kicking brashness that I appreciate sometimes.)

I'm of the opinion that you should order what you like, with the caveat that there are people who will judge you by what you drink. If that matters to you, find something you like that will also produce the social effect you want.

The one thing you should never do—and we have plenty of examples of this in the thread—is order based on what you think you should order, instead of what you know and like. It's absurdly easy to come across as a pretentious pseudo-cognoscenti if you're more concerned with the status a drink supposedly confers than the quality of the drink itself.

WordMan
11-12-2010, 08:54 AM
Especially if they order 12-year-old Laphroaig when the standard 10 and 15 year releases are rated more highly. (I prefer the sister distillery Lagavulin's 16-year release, myself, though the Laphroaig 10 has a certain ass-kicking brashness that I appreciate sometimes.)

I'm of the opinion that you should order what you like, with the caveat that there are people who will judge you by what you drink. If that matters to you, find something you like that will also produce the social effect you want.

The one thing you should never do—and we have plenty of examples of this in the thread—is order based on what you think you should order, instead of what you know and like. It's absurdly easy to come across as a pretentious pseudo-cognoscenti if you're more concerned with the status a drink supposedly confers than the quality of the drink itself.

Wanting to be a Scotch enthusiast is very different than navigating your way through standard business and personal social situations. Knowing the stuff you know - enough so you would order it in a work situation, and want to get a bit geeky about the distinctions - that's staking a position of "I am into this; lemme demonstrate." The criteria for "credibility" in that case is very different - it's not "can I order a drink with conviction?" its "can I use my Booze/Wine/Beer expertise in a work situation in a way that makes me look cool and not a douche?" I would argue both are equally difficult but in very different ways. I wish some Experts were more aware of how delicate a balance there should be...

Scumpup
11-12-2010, 09:28 AM
If you want credibility from your fellow drinkers and for the bartender to love you, there is only one choice: The Pousse Cafe (http://www.badideatheater.com/pousse.html). For added cred, specify that you want their best and most expensive cordials, right down to the grenadine. Trust me. Ordering this drink will make you as a god among drinkers.

Siam Sam
11-12-2010, 09:52 AM
Straight drinks like scotch, bourbon or tequila ordered neat or on the rocks tend to be legit, but make sure you know what you want. "Your best scotch" tells me that you are probably faking it.

In his novel Kowloon Tong, set in the closing days of British rule over Hong Kong, Paul Theroux has one of his main Chinese characters ordering "your best Scotch" in a bar. He proffered the observation that this was a tell-tale sign the person had grown up in poverty, and now that he was wealthy, he did this to try to flaunt his riches. Said real Scotch drinkers had their favorite brands that while good, wouldn't necessarily be the most expensive.

My personal observations over here bear this out. For example, one Chinese-Thai businessman of my acquaintance was like that. Became very rich, and always -- and I mean always -- had to have the "best" of everything, the most modern, the most up to date, and he would not believe he was often sacrificing quality by foregoing something older but a little better. He had grown up in humble circumstances.

ministryman
11-12-2010, 12:16 PM
Bourbon...neat...water back....

If you have to ask, you're not ready....

Lust4Life
11-12-2010, 12:40 PM
I like methelayted spirits out of a tin can myself.

Bosstone
11-12-2010, 12:42 PM
Gasoline in a dirty glass.

Siam Sam
11-12-2010, 07:39 PM
Well, you did say water or milk. It wouldn't be too strange to order water, at least not something like Perrier.

If I'm out in the bars but need to stay reasonably sober for this or that reason, I'll order soda water with a slice of lime in it. It at least looks like it may be an alcoholic beverage, and the bars like it because it's a high-profit item; you get charged the same as if it were, say, a gin and tonic. That's also the standard bar drink of some teetotalers I know.

Nostalgiascape
11-12-2010, 08:53 PM
I think that anyone who believes that drinks determine credabilty is an assbone. That said I prefer Vodka in many mixxed forms as well as straight.

Nzinga, Seated
11-12-2010, 09:13 PM
No one really believes that a drink determines credability. It is something that people who appreciate fine wine or top shelf liquor or whatever like to talk about. It's not really serious. No one cares if you have an appletini.

Siam Sam
11-12-2010, 09:19 PM
Still, I try to avoid ordering Shirley Temples.

Bosstone
11-12-2010, 09:28 PM
Still, I try to avoid ordering Shirley Temples.Same. I much prefer Roy Rogers.

More manly, and what.

appleciders
11-12-2010, 10:18 PM
I usually order a Godfather, regardless of the fact that more often than not I have to explain to the bartender what it is. Unfortunately, sometimes it's assumed that I'm doing that because I can't drink the scotch neat, and so it ends up being less than 1/3 scotch, rather than half (the way it's supposed to be) or 2/3 (the way I mix them myself).

LawMonkey
11-13-2010, 01:14 AM
They had Mountain Dew in the early 60s? I guess they did (per wiki, they had it in the 40s) but somehow I associate Mountain Dew with sweaty guys at scifi conventions or for computer programmers before Red Bull came along. Not for the suave, pencil skirted set on Mad Avenue!

And originally developed as a mixer for whiskey, no less. I've been meaning to give this a try for a while now, but haven't had any whiskey on hand.

Somewhat tangential to the topic, as the drink would only give you credibility with classic movie fans, but one day I hope to find a suitably serious cocktail place to have a Louisiana Flip. Something sweet and cold... :)

Siam Sam
11-13-2010, 06:38 PM
And originally developed as a mixer for whiskey, no less. I've been meaning to give this a try for a while now, but haven't had any whiskey on hand.

Somewhat tangential to the topic, as the drink would only give you credibility with classic movie fans, but one day I hope to find a suitably serious cocktail place to have a Louisiana Flip. Something sweet and cold... :)

I definitely recall drinking Mountain Dew in the 1960s. There's even a Mountain Dew thread in her somewhere. It was especially marketed hard where my grandmother lived Arkansas, with a heavy hillbilly theme including at the now-defunct Dogpatch USA theme park that was based on Al Capp's Li'l Abner comic strip.

Green Bean
11-14-2010, 01:49 AM
I don't see how this is any different than deciding on, say, what to wear for an occasion. It doesn't require "encyclopedic knowledge" of fashion to have an idea of what your attire should be given the event. There are some fairly established rules (e.g. don't wear denim to a job interview), but even the least flexible of rules ultimately depend on context. The mores of drinking aren't much different in that regard. There are some Drink Rules. Feel free to ignore them, as freely as you would ignore whatever else social customs that don't suit you.
Very well said.

My problem is that the only cocktail-type drinks I like are fruity girl drinks. I'd love to be able to order some great scotch neat or whatever, but I just find the stuff intolerable. I'm sitting here trying to drink some Jack Daniels and failing. And I can't stand gin & tonics.

This isn't a problem in social situations, because I like beer, or I'll get a fruity girl drink if I want one.

But in a work-type situation...well, I just don't know what to do. I'm afraid ordering beer might seem weird. Do you think it would be?

Up until now, I've been lucky enough to be able to go along with someone else's wine order and not expose my oenignorance. But if I had to order it myself, I'd be stuck.

ETA--good news...just tried some Tanqueray. (I have a ton of booze in the house). I can work with this...I just can't order a martini because I'd spill it everywhere. :)

Bam Boo Gut
11-14-2010, 05:49 AM
If I'm out in the bars but need to stay reasonably sober for this or that reason, I'll order soda water with a slice of lime in it. It at least looks like it may be an alcoholic beverage, and the bars like it because it's a high-profit item; you get charged the same as if it were, say, a gin and tonic. That's also the standard bar drink of some teetotalers I know.

That's me, they don't charge me much for it, and I eat the lime for a kick, hoping for a chunk not a slice.

A couple of my girlfriends drink Vodka with diet coke. They don't like it when it's my round and I order it for them ...... two VD's please! :D

Martini Enfield
11-14-2010, 06:13 AM
But in a work-type situation...well, I just don't know what to do. I'm afraid ordering beer might seem weird. Do you think it would be?

Depends where you are and what sort of person you co-workers think you are. For some people, it can seem a bit "Unladylike" to drink beer. Bacardi & Coke is quite nice, though, and an acceptable "work do" drink, IMHO. :p

PunditLisa
11-14-2010, 07:01 AM
I don't care if my date orders a Budweiser, a White Russian, or 100 year old scotch over ice; he'd better tip well if he wants to hold my good opinion.

Order more than three of the high octane drinks over the course of a few hours, and I'll be wondering if a trip to the "Betty Ford Clinic" isn't in your future. Or "Crossroads" if the former is too girly.

Enuma Elish
11-14-2010, 01:53 PM
Gasoline in a dirty glass.

Sniff! Anyone with taste drinks turpentine while smelling an oily rag as a chaser!:p

Dangerosa
11-14-2010, 01:55 PM
No one really believes that a drink determines credability. It is something that people who appreciate fine wine or top shelf liquor or whatever like to talk about. It's not really serious. No one cares if you have an appletini.

Obviously, a lot of people do care. The question is - really - do you care if some stranger at the bar next to you thinks "appletini, really?" Now, you might care if your date or coworkers think that. A date - I'd say they'd better get used to you drinking trendy sweet girly martinis or maybe you aren't cut out for each other. Your coworkers - those you might need to impress with someone other than "the real you" - depending on your job and the coworkers.

MeanOldLady
11-14-2010, 02:00 PM
Depends where you are and what sort of person you co-workers think you are. For some people, it can seem a bit "Unladylike" to drink beer.Or gains insta-cred for "drinking like a man." I'm not even going to start on whether or not that's a compliment, so moving along, you're all right if you order a decent beer.

Bosstone
11-14-2010, 03:16 PM
Or you can do what I did:

Refuse (politely) to drink alcohol for your entire life, then one night at a work party mention you're giving alcoholic drinks a shot. Guaranteed, whatever you order will be totally acceptable. :p

Rick
11-14-2010, 10:45 PM
Or you can do what I did:

Refuse (politely) to drink alcohol for your entire life, then one night at a work party mention you're giving alcoholic drinks a shot. Guaranteed, whatever you order will be totally acceptable. :p
This wins the thread!

Nzinga, Seated
11-15-2010, 09:17 AM
Obviously, a lot of people do care...

Wasn't obvious to me. I thought folks were just having a bit of fun. The kind of way we might tease someone for listening to Barry Manilow, but not really judging them truly for it. Hey, I might tease a friend for ordering milk in a bar, but I wouldn't truly care. If I ever met someone who honesttogod cared about what someone else ordered in a bar...well, I would just laugh and laugh at them.

pulykamell
11-15-2010, 09:56 AM
Wasn't obvious to me. I thought folks were just having a bit of fun. The kind of way we might tease someone for listening to Barry Manilow, but not really judging them truly for it. Hey, I might tease a friend for ordering milk in a bar, but I wouldn't truly care. If I ever met someone who honesttogod cared about what someone else ordered in a bar...well, I would just laugh and laugh at them.

I'm with you, Nzinga. For example, Chicagoans razz others (fellow Chicago-area dwellers especially) for putting ketchup on a hot dog. But nobody really gives a fuck.

kushiel
11-15-2010, 11:15 AM
I ain't at the bar to look credible, I'm there for your nachos and a Porn Star.

As for work drinks, I've never gone with a client, just coworkers. And you know what? I'm already the chick with the Hello Kitty coffee mug and this pic (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_D_Z-D2tzi14/TBpqnHOTiyI/AAAAAAAADG8/rNNm55KqH_k/s1600/responsibility6.png) on my office door, but when it's time to get down to business, I bring my best game to the table. Ordering a Porn Star or a Long Island Iced Tea in front of my boss doesn't mean anything other than 'kushiel doesn't like the taste of alcohol and likes fruity drinks'.

Besides, I wasn't the employee who got drunk at an industry convention. Now *that* is a story...most bosses probably won't care what you drink as long as you can hold it. :D

ralph124c
11-15-2010, 11:22 AM
Vodka martini..shaken, NOT stirred!
or Ripple and soda!

Darth Panda
11-15-2010, 11:33 AM
30-year-old single malt scotch

Or drinking a banana daiquiri with 151 Bacardi

Now I kind of want to order a banana dacquiri with 30-year old single malt scotch to see what kind of reaction I get...

Philster
11-15-2010, 03:42 PM
While this thread is drawn out and all over the place, and is the very type of thread I avoid... I'd still like to opine:

A confident, down-to-earth person can order anything they want, if it truly is what they want, and they carry it, hold it and drink it like the very down-to-earth, respected person they are and make no apologies for it and are not really in it to impress anyone.

As soon as one puts an iota of thought into making someone else think they are credible, the whole ''credible thing'' goes out the window.

I drink Dirty Martinis and will order a full-bodied draft beer as I see fit. If you are a down-to-earth person and you order Red Bull and flavored vodka and are with me, and you like that drink and I respect you, all is good.

If I go into a pub with you that has 257 varieties of beer on tap and you order a Coors Light in a bottle, you are a douchebag and should have your skirt shortened.... you freaking clueless wuss. :)

.

.

villa
11-15-2010, 03:50 PM
If I go into a pub with you that has 257 varieties of beer on tap and you order a Coors Light in a bottle, you are a douchebag and should have your skirt shortened.... you freaking clueless wuss. :)


Well I'll order Miller Lite in a bottle (or on tap) in that situation most of the time. Trust me, with my legs you don't want my skirt shortened. But I am sure I could find a use for the bottle once I'd emptied it given your attitude. :)

Philster
11-15-2010, 03:53 PM
I'm sure you could, Miller-Lite-in-a-bottle-drinker.

villa
11-15-2010, 04:11 PM
I bet I could, Mr. Pretentious FartyPants Guy Who'll Drink Skunked Microbrews if Someone with a Goatee Tells Him the Taste is Particularly Precocious Today. :)

MeanOldLady
11-15-2010, 04:53 PM
Instant, irrevocable cred for any drink purchased by another party for me.

Sycorax
11-15-2010, 07:57 PM
I think "credibility" is especially an issue for women because, in my experience, bartenders short me on the liquor because (IMO) they figure a woman won't notice. So I've been avoiding the "girlie" drinks. I like vodka and normally order a vodka tonic, but it usually comes back to me with little vodka and a lot of tonic. I don't like the taste of any liquor neat. At a favorite local bar, the bartenders know me, and we (me and spouse) tip well, but the amount of liquor varies depending on the bartender -- a strong drink one day, a weak one the next. I was talking to another woman about this; she said she'd experienced the same thing and now brings with her a small packet of the diet Crystal drink powder, orders a vodka martini, then adds a little of the flavored powder to it. I've been doing that ever since. BTW, I've noticed that most bartenders do free pours; could result in more liquor, but in my experience, it results in less.

Snarky_Kong
11-15-2010, 08:52 PM
For all my talk of top shelf neat booze, I walk into a new (to me) bar late this afternoon and inquire about any specials/happy hour.

"mumble mumble pitchers of Genesee Cream Ale." (a quaffable C+ beer)

"How much?"

"$1."

Well, that's the only time I'll have been know to tip 200%.

Do you live in Zimbabwe?

$1 for a pitcher? Jesus, in cowtown Illinois it's a dollar for bottles of the shit beer when there's a special.

drastic_quench
11-15-2010, 09:29 PM
Do you live in Zimbabwe?

$1 for a pitcher? Jesus, in cowtown Illinois it's a dollar for bottles of the shit beer when there's a special.

I know! I used to live in IL. I don't really like giving out even my general location, but no, I do with in the contiguous US. They also gave me a free slice of pizza at the bar. Maybe they just really want me to come back.

It was a big and full pitcher too. At least 60oz.

dzero
11-15-2010, 10:02 PM
I think "credibility" is especially an issue for women because, in my experience, bartenders short me on the liquor because (IMO) they figure a woman won't notice. So I've been avoiding the "girlie" drinks. I like vodka and normally order a vodka tonic, but it usually comes back to me with little vodka and a lot of tonic. I don't like the taste of any liquor neat. At a favorite local bar, the bartenders know me, and we (me and spouse) tip well, but the amount of liquor varies depending on the bartender -- a strong drink one day, a weak one the next. I was talking to another woman about this; she said she'd experienced the same thing and now brings with her a small packet of the diet Crystal drink powder, orders a vodka martini, then adds a little of the flavored powder to it. I've been doing that ever since. BTW, I've noticed that most bartenders do free pours; could result in more liquor, but in my experience, it results in less.
Or . . . pretend you're ordering for a friend and get a double vodka and a plain tonic water. Return to your roost pour A into B. If you're feeling rebellious, pour B into A. That'll show 'em. :D

Darth Panda
11-15-2010, 10:50 PM
Or . . . pretend you're ordering for a friend and get a double vodka and a plain tonic water. Return to your roost pour A into B. If you're feeling rebellious, pour B into A. That'll show 'em. :D

Nah, order the double vodka and then ask for a vodka tonic as a chaser.

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