PDA

View Full Version : What is milk called when it's poured on cereal


KennerTheGreat
11-11-2010, 05:47 PM
My brother just asked me on Facebook what you would call the milk that you pour onto cereal. I told him I'd get back to him on it; thus, I put it to the Dope.

Oakminster
11-11-2010, 05:49 PM
I'd call it breakfast. But I'm pragmatic like that.

MovieMogul
11-11-2010, 05:52 PM
Milk. In a bowl.

kittenblue
11-11-2010, 05:56 PM
I'd call it milk.

ToeJam
11-11-2010, 05:58 PM
Milk. In a bowl.

missred
11-11-2010, 06:06 PM
Milk. No need for further explanation.

Queen Tonya
11-11-2010, 06:08 PM
It's just milk.

Like coffee poured out of the pot and into a mug is....coffee. :confused:

running coach
11-11-2010, 06:08 PM
Milk. In a bowl. On cereal.

Rhiannon8404
11-11-2010, 06:12 PM
I think we called it "cereal milk" when I was a kid. As in, "...but I don't like the cereal milk..." when my mom would tell us to drink the milk left over after eating the cereal.

elfkin477
11-11-2010, 06:15 PM
I'm going to have to buck the trend and say we'd call it "milk." Broth and Sauce have definitions that milk in its unaltered form doesn't meet, and it's not a Beverage if you're not drinking it, so...Milk.

Vinyl Turnip
11-11-2010, 06:20 PM
It becomes the blood of Christ, right? Or am I thinking of something else?

delphica
11-11-2010, 06:29 PM
I think we called it "cereal milk" when I was a kid. As in, "...but I don't like the cereal milk..." when my mom would tell us to drink the milk left over after eating the cereal.

We also call it "cereal milk."

GuanoLad
11-11-2010, 06:31 PM
Lubricant.

Ura-Maru
11-11-2010, 06:34 PM
In my cause, yogurt.

Seriously. Plain, lo or non-fat yogurt with cold cereal. It’s WAY better than milk.

--
You don’t even need the good stuff, you’re not going to be able to tell the difference once you mix in the grape-nuts.

aceplace57
11-11-2010, 06:35 PM
It turns into sweet milk after you've eaten sugar pops, Capt Crunch or other sugary cereals.

The best part is slurping the sweet milk after the cereal is gone.

running coach
11-11-2010, 06:35 PM
It becomes the blood of Christ, right? Or am I thinking of something else?

Eucha-Crisp-the cereal of Christ.

Chefguy
11-11-2010, 06:39 PM
Beverage: No, it's clearly meant as a part of the dish. When you slurp up the remaining broth from your bowl of soup, do you call it a beverage? No, unless you're an idiot. If you consider cereal as a stand-alone food that is eaten with other toppings, you might get away with calling it a condiment, but you'd be laughed at.

Broth: Clearly not. Broth is what you get when you distill the essence of meat or fish.

Sauce: You're reduced to grasping at straws. There is no sauce-making activity going on here. Where are the elements of a sauce? The preparation?

Sorry, but it's just 'milk'.

twickster
11-11-2010, 06:41 PM
"Milk."

Markxxx
11-11-2010, 06:53 PM
The answer is sludge

brainstall
11-11-2010, 07:09 PM
Hot milk with shredded wheat. mmmmmmmmmm. It's an ingredient in the final dish, so none of the above.

GuanoLad
11-11-2010, 07:44 PM
Soggifier

Kent Clark
11-11-2010, 07:49 PM
I have started my day with a bowl of crunchy cereal drowning in a white liquid for more than a half-century. In all that time, I have only called it milk.

Apollo
11-11-2010, 08:12 PM
Co-gredient?

Joey P
11-11-2010, 08:19 PM
Sauce?
Broth?
WTF?
Another vote for Milk.

AClockworkMelon
11-11-2010, 08:29 PM
Milk.

First!

guizot
11-11-2010, 08:40 PM
I think the tradition of putting grains in a bowl with milk over them came from European immigrants who put bread in their coffee (perhaps because it was dried out). This article (http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F10A17FB395416738DDDAC0A94DD405B8785F0D3) (.pdf) from the New York times in 1987 indicates that it might also have been the origin of Postum as a child's version of coffee.

And, in fact, some people on a farm in northern Italy once gave me for breakfast a large mug of coffee with milk that had crouon-like pieces of hard bread already in it.

Trepa Mayfield
11-11-2010, 09:11 PM
Icky.

Elendil's Heir
11-11-2010, 09:30 PM
It's just milk. Even when it turns interesting colors from the sugar-laden cereal floating in it.

Infovore
11-11-2010, 09:35 PM
It's milk in a bowl.

vix
11-11-2010, 09:37 PM
Milk.

drastic_quench
11-11-2010, 09:38 PM
WTF? It's still milk, or course. Stoner question.

pulykamell
11-11-2010, 09:42 PM
Milk. What the hell kind of weird question is this?

rowrrbazzle
11-11-2010, 09:43 PM
Milk. Or ingredient (of the dish "cereal with milk").

Ranchoth
11-11-2010, 09:46 PM
To clarify, are we trying to decide if there's a name change for the milk itself when used for this purpose, or is the question more like "what do you call a liquid specifically used for soaking other food with?"

Electronic Chaos
11-11-2010, 09:56 PM
If anybody's curious, the question is from an episode of Hey Ash, Whatcha Playin'? (http://www.gametrailers.com/video/1-vs-hawp/63698).

blondebear
11-11-2010, 09:56 PM
Are we talkin' cow milk? Goat milk? Mother's milk?

It's all just milk.

Czarcasm
11-11-2010, 10:31 PM
My cereal makes it's own gravy!

johnpost
11-11-2010, 10:37 PM
wasted milk on ruined cereal.

Kozmik
11-11-2010, 10:38 PM
Chocolate milk. :cool:

Czarcasm
11-11-2010, 10:39 PM
Y'all ever have an "Irish Breakfast"?

Chefguy
11-11-2010, 11:43 PM
Y'all ever have an "Irish Breakfast"?

You mean a pint of whiskey? Sure.

foolsguinea
11-12-2010, 12:04 AM
It's called milk.

Lanzy
11-12-2010, 12:38 AM
Going waaay out on a limb here....MILK!

Ostrya
11-12-2010, 12:38 AM
For this you will need 3 items, one for each stage of the experiment - 1, bowl, 2, some milk, and 3, enough cereal to fill the bowl.

Now the first thing to do is name your bowl. Pick a good name, any name. Have you done that? Okay, good. No, don't reveal the name you chose just yet. Now pour some milk into the bowl. What's the name of the bowl now? How about... now? Or now?
Is the name still the one you chose? It is? okay. things are going well so far

For the second part of the experiment, you'll need to name that cereal. Once again, pick any name you want...

jackdavinci
11-12-2010, 12:39 AM
It's milk. Or dairy. Possibly cream.

To clarify, are we trying to decide if there's a name change for the milk itself when used for this purpose, or is the question more like "what do you call a liquid specifically used for soaking other food with?"

Or more specifically, cereal. Even soy and rice beverages are called milk. I think it's a fairly safe generic term. Is there anything people put in their cereal to make it wet besides dairy products (or ironically alcoholic things)?

I guess it's closest cousins would be cold soup (is there a non descriptive term for that?) and some sort of dessert (most cereals seem to be highly sweetened).

I look forward to commentary by someone with a more expansive culinary lingua franca.

I guess we should also examine other ingredients that play the role of milk but in other contexts, like as a drink creamer, or in baked goods or chocolate.

Czarcasm
11-12-2010, 01:07 AM
You mean a pint of whiskey? Sure.Bailey's Irish Cream over Lucky Charms.

Sunshine and Smiles
11-12-2010, 01:15 AM
A suspension?

Nava
11-12-2010, 01:54 AM
I usually call it leche, sometimes I call it milk, but it never answers back. Very impolite, I say!

Ellis Dee
11-12-2010, 02:20 AM
Is there anything people put in their cereal to make it wet besides dairy products (or ironically alcoholic things)?An ex-football player now football pundit grew up so poor that as a kid he put water on his cereal, and that ended up such a normal thing for him that he still does it to this day. I think it's Cris Carter, but not positive. I imagine he's not the only person in the world to ever do this, though his co-pundits looked at him like he had three heads when he admitted t.

Panurge
11-12-2010, 02:32 AM
Mælk!

Ellis Dee
11-12-2010, 02:36 AM
Is there anything people put in their cereal to make it wet besides dairy products (or ironically alcoholic things)?An ex-football player now football pundit grew up so poor that as a kid he put water on his cereal, and that ended up such a normal thing for him that he still does it to this day. I think it's Cris Carter, but not positive. I imagine he's not the only person in the world to ever do this, though his co-pundits looked at him like he had three heads when he admitted t.

Weedy
11-12-2010, 03:50 AM
My mother has water on her cereal, because milk makes her feel queasy.

BigT
11-12-2010, 06:45 AM
Maybe it's a soup base? I mean, what you have when you are finished is pretty much an uncooked soup, right?

Nava
11-12-2010, 07:18 AM
Uh? No it's not, or at least not necessarily, and there is no such thing as "a soup base".

Zeldar
11-12-2010, 07:58 AM
I love these answers! :D

My original reaction was "milk" followed by "wetting agent." But I much prefer some of the other alternatives. Of the poll answers, the only one I was even tempted to use beyond "other" was "sauce." But milk is not a suace without other stuff being added to it, IMVHO.

Annie-Xmas
11-12-2010, 08:06 AM
I'm tired of this motherfuckig milk in this motherfucking bowl.

GoodOmens
11-12-2010, 08:08 AM
I call it a bad idea, but I'm one of those freaks who likes my cereal crunchy, so I have my milk on the side.

don't ask
11-12-2010, 08:10 AM
I guess the OP's brother is KennerTheWayWayLessThanGreat. Tell him it's milk.

Rhythmdvl
11-12-2010, 08:16 AM
Milk. In a bowl. On cereal. For twenty minutes.

Hampshire
11-12-2010, 08:40 AM
I think the OP asked the question wrong.
The milk you pour on cereal is just milk, period. The typical 'pop culture' question is "what is the leftover milk in the bottom of a cereal bowl called?" The mixture of milk, tiny cereal bits, and sugar.

running coach
11-12-2010, 08:51 AM
I think the OP asked the question wrong.
The milk you pour on cereal is just milk, period. The typical 'pop culture' question is "what is the leftover milk in the bottom of a cereal bowl called?" The mixture of milk, tiny cereal bits, and sugar.

Room for more cereal.

Elendil's Heir
11-12-2010, 08:52 AM
Pour the milk from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

WOOKINPANUB
11-12-2010, 09:13 AM
Well of course one simply calls it milk, but I think the OP means to give it a definition in the context of its function. In that spirit, I think it could be considered a condiment.

TruCelt
11-12-2010, 09:21 AM
Well, if you're like me and never, ever drink or consume the milk, then you could call it a "substratum," I suppose. . .

I started with "substrate" which sounds better, but really has an implication of supporting life, while "substratum" is more of a foundation or bottom layer.

Hypno-Toad
11-12-2010, 09:26 AM
Eucha-Crisp-the cereal of Christ.

Corpus Crispies.

garygnu
11-12-2010, 09:51 AM
Still milk.

Chefguy
11-12-2010, 09:57 AM
Bailey's Irish Cream over Lucky Charms.

Hurk!

Acsenray
11-12-2010, 10:27 AM
Milk.

You might describe it as a "medium."

kath94
11-12-2010, 10:39 AM
It turns into sweet milk after you've eaten sugar pops, Capt Crunch or other sugary cereals.

The best part is slurping the sweet milk after the cereal is gone.

I've been beaten to this already, but Coco Puffs makes chocolate milk! Yum!

Soggifier

I vote for this one. But only if "milk" doesn't win.

enomaj
11-12-2010, 11:05 AM
Milk++
Anti-milk
Dark Milk
The Liquid Formerly Named Milk
Milk Diddy
M!lk
Milkalicious

Elendil's Heir
11-12-2010, 11:09 AM
The Liquid Which Is Not A Martyred Gay San Francisco Politician

Nzinga, Seated
11-12-2010, 11:12 AM
It becomes the blood of Christ, right?...

I thought so too.

Christblood. In a bowl.

tr0psn4j
11-12-2010, 11:19 AM
Milk.

DonLogan
11-12-2010, 12:12 PM
Dirty milk.

Milk Plus.

Emily Litella
11-12-2010, 12:16 PM
Topping?

WOOKINPANUB
11-12-2010, 12:45 PM
Topping?

Yes. I want to change my answer to topping.

jackdavinci
11-12-2010, 02:50 PM
An ex-football player now football pundit grew up so poor that as a kid he put water on his cereal, and that ended up such a normal thing for him that he still does it to this day. I think it's Cris Carter, but not positive. I imagine he's not the only person in the world to ever do this, though his co-pundits looked at him like he had three heads when he admitted t.

I've tried that and it's always tasted horrible to me. Maybe you need particularly tasty water or cereal that melts a lot when wet.

Tethered Kite
11-12-2010, 03:00 PM
A condiment?

An accomplice to slow death by food additive poisoning?

Irishman
11-12-2010, 04:39 PM
What do you call cereal when you eat cereal in a bowl of milk?

I think the answer you are looking for is "an ingredient" in "cereal and milk".

I think the tradition of putting grains in a bowl with milk over them came from European immigrants who put bread in their coffee (perhaps because it was dried out). This article (http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F10A17FB395416738DDDAC0A94DD405B8785F0D3) (.pdf) from the New York times in 1987 indicates that it might also have been the origin of Postum as a child's version of coffee.


Postum was invented by C.W. Post (the cereal guy, who was a student of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, the other cereal guy) who created it as a healthy alternative to coffee. He did not intend it merely for children, he intended it as a healthy replacement for coffee. Later marketing may have recognized that adults did not seem inclined to replace their coffee with fake coffee a healthy alternative, so aimed the marketing for children, on the theory that the parents would think, "Gee, of course it is unfair that my kids can't have their bread in coffee, but this stuff is too toxic for them. But they can use the fake stuff."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postum

Snowboarder Bo
11-12-2010, 04:53 PM
I call it milk.

guizot
11-12-2010, 06:24 PM
...Later marketing may have recognized that adults did not seem inclined to replace their coffee with fake coffee a healthy alternative...Well, someone where I once worked put Postum in the Mr. Coffee machine by mistake, and half the people there didn't even notice the difference. So much for Folgers.

glowacks
11-12-2010, 10:40 PM
wasted milk on ruined cereal.

I concur.

I don't understand how people actually like to use perfectly good milk to make their previously delicious crunchy cereal into a soggy mess, and to top it off not even consume the entirety of the milk.

Hockey Monkey
11-12-2010, 11:04 PM
I have never thought of it as anything other than milk, but I'm calling it "cereal sauce" from now on. For all applications.

"Hey, can you pass the cereal sauce?"

"I just spewed cereal sauce through my nose when I read that!"

TruCelt
11-13-2010, 04:14 AM
Milk.

You might describe it as a "medium."

FTW

DonLogan
11-13-2010, 11:38 AM
Used milk.

prettydorky
11-13-2010, 12:47 PM
I have never thought of it as anything other than milk, but I'm calling it "cereal sauce" from now on. For all applications.

"Hey, can you pass the cereal sauce?"

"I just spewed cereal sauce through my nose when I read that!"


:D:D:D

My son calls it cereal milk. We used water as kids sometimes, what a disaster. My brother makes sugary coffee with milk, then pours it over frosted mini wheats.

Harmonious Discord
11-13-2010, 01:41 PM
Milk

SciFiSam
11-13-2010, 01:44 PM
I call it Dave.

Nametag
11-13-2010, 01:56 PM
It's milk, FFS. Ideally, there won't be any left in the bowl, but if there is, and you drink it, it's still not a beverage, it's just salvageable waste. Scrap milk, if you will.

Elysian
11-13-2010, 02:18 PM
That's funny, I call it sludge too. Or at least the bit of it left that's thick and sludgy with sugar and/or cereal shrapnel.

Elendil's Heir
11-13-2010, 07:44 PM
Unless I'm in polite company (when I wouldn't be eating cereal anyway) I always pick up my bowl and drink the milk once all the cereal is gone. Anyone else do that?

AmunRa
11-13-2010, 08:04 PM
If it must be called something beyond simply "milk," I vote for condiment. I usually leave the left over milk for the cat when I'm done.

Tanbarkie
11-13-2010, 11:43 PM
It's basic chemistry. Milk is the solvent, cereal is the solute.

panache45
11-14-2010, 12:00 AM
Additive.

devilsknew
11-14-2010, 12:43 AM
Spum.

Lobsang
11-14-2010, 12:58 AM
None of the above. It's still 'milk'.

:dubious:

devilsknew
11-14-2010, 01:26 AM
Malt Smoothie.

devilsknew
11-14-2010, 02:45 AM
You could of course include a muesli or oatmeal based smoothie, marinated in whole milk for twenty four hours then blended with yogurt, milk, ice, and berries. You could of course make this smoothie with your favorite cereal.... maybe Ghostberry Crunch....Maybe some malt powder.

Cuckoorex
11-14-2010, 07:17 AM
Uh? No it's not, or at least not necessarily, and there is no such thing as "a soup base".

No? I hear many people refer to various kinds of chicken, fish, beef or vegetable stock as a "soup base." It may not be the preferred term, but I would consider it a synonym in most cases.

njtt
11-14-2010, 07:54 AM
I have never called it, or heard anybody call it, anything but milk. Maybe, just maybe, one could argue that it is technically functioning as a sauce in these circumstances, but nobody "calls" it that.

It is not a beverage, because it is not primarily there to be drunk (just as gravy or other sauces are not there to be drunk, just because they are liquids), and by no stretch of the imagination can milk, in itself, be a broth.

TruCelt
11-14-2010, 08:13 AM
I have never called it, or heard anybody call it, anything but milk. Maybe, just maybe, one could argue that it is technically functioning as a sauce in these circumstances, but nobody "calls" it that.

It is not a beverage, because it is not primarily there to be drunk (just as gravy or other sauces are not there to be drunk, just because they are liquids), and by no stretch of the imagination can milk, in itself, be a broth.

What about New England clam chowder? Now, I'm not saying that more doesn't go i there, but most of the "broth" is milk.

ExTank
11-14-2010, 08:42 PM
I agree with the other 124 respondants before me; it's still milk.

Tabby_Cat
11-14-2010, 09:18 PM
I don't know if people are being obtuse and not answering the question on purpose or if they're simply misunderstanding the purpose of the question.

Yes, it's still milk. Yes, you might still call it milk. Like how burnt bits of meat on the bottom of a pan are still burnt bits of meat on the bottom of a pan although they are also known as sucs when making a sauce, or like how burnt bits of meat on the bottom of a pan deglazed with a liquid are still burnt bits of meat on the bottom of a pan deglazed with a liquid although they are also known as fond.

Just calling it "milk" doesn't differentiate it from the carton of milk you have in your fridge, or the milk in your coffee (although you might call THAT creamer), or the milk you add to your milquetoast (which you might call gravy, I suppose).

If there is no other term, then the answer would be "there is no specific technical term for it, colloquially it's known as cereal milk", but "WTF it's milk" appears to misunderstand the question.


For the record, I don't have any specific identifier or categorisation for the milk leftover from cereal. I ususally called it the "leftover milk". "Cereal milk" sounds like a good candidate.

Ellis Dee
11-15-2010, 02:08 AM
Nope, those fancy terms apply to leftovers from the cooking process. Cereal milk is leftovers from food that has been eaten. I can't think of a single thing served as part of a meal that if you don't finish it, it gets a special name.

For context, it's like asking what you call ice cubes still in your glass after you finish your drink.

Unless someone can come up with a single example of any other half-eaten food that gets a special name, I call shenanigans on the OP.

Tabby_Cat
11-15-2010, 02:42 AM
I quote the OP (and the title of the poll)

What is milk called when it's poured on cereal

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My brother just asked me on Facebook what you would call the milk that you pour onto cereal. I told him I'd get back to him on it; thus, I put it to the Dope.

Nothing to do with leftovers. Is there any term for milk, which is used for pouring over cereal.

A sprig of parsley, when placed on my plate of roast beef, is a garnish. Chopped up into melted butter, sauce. Chopped up and rubbed into the meat before roasting, rub (or if with liquid, marinade).


For this particular question (milk, to be used with cereal), sauce, broth, and beverage have all been suggested in the poll. I don't think that any of them really apply, but someone might know.

outlierrn
11-15-2010, 04:16 AM
Eucha-Crisp-the cereal of Christ.

Man, I think I ate a whole leg of Christ just this week.

Omniscient
11-15-2010, 04:40 AM
The closest I can come to forcing a noun onto it would be to call it an "ingredient". If forced you might want to call it a topping, but ingredient sounds more appropriate.

Ellis Dee
11-15-2010, 06:34 AM
Nothing to do with leftovers. Is there any term for milk, which is used for pouring over cereal.

A sprig of parsley, when placed on my plate of roast beef, is a garnish. Chopped up into melted butter, sauce. Chopped up and rubbed into the meat before roasting, rub (or if with liquid, marinade). I stand corrected.

Gyrate
11-15-2010, 06:44 AM
Moo juice.

TruCelt
11-15-2010, 09:20 AM
I quote the OP (and the title of the poll)



Nothing to do with leftovers. Is there any term for milk, which is used for pouring over cereal.

A sprig of parsley, when placed on my plate of roast beef, is a garnish. Chopped up into melted butter, sauce. Chopped up and rubbed into the meat before roasting, rub (or if with liquid, marinade).


For this particular question (milk, to be used with cereal), sauce, broth, and beverage have all been suggested in the poll. I don't think that any of them really apply, but someone might know.

I think the basic question is "What is the word for the role the milk plays in the dish?"

I still like "medium". Is there a gastronomic term for that?

Nava
11-15-2010, 09:36 AM
Unless I'm in polite company (when I wouldn't be eating cereal anyway) I always pick up my bowl and drink the milk once all the cereal is gone. Anyone else do that?

If the company is polite, then by Jove they will drink their leftover milk as well :mad: My house, my rules!

Now seriously, what the frack else would you do, toss it? Anybody who throws away either the leftover broth after eating the solid bits in a soup or the milk after eating the soaked cereal will not be invited into my house again. And if we're in their house and my spooning the broth/drinking the milk bothers them, well then, I guess I won't be coming by for meals again!

Irishman
11-15-2010, 10:44 AM
"Ingredient" is the best noun. The dish is "a bowl of cereal", which typically is understood to mean "a bowl of cereal in milk".

"What do you call the gin in a gin and tonic?" An ingredient, gin.

"What do you call the bacon in a BLT?" An ingredient, the meat, bacon.

There does not appear to be an exact parallel case - I cannot think of another example of food that you pour a beverage on and then eat. Certainly nothing where the beverage remains distinct, as opposed to getting mixed in to form a single liquid mixture.

Pouring milk on your oatmeal, then mixing the milk in to the oatmeal, does not leave oatmeal and milk, just oatmeal.

Pouring milk on your macaroni, then blending in the cheese packet (yes, I'm talking instant, deal with it) does not leave macaroni and milk, it leaves macaroni in cheese sauce.

Yep, keep coming back to "ingredient". Or just "milk" - possibly "cereal milk" for the milk after the cereal has been in it for a bit.

Acsenray
11-15-2010, 10:51 AM
There does not appear to be an exact parallel case - I cannot think of another example of food that you pour a beverage on and then eat.

Ochazuke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ochazuke) - hot tea poured over rice, seaweed, pickled vegetables, and fish.

devilsknew
11-15-2010, 06:52 PM
Spum.

I have never called it, or heard anybody call it, anything but milk. Maybe, just maybe, one could argue that it is technically functioning as a sauce in these circumstances, but nobody "calls" it that.

It is not a beverage, because it is not primarily there to be drunk (just as gravy or other sauces are not there to be drunk, just because they are liquids), and by no stretch of the imagination can milk, in itself, be a broth.


What about New England clam chowder? Now, I'm not saying that more doesn't go i there, but most of the "broth" is milk.

Milkbroth is/was a popular base for many dishes throughout history, perhaps most famously outlawed through the Kashrut Laws of Judaism prohibiting the boiling of a kid in its Mother's Milk.

I argue that in modern gastronomic terms flavored and frothed Dairy has come into a renaissance in nouvelle cuisine as Spuma. I think that Spuma would best describe a flavored medium of milk.

devilsknew
11-15-2010, 07:06 PM
Of course, I drink it out of the bowl... so it would still be a beverage. Just as broth and sauce could be a beverage if you choose to drink them. I have drunk hot broth out of a cup when sick... does that change the inherent quality of broth and also make it a beverage? I don't like the poll chooices because they are not consistently logical.

devilsknew
11-15-2010, 10:49 PM
Ya know... spume (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spume). As in "cereal spume"... spuma (L,Fr,It,Sp,gastro.)

devilsknew
11-15-2010, 10:52 PM
I suppose in brewing terms, one might consider it the wort (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wort).

devilsknew
11-15-2010, 11:30 PM
If you're trying to be clever and hyper-literal then I suppose it is a condiment or compliment to your cereal.... so, none of the above. When you pour it, it is an aquaeaous protein and lipid solution in hydrokinesis.

devilsknew
11-15-2010, 11:39 PM
complement to your cereal.

Tabby_Cat
11-16-2010, 12:07 AM
Cappy, you so fine... and crunchy... :D

Isn't spume the foam though, like the foam you get on some frou frou amuse bouche, or something? I don't think the purpose of milk on cereal is foam.

How about base? Like using chicken stock, consomme, or water as a base for a soup.

pulykamell
11-16-2010, 01:11 AM
I suppose in brewing terms, one might consider it the wort (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wort).

That's really stretching the definition. "Wort" is specifically the malt solution that's fermented to make beer. As the milk in cereal is neither a malt solution nor meant for fermenting, I really don't see how "wort" could applied here.

pulykamell
11-16-2010, 01:18 AM
Missed the edit: Although I guess the angle you're playing is the cereal grain + liquid solution. Like I said, stretching.... (ETA: I should say "beer or a mash for whiskey" in the post above.)

devilsknew
11-16-2010, 05:41 AM
Cappy, you so fine... and crunchy... :D

Isn't spume the foam though, like the foam you get on some frou frou amuse bouche, or something? I don't think the purpose of milk on cereal is foam.

How about base? Like using chicken stock, consomme, or water as a base for a soup.

Crunchberry Punch... cap'n.

Yes and no, not strictly foam, spume could be simply kinetically agitated milk from pouring and repeated spooning, foamieness is simply a matter of degree. In modern applications the classic agitators are gaseous compression (CO2) and steam pressure, however vigorous spumante can also be achieved through string pouring (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l67EzIbSY4I) like this expert chai maker or whipping. Or in the case of cereal spuma, pouring and spooning... the remnants are the scum of the cereal.

As regards wort, although one classically does not ferment the remnant of milk and cereal particulates, there is certainly no reason one couldn't. Crunchberry (alcoholic) Milk Punch. Cap'n.

devilsknew
11-16-2010, 05:53 AM
Missed the edit: Although I guess the angle you're playing is the cereal grain + liquid solution. Like I said, stretching.... (ETA: I should say "beer or a mash for whiskey" in the post above.)

Kefir for example (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kefir), is made with a milk and kefir wort, for all intents and purposes.

devilsknew
11-16-2010, 06:28 AM
Or maybe, you could make a kumis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kumis) with cap'n crunch inoculated melkwirt, it should have a more suitable sugar content, and the end product will have more of a kick.

TruCelt
11-16-2010, 09:16 AM
If you're trying to be clever and hyper-literal then I suppose it is a condiment or compliment to your cereal.... so, none of the above. When you pour it, it is an aquaeaous protein and lipid solution in hydrokinesis.

Interesting. Is the cereal "in solution" as regards the milk? The flakes don't break down, but they don't distribute evenly throughout the mixture either; and settle out of solution almost immediately after being stirred. I think it's only a solution if it's left out all day untilt he cereal has thoroughly incorporated all the liquid.

pulykamell
11-16-2010, 09:30 AM
Kefir for example (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kefir), is made with a milk and kefir wort, for all intents and purposes.

Yes, but you wouldn't call that solution "wort" any more than you would call kefir, kumis, or yogurt "beer." I mean, better analogy, would you call the prefermented/fermenting juice for wine "wort"? No, it's "must."

Acsenray
11-16-2010, 09:37 AM
milk : cereal

rice : General Tso's chicken

luchi (puri) : alu-phulkopir torkari (alu-gobi/potato and cauliflower)

roll : hamburger patty

sliced rye bread : corned beef and pastrami

tortilla : meat, cheese, rice, and beans

prettydorky
11-16-2010, 09:52 AM
I vote for topping. Or medium. Or... vehicle?

devilsknew
11-16-2010, 03:53 PM
Interesting. Is the cereal "in solution" as regards the milk? The flakes don't break down, but they don't distribute evenly throughout the mixture either; and settle out of solution almost immediately after being stirred. I think it's only a solution if it's left out all day untilt he cereal has thoroughly incorporated all the liquid.

At the time of pouring it has not interacted with the cereal, it is simply a stream of solution in movement in midair - this page (http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen99/gen99499.htm) has three differing and sort of agreeing opinions that milk is a solution, colloid, and suspension. What's the straight dope on that?

Irishman
11-17-2010, 04:46 PM
From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/colloid

colloid (kloid)
A mixture in which very small particles of one substance are distributed evenly throughout another substance. The particles are generally larger than those in a solution, and smaller than those in a suspension. Paints, milk, and fog are colloids.

sus·pen·sion (s-spnshn)
n.

5. Chemistry A system in which microscopically visible particles are dispersed throughout a less dense liquid or gas from which they are easily filtered but not easily settled because of system viscocity or molecular interactions.

solution (s-lshn)
1. Chemistry A mixture in which particles of one or more substances (the solute) are distributed uniformly throughout another substance (the solvent), so that the mixture is homogeneous at the molecular or ionic level. The particles in a solution are smaller than those in either a colloid or a suspension.

Suspension is macroscopic particles that are intermingled because of disturbance.

Colloid has smaller particles that stay intermingled better.

A solution has even smaller particles, the intermingling is at the atomic/molecular level.

devilsknew
11-17-2010, 06:09 PM
Yes, but you wouldn't call that solution "wort" any more than you would call kefir, kumis, or yogurt "beer." I mean, better analogy, would you call the prefermented/fermenting juice for wine "wort"? No, it's "must."

Yes, must is specific to winemaking and distilling with fruit generally and wort is specific to brewing and distilling with malted grain generally. I guess the question is if you were making a wine with anything other than grapes would you still call it ohh.. cherry must? Why not Milk wort? Malted cereals and milk could very easily be called milk wort... the language does allow us to do that, and the meaning is quite clear.

devilsknew
11-17-2010, 06:22 PM
Or, for example, more generally would it be errant or confusing I were making cherry juice in a juicer with no intentions of winemaking, and offhand referred to the pith and remnants left in the juicer as "cherry must"? If that is allowed, why not "cereal or milk wort" to refer to the bottom of a bowl of cereal?

devilsknew
11-17-2010, 10:45 PM
...and have some Cherry Wine... Un hunH!

devilsknew
11-18-2010, 12:26 AM
milk : cereal

rice : General Tso's chicken

luchi (puri) : alu-phulkopir torkari (alu-gobi/potato and cauliflower)

roll : hamburger patty

sliced rye bread : corned beef and pastrami

tortilla : meat, cheese, rice, and beans

milk: cheese

rice: La Choy

luchi: vindaloo

roll: My aunt's and Grandma's Parkerhouse...

rye: gotta be a reuben

tortilla: puffy tacos

jackdavinci
11-18-2010, 01:54 AM
Milk as an agent is often called a creamer or whitener. But I think mostly, milk is also the generic term for any substance used in such a way.

Irishman
11-18-2010, 03:02 PM
I usually see it opposite - "creamer" is the generic, replacement for milk or cream (or half and half). Hadn't seen "whitener" until not long ago on this board.

devilsknew
11-19-2010, 09:14 PM
milk: cheese

rice: La Choy

luchi: vindaloo

roll: My aunt's and Grandma's Parkerhouse...

rye: gotta be a reuben

tortilla: puffy tacos

Actually, I suppose if we are working with the parmaeters of this undersided autistic poll... it would go
Milk: cheese

rice: ricecake or mochi

luchi: Stuffed luchi... don't know what they are called ... basically a luchi with a lentil daal spread between layers and fried or baked Or what do Indians make to use up leftover chiapatti?.

roll: Thanksgiving stuffing

tortilla: chilaquiles

devilsknew
11-19-2010, 09:22 PM
From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/colloid







Suspension is macroscopic particles that are intermingled because of disturbance.

Colloid has smaller particles that stay intermingled better.

A solution has even smaller particles, the intermingling is at the atomic/molecular level.
That doesn't answer my question?
Which is milk?

The replies from three scientists on that linked page claim that Homogenized milk is a suspension , a colloid, and a solution? Which is it... or does it depend on each scientists' prejudices and application?

Ignatz
11-19-2010, 10:15 PM
My cereal makes it's own gravy!

It's a white powder until I pour water over it to reconstitute it.

"it's" always means "it is" or "it has".

FoieGrasIsEvil
11-20-2010, 07:02 AM
Lava.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.