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twickster
11-17-2010, 07:55 PM
I don't particularly enjoy cooking, and would describe myself as a merely competent cook, but I make up new recipes on a fairly regular basis. Part of this is because I don't like to cook: when I have X and Y ingredients, instead of looking for a recipe that would use them, I make one up. They're not all winners, but I've come up with a few good dishes over the years.

The latest:
______________

twickster's stuffed chicken breasts

6 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
1 can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 can diced tomatoes, drained (plain or with jalapenos, as you prefer)
8 oz. cheese, shredded (pepper jack, jack, cheddar, or a mix, as you prefer)

Flatten the chicken breasts.

Take a casserole or baking dish big enough to hold three pieces of chicken flat, (I used an 11x7 Pyrex baking dish). Place each piece of chicken in the dish, throw on a handful (or spoonful, if you're squeamish) of beans, and a handful (spoonful) of cheese, and fold the breast in half. Don't worry about trying to keep the innards in.

If you've got extra beans left over when you've filled all six breasts, sprinkle them over the chicken. Spread the diced tomatoes across the top of the chicken. If there's extra cheese left (or if you want a supercheesy version, you could shred some more), sprinkle it on top of the tomatoes.

Bake at 350 for an hour.
_______________

Share recipes that you've made up! (Preferably the successful ones. ;) )

Savannah
11-17-2010, 08:42 PM
Mmm... your Black Bean Chicken sounds good. Rice on the side, perhaps?

twickster
11-17-2010, 08:50 PM
Mmm... your Black Bean Chicken sounds good. Rice on the side, perhaps?
Yeah, that would be really good -- I'm ending up with some extra liquid, and rice would sop that up nicely. Or cornbread, maybe.

Athena
11-17-2010, 09:19 PM
Hey! That sounds great! I'm keeping that one in mind.

I do make up recipes, mostly when I either don't have the ingredients on hand or if I really like a recipe except for one or two things. Tonight is a good example - work was busy, I didn't have much on hand for dinner, and at the last minute a friend stopped over. Must create something for dinner. I had leftover pizza dough in the fridge, but not many fixings. Dug out some marinara from the freezer, diced some red bell peppers, carmelized some onions, threw it all on the dough along with some pepperoni, sun dried tomatoes, and feta. Turned out better than if I had gone to the store to buy stuff for it. Yum!

A more formal recipe that I made up was a variation on potatoes au gratin. I loooove potatoes au gratin, but I mostly try not to eat things based completely on white carbs and fat. So I have a variation I made on them where in addition to potatoes, I add celeriac, parsnips, and ham, and layer the baking dish with spinach sauteed in olive oil and garlic. It's amazingly good - better than simple potatoes au gratin - and much healthier as well.

LVBoPeep
11-17-2010, 09:29 PM
I don't really make up recipes but I did make an outstanding soup out of left over Chili Verde and white beans. Here's what I did:

1/2 bag of White/Navy Beans, rinsed and sorted.
Baby carrots (as many as you want, my SO doesn't eat any veggies but carrots, corn and green beans so I used lots)
1/2 onion, chopped
2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
5-6 strips center cut bacon
2 cups leftover pork chile verde (homemade and another recipe I made on the fly, so I will share that one too :)!)
7-8 cups chicken stock (low sodium is best)

Cook the bacon in the bottom of a dutch oven until crispy. Remove the bacon (set aside for later) and then saute the onions in the bacon grease. When onions are translucent, add the garlic and cook briefly (don't burn the garlic!).

Add the chicken broth to the onion/garlic mixture, then add the beans and simmer for two hours or until the beans are tender. Add chili verde mixture and simmer for another 15-20 minutes. Right before serving,crumble up the bacon and serve with cornbread and sour cream topping if you wish. I advise salting only after you stir in the bacon, just to avoid over-saltiness. Use extra pepper, cumin, oregano, cilantro or whatever to your taste.

For the Chile Verde- not really an original recipe but it's a very forgiving type of thing so I just wing it:

I cut a pork loin (2-3 lbs) in to 1 inch cubes and sauted with fresh jalapenos from my friend's garden along with some garlic (3 or so cloves) Use as many jalapenos as you want, I usually go with 4-5. She also gave us anaheim peppers, so I roasted about 6 on my cast iron skillet and then peeled those babies and chopped them up. Throw into a crockpot with about a tablespoon of cumin, two cans of crushed tomatillos, a tablespoon of dried oregano, salt and pepper to taste and then cook on low for 8-10 hours. I serve these wrapped almost burrito style with pepper jack cheese inside and the sauce is very sauc-y, so there's usually plenty to throw on top with more cheese.

Both of these recipes made my SO go nuts and he's very picky in general.

Antigen
11-17-2010, 09:38 PM
I had pork chops and I was tired of apple-based sauces so I poked around a little and came up with:

Cranberry Marmalade Pork Chops

You will need:
Some pork chops
Fresh cranberries
Orange marmalade
Ground cloves

I seasoned some chops with salt and pepper and then browned them in a pan with a little butter. Then I moved them to a glass baking dish. I mixed up the cranberries and marmalade in a bowl - I didn't measure anything, I just put as much as I thought I'd need to put a blob of mixture on each chop. It was more cranberry than marmalade, though. The marmalade was mostly to hold the cranberries together. I mixed in a pinch of cloves - not too much because I didn't want that to be the overwhelming flavor.

After spooning a blob of this mixture onto each chop, I baked them in the oven at 325 for about 15-20 minutes (check the temp with a thermometer to know if they're done).

And they were SO good.
I plan on trying this with big fat pork chops, and using this as a stuffing instead of a topping.

I do make up recipes sometimes, but more often I'll be trying to make a real recipe and start going "hm, no lemons in the house, guess I'll see if an orange works..." and end up tweaking and substituting things so much it's a whole new thing that barely resembles the originally intended product. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.

overlyverbose
11-17-2010, 09:56 PM
I often come up with recipes trying to copy ones I like from restaurants. Here's my husband's favorite:

Yellow chicken
4 chicken breasts
1 onion, sliced
4 cloves garlic, sliced or minced
1 inch ginger, minced
1 bundle of bean thread noodles (if you can't find 'em, use rice sticks)
1 can coconut milk
1 bunch green onions, cut into 1-inch lengths
1 handful cilantro (optional)
Any other veggies you want (I often use red bell peppers and broccoli)
about 1/2 to 1 cup chicken stock
soy sauce
brown sugar (about 1 tbsp)
1 1/2 tbsp curry powder
salt
pepper

Cut up chicken into 1-inch chunks and brown in a wok or pot (I use a dutch oven because my wok's non-stick lining started coming off; I need a real wok that's not non-stick). Set aside. Cook the noodles in a separate pot according to directions. If using bean threads, after cooking, when you drain them, it's a good idea to run cold water over the noodles, then cut them up in smaller pieces - they're very, very long.

Heat up some oil and sizzle the garlic and ginger for about 30 seconds, then toss in the onion and fry 6 minutes or so. Put in the other veggies (if you use bell pepper, put it in with the onion) and the chicken, then put in the chicken stock and coconut milk. Mix in the curry powder and brown sugar, put in about 2-3 tbsp of soy sauce and grind in some pepper. Cover the pot and simmer for 10 minutes, then salt or use soy sauce to taste.

When you're satisfied with the taste, toss in the green onions and cilantro.

You can also add a handful of peanuts to this dish toward the end of the simmer time - it's really tasty that way.

Anyway, serve with rice.

nikonikosuru
11-17-2010, 10:13 PM
I tend to take recipes and tweak them. Sometimes I change whole elements in it but for the better of course. ;)
I recently concocted a vegetable soup that I got from a website. I tweaked it with some spices and meat (it's just as good without the meat) and it came out tasting very much like an Indian dish. Each time I've made it I've been given rave reviews.

twickster
11-17-2010, 11:08 PM
I had pork chops and I was tired of apple-based sauces so I poked around a little and came up with:

Cranberry Marmalade Pork Chops


That sounds super yum!

I don't keep marmalade in the house, but I'm guessing apricot jam would work also....

Walkabout
11-17-2010, 11:10 PM
I make up recipes, but I'm never sure of the proportions of ingredients. I search the internet for something similar to what I have in mind (and there always is) and I adapt theirs to my idea, or vice versa.

devilsknew
11-17-2010, 11:11 PM
I don't like the term "make up recipes". I listen to the ingredients I have, then whisper in their ear... I am the recipe whisperer!

catastrophe
11-17-2010, 11:22 PM
I tend to cook from the ingredients I have, instead of picking a recipe and then buying ingredients. Most of the time it tends to work out, but I get nervous cooking for a crowd.

Recently I made butternut squash and chickpea curry. I chopped and onion and cooked it in oil until it turned translucent. Then I dumped in a butternut squash, chopped into pieces about a half inch square. Right after that, a can of coconut milk, a cup of water, and a few teaspoons of red curry paste. I simmered until the squash was cooked and then added a can of chickpeas. Served topped with crushed peanuts.

I think it would work with any combo of veggies and protein (see overlyverbose's curry recipe), but the squash made it extra warm and filling.

pulykamell
11-17-2010, 11:41 PM
I have a number of set and relatively consistent recipes in my head, but a good portion of the time it's a trip to the store to see what looks good and what I have a taste for (I shop almost every day for dinner--it helps that I have a supermarket one block from my house.) So, most of my cooking is riffing on whatever catches my eye (or what's on sale) at the supermarket.

jackdavinci
11-18-2010, 04:06 AM
Not a good cook by any means. Usually too lazy for anything but microwave and takeout.

But occasionally I get creative.

This weekend I made some croissants, and put the tiniest bit of cookie dough on top of the triangles before I rolled them up. VERY GOOD IDEA.

ministryman
11-18-2010, 10:04 AM
I often come up with recipes trying to copy ones I like from restaurants. Here's my husband's favorite:

Yellow chicken
4 chicken breasts
1 onion, sliced
4 cloves garlic, sliced or minced
1 inch ginger, minced
1 bundle of bean thread noodles (if you can't find 'em, use rice sticks)
1 can coconut milk
1 bunch green onions, cut into 1-inch lengths
1 handful cilantro (optional)
Any other veggies you want (I often use red bell peppers and broccoli)
about 1/2 to 1 cup chicken stock
soy sauce
brown sugar (about 1 tbsp)
1 1/2 tbsp curry powder
salt
pepper

Cut up chicken into 1-inch chunks and brown in a wok or pot (I use a dutch oven because my wok's non-stick lining started coming off; I need a real wok that's not non-stick). Set aside. Cook the noodles in a separate pot according to directions. If using bean threads, after cooking, when you drain them, it's a good idea to run cold water over the noodles, then cut them up in smaller pieces - they're very, very long.

Heat up some oil and sizzle the garlic and ginger for about 30 seconds, then toss in the onion and fry 6 minutes or so. Put in the other veggies (if you use bell pepper, put it in with the onion) and the chicken, then put in the chicken stock and coconut milk. Mix in the curry powder and brown sugar, put in about 2-3 tbsp of soy sauce and grind in some pepper. Cover the pot and simmer for 10 minutes, then salt or use soy sauce to taste.

When you're satisfied with the taste, toss in the green onions and cilantro.

You can also add a handful of peanuts to this dish toward the end of the simmer time - it's really tasty that way.

Anyway, serve with rice.

I'll bite; What's a Yellow Chicken?

I know of Black Silkies and Bluefoots.......

overlyverbose
11-18-2010, 03:27 PM
I'll bite; What's a Yellow Chicken?

I know of Black Silkies and Bluefoots.......

Hee! I think I need to come up with a more esoteric name for the recipe than Yellow Chicken. I wish I could remember the name associated with it from the Vietnamese restaurant I got the idea from.

Feel free to make any suggestions. :)

Chronos
11-18-2010, 04:00 PM
When I look at recipes written by others, it's mostly for inspiration, not for instructions.

When I told my grandmother that I had made chili according to her recipe, just with a few modifications, she couldn't even recognize the end result.

Serenata67
11-18-2010, 11:03 PM
Serenata's Pasta Fresca

1 bag of spinach (about 12 ounces of fresh spinach)
about 1 1/2 cups of tomato, cut into large chunks
about 3/4 cups of red onion, in strips
1 package of feta cheese (about 6 oz or so)
about 1 1/2 cup of extra virgin olive oil
about 1/2 cup of balsamic vinegar
2 or 3 pepperoncinis
1 clove garlic
1 box of linguine (1 lb)

Start water boiling for linguine. Put 1 cup of olive oil into saute pan along with oil and chopped garlic clove and sliced pepperoncinis. Sautee over medium heat for a little bit until onions are slightly softened. Once water comes to boil, add linguine and cook al dente. When onions are soft-ish, add tomatoes and balsamic vinegar. Saute for a while until liquid from the tomatoes and the vinegar reduces a little. Add the spinach just before serving and toss for a very short while until spinach is softened a little, but not mushy. Add last 1/2 cup of oil and feta. Toss immediately with pasta and serve.

Goes well with fish or chicken, prepared as you like.

CalMeacham
11-19-2010, 07:35 AM
I just made up Pomegranate Pie last month. I've looked up Pomegranate Pie recipes on the Internet since -- mine is not the same.

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
11-19-2010, 09:00 AM
For me, the start of learning to cook was when my late sister gave me a copy of James Barber's 'Fear of Frying (http://www.james-barber.com/tag/fear-of-frying/)' and 'Ginger Tea Makes Friends (http://www.james-barber.com/2009/03/ginger-tea-makes-friends/)'. It was in my university days, and I think she was worried about my tendency to live off bread, cheese and scrambled eggs for days on end. Anyway, one of the biggest things that rubbed off from his style of cooking was his whole attitude about ingredients. Many of his recipes derived from situations where he had to cook with what was at hand, stemming back to his days in the army - 'Chicken Calvados' was invented in his days in Normandy when the army provided crates of canned chicken. Cooking it with apples and Calvados, an apple-based liqueur readily available from the locals ("I could never tell if that meant they were for us or agin us!") rendered it delicious. Cooking it with real chicken was a great treat. Actually, that website (http://www.james-barber.com/) is full of anecdotes from friends and fans, as well as a collection of his recipes.

So, like him, I will often improvise recipes based on what is at hand. Sometimes it's a flop, sometimes it's worth improving and sometimes it's right on the money.

Penne Victoria.
Onions, mushrooms, grilled italian sausage and asparagus. Sauté until al dente, add chèvre cheese. Serve on penne, or what ever other pasta you have.

Asparagus rolls.
Set the chèvre out a couple of hours before hand, so it's soft. Take some fairly thick sliced prosciutto; bacon or deli hame if you don't have prosciutto. 'Butter' one side of the prosciutto with the chèvre. Take two fresh pieces of asparagus so that the heads are at opposite ends and sticking out from the stalks. Roll the asparagus at a 45 degree angle to the prosciutto so that the asparagus is completely wrapped. Grill or broil on high for about 7 minutes, until the prosciutto is crispy. Slice into 1" pieces so they look like sushi maki. Serve as hors d'œuvres.

twickster
11-19-2010, 09:40 AM
Asparagus rolls.
Set the chèvre out a couple of hours before hand, so it's soft. Take some fairly thick sliced prosciutto; bacon or deli hame if you don't have prosciutto. 'Butter' one side of the prosciutto with the chèvre. Take two fresh pieces of asparagus so that the heads are at opposite ends and sticking out from the stalks. Roll the asparagus at a 45 degree angle to the prosciutto so that the asparagus is completely wrapped. Grill or broil on high for about 7 minutes, until the prosciutto is crispy. Slice into 1" pieces so they look like sushi maki. Serve as hors d'œuvres.

**drool**

Miss Woodhouse
11-19-2010, 05:40 PM
I do every once in a while. This one is my favorite I've done:

Cream of Chicken Soup with Leeks

1/2 T olive oil
2 leeks, chopped
1 t salt
2 t minced garlic
2 celery stalks chopped
5 c chicken stock
1 1/2 c cooked chicken
3 carrots, sliced
3/4 c heavy cream
1 t chopped lemon thyme

heat the oil in a heavy bottom 4 quart pan. Add the salt, celery and leeks, cook over medium heat until tender and transparent. You want to sweat the aromatics, not saute them. Stir often and turn down the heat if they get a little color. Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds or so to release flavor. Dump in the cooked chicken, chicken stock and carrots. heat to simmer and cook until the carrots are tender. Gently stir in the heavy cream, then add the thyme. Salt and pepper to taste. heat through, but do not let boil. Serve.

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
11-19-2010, 09:01 PM
**drool**

::blushes::



The quotation "Mercifully, his recipe for 'Duck a la Banane' will go with him to the grave." has been running through my head all day.



One of these days, we ought to have a big ol' SDMB virtual pot luck supper....

Little Nemo
11-20-2010, 01:10 AM
My Pasta Fungi recipe.

Get a jar of chopped sun-dried tomatoes in oil, about half a handful of pine-nuts, a couple of garlic cloves, some red wine, a big double handful of good mushrooms (chopped up a little), and some fresh pasta (linguini's good).

Notice that Nemo is not big on measuring.

Start your pasta cooking off to the side.

Pour some of the oil from the tomatoes into a frying pan. Smash up your garlic and throw the garlic and the pine nuts into the oil. Fry them up until they start to brown. Pour in some wine. Add the tomatoes and mushrooms. Heat it up until the tomatoes and mushrooms are warm but not cooked.

Drain your pasta. Dump your sauce on top.

Hilarity N. Suze
11-20-2010, 02:41 AM
I do make up recipes, but mostly because either I can't follow one, or because I'm out of something it calls for. Or sometimes I just want a different taste.

Peanut butter chocolate cookies, for instance. Use the Toll House recipe, except substitute peanut butter for half the shortening. Mmmmm.

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
11-30-2010, 09:09 AM
A variation on 'Chicken Veronique' - still in development.

Dice two chicken breasts into one inch cubes. Coat in flour with a little salt and pepper. Sauté in about 2 tbsp butter, about 2 minutes. Add 1/2 tsp ground rosemary, 1/2 cup of pomegranate seeds and 1/4 cup white wine. Salt and pepper to taste. Simmer, covered, for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve on rice with side veg.

My next pomegranate, I want to experiment with flambéing the seed in gin; It'll either be really cool or disgusting...

DCnDC
11-30-2010, 09:56 AM
Make-it-up-as-you-go is pretty much all I do. I don't cook that often, usually just when my GF asks me to make something to eat (she usually does it), so when I do I basically just take whatever we've got and mix it together with a dash of this and that from the spice rack. Sometimes it's okay but not great, sometimes it's brilliant.

Of course the problem with this approach is no matter how it turns out I'll never be able to make it again.

Sattua
11-30-2010, 10:10 AM
Yep, I do it all the time. It drives my husband nuts--his family thinks recipes are sacred. They even got confused because I used *two* crusts on a particular pie that's only supposed to have *one*... sigh.

Anyway, here are two good ones:

Mexican Mess (good for burritos, on top of salad)
Stir-fry together in the following order:
2 onions
2 cloves garlic
2 chicken breasts, cut into small pieces
2 cans black beans
Rice, the cooked product of 1 cup raw
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon ancho chili powder
1 teaspoon chipotle chili powder
Salt to taste

Beans & Greens
Cook in skillet the following:
2 cloves garlic
1 diced onion
1 package frozen spinach
1 can tomato sauce
1 can beans of your choice
1 t dried basil
Salt to taste

Rafe Hollister
11-30-2010, 11:02 AM
I'm experimenting with pork loin currently. Here's one I did this weekend that turned out great. I don't measure a whole bunch, but I'll estimate the best I can.

4-5 lb pork loin
10-12 strips of smoked bacon
2 cups vegetable broth
2 cups apple juice
1 whole apple
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/8 cup kosher salt
1 tbsp liquid smoke
Your favorite variety of pork rub

BRINE:
Boil vegetable broth and apple juice, dissolve brown sugar and kosher salt in it and add the liquid smoke. Allow to simmer for a few minutes. Let it cool, then pour it on the pork loin in a large (2.5 gallon) ziplock bag, squeezing out the air. Let it soak up the brine for several hours, up to 24 hours.

PREPARE:
Pre-heat oven to 350. Slice apple into slices about 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick. Place pork loin on a baking dish. Sprinkle meat with pork rub, then lay out apple slices on top. Wrap with bacon, securing with toothpicks. Pour brine in dish to about 1/4 inch deep.

Bake for 2:15 - 2:30 in center of oven.

Push You Down
11-30-2010, 12:17 PM
I'm perfecting an original pie recipe right now.
It's pretty cool to know I invented something.

janis_and_c0
11-30-2010, 12:28 PM
Sure. One of my favorites, Measurements are approximate:
Simon & Garfunkel Chicken
4-6 pieces boneless chicken
Wine 1 cup
Soy sauce 1/2 cup
1 1/2 t Garlic
(2/3 cup chopped onion
2/3 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 fresh diced tomatoes
3/4 cup shredded cheese
Herbs (see below)

Beat hell out of chicken pieces & marinate in wine (I use white Zinfandel but anything you like will do) soy sauce & Garlic.
Marinate for at least four hours, up to overnight.
pour marinade in frying pan, along with chicken pieces.
Cook chicken until white on both sides.
sprinkle with herbs (Parsley Sage Rosemary & Thyme)
remove chicken from frying pan , place in baking pan
add onions & peppers to frying pan, cook until all the marinade is absorbed.
top chicken with onion & peppers & bake for 30 mins
add cheese bake for another 20 mins
add tomatoes bake for 5 additional mins

Rafe Hollister
12-01-2010, 01:37 PM
Janis, what temp do you bake the chicken?

Alpha Twit
12-01-2010, 02:04 PM
Expando-thigh Pie.

Start with a basic graham cracker crust. Don't crush the crackers too finely. Leave them a little chunky. Line the top and sides of a 9"x3" round cake pan with parchment and press in the crumbs. I like them nearly 1/2 an inch thick and par baked 10 minutes for extra crunchiness. Follow up with your favorite cheesecake batter. Don't make the cheesecake layer too thick. three quarters to one inch is plenty. Using a water bath, par bake the cheesecake at 325 for 20 minutes to help set the top.

While the cheesecake is in the oven, prepare a batch of pecan pie filling. Carefully pour the pecan filling onto the cheesecake, again trying for about half to three quarters of an inch thick. Top with roasted pecans and return pie to oven to finish baking. 40 minutes later, check with a knife. it should come out nearly clean. Shut the oven off but don't remove it the pie yet. Let is remain undisturbed for at least an hour then transfer to the fridge overnight before you attempt to de-pan it.

After removing it from the pan, press finely chopped toasted pecans against the sides of the pie. and then try not to eat the whole thing.

I'm still experimenting with this. It's good but not quite right yet

janis_and_c0
12-02-2010, 01:51 AM
Janis, what temp do you bake the chicken?

Oops! heh 375!

pulykamell
12-02-2010, 02:02 AM
I'm perfecting an original pie recipe right now.
It's pretty cool to know I invented something.

What is it? (Or I suppose it must be a secret). I find that every time I think I've come up with something original, a little bit of Googling shows somewhere, someone else has already done it. The only thing I've created that I haven't been able to Google is a xoconostle (sour prickly pear) and strawberry pie.

elfkin477
12-02-2010, 02:36 AM
I'm not very adventurous, but once in a while...

Teriyaki Soul Chicken Breasts

you need:
- chicken breasts, one per person
- a bottle of thick-style Teriyaki sauce
- Soul Food Seasoning
- foil

Take your chicken breasts and slather them with a thick teriyaki sauce. Seal in a ziplock bag overnight. The following day, sprinkle the breasts liberally with Soul Food Seasoning. Wrap them in foil and bake at 350 until they're done (however long it usually takes your oven to handle fresh, rather than frozen, chicken breasts. for me that's 30-40 minutes, but the oven's a bit flaky)

It's not a combination most people would think of, but it seemed like a good idea when faced with (raw) leftover teriyaki'd chicken. YMMV


Ten Minute Chocolate Covered Cashews

you need:
- one can of cashew halves & pieces (not whole)
- at least one five-six ounce bar of your favorite milk chocolate (Dove, Cadbury, Hersey, Symphany etc) OR buy a bag of milk chocolate baking chips and measure out half of them to begin with
- a double boiler
- a roll of wax paper

Set up your double boiler, and while you wait for the water to boil, break your chocolate bar into pieces, the smaller the better. Less than 1/2 an inch is best. Also, take this time to line one or more cookie sheets with wax paper.

When the double boiler is boiling, pour your chocolate into the upper part and stir as the chocolate melts. Once the chocolate is uniformly melted, stir in cashews a handful at a time (don't dump a whole bunch in at once, basically), making sure that each piece of nut is throughly coated with chocolate. Spoon up several pieces of nut and a bit of chocolate together and plop it onto the wax paper in a rough cluster. Continue to do so, putting a bit of distance between the clusters (like when spacing cookies or biscuits), until you run out of chocolate and/or nuts.

Place cookie sheets in the fridge and chill until hardened. Enjoy!

Rafe Hollister
12-02-2010, 05:37 PM
Like I said earlier, I am playing around with pork loin. Here's a stuffed loin that I like to do.

4-5 lb. pork loin
1 box Stove Top Chicken stuffing
2 cups chicken broth
1 small red onion
1 small apple
1/4 cup dried cranberries
Nutmeg, ground sage, salt, pepper

Preheat oven to 350.

Prepare the stuffing according to the directions on the box, except use chicken broth, or at least a diluted chicken broth/water mix.

Shred the onion and the apple.

Mix stuffing, onion, apple, nutmeg and dried cranberries. (Nutmeg can easily be made optional)

Cut the pork loin lengthwise about 3/4 of the way through, but leave an inch of it uncut at each end. Fill the cut with stuffing. Sprinkle the roast with ground sage, salt and pepper.

Bake at 350 for 2.5 hrs., basting with chicken broth with about an hour left.

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