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RealityChuck
04-19-2011, 08:20 AM
We all know it's the worst cliched ending you can come up with: He woke up and discovered it was all a dream!

Good authors avoid it. Even mediocre authors usually know better. But after seeing the most blatant example ever, I wondered how many times it actually has gotten into print or on screen. I can think of a few:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Henry James, "The Great Good Place." (Actually, this is one of the few times it worked.)

Season eight of Dallas

The Limping Man (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0046001/) -- not only a cheat, but completely unnecessary and pointless.

Inception (Maybe). :)

Don Draper
04-19-2011, 08:36 AM
Monty Python's Flying Circus brilliantly subverted this. It was in the single episode of the series that consisted of one episode-long skit - in which Brian Jones (I think) played a mild-mannered, ordinary British civil servant who through a series of wacky incidents ends up in a Soviet gulag, waiting to be marched out in front of the firing squad.

As he lay on his cot in the cell, his eyes fluttered closed, the camera shot dissolved to a new scene and...

He found himself on a hammock in in the backyard of his home in England, safe and sound, with his mother (Eric Idle) bringing him a hot toddie.

Jones: Mother! I'm back home in England! Oh, it was all just a horrible dream!

Idle: (chuckles) No dear. THIS is the dream, you're really still in that prison cell.

And the camere shot dissolves once again, and Jones wakes up in the gulag...

*********************************

The entire run of the series St. Elsewhere was revealed to be the delusions of a non-verbal autistic kid. (My late father, who was a doctor and used to scream in fits of agitation when the actors on that show mis-pronounced common medical terms, LOVED that ending.)

And the one where it all started in the first place -Wizard of Oz.

Taomist
04-19-2011, 08:53 AM
...

I used to watch St. Elsewhere every week, but apparantly I missed the ending.
It was a farking DREAM?
omg

I am glad I missed that; I might have been pissed!! :P

Ferret Herder
04-19-2011, 08:56 AM
A well done example: the end of Brazil. The office drone finds the literal woman of his dreams, fights off government agents trying to stop them, and... cut to a scene back in the torture chamber, where his (former) friend has reduced him to a happily-drooling shell of himself. The protagonist has "won" by getting beyond their reach.

Schoaff
04-19-2011, 09:18 AM
Ambrose Bierce, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"

I also thought that Bradbury's "The Crowd" was supposed to be all a hallucination while the man lie dying from the first car accident, but that doesn't seem to be the most common interpretation.

Tom Scud
04-19-2011, 09:18 AM
Alice in Wonderland (and Through the Looking Glass), though maybe they're grandfathered out.

Oh, and the Iain Banks (not Iain M. Banks) novel The Bridge

Superdude
04-19-2011, 09:30 AM
The entire run of the show Newhart was determined to be a dream of Bob Newhart, when he wakes up next to Suzanne Pleschette, his wife from The Bob Newhart Show.

astorian
04-19-2011, 09:34 AM
Of course, there's the movie version (not the book) of The Wizard of Oz.

Arguably Tim Robbins' movie Jacob's Ladder.

The old British horror anthology Dead of Night (which also originated another cliche: the killer ventriloquist's dummy).

The Italian zombie flick Nightmare City (aka City of the Walking Dead).

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
04-19-2011, 09:38 AM
One of the early ones was in the 1930s on the "Amos 'n' Andy" radio series. I'm guessing that many, if not most, radio comedy programs were serial or at least had story arcs. In one, Amos ended up accused of murder, and it ended up being resolved by "it was just a dream." I don't know exactly how long that story line went on, though.

Stanislaus
04-19-2011, 09:42 AM
John Masefield's Box of Delights. A complex and engrossing children's fantasy that involves ancient English myth, mysterious peddlers, sinister conspiracies and a truly terrifying main villain turns out in the end to be the idle dozing of a boy on a train. Weak.

Bryan Ekers
04-19-2011, 09:52 AM
That Nic Cage movie Next. Interesting premise, completely fucked-up ending.

kaylasdad99
04-19-2011, 09:58 AM
Robot Monster about a gorilla with a fishbowl-space helmet for a head.

That a little boy dreams about while on a picnic with his family.

RealityChuck
04-19-2011, 10:31 AM
Mr. Tompkins in Wonderland is a series of short stories by George Gamow that illustrate modern physics concepts -- Lorentz Contractions, for instance, in a world where the speed of light is 30 mph. Or playing pool with quantum effects. Each one ends with Mr. Tompkins waking up. Still a fascinating book, since the "All a dream" part isn't a way of resolving the plot.

Annie-Xmas
04-19-2011, 10:33 AM
Son of Rosemary *insert barfy, snotty, bloody smiley here*. I so loved Rosemary's Baby, and for Ira Levin to ruin it this way was absolutely, totally and utterly unforgiveable

Larry Mudd
04-19-2011, 11:10 AM
Living in Oblivion (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113677/) with Steve Buscemi is a series of nested dream/nightmare sequences. It's been many years since I've seen it, but if I recall correctly it forms a strange loop, and none of the "awakenings" take us to the top level of common experience.

The increasingly hallucinatory events in Stay (http://www.imdb.com/find?s=all&q=stay) are eventually resolved as a sort of dream of one of the characters. This is still very satisfying as the specifics give delayed significance to many things that initially appear to be random weirdness. (Eg; "Why the heck are Ewan McGregor's pants so ridiculously short? That makes no sense!") Very cool resolution.

JohnT
04-19-2011, 11:24 AM
...

I used to watch St. Elsewhere every week, but apparantly I missed the ending.
It was a farking DREAM?
omg

I am glad I missed that; I might have been pissed!! :P

Not just St. Elsewhere but shows like COPS, the X-Files, the Simpsons, the original run of Mission Impossible, all the Doctor Who's... they're all dreams in the mind of Tommy Westphall, the most brilliant child in TV history.

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers.html

Baker
04-19-2011, 11:35 AM
And the one where it all started in the first place -[b]Wizard of Oz.

That was the movie's version. In the book Oz was a real place. Dorothy eventually moved there for good.

Damn, I see astorian beat me to this one.

Mahaloth
04-19-2011, 12:03 PM
Super Mario Bros. 2(US edition).

astorian
04-19-2011, 01:44 PM
That Nic Cage movie Next. Interesting premise, completely fucked-up ending.

I'm not familiar with that one... but how about Cage's Christmas movie, "Family Man," in which he gets to see how his life could have been if he'd given up his high-powered career to settle down with a wife and kids.

Just when Cage is finally learning to love the kids he's been handed, it turns out that everything he saw was just an illusion. Those kids he learned to love? They didn't exist and never will.

THAT was a f---ed up ending to what was SUPPOSED to be a touching and inspirational story.

Tom Scud
04-19-2011, 01:51 PM
Ah, remembered another: THE IRON DRAGON'S DAUGHTER, by Michael Swanwick. Almost kind of works in that one.

billfish678
04-19-2011, 01:51 PM
THAT was a f---ed up ending to what was SUPPOSED to be a touching and inspirational story.

I dunno. Seems to me the message is fine. You DON'T get a second chance. Be careful of the choices you make. Yeah, the message sucks. But that IS life.

PSXer
04-19-2011, 02:03 PM
I think all of Total Recall is a dream, but not really a cop-out in the same way as the TC intends

zoog
04-19-2011, 02:12 PM
Thanks for giving me another chance to bash Boxing Helena. Gawd-awful piece of shit movie.

Greg Charles
04-19-2011, 02:13 PM
Much of the ending of Journey to the Center of the Earth, by Jules Verne turns out to be a dream, or at least a hallucination ... a cheap trick unworthy of Verne. I remember being pissed off by that when I was twelve.

Sampiro
04-19-2011, 02:15 PM
Not a dream exactly, but as the logic implodes in American Psycho it leaves you with the notion all or part of it might be a PSYCHOtic delusion of the main character.

Fight Club also- not a dream but not real either.

Don Draper
04-19-2011, 02:15 PM
An interesting one that I just remembered would be Richard Linklater's Waking Life (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0243017/), in which an un-named protagonist is stuck in his dream state. As the movie progresses, the dreamer realizes that the visions he's seeing are dream images and he must be asleep...but he can't wake up. He keeps dreaming and dreaming, until at least the end of the movie. The movie simply ends with him stuck in the dream. Thus, in this case, the movie is quite literally "all just a dream!"

Morbo
04-19-2011, 02:16 PM
Oz. Beecher finally gets released and lives happily ever af--

billfish678
04-19-2011, 02:23 PM
Fight Club also- not a dream but not real either.

Perhaps, but I'd say not in a bad way like many examples posted here. In that movie for all practical purposes what happened in that stories real world actually happened. Its just that one persons perspective wasn't quite right.

Bytegeist
04-19-2011, 02:25 PM
To add to the thread: the first 3/4 or so of David Lynch's Mulholland Drive is a dream by the main character (though we don't know who that is initially). After she wakes up, we're introduced to a very different and darker reality which fueled the dream.

But I'll echo PSXer and say that most of the films and TV shows being mentioned are not the "cop-outs" that the OP seems to be asking about. A long dream sequence is not automatically a bad plot device.

Súil Dubh
04-19-2011, 04:38 PM
John Masefield's Box of Delights. A complex and engrossing children's fantasy that involves ancient English myth, mysterious peddlers, sinister conspiracies and a truly terrifying main villain turns out in the end to be the idle dozing of a boy on a train. Weak.

I haven't read the book, but I have seen the BBC television adaption from the 1980's. (In fact I just watched it again this Christmas.)

I thought the ending worked fairly well. It seemed to me that having the harrowing adventures turn out to be a dream allowed the Christmas ending to be all the more peaceful and relieving.

I also thought the TV adaption was really well done. Patrick Troughton was well cast as the Punch and Judy Man, and Robert Stephens was deliciously over the top as the villain. Plus I'm a sucker for shoestring budget BBC special effects. I'm always amazed at what they could pull off compared to how little they had to work with.

from_a_to_z
04-19-2011, 07:06 PM
...Good authors avoid it....Henry James, "The Great Good Place." (Actually, this is one of the few times it worked.)...This thread is keeping me awake, even though I'm familiar with only 4 of the works (or don't works?) so far.

I enjoyed "The Life Before Her Eyes" (Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Life_Before_Her_Eyes)), movie somewhat more than the book though I recommend both if you can go for poignancy more than teen comedy. But I found each to be less than a major work of art, with all due respect to the dreaminess, so you may prefer to spend your time with Henry James and his ilk.

And this thread also reminded me of the Richard Harding Davis (Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Harding_Davis)) story "In the Fog" (gutenberg.org (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/7884)). For those who know the story, yes it's not a dream. But I think that it's related enough to include here. Well worth reading, and may even help you to dream better.

Taomist
04-19-2011, 08:06 PM
Not just St. Elsewhere but shows like COPS, the X-Files, the Simpsons, the original run of Mission Impossible, all the Doctor Who's... they're all dreams in the mind of Tommy Westphall, the most brilliant child in TV history.

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers.html


:eek::eek::eek:

Since I apparantly wasn't paying any attention at that point, does anyone recall what the general thoughts were on that kind of ending? Were people pissed?
Dang...I really should have watched the ending, apparantly. :p

JohnT
04-19-2011, 08:49 PM
I tried finding a clip of the last scene of St. Elsewhere, and I got this... the final credits to the final episode of St. Elsewhere..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fce6tlwwjQo

For those of you who don't want to click on the link, it's the old-time MTM production logo with the cat, Mimsy, laying on its side, hooked up to that medical machine that beeps when your heart beats. At the end of the credits... Mimsy flatlines. :eek:

Cugel
04-19-2011, 08:57 PM
The Brittas Empire, also a whole (7 series) show as a dream.

ITR champion
04-19-2011, 10:42 PM
Philip K. dick used that ending for his novel A Maze of Death and it actually worked, more or less.

alphaboi867
04-19-2011, 10:57 PM
Peggy's pregnancy arc on Married With Children. In the writers defence they intended it to be a real pregnancy (Katey Sagal was pregnant IRL) and have every intention of adding a new kid to the cast. Then Sagal miscrarried and the writers abandoned the plotline at the last minute because they didn't want to force her were a pregnancy suit (though I think she offered to go through with it).



Regarding St Elswhere, somebudy put a chart linking all the spinoffs, crossovers, spinoffs of spinoffs, etc together and proving that most TV showes of the 80s & 90s all take place in that little boy's mind.

JohnT
04-19-2011, 11:00 PM
... as linked-to in post 16. ;)

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers.html

Isamu
04-19-2011, 11:27 PM
If my life ends that way I'm going to be very annoyed.

CalMeacham
04-20-2011, 07:37 AM
The Dick Van Dyke Show did several dream episodes, with two outstanding ones -- the one with Kolak of Twilo and the one where Rob is bald. Both of them feature dream-within-dreams, with false endings. If not the earliest appearance of the trope, it's the first I recall. The show dealt brilliantly with many common and abused tropes (which are still common and abused).

Darth Nader
04-20-2011, 09:36 AM
Am I the first to mention Time Bandits?

But wait. He had the polaroids, and they touched it and went "fhwamp", and the fireman looked like Agamemnon... Ow my brain.

I really love that movie.

astorian
04-20-2011, 09:41 AM
I dunno. Seems to me the message is fine. You DON'T get a second chance. Be careful of the choices you make. Yeah, the message sucks. But that IS life.

But the Nic Cage character didn't ASK to see how his life could have turned out differently. He was HAPPY as a rich, selfish prick. He didn't WANT to leave his yuppie existence to become a middle class suburban father of 3. He was FORCED to enter that alternate reality. And just when he finally learned to care about the new people in his life, the whole thing was exposed as an illusion.

The Spirits who visited Ebenezer Scrooge never toyed with him to that degree.

Derleth
04-20-2011, 09:50 AM
Due to the number of crossovers, a large chunk of the American televised canon is the dream of the autistic kid in St. Elsewhere. Tommy Westphall, A Multiverse Explored (http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers.html) has the details.

Exapno Mapcase
04-20-2011, 09:52 AM
The cliché was driven into the ground by the start of the 20th century. One of the most famous books of the era was Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward 2000-1887, a socialist utopia. The narrator ostensibly builds a suspended animation chamber and wakes up 113 years later. But it was all a dream, and he's stuck in the horrors of 1887 Boston. The moral: we can change all that!

People claim that Looking Backward was the third best-selling novel of the century, after Uncle Tom's Cabin and Ben-Hur, so it was incredibly influential. It wasn't first, though. Edward Bleiler's definitive Science Fiction: The Early Years lists a hundred or so entries in the index under Dream, It was only a. And that's not including Delirium, It was all. The Early Years are those before the Hugo Gernsback age of science fiction. The volume that covers that, Science Fiction: The Gernsback Years, lists only about 20 entries under Dream, It was all a, so even by then writers understood that the device had been beaten into the ground and could used properly only for comic effect.

St. Elsewhere was a neat twist, but nobody believed it at the time or since. And I remember giving up on Philip K. Dick after reading one book that ended it was all somebody else's dream.

Malthus
04-20-2011, 10:05 AM
The cliché was driven into the ground by the start of the 20th century.

The earliest use of this cliché was probably in Chuang Tzu's "butterfly" anecdote, circa 4th century BC:

Once upon a time, Chuang Tzu dreamed that he was a butterfly, flying about enjoying itself. It did not know that it was Chuang Chou. Suddenly he awoke, and veritably was Chuang Chou again. He did not know whether it was Chuang Chou dreaming that he was a butterfly, or whether it was the butterfly dreaming that it was Chuang Chou. Between Chuang Chou and the butterfly there must be some distinction. This is a case of what is called the transformation of things.

Two Many Cats
04-20-2011, 10:08 AM
The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari ended as the dream of a mental patient. I remember laughing at the last line on the titles where the psychiatrist says, "I think I know how to treat him now."

How 'bout a shot upside the head, Doc?

CalMeacham
04-20-2011, 10:15 AM
The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari ended as the dream of a mental patient. I remember laughing at the last line on the titles where the psychiatrist says, "I think I know how to treat him now."

How 'bout a shot upside the head, Doc?

To be fair, that's not how it originally ended. It was an example of German Expressionist cinema, and generations of critics have complained about the studio insisting on that "explanatory" ending, which they thought was necessary, because otherwise the audience would be confused.







Another "it's only a dream" ending that really didn't make a lot of sense was the original Invaders from Mars. I'm not a big fan of this film, which I don't think deserves the lofty status it's received, and i really don't see the point of the "it's only a dream" ending, especially when it's immediately subverted. Why couldn't it simply be a straight story?

Doug K.
04-20-2011, 10:26 AM
William Golding's Pincher Martin.

Two Many Cats
04-20-2011, 10:57 AM
To be fair, that's not how it originally ended. It was an example of German Expressionist cinema, and generations of critics have complained about the studio insisting on that "explanatory" ending, which they thought was necessary, because otherwise the audience would be confused.






And The Bad Seed didn't originally end with Rhoda getting struck by lightning either, but it still counts as a dumb ending.

WhyNot
04-20-2011, 11:09 AM
As with so many other cliches, Joss Whedon used it to good effect in Buffy The Vampire Slayer. Or did he?

In the episode Normal Again, it seems that Buffy wakes up in a psychiatric hospital, and she's been suffering from delusions that she's a Vampire Slayer and has invented a slew of sidekicks to help her in her quest. In other words, the whole series we've been watching for 6 years is a dream. As the episode progresses, her psychiatrist encourages her to kill her sidekicks when she slips into delusions, so that she can be normal again and live her real life with her mother (dead in her delusions) and her father (absent in her delusions). Ultimately, she must make the choice of whether to stay in her dream world or return to the real one. The catch is that her "delusion" explains that the "real" world is the dream, caused by demon venom.

She makes her choice, but there's great debate among fans as to whether she chooses the dream or reality.

Sr Siete
04-20-2011, 11:36 AM
Wait. Nobody has come up with "Last season of Lost" yet?

Shame on you, guys.

silenus
04-20-2011, 03:43 PM
Forget Lost! I'm surprised nobody has mentioned St. Elsewhere yet.

JohnT
04-20-2011, 03:44 PM
Apparently there's some website that talks in depth about the St. Elsewhere ending and its implications...

Darth Nader
04-20-2011, 04:18 PM
"Oh shit! That's Bobby in the shower. Aww, fuck you Dallas!"

Tess
04-20-2011, 04:46 PM
I read somewhere that The Wizard of Oz once had a slightly longer ending. Dorothy is home realizing "it was all a dream" but then the camera pans down to show the ruby slippers.
Assuming it's true (I've never seen it) instead of tacking on the dream explanation, the PTB just cut out the "it was all real" ending.

Jack Batty
04-20-2011, 04:58 PM
Back in 5th grade, we all wrote books. We wrote the stories, illustrated them, and had fun with the laminator to get them all book-like. I can't remember a lot about my story, but I do recall it featuring a 50 foot long crocodile that had my intrepid hero cornered after a spirited chase. For the life of me I could figure out how to finish it, so I came up with ... "and then he woke up and it was all a dream."

I thought I was a fucking genius! Turns out I was a 10 year old hack and I didn't even know it.

Superdude
04-20-2011, 05:40 PM
Forget Lost! I'm surprised nobody has mentioned St. Elsewhere yet.

See post #3.
:D

Yllaria
04-20-2011, 05:57 PM
. . . And the one where it all started in the first place -Wizard of Oz.

Okay, now I have to check dates.

Ambrose Bierce, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
. . .

That's 1890. It beats The Wizard by about ten years.

Alice in Wonderland (and Through the Looking Glass), though maybe they're grandfathered out. . .

That's 1865. Even older.

I missed picking up the quote for Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne; but it's the oldest one mentioned so far, from 1964.

If it counts, congrats to Greg Charles.

---------------
The entire run of the show Newhart was determined to be a dream of Bob Newhart, when he wakes up next to Suzanne Pleschette, his wife from The Bob Newhart Show.

And dates aside, this is the one that works best.

Malthus
04-21-2011, 08:39 AM
Okay, now I have to check dates.



That's 1890. It beats The Wizard by about ten years.



That's 1865. Even older.

I missed picking up the quote for Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne; but it's the oldest one mentioned so far, from 1964.

If it counts, congrats to Greg Charles.

---------------


And dates aside, this is the one that works best.

Hey, at 400 BC, Chuang Tzu has 'em all beat. :D

CalMeacham
04-21-2011, 08:54 AM
Sometimes it being a dream is the whole point of the thing, which allows the creator greater freedom. In these cases, it's only playing fair if the creator tells you right off the bat that it's a dream. This was the case with teo of cartoonist Winsor McKay's comic strips from the early 20th century -- Dreams of the Rarebit Fiend and Little Nemo in Slumberland. Both were adapted as animated cartoons, as well.


Bob Clampett used the "invading the Dream" idea in his last Bugs Bunny cartoon, 1946's The Big Snooze.

Little Nemo
04-21-2011, 09:14 AM
Let's not forget the greatest work of art based on the theme of waking up and finding out it was all a dream. I refer, of course, to "I Kissed A Girl" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1ShTYMMjQ0) by Kary Perry.

CalMeacham
04-21-2011, 09:28 AM
Let's not forget the greatest work of art based on the theme of waking up and finding out it was all a dream. I refer, of course, to "I Kissed A Girl" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1ShTYMMjQ0) by Kary Perry.

I'm surprised that someone called Little Nemo finds that the Greatest Work of Art based on this theme.



Ever see Little Ego in Slumberland, by the way?

http://www.amazon.com/Little-Ego-Vittorio-Giardino/dp/1561630942

Little Nemo
04-21-2011, 09:34 AM
I'm surprised that someone called Little Nemo finds that the Greatest Work of Art based on this theme.I agree with what you said in your previous post: it was never a surprise ending when my namesake woke up from a dream. The reader always knew he was in a dream.

Another example of that type of work would be H.P. Lovecraft's Dream Cycle (which Brain Lumley has added to).

eta: And I have read Giardino's book.

Two Many Cats
04-21-2011, 09:39 AM
How about Futurama when Leela keeps dreaming about Fry telling her to wake up. It was the one with the space bees. It was actually quite a touching episode.

TreacherousCretin
04-21-2011, 12:34 PM
Does Roseanne qualify?

.

TreacherousCretin
04-21-2011, 12:36 PM
Monty Python's Flying Circus brilliantly subverted this. It was in the single episode of the series that consisted of one episode-long skit - in which Brian Jones (I think) played a mild-mannered...


Terry Jones?

Bytegeist
04-21-2011, 01:17 PM
Monty Python's Flying Circus brilliantly subverted this. It was in the single episode of the series that consisted of one episode-long skit - in which Brian Jones (I think) played a mild-mannered, ordinary British civil servant who through a series of wacky incidents ends up in a Soviet gulag, waiting to be marched out in front of the firing squad.

Terry Jones?

In the episode (http://www.ibras.dk/montypython/episode34.htm) he's thinking of, Michael Palin actually plays the mild-mannered man (Mr. Pither) who's on a bicycling tour of Cornwall, and who finds himself in a Soviet prison at one point.

I don't recall any reason to think Mr. Pither's a civil servant though. His profession is never mentioned.


I'm . . . . . just . . . . a . . . . .

♫ Jack in the box
♫ You know whenever love knocks
♫ I'm gonna bounce up and down on my spring

BOM BOM BOM

astorian
04-21-2011, 01:29 PM
I think it was in the fall of 1986 that Madonna appeared on the season premiere of "Saturday Night Live" and told us the entire 1985 season (with Randy Quaid, Terry Sweeney and Robert Downey Jr.) had been a dream.

BigT
04-21-2011, 01:29 PM
Not just St. Elsewhere but shows like COPS, the X-Files, the Simpsons, the original run of Mission Impossible, all the Doctor Who's... they're all dreams in the mind of Tommy Westphall, the most brilliant child in TV history.

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers.html

I question the premise. The kid dreaming about them showing up in St. Elsewhere doesn't reveal anything: I dream about both real people and people from TV in odd situations all the time. Only people from St. Elsewhere appearing elsewhere would establish them as part of a dream, and then only if we know for sure they have had experiences that the kid had in the dream.

Still, I stumbled upon this site a long time ago, and couldn't remember what to look up to get back to it. So thanks.

EDIT: Even the Wizard of Oz movie doesn't count, as Dorothy insisted it wasn't a dream, and later went back in sequels. The ending was more of a "Was it just a dream?" ending, at least as I remember it.

Swallowed My Cellphone
04-21-2011, 01:56 PM
Isn't Click (Adam Sandler movie) basically based on the dream sequence formula?

Larry Mudd
04-21-2011, 02:04 PM
Even the Wizard of Oz movie doesn't count, as Dorothy insisted it wasn't a dream, and later went back in sequels. The ending was more of a "Was it just a dream?" ending, at least as I remember it.The 1939 film is pretty firmly in the "it was all a dream" column, as Dorothy recognized on waking that the farmhands, Elvira Gulch, and Professor Marvel had been transformed in her imagination into the fantastic characters of Oz, in typical dream fashion. "And then I bumped into you - except that it wasn't you, exactly - you were made of tin. Seemed normal at the time."

Subsequent Oz movies don't have any bearing, because they weren't sequels to the 1939 movie any more than they were to '20s version with Oliver Hardy..

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