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Apocalypso
04-26-2011, 08:11 PM
I've seen Dee Snyder on VH1 a lot, and he seems to be under the mistaken impression that he was a rock god or something back in the 80's. I remember them as a gimmick band that were ok but nothing special. You didn't call people and go "you gotta hear this!" like you did with Ride the Lightning. They were basically a 2 hit wonder, and got a lot of mileage off those 2 videos, but I don't remember them being anyone's favorite band.

Why does Dee Snyder think he's a rock god? Did they make THAT much money off "I Wanna Rock" and "We're not gonna take it"?
Would they have achieved more success if they had dropped the transvestite gimmick? I remember Dee saying they spent a lot of years touring in small clubs but I don't think they were that talented.
What was up with that one guitarist that only wore a couple stripes on his cheek? I kept picturing it like this "Dude, everyone else is wearing the makeup. You gotta at least do some eyeliner and lipstick." "No, this whole thing is fuckin stupid. I'm not doing it." "Fuck, no one else will play with us. Dude can you pleeease at least do something? Our whole image revolves around this, and we can't have one guy with no makeup" "Ok how about if I just do it warpaint-like?" "I guess so."

multimediac17
04-26-2011, 08:20 PM
Isn't that kinda his "thing"? Act like a legend of rock even though he isn't one?

Diogenes the Cynic
04-26-2011, 08:23 PM
Twisted Sister came in near the beginning of MTV and were a very video friendly band. The songs were hooky and the videos had a sense of humor that played a role in making metal more accessible to the mainstream. Stay Hungry was actually a pretty decent album and has sold something like 5 million copies, which isn't bad.

They were really big for a short period of time. My impression of Dee Snyder in recent years is not exactly what yours is, thouigh. I don't get the impression that he thinks he's some kind of icon. I've seen him be brutally honest in interviews about how he knows his band is now a retro-act, that he wants to put on a good and professional show for the old-timers, but is not under any illusion that the band is going to have some kind of resurgence with a younger audience. I remember that he specifically chastised some other 80's hair metal bands who (he thought) couldn't accept that their salad days were over and were still deluding themselves that they were going to be back on top again (or never realized they weren't still there).

I remember his comments as being honest, practical and realistic, basicallysaying that bands like his needed to show up on time, be professional, play the songs the audience came to hear and treat them with respect. From what I've heard, he actually is generous to fans as well.

salinqmind
04-26-2011, 09:04 PM
Absolutely, yes. That. Great sense of humor, one of their albums had the names of their hair care products listed in the credit lines!

And who the hell was "Ride the Lightning"?

Dolores Reborn
04-26-2011, 09:09 PM
From wiki:

In 1985, a Senate hearing was instigated by the Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC), who wanted to introduce a parental warning system that would label all albums containing offensive material. The system was to include letters identifying the type of objectionable content to be found in each album (e.g. O for occult themes, S for sex, D for drugs, V for violence, etc.). Dee Snider, John Denver, and Frank Zappa all testified against censorship and the proposed warning system. Such a system was never implemented, but the result of the trial brought about what is now the generic "Parental Advisory: Explicit Content" label.

The PMRC was initially formed by the wives of Washington DC power brokers Al Gore (D-TN[clarification needed], Senate) and Secretary of State James Baker. Tipper Gore in particular became the face of the PMRC and a public foil for Snider in the hearings. Ironically, in the 2000 US Presidential Election cycle, Snider endorsed Vice President Gore for office.

Diogenes the Cynic
04-26-2011, 09:19 PM
And who the hell was "Ride the Lightning"?
Not a band, an album. Metallica's second album.

FoieGrasIsEvil
04-26-2011, 09:20 PM
Don't you fucking DARE make fun of Eddie "Fingers" Ojeda!
:mad:

Diogenes the Cynic
04-26-2011, 09:26 PM
Absolutely, yes. That. Great sense of humor, one of their albums had the names of their hair care products listed in the credit lines!
I think the sense of humor is key. They weren't taking themselves seriously. They were being intentionally campy and over the top. You have to think of Dee the way you think of pro wrestlers. It's a hammy stage character.

Moirai
04-26-2011, 09:33 PM
Yeah but even our minister thought that TS's rendition of "Oh Come, All Ye Faithful" was great fun- Snider actually does have a decent voice, and that song is perfect for him.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YV-SpT69IZ8

Snowboarder Bo
04-26-2011, 09:53 PM
Dolores remembers the right part about why Dee Snider is a rock god (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pvmyNnepTk). He carried our flag into battle and he kicked their asses. ALL their asses.

Superdude
04-26-2011, 09:59 PM
They also had a fairly decent cover of Leader of the Pack (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMU6GemrG8Y).

And "Burn in Hell" - and the band - had a cameo in Pee Wee's Big Adventure (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUsafOL0kew).

Jim's Son
04-26-2011, 10:31 PM
They also had a fairly decent cover of Leader of the Pack (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMU6GemrG8Y).

And "Burn in Hell" - and the band - had a cameo in Pee Wee's Big Adventure (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUsafOL0kew).

Hasn't Snider said that recording "Leader of the Pack" was because of record company pressure and was a mistake that hurt the band? He has also felt that few other groups stood with him speaking out against the PMRC.

Watching the PMRC hearing with Denver, Snider, and Zappa was one of the few times I ever watched congressional hearings on C-SPAN. It made me realize what trouble we are in when Dee Snider is more intelligent that politicians in both parties.

Yorikke
04-26-2011, 11:27 PM
I still contend that "We're Not Gonna Take It" is one of the greatest pop songs of all time. It crystallizes teen rebellion perfectly.

Joe

Superdude
04-27-2011, 01:04 AM
Hasn't Snider said that recording "Leader of the Pack" was because of record company pressure and was a mistake that hurt the band? He has also felt that few other groups stood with him speaking out against the PMRC.

I honestly don't know one way or the other, but a record company pressuring an artist doesn't surprise me in the least, if it's true. As to whether it's a mistake that hurt the band, I can't argue one way or the other. I was 12 when that song was recorded, and the impact it had on the band's reputation wasn't something I was particularly interested in.

Lynn Bodoni
04-27-2011, 02:03 AM
Watching the PMRC hearing with Denver, Snider, and Zappa was one of the few times I ever watched congressional hearings on C-SPAN. It made me realize what trouble we are in when Dee Snider is more intelligent that politicians in both parties. I think that most politicians are not elected for their brains, but for their charisma. They usually have their puppet masters behind the stage to let them know what to do or say. Of course, the same can be said of most entertainers...not known for their brains, most of them. They just have to look good and play their parts.

Occasionally, though, there IS a bright politician or entertainer, and I think that Snider is one of the brighter ones.

Toxylon
04-27-2011, 02:43 AM
I remember them as a gimmick band that were ok but nothing special. You didn't call people and go "you gotta hear this!" like you did with Ride the Lightning.

I think this has to do with one's age. I was 8 years old when Stay Hungry hit the music scene, and, like all my friends, was instantly hooked. To us little kids just discovering rock music, there was nothing gimmicky about TS. They looked super-cool, they had insanely good songs and videos, and they were heavily featured in the music media at the time. Early Metallica was a bit too aggressive and progressive to our virgin ears, and they looked like any regular burnout dudes hanging around the mall in their jeans, band T-shirts and acne. Seeing their picture in a magazine did not make me want to buy their albums. In comparison, Dee Snider was easily the greatest Rock God evah, for those couple important years.

Foxy40
04-27-2011, 04:58 PM
Why does Dee Snyder think he's a rock god?

I grew up across the street from him. He was a nice guy, not a jerk at all. I don't think he thinks he is all that. I believe it is an act.

astorian
04-27-2011, 05:16 PM
I'm not a big fan of Twisted Sister, but let me point out a few things, in their defense:

Twisted Sister was around for a LONG time, a LOT longer than MTV fans ever knew. And they realy paid their dues. When I was a kid in New York in the early/mid-Seventies, Twisted Sister was playing every dive in the Tri-State area. I used to hear ads for their gigs on the radio constantly. They really WANTED to break through and become hugely successful, and they worked their butts off to do it. But they could never get any radio airplay even in their hometown. I never saw them live in those days, but I'm told they would curse and insult the local New York City rock deejays mercilessly onstage.

They were sort of like April Wine in that they were "the next big thing" in hard rock for what seemed like forever. Say this for them: they made a living without having any big hits, and that's HARD to do.

When they finally got a few videos on MTV and experienced a bit of commercial success, I think their attitude was "It's about freaking TIME!" They'd watched other bands from their circle become successful for years, and it galled them.

DiosaBellissima
04-27-2011, 05:24 PM
A funny aside:

I taught a summer school speech class a few years ago and there was an 11 year old boy who was utterly obsessed with Twisted Sister. And when I say "a few years ago," I don't mean 1992 or something-- I literally mean summer of 2009. First day of class, I have the kids do introductory speeches and his went something like this:

Hi, I'm Timmy (not his name, but you know). I'm in 5th grade and I LOVE TWISTED SISTER!!!!"

Cut to confused looks from his classmates and me hysterically laughing. I mean, c'mon! They were popular before even I was born! I helped the kid out, though: I let him do every speech about TS. First speech was to perform a famous speech, so I told him about the testimony before Congress. Kid thought that was probably the coolest thing in the entire world. :D

Miller
04-27-2011, 05:30 PM
That kid is clearly caught up in some sort of kooky time travel hi-jinks. He's probably actually Adam Sandler or, posisbly, Vince Vaughn.

DiosaBellissima
04-27-2011, 06:47 PM
That kid is clearly caught up in some sort of kooky time travel hi-jinks. He's probably actually Adam Sandler or, posisbly, Vince Vaughn.

That would explain a significant amount of his behavior in that class, now that you mention it.

Daithi Lacha
04-27-2011, 06:58 PM
I still contend that "We're Not Gonna Take It" is one of the greatest pop songs of all time. It crystallizes teen rebellion perfectly.

Joe

Funny - this song came on over the weekend, and I was listening to it like I never listened to it in High School and I was struck by what a wonderful little bit of pop it really was. The progressions, the production, everything is very cleverly done. It's rebellion calculated by an almost mathematical precision.

Apocalypso
04-27-2011, 07:12 PM
I'm not a big fan of Twisted Sister, but let me point out a few things, in their defense:

Twisted Sister was around for a LONG time, a LOT longer than MTV fans ever knew. And they realy paid their dues. When I was a kid in New York in the early/mid-Seventies, Twisted Sister was playing every dive in the Tri-State area. I used to hear ads for their gigs on the radio constantly. They really WANTED to break through and become hugely successful, and they worked their butts off to do it. But they could never get any radio airplay even in their hometown. I never saw them live in those days, but I'm told they would curse and insult the local New York City rock deejays mercilessly onstage.

They were sort of like April Wine in that they were "the next big thing" in hard rock for what seemed like forever. Say this for them: they made a living without having any big hits, and that's HARD to do.

When they finally got a few videos on MTV and experienced a bit of commercial success, I think their attitude was "It's about freaking TIME!" They'd watched other bands from their circle become successful for years, and it galled them.

Well I knew they spent years and years on the club circuit before "Stay Hungry" became popular. And it is cool to hear that Dee is pretty humble. Still, I look at bands who achieved a similar level of popularity like Quiet Riot, and I don't see Kevin Dubrow all over VH1 and every 80's music retrospective program on television. As much as I despise Metallica, I have to admit they were one of the most influential bands of their day. Twisted Sister had some solid anthem type tunes and funny videos and they definitely deserved their moment in the sun but I don't think too many people would choose them to represent the 80's.

Don't you fucking DARE make fun of Eddie "Fingers" Ojeda! :mad:
I'm not making fun of him, really! Just wondering why everyone else wears dresses and makeup and he...doesn't. :dubious: He's just got those 2 cheek stripes. I think I remember reading that he had native american ancestry or something? But the fact is everyone else in the band looks like a really ugly transvestite and he just looks kind of like Eddie Van Halen with war paint.

luv2draw
04-27-2011, 07:40 PM
Saw Twisted Sister in the Hamptons (Long Island, NY) in the summer of 1974. They played outside at some seedy bar on a Sunday afternoon. Never heard of them before that and since they weren't my type of entertainment never followed them.

Nunzio Tavulari
04-27-2011, 08:07 PM
Saw Twisted Sister many times in small clubs because my friends liked them. Not my favorite type of music, but they knew what they were doing and fulfilled all the requirements of the genre. My recollection is that Kiss only had one hit record and people still go crazy for them today. Same audience, young boys who favor loud androgynous men. Would have been Liberace fans in an earlier day.

I expected Dee and Frank to put up a fight before Congress and wasn't impressed by their appearances. I had great respect for John Denver's testimony although I've never like his music. There should have been more mainstream performers there.

And I'll say this, the PMRC is the reason that Al Gore didn't get my vote. The thought that he let that happen or worse, agreed with it. That's not who I want running the country. His opponent was a fool too, but I digress.

Diogenes the Cynic
04-27-2011, 08:08 PM
Well I knew they spent years and years on the club circuit before "Stay Hungry" became popular. And it is cool to hear that Dee is pretty humble. Still, I look at bands who achieved a similar level of popularity like Quiet Riot, and I don't see Kevin Dubrow all over VH1 and every 80's music retrospective program on television.
Kevin Dubrow died several years ago.

Edward The Head
04-27-2011, 08:24 PM
I love me some Twisted Sister. Stay Hungry is one of my favorite albums, top 5 and has been for years. I've seen both Twisted Sister and Dee perform a few times and they've always put on a good show.

While you may not like them I can say that back in 98 or 99 Dee and his band drove the normally four hours from Jersey to Frederick Maryland to perform, in a nasty ice storm. It was some dive and a lot of the tickets were free. He still put on a hell of a show and said the weather wasn't going to stop him from being there. I really respected that.

dada2fish
04-27-2011, 10:45 PM
I do like Dee Snider as a person. I enjoy his interviews. He seems like a down to earth, smart guy and good family man, but I saw Twisted Sister open up for Iron Maiden back in the 80's and I have to say they were the worst band I ever saw live. They played their two hits, which was ok, but then talked to the audience ALOT. They were trying to rile up the crowd, saying stuff like, "Are ya ready to rock??!!", but didn't actually play anymore songs. The crowd grew impatient, bored and booed them until they left the stage. I almost felt sorry for them, except I paid hard earned money to see a concert, not a pep rally.

Superdude
04-27-2011, 11:56 PM
That kid is clearly caught up in some sort of kooky time travel hi-jinks. He's probably actually Adam Sandler or, posisbly, Vince Vaughn.

I think that it's clearly Dee Snider himself. One of his descendants had obviously perfected time travel in the future, went back to Snider's childhood days, gave young Dee the technology, and young Dee decided to come to 2009 to see if people would still remember him.

Then his descendant sold the technology to Skynet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skynet_(Terminator)).

Miller
04-28-2011, 12:30 AM
Kevin Dubrow died several years ago.

That never stopped Keith Richards.

Superdude
04-28-2011, 01:39 AM
Nobody TOLD Keith Richards that he's been dead for the last 30 years, though.

WordMan
04-28-2011, 09:46 AM
Dolores remembers the right part about why Dee Snider is a rock god (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pvmyNnepTk). He carried our flag into battle and he kicked their asses. ALL their asses.

I assume that is a clip of his prepared statement before the PMRC, where he was very articulate and really pushed past all the chirping and silliness Tipper & Friends were engaged in.

He is a hero and thoughtful guy for that.

But I would put him on a level with Sir Bob Geldof - a guy who acted on principle and stood for good things, but their music is more of a side note. And in the case of Twisted Sister - they are a meh band at best. Their shtick was too shticky and their look was more than a little silly and the songs were plodding shout-alongs.

But more power to 'em regardless.

Jim's Son
04-28-2011, 12:10 PM
I saw Twisted Sister around 1980 opening for Jefferson Starship without Marty Balin or Grace Slick. Kind of mediocre although "We're Not Gonna Take it" is a great song.

Also one of the members Mark "The Animal" Mendoza once asked to be introduced to one of my brothers because he had the highest score on a video game at a club where TS played. He said Mendoza was a pleasant guy.

aruvqan
04-28-2011, 12:33 PM
the songs were plodding shout-alongs.
.

Sometimes you just want to headbang and have fun, why do people insist that everything has to have deep inner meaning?

/me goes off to bop to Girls just want to have fun ...

Malthus
04-28-2011, 01:08 PM
Reminds me of a memory from my high school days ... one halloween in the '80s, a friend and I dressed up as "evil priests" and, to make the costume complete, we "borrowed" some soaked-in-formadehyde rats from the bio lab and tied them upside-down to crucifixes. We then paraded up and down in our finery (basically, raggy robes and crucified rats) on Yonge St. in Toronto.

Well, we met on the street a HUGE guy dressed exactly like the lead singer of Twisted Sister (very popular at the time). He looked sort of like a pro wrestler in drag ... he asked us "what you got there, boys?" and I said "crucified rat, soaked in formaldehyde". He said "cool", reached out, and took it from me - then took a huge bite out of it, and handed it back.

I can't imagine it did him any good.

WordMan
04-28-2011, 01:12 PM
Sometimes you just want to headbang and have fun, why do people insist that everything has to have deep inner meaning?

/me goes off to bop to Girls just want to have fun ...

Oh - to be clear: I loves me some Big Dumb Rock. The more rawk-ing and meaningless, the better, when that is what was called for.

I would just argue that bands like AC/DC do it better...

Uncle Brother Walker
04-28-2011, 08:44 PM
Amen, dude.

I like the anthemic-type songs out there in the HM library (from many different bands), but Twisted Sister, AC/DC, KISS... There are so many of these bands that put an anthem song on their new release to balance out all the "hits". Oh, and a power ballad. It became a formula. (That's how I understand it.) I think Dee knew they were doing a schtick, but they did work pretty hard. I liked the music they played, cheesy or not.

They do a wonderfully funny version of The Twelve Days of Christmas as well. It is pretty funny.

When I graduated HS, We're Not Going To Take It came in 2nd when the student body voted that year on our choice of class song.

I also think it was one of rock's proudest moments when Dee testified at the Hearings. I made my mom watch that because she assumed (as many do) that all rockers are just jobless burnouts. He was quite articulate. (I believe I stole this quote off these boards recently, but don't remember where: "Fast forward 25 years- I'm still married to my first wife and none of my kids have ever been arrested. Can Al and Tipper Gore say that?" - Dee Snider)

Did anybody bother to watch Growing Up Twisted, his short lived reality show at his Long Island home. I liked it, but I'm pretty sure it got cancelled.

All in all, amongst all the talk around the biz, I hear the entire band are a bunch of good guys. No serious drug problems or arrests. Just a bunch of guys who wanna rock.

There's my two cents.

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