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View Full Version : Ever try a food because of a movie/show/song?


installLSC
04-28-2011, 11:32 PM
I was drinking Bubble Up (a lemon line soda) today when I remembered why I started drinking it. Back in the early 80s, Merle Haggard had a hit called "Rainbow Stew" that mentioned Bubble Up. When I found out five years ago it actually exists, I had to get it and have regularly drank it ever since. Has a piece of entertainment ever caused you to try a drink or food item?

Arrendajo
04-28-2011, 11:38 PM
Horchata, thanks to the Vampire Weekend song.

drastic_quench
04-28-2011, 11:50 PM
Kalkalash and crab juice.

I'm sure I have a real example, but I can't think of it.

Oh! I have been wanting to try a hearts of palm salad since Don Draper ordered one. (season 2 episode 5, my googling reveals)

drastic_quench
04-28-2011, 11:56 PM
Kalkalash and crab juice.

I'm sure I have a real example, but I can't think of it.

Oh! I have been wanting to try a hearts of palm salad since Don Draper ordered one. (season 2 episode 5, my googling reveals)

*Khlav Kalash

koeeoaddi
04-28-2011, 11:56 PM
If books also count, I tried Rooibos (red bush tea) because of Alexander McCall Smith's Ladies #1 Detective series.

Silver Tyger
04-29-2011, 12:00 AM
I just bought a pint of Stephen Colbert's Americone Dream from Ben & Jerrys because... Mr. Colbert is utterly adorkable and he wants me to.

runcible spoon
04-29-2011, 12:04 AM
Horchata, thanks to the Vampire Weekend song.

Hey, me too! I mean, I'd had it before, but last December I was visiting home, and my friends and I went to the Mexican place we used to frequent, and hey, December, right?

I tried onigiri after watching One Piece - I was sort of on a Japanese food kick anyways, but onigiri specifically I can attribute to One Piece.

Lucky 13
04-29-2011, 12:09 AM
I made spaghetti tacos for my daughter after she saw them being prepared on "iCarly." All they are is taco shells filled with spaghetti. Also, I wanted to try Japanese-style curry after watching a Sailor Moon episode in which Rini asked Serena to cook some for her. I eventually tried the curry from Curry House in Little Tokyo - it's great! You can even ask them to put an onion ring or a fried hot dog on top. Now I want to try chocolate cornets after seeing Konata on "Lucky Star" eating one for lunch. I've looked all over, and I'm not even sure there is such a thing as chocolate cornet.

Lakai
04-29-2011, 12:11 AM
White Russian, because of The Dude.

Old Fashion, because of Don Draper.

Blisters
04-29-2011, 12:15 AM
At the risk of sounding old:

Milk and Pepsi because of Laverne and Shirley

verdict: disgusting


though I now want to try a hearts of palm salad too! (because of this thread, does that count?)

ZipperJJ
04-29-2011, 12:24 AM
Seven & seven because of Community. I could do it because I'm a girl.

penultima thule
04-29-2011, 12:46 AM
Have searched for a Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster without success

Angel of the Lord
04-29-2011, 12:56 AM
Turkish delight, because of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe..

Next time, I'll just sugar some perfume and drink that instead. Yuck. Edmund was an idiot.

Tim R. Mortiss
04-29-2011, 01:50 AM
I had never heard of a Mojito before I saw "Die Another Day." After that, seemed like everyone was drinking them.

Personally, I can take it or leave it. It just seems like a rum version of a Mint Julep.

jackdavinci
04-29-2011, 04:26 AM
If it existed I would have tried a pan galactic gargle blaster.

The great reputation in various media of scotch (and cigars) has made me want to experience that but I haven't had the opportunity.

Arkcon
04-29-2011, 06:18 AM
Tea. Earl Grey. Hot.

I would never have picked that out of the Twining's lineup of Breakfast Tea, Prince of Wales tea, etc. But the way he said it, made it sound like such a manly cup of tea, that I sought it out and gravitated to it. 'Cause you know, there's nothing more manly, than tea ... with flowers in it.

Cayuga
04-29-2011, 06:22 AM
If books also count, I tried Rooibos (red bush tea) because of Alexander McCall Smith's Ladies #1 Detective series.

A second for this one.

ryan
04-29-2011, 06:41 AM
I owe my long time on again/off again love affair with single malt Scotch whisky to trying Glenmorangie on a whim after seeing Highlander when I was 19.

PookahMacPhellimey
04-29-2011, 06:55 AM
Donuts.

No really. When Twin Peaks first came on in The Netherlands those were unheard of. As my whole family was obsessed with the series my mum and me went to the library (internet also not being around), found a recipe and tried to make these "donuts". And we couldn't figure out what the deal was. I found out later this was because the cookbook was way off and are fritters bore no relation to real donuts. I was quite surprised to find out what they really look and taste like.

Jim's Son
04-29-2011, 07:08 AM
Years ago I tried taking a sip of beer, then white wine because Broderick Crawford did it in the movie "The Mob". As I remember the plot, he was trying to establish he was from New Orleans to infiltrate a gang and (according to the movie) people in New Orleans drink this. It was alright but I have never repeated it.

Ludovic
04-29-2011, 07:18 AM
Back in high school, some of the kids tried Fruit Striped Gum because of the line on Pauls Boutique ("I got more flavor than fruit striped gum!")

joebuck20
04-29-2011, 07:21 AM
I started drinking Snapple in the '90s because of Seinfeld. I haven't had it in years though.

Dung Beetle
04-29-2011, 07:29 AM
Turkish delight, because of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe..

That was mine too. Disgusting! The Queen must have had some kick-ass powers to make anyone want to eat more of it. I prefer to think of Turkish delight the way I imagined it as a kid; definitely something chocolatey.

RealityChuck
04-29-2011, 07:33 AM
I adapted a tuna salad recipe from an Ellery Queen novel, leaving out the poison.

Skywatcher
04-29-2011, 07:37 AM
Commander Taggart's favorite meal.

Ike Witt
04-29-2011, 08:04 AM
I had to invent a Tequila Fannybanger after reading about it in Bloom County.

It turned out to be a not too bad summer drink and really did get me hammered that one weekend.

Ponch8
04-29-2011, 08:09 AM
A few years ago I came across a website (no longer in existence) that had a lot of old TV commercial jingles. One was for Lowenbrau beer, which I hadn't heard of in years. It still exists, so I bought a six-pack or two.

The jingle was some hokey song about two friends who met for the first time in a while: "Here's to good friends, tonight is kind of special..."

Ludovic
04-29-2011, 08:11 AM
I adapted a tuna salad recipe from an Ellery Queen novel, leaving out the poison.Yeah, I hate mayonnaise too.

lieu
04-29-2011, 08:13 AM
Yep, fried green tomatoes.

Terraplane
04-29-2011, 08:23 AM
Cornish pasties. I read about them in Neil Gaiman's American Gods and they sounded good so I found a recipe online. They're one of my favorite foods now.

Hazle Weatherfield
04-29-2011, 08:28 AM
Caucasian - The Big Lebowski
Milk and Pepsi - Laverne and Shirley - Loved it!
Also, I would like to drink everything mentioned in Hemingway's Garden of Eden.

salinqmind
04-29-2011, 08:32 AM
I once leafed through the Nero Wolfe cookbook, - a genre called 'continental cooking' - but as I don't have a chef on call 24/7 or access to a brace of pheasants, I can only dream on.

However! I have had GREAT success with Sticky Toffee Pudding (or something similar) mentioned in some Harry Potter book, made with dates and brown sugar. Even better with Whiskey Sauce.

Annie-Xmas
04-29-2011, 08:34 AM
I love culinary mysteries and have tried a lot of recipes from some of the authors. Diane Mott Davidson and Joanne Fluke come to mind.

Leaffan
04-29-2011, 08:35 AM
Well, I woke up this morning and I got myself a beer.......

MikeG
04-29-2011, 08:36 AM
Tupelo Honey is not all Van Morrison says it is, it has an aftertaste I don't care for.

Freddy the Pig
04-29-2011, 08:48 AM
When Jimmy Stewart arrives in San Diego in Spirit of St. Louis, his hosts (at the company which will manufacture the title airplane) offer him sand dabs heated with a welder's torch. They're bad.

So when I saw sand dabs at a California restaurant--we don't have them here in the Midwest--I had to order them. They weren't heated with a welder's torch, though, and damn, they were good.

drastic_quench
04-29-2011, 08:48 AM
"I like that black fucking darjeeling," got me interested in teas. It only took Al Swearengen's recommenation.

ministryman
04-29-2011, 09:04 AM
Vodka Martinis - shaken AND stirred.

blondebear
04-29-2011, 09:06 AM
The Fountains of Wayne song Red Dragon Tattoo inspired me to try Basil Hayden's bourbon. Tasty stuff!

sachertorte
04-29-2011, 09:40 AM
Fava Beans

Knorf
04-29-2011, 09:48 AM
And a nice chianti.

Sitnam
04-29-2011, 09:52 AM
I always thought Popeye's Chicken was just a fake brand for Little Nicky, turns out it exists. I was driving around a suburb in south Minneapolis and I saw one. I wasn't even hungry but I just couldn't pass it up.

Now to find a Kahuna Burger.

ryan
04-29-2011, 10:11 AM
Milk and Pepsi - Laverne and Shirley - Loved it!


Ewww...I had purged this from my memory, but my older sisters made us all try it when I was young. Truly vile.

Not sure from where, but I also remember getting the idea to put potato chips on (in?) a sandwich from something we'd seen on TV. Probably some "After School Special". I still do so on occasion, but I prefer corn chips over potato.

There are a bunch of recipes/cooking scenes presented in the Sten series by Cole & Bunch that I've always wanted to try.

I was always curious about Turkish Delight after reading The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe but it was such a let-down.

joebuck20
04-29-2011, 10:17 AM
I started drinking Snapple in the '90s because of Seinfeld. I haven't had it in years though.

Actually now that I think about it, there are quite a few foods I've tried because of Seinfeld. The first time I had a marble rye sandwich was because of the episode where Jerry steals the loaf from the old lady. Also for a long time I was curious to try babka because of the episode where Jerry and Elaine are stuck in the bakery (and find a hair in their babka), but couldn't find it at any bakeries where I lived until about a year ago. It's actually pretty good, kind of like a cinnamon bun.

Also I first wanted to try cannolis because of the Godfather and all the other Italian-themed movies and shows where they're referenced.

Dolores Reborn
04-29-2011, 10:28 AM
Fried green tomatoes.

Zsofia
04-29-2011, 10:31 AM
Yeah, Turkish Delight is gross! Thanks a lot, Mr. Lewis.

We drink a lot of rye now because of Don Draper.

Freudian Slit
04-29-2011, 10:32 AM
That was mine too. Disgusting! The Queen must have had some kick-ass powers to make anyone want to eat more of it. I prefer to think of Turkish delight the way I imagined it as a kid; definitely something chocolatey.

Same here. I was SO let down when I realized that's what Edmund had been eating. With you on the chocolate. I always imagined it like the most gorgeously chocolately chocolate bar. Or a warm, melty brownie.

MovieMogul
04-29-2011, 10:38 AM
Another vote for Turkish Delight because of Narnia. I didn't think it was as bad as everyone else here, but certainly nothing that would count as a serious temptation.

Lemur866
04-29-2011, 10:41 AM
Tea. Earl Grey. Hot.

I would never have picked that out of the Twining's lineup of Breakfast Tea, Prince of Wales tea, etc. But the way he said it, made it sound like such a manly cup of tea, that I sought it out and gravitated to it. 'Cause you know, there's nothing more manly, than tea ... with flowers in it.

Bergamot is a citrus fruit that looks like a little green orange. The flavoring agent in Earl Grey tea is from the bergamot peel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bergamot_orange#In_food), not the flowers.

KneadToKnow
04-29-2011, 10:42 AM
Another victim of Laverne Defazio checking in.

Oh, and I'm assuming we're not supposed to count all the things we've tried because Alton Brown made them look so good?

ministryman
04-29-2011, 10:55 AM
....Not sure from where, but I also remember getting the idea to put potato chips on (in?) a sandwich from something we'd seen on TV. Probably some "After School Special". I still do so on occasion, but I prefer corn chips over potato.
.

The Breakfast Club, perhaps?

Skammer
04-29-2011, 11:01 AM
Not what I immediately thought of, but this thread reminded me about milk & Pepsi, turkish delight, and B&Js Americone Dream ice cream. Only the ice cream was good.

But my first thought - has anyone seen Big Night? Where they make that huge timpano? I bought Stanley Tucci's (and Mrs. Tucci's) cookbook and made timpano by their recipe. It's a huge production and takes two days so I've only done it twice, but it's amazing. It's been a few years, I need to do it again.

zagloba
04-29-2011, 11:02 AM
I had to invent a Tequila Fannybanger after reading about it in Bloom County. Don't order that from a sheila bartmaid in Adelaide.

Well, I woke up this morning and I got myself a beer.......The future's uncertain and the end is always near.

kath94
04-29-2011, 11:03 AM
I've been looking for Purple Flurp, but as yet have not found it.

(JImmy Neutron reference)

Freudian Slit
04-29-2011, 11:08 AM
My Little Pony: FiM is making me want to chow down on some diamond surprise.

CalMeacham
04-29-2011, 11:21 AM
I never saw Vegemite here in the US until after the Men at Work song. Then it started showing up in boutique stores and specialty shops. Definitely a case of people getting the stuff because of pop culture.



I've been tempted to try some of the things I've read of in Nero Wolfe novels. Even Eggs au beurre noir, despite the fact that I don't particularly care for eggs. But it seems to be their breakfast of choice.

KittenKat
04-29-2011, 11:33 AM
I once leafed through the Nero Wolfe cookbook, - a genre called 'continental cooking' - but as I don't have a chef on call 24/7 or access to a brace of pheasants, I can only dream on.

I've been tempted to try some of the things I've read of in Nero Wolfe novels. Even Eggs au beurre noir, despite the fact that I don't particularly care for eggs. But it seems to be their breakfast of choice.


Shortly after it first came out, I got The Nero Wolfe Cookbook out of the library, and if IIRC, got my mother to make the shirred eggs. Some years ago I made the lobster salad recipe.

As a member of the Wolfe Pack, I've had the opportunity to try several of the dishes in the books at various events, including the French and American banquets and (a version of) Saucisse Minuit from the book Too Many Cooks.

Laalune
04-29-2011, 11:48 AM
Banana pancakes. Very good!

jackdavinci
04-29-2011, 12:02 PM
I used to hate strawberries but I was finally convinced to give them a try after all the scenes in movies where they are portrayed as fruity orgasms.

Peter Morris
04-29-2011, 12:10 PM
Turkish delight, because of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.. Next time, I'll just sugar some perfume and drink that instead. Yuck. Edmund was an idiot. That was mine too. Disgusting! The Queen must have had some kick-ass powers to make anyone want to eat more of it. Yeah, Turkish Delight is gross! Same here. I was SO let down when I realized that's what Edmund had been eating.


Two points to be made about Turkish Delight. First of all, you've obviously only ever had the cheap stuff. Proper Turkish Delight is mostly made of nuts and dates, and the jelly is only a small part of it.

The second point is, that Edmund came to Narnia from Britain during World War II. Sweets of all kinds were heavily rationed and in short supply. This was possibly the only sweets he had eaten for several months.


As for the main topic of the thread, I used to put ketchup on my chips (fries). After seeing Pulp Fiction I tried mayonnaise instead, and it was much better. I've never looked back.

Infovore
04-29-2011, 12:10 PM
I tried Vegemite in college because of "Down Under." My friend and I were obsessed with Men at Work (my first-ever concert was one of theirs) and when Vegemite turned up in our college cafeteria one morning for breakfast, we both put a little on our toast and gave it a shot.

Verdict: The most vile substance ever inflicted on humankind. It was like pure salt suspended in brown stuff. Ugh!

Thus ended our experiment with Vegemite. We still liked Men at Work, though :D

PSXer
04-29-2011, 12:16 PM
I got Totino's Pizza Rolls because of the Plinkett reviews and it was the biggest disappointment since my son

Freudian Slit
04-29-2011, 12:17 PM
Two points to be made about Turkish Delight. First of all, you've obviously only ever had the cheap stuff. Proper Turkish Delight is mostly made of nuts and dates, and the jelly is only a small part of it.

The second point is, that Edmund came to Narnia from Britain during World War II. Sweets of all kinds were heavily rationed and in short supply. This was possibly the only sweets he had eaten for several months.


Nuts and dates? That sounds even worse!

MovieMogul
04-29-2011, 12:23 PM
Two points to be made about Turkish Delight. First of all, you've obviously only ever had the cheap stuff. Proper Turkish Delight is mostly made of nuts and dates, and the jelly is only a small part of it. Well, I got mine at the high-end confectionary stand in Harrods, so don't think I was slumming. And while there were variations like you described, they had the simple jelly ones too. Not impressed.

a35362
04-29-2011, 12:26 PM
I used to hate strawberries but I was finally convinced to give them a try after all the scenes in movies where they are portrayed as fruity orgasms.

Not in the movie Fearless (someone is deathly allergic to them and nearly dies after trying to eat one).

I always thought Turkish Delight was just made up by Lewis. I imagined it to be a really heavy, chewy, sticky kind of taffy/toffee/caramel/whatever you call it, and it kind of dopes you while you're working it around in your mouth, making you more docile and suggestible.

Quimby
04-29-2011, 12:35 PM
I first ordered Chow Fun based on George Costanza's description of it and I loved it!

a35362
04-29-2011, 01:02 PM
I would love to try some Chow Yun Fat (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000334/) -- sounds delicious! ;)

Alan Smithee
04-29-2011, 01:09 PM
I love turkish delight! It isn't always flavored with rose water, though I have no problem with it being. A few months ago, someone brought some ginger flavored turkish delight to a party, and everyone seemed to like it. And of course, Aplets and Cotlets (http://www.libertyorchards.com/category/Turkish_Delights) are really just fruit flavored turkish delight. Does anyone NOT like those?(Actually, that reminds me that they have traditional flavored turkish delight in their catalog, including rose-and-pistachio, and I've never tried it. I should order some!)

Admittedly, the first time I tried turkish delight as a child, it was for the same reason as everyone else, and I had the same reaction. It didn't take me long to develop a taste for it, though. Most of the stuff you buy in the store in the UK (like Fry's) is pretty much rubbish, I have to say.

Other foods I've tried because of some fiction...Do Bertie Bott's Every Flavor Beans count?

Also fried green tomatoes.

Oh, and Bill Gannon's garlic-nut-butter sandwich (from Dragnet) is actually delicious! Haven't had one of those in ages! I'm sure I'll think of more....

robardin
04-29-2011, 01:13 PM
[Turkish Delight, from The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe] was mine too. Disgusting! The Queen must have had some kick-ass powers to make anyone want to eat more of it. I prefer to think of Turkish delight the way I imagined it as a kid; definitely something chocolatey.

Another vote here for TD, except that when I finally had it as an adult, I didn't find it disgusting so much as kinda meh - rather like dried out marzipan with chewy fruit bits reminiscent of jelly beans. As I kid I never pictured it as a confection-in-cubed-pieces either. Based on the illustration of Edmund being presented some by a Dwarf on a silver dome-covered platter I thought it was more cake-like. Basically I imagined what a Napoleon (mille-feuille) actually is, except that I'd never seen or had a Napoleon yet.

That was more a lifelong (well, up until the age of 38) curiosity about Turkish Delight though; I wasn't moved to seek out the food to try it out based on reading about it. In fact I can't think of any examples of that offhand. What I can give instead is an example of a food I was predisposed to AVOID because of a cartoon: a Woody Woodpecker one where he throws a cake (meant as bait) back in someone's face with the retort, "I... Don't... Like... CHEESECAKE!!"

And so until I was 12 or so I refused to try cheesecake. "I don't like... CHEESECAKE!" Then my mom insisted I try a Baby Watson cheesecake from the supermarket. I loved it.

Actually that DOES remind me of a food I wanted to try because of on-screen exposure: "flapjacks", due to a Chilly Willy cartoon where he's constantly trying to sng some freebies from the big Swedish walrus who ran a restaurant in a logging camp. I was born and raised in NYC but as the only child of Chinese parents, such a food never crossed my table. It wasn't until I was about 9 years old on a long weekend camping trip with my Cub Scout troop that I got a chance to actually eat them, at an IHOP in upstate New York. I initially found them inedibly sweet - I had always pictured them as a savory food, since it was usually shown as served with bacon and eggs and butter (that is also how they were described in books like Little House on the Prairie or Jack London books I'd read), and I was expecting something more like egg-and-scallion pancakes.

DummyGladHands
04-29-2011, 01:24 PM
Conch Fritters because of Jimmy Buffet. Awful. Rubber bands in fried dough.

Jenaroph
04-29-2011, 01:32 PM
Fried green tomatoes.

Ah yes! Ditto. They're delicious.

I've been wanting to try Calpis spotted in the movie Tokyo Zombie. There's a Japanese grocery near here that carries the renamed American version, Calpico. (I s'pose a drink that sounds too much like Cowpiss doesn't sell very well.) If sweetie wasn't milk-intolerant I'd have picked some up already.

Snooooopy
04-29-2011, 01:50 PM
I tried a variety of Doritos that I probably wouldn't have ever thought about because Stephen Colbert was doing some kind of Doritos-oriented joke on his show. They weren't terrible, but I've never felt the need to try them again.

Miss Mapp
04-29-2011, 01:54 PM
I adapted a tuna salad recipe from an Ellery Queen novel, leaving out the poison.

A Dorothy Sayers' novel led me to try a "jolly old arsenical omelet," leaving out the arsenic. It was a "sweet" dessert omelet with a little sugar mixed into the eggs and a hot jam filling. The jam, however, melts to a liquid state and runs all over the place.

Dr. Rieux
04-29-2011, 02:02 PM
Well, I woke up this morning and I got myself a beer.......

The beer I had for breakfaast wasn't bad, so I had one more for dessert....

After seeing Serenity, I had a craving for Fruity Oaty Bars for weeks.

Alan Smithee
04-29-2011, 02:29 PM
Oh! I thought of another one!

Pocari Sweat (which I saw for the first time in Hawaii) after reading a thriller set in Japan called "Tokyo Zero." I really liked it, and wish they had it around here!

Labdad
04-29-2011, 02:41 PM
I drank vodka and lime for the first time after hearing Simon and Garfunkle's "Hazy Shade of Winter." It just sounded cool! I was 18.

xizor
04-29-2011, 02:56 PM
Pocari Sweat (which I saw for the first time in Hawaii) after reading a thriller set in Japan called "Tokyo Zero." I really liked it, and wish they had it around here!

Same here, then I saw it on my first trip to Japan and now it is a must have every trip over there.

Tom Scud
04-29-2011, 03:00 PM
Thanks to this thread, I walked over to the box of TurkishCyprus Delight I brought back to the office from Cyprus.

Pyper
04-29-2011, 07:06 PM
I was inspired to try potted meat, which is a favorite of the mentally retarded protagonist in "Sling Blade." Absolutely terrible, looks and smells just like cat food.

Freudian Slit
04-29-2011, 07:22 PM
I first ordered Chow Fun based on George Costanza's description of it and I loved it!

Similarly, I was a bit let down by calzones. Seinfeld led me to believe that this would be awesome.

runcible spoon
04-30-2011, 01:08 AM
Looks like I forgot a few: like others, I tried Turkish Delight via Narnia - I don't mind rose flavor, but the texture doesn't work for me, too sticky and soft. I had read about it being jelly, and expected something more like a jellybean, or maybe gummy bear - harder, chewable. Not really a fan.

Also, I have Lobscouse and Spotted Dog, the companion cookbook to the Aubrey/Maturin series, and I can honestly say I would never have made a Sea Pie, Neeps Hackitt with Balmogowry, Lobscouse, or a Cabinet Pudding without that series/cookbook.

Redwall gets credit for Deeper'n'Ever Turnip'n'Tater'n'Beetroot Pie too. If the companion cookbook to that wasn't such rubbish (well, no, just aimed at dibbuns), I'd have had a lot more Redwall fare too.

Aaaaand I had the Dragonlover's Guide to Pern as a kid, and my sister and I made 'klah' and bubbly pies, albeit with Earthly ingredients. Man, I'd forgotten about that - I've been a cooking nerd longer than I remembered...

KinkiNipponTourist
04-30-2011, 02:52 AM
I don't remember the movie--wait, maybe I do--I think it was Pretty Woman, actually, where they eat fresh strawberries dropped into champagne. So romantic in a tacky kind of way! Must try!

Bleccchhhh.

Alan Smithee
04-30-2011, 03:11 AM
Similarly, I was a bit let down by calzones. Seinfeld led me to believe that this would be awesome.
What is not awesome about calzones? They're more variable than pizza, so maybe you just had a "meh" one. A great calzone is better than a great pizza, though.

devilsknew
04-30-2011, 03:22 AM
What is not awesome about calzones? They're more variable than pizza, so maybe you just had a "meh" one. A great calzone is better than a great pizza, though.

I concur.

Martini Enfield
04-30-2011, 03:22 AM
Being a huge fan of The Big Lebowski, there was no way I could pass up the chance to dine at an In-N-Out Burger when I happened upon one during a visit to the US... I really was actually impressed at how nice they were, even if they didn't have any lettuce on them. They really were some good burgers. :)

Haunted Pasta
04-30-2011, 03:26 AM
Another one from a book that my book club read. We always have a potluck dinner and often try to bring foods related to the book in some way. A couple of years ago the club read Peace Like a River, which takes place in North Dakota. We were a little short on ideas for North Dakota cuisine, but the book did mention in passing a dessert called Bob Andy pie. My wife and I Googled it, it sounded good, so we made it. It was sort of a custard pie, and was GREAT.

Wile E
04-30-2011, 03:27 AM
Fried Green Tomatoes, of course.

Soft boiled eggs and toast soldiers, thanks to Pratchett's Discworld. Seems like the Night Watch is always eating this.

Tried a Triple Fried Egg Chili Chutney sandwich at a Red Dwarf watching party once. You really have to eat it fast because the bread does dissolve.

Sierra Indigo
04-30-2011, 03:32 AM
Those of you who were expecting Turkish Delight to be a chocolate candy - say hello to Fry's Turkish Delight (http://www.chocablog.com/reviews/frys-turkish-delight/).

The rose aspect of the jelly is greatly toned down, and the chocolate is thick and rich. I find "proper" turkish delight to be horrifically cloying, but I love me some Fry's Turkish Delight bars.

aruvqan
04-30-2011, 03:51 AM
Turkish Delight comes in a number of different flavors, at least at the Persian Deli I shop at occasionally [mrAru loves the stuff. I prefer the rose flavored, he prefers the orange flavored. I eat maybe 2 pieces a year ...]

Think of them more as aplets and cotlets (http://www.libertyorchards.com/product/Aplets_and_Cotlets/Aplets_and_Cotlets). This brand (http://www.brittles-n-more.com/products_turkish-delight.html) isn't my favorite brand, but they have a range of flavors.

Martini Enfield
04-30-2011, 06:37 AM
Those of you who were expecting Turkish Delight to be a chocolate candy - say hello to Fry's Turkish Delight (http://www.chocablog.com/reviews/frys-turkish-delight/).

The rose aspect of the jelly is greatly toned down, and the chocolate is thick and rich. I find "proper" turkish delight to be horrifically cloying, but I love me some Fry's Turkish Delight bars.

Have you tried Cadbury's Turkish Delight chocolate blocks? Om nom nom nom! For the Kiwis out there, it tastes exactly like Jellytip icecream.

And Fry's Turkish Delight is very tasty indeed, too!

salinqmind
04-30-2011, 08:55 AM
In "National Velvet", they had for dessert Castle Puddings, small cakes baked in ramekins, topped with custard or jam. Simple to make - they sell Bird's custard mix in the furrin foods section of the grocery, to make and put on cake and such. In "Poldark", set in Cornwall in the 1700's, one of the women made a Stargazy Pie - a fish pie, using whole fish, heads and all, set into holes in the crust so they're looking upwards. I didn't make this, but whenever I used to see small fish in the fish store, that's what I thought of...

Ferret Herder
04-30-2011, 09:21 AM
I would love to try some Chow Yun Fat (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000334/) -- sounds delicious! ;)
Hey, I had dibs! :D

I wanted to try jelly babies after watching Doctor Who, the Tom Baker season. :) Finally did manage to get hold of some; nothing fantastic but it was just fun to have done.

gallows fodder
04-30-2011, 09:38 AM
Donuts.

No really. When Twin Peaks first came on in The Netherlands those were unheard of. As my whole family was obsessed with the series my mum and me went to the library (internet also not being around), found a recipe and tried to make these "donuts". And we couldn't figure out what the deal was. I found out later this was because the cookbook was way off and are fritters bore no relation to real donuts. I was quite surprised to find out what they really look and taste like.
I was 13 when Twin Peaks was on the air, and I tried to cultivate a love for cherry pie and coffee in honor of Dale Cooper. The cherry pie was easy; the coffee was gross. (I still don't like coffee.)

singular1
04-30-2011, 11:20 AM
Have searched for a Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster without success

We went to a Sci Fi Convention,and there were drunken costumed boys roaming the halls with thermoses they claimed were filled with Pan Galactic Gargle Blasters, and they were generous enough to share. I don't know what was in them, but they were damn good.

Number
04-30-2011, 12:06 PM
I made myself a beer milkshake because Doc drinks one in Cannery Row, and Lister orders one in Red Dwarf. I used homebrewed stout and vanilla ice cream and it was...well, pretty terrible. But I survived and got a story out of the experience, so I count it as a success.

Jaledin
04-30-2011, 12:30 PM
I used to drink Pepto Bismol (generic store brand version IIRC) and whiskey pretty often, after the idea of Joe Don Baker mixing it up suchlike in "Cape Fear" (the remake).

I can't remember if it was my idea or a friend's, but it was, unsurprisingly, called "The Cape Fear."

Also, warm gin on inspiration from "The Days of Wine and Roses."

Silver Tyger
04-30-2011, 02:25 PM
The beer I had for breakfaast wasn't bad, so I had one more for dessert....

After seeing Serenity, I had a craving for Fruity Oaty Bars for weeks.

http://www.atomicshrimp.com/st/content/fruity_oaty_bar/

Off Mangetout's site. Haven't tried it.

Alan Smithee
04-30-2011, 02:48 PM
Those of you who were expecting Turkish Delight to be a chocolate candy - say hello to Fry's Turkish Delight (http://www.chocablog.com/reviews/frys-turkish-delight/).

The rose aspect of the jelly is greatly toned down, and the chocolate is thick and rich. I find "proper" turkish delight to be horrifically cloying, but I love me some Fry's Turkish Delight bars.

Have you tried Cadbury's Turkish Delight chocolate blocks? Om nom nom nom! For the Kiwis out there, it tastes exactly like Jellytip icecream.

And Fry's Turkish Delight is very tasty indeed, too!
That's funny, because I specifically mentioned Fry's as one that's bad! I'll still eat it, mind you, but it has about the same relation to real turkish delight as cheap Easter-basket jelly beans have to Jelly Belly beans. (The Wikipedia article, BTW, points out that jelly bean goo is basically the same as turkish delight goo.)

I just did some comparison shopping and found some turkish delight (made in Turkey!) on Amazon for much cheaper than Liberty Orchards, which I linked to earlier (the Aplet and Cotlet company). I just ordered eight one-pound boxes of turkish delight! I would totally have fallen for the White Wich! It'll keep, and I can take a couple of boxes into work, so with free SuperSaver shipping it works out to a pretty good deal! Much cheaper than betraying Aslan and condemning my eternal soul (though unlike Susan who used lipstick, Edmund got saved in the end, so I guess he got a refund!)

I got half assorted plain with nuts and half assorted rose, mint & lemon. You know, because sometimes.... (Oops, wrong candy!) I can't wait! Yep, I'd have been in that sleigh in a Calormene minute.

Dewey Finn
04-30-2011, 02:48 PM
I went to Disneyworld with my brother and his family a couple of years ago. So when they had ratatouille in the buffet at one of the restaurants, we had to try it. (Although I suspect it wasn't the same recipe as in the movie.)

Alan Smithee
04-30-2011, 02:51 PM
I went to Disneyworld with my brother and his family a couple of years ago. So when they had ratatouille in the buffet at one of the restaurants, we had to try it. (Although I suspect it wasn't the same recipe as in the movie.)
The recipe designed for the movie (yes, they based it on a real recipe!) has it's own Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confit_byaldi).

Freudian Slit
04-30-2011, 03:17 PM
What is not awesome about calzones? They're more variable than pizza, so maybe you just had a "meh" one. A great calzone is better than a great pizza, though.

I've had a couple, never really got that into them. I'm in NYC, just like the Seinfeld gang, so if anyone can recommend some great Manhattan calzones, I'll try them out. Have yet to find a calzone I like better than pizza!

An Gadaí
04-30-2011, 03:26 PM
I tried one of those gross challenges that they had on Man V. Food. Never again. :(

Ike Witt
04-30-2011, 06:44 PM
Don't order that from a sheila bartmaid in Adelaide.

At the risk of hearing something I don't want to know, I have to ask why not?

Martini Enfield
04-30-2011, 07:58 PM
At the risk of hearing something I don't want to know, I have to ask why not?

Well, "Fanny" in this part of the world (and the UK and NZ, incidentally) doesn't generally refer to the buttocks like it does in the US; instead being applied to a certain area of the female anatomy...

And "Banging" of course, being a common euphemism for, well, if you don't know then you probably shouldn't be on the internet. So, put the two together, and you get a drink with a name you really shouldn't be ordering in pubs in some parts of the world. :p

MacCat
04-30-2011, 09:56 PM
Also for a long time I was curious to try babka because of the episode where Jerry and Elaine are stuck in the bakery...

Also I first wanted to try cannolis because of the Godfather and all the other Italian-themed movies and shows where they're referenced.Lesser babka? I used that line with my son today.

Godfather/cannolis reminded me I did try svogliatelle because of The Sopranos.

I want to try that egg in the hole of the toast in the frying pan/griddle in Moonstruck.

KneadToKnow
04-30-2011, 10:10 PM
I want to try that egg in the hole of the toast in the frying pan/griddle in Moonstruck.

If you have a Cracker Barrel around, it's on the menu there as "Egg in the Basket"

bahia hombre
04-30-2011, 10:42 PM
The best wine I've had (and I don't buy expensive stuff) was a Frey Vineyards organic merlot from Wild Oats circa 2003. However, since seeing the movie Sideways, I'm hesitant to buy/drink any merlot :(

MacCat
04-30-2011, 10:45 PM
If you have a Cracker Barrel around, it's on the menu there as "Egg in the Basket"No Cracker Barrel in these parts, but googling Egg In The Basket found me this...

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_F1vrceORD9w/TGQpOtjpq-I/AAAAAAAAAKo/wKyLAtRxuAg/s1600/One+Eyed+Jack.jpg

Wish we had some left over Italian bread for Sunday breakfast tomorrow!

Knorf
04-30-2011, 11:26 PM
The best wine I've had (and I don't buy expensive stuff) was a Frey Vineyards organic merlot from Wild Oats circa 2003. However, since seeing the movie Sideways, I'm hesitant to buy/drink any merlot :(
Keep in mind that the dislike of merlot was only expressive of the character's very idiosyncratic tastes, and nothing more.

There are plenty of excellent merlots in the world, at all price points.

CanvasShoes
05-01-2011, 12:40 AM
Cannolis. They were featured on "Cake Boss". I bought them at a local (in Anchorage when I still lived there) bakery but I didn't care for them at all.

Jaledin
05-01-2011, 01:28 AM
Cannolis. They were featured on "Cake Boss". I bought them at a local (in Anchorage when I still lived there) bakery but I didn't care for them at all.

Talia Shire must have been in town -- normally they're pretty good if you like sweets. Shire is well-known for putting her hands and mouth all over them whenever she's in a town and ruining the experience for everyone.

NDP
05-01-2011, 01:38 AM
What is not awesome about calzones? They're more variable than pizza, so maybe you just had a "meh" one. A great calzone is better than a great pizza, though.
I've had a couple, never really got that into them. I'm in NYC, just like the Seinfeld gang, so if anyone can recommend some great Manhattan calzones, I'll try them out. Have yet to find a calzone I like better than pizza!

Just out of curiosity, did the calzones you tried have the marinara sauce inside the calzone or outside the calzone as a dipping sauce? I believe there's a dispute over which type is considered to be a "real" calzone. (For the record, I prefer the marinara sauce be inside the calzone.)

installLSC
05-01-2011, 03:49 AM
Went out drinking tonight and had three brandy and ginger ales. The reason I got into them is when I read Chuck Klosterman's "Fargo Rock City" he called them Witty Chucks.

EvilTOJ
05-01-2011, 04:53 AM
Brawndo (http://www.brawndo.com/) the Thirst Mutilator!

coffinjumper
05-01-2011, 11:03 PM
Do plays count? I loved the Rent as a teen (still do) and after learning one of the characters was named after the drink Tom Collins became one of my regular orders at bars once I became legal

gonzoron
05-02-2011, 09:24 PM
I owe my long time on again/off again love affair with single malt Scotch whisky to trying Glenmorangie on a whim after seeing Highlander when I was 19.

That was mine! Though it turns out, I hate straight up whiskey. No matter how cool it may seem to imagine oneself wearing a badass trenchcoat with a katana hidden inside and ordering Glenmorangie in an ambiguous accent, I could barely finish a glass of the stuff. I suppose adding sour mix would have been cheating and/or sacrilege to Scotch drinkers.

ETA: (And the barkeep didn't even have the decency to reply correctly, "Glenmorangie, right.")

The Lovely Margo Lane
05-02-2011, 10:59 PM
Gimlets, after reading The Long Goodbye. Also supposedly they were Ed Wood's favorite, so there's that.

buddha_david
05-03-2011, 12:05 AM
Piña colada.

Frankly, I prefer getting caught in the rain.

tumbleddown
05-03-2011, 05:50 AM
If books also count, I tried Rooibos (red bush tea) because of Alexander McCall Smith's Ladies #1 Detective series.
As did I. It's not one of my favorites, I'm with Mma Makutsi on that one, I prefer black teas.
The Breakfast Club, perhaps?
The sandwich in The Breakfast Club was one slice of white bread, one slice of brown, buttered, sugared with the contents of a pixie stick, piled high with Captain Crunch cereal, then mashed down. I may or may not have tried this once in my misguided youth. :cool:

I tried mee krob because of Sex And The City, it was pretty good but it's not my go-to dish when I order Thai.

I tried a black and white cookie because of Seinfeld. I'd had babkas and marble rye, but the B&W cookie remained a mystery. Final verdict is that it's not worth the unbelievably high calorie/fat count.

I've used McDonald's fries and Coke as a remedy when I wake up with a headache (though not a hangover) like Stephanie Plum in Janet Evanovich's novels. If the headache is from dehydration, it actually works pretty well.

One of the times I made butter last year (I do that about four times a year) I tried coloring it by squeezing carrot shavings through cheesecloth, like the Ingalls girls did with Ma in "Little House in the Big Woods" but it didn't work so well.

A large number of my Italian recipes are derived from "Scarpetta's Winter Table" which is a cookbook written of recipes "from" Patricia Cornwell's Kay Scarpetta character. The bechamel lasagna is perfection.

I've made a number of the recipes featured in Joann Fluke's cookie murder mysteries, and Tamar Myers's Penn-Dutch series. Both feature a lot of recipes from professional culinary sources, though, so it's not exactly "from the source" there. Some successes, some notable failures (a cookie from a Fluke book that had corn flakes in it, ech).

brocks
05-03-2011, 06:43 AM
I don't remember it, but I'm told that when I was a small boy, I demanded a big heap of spinach, so I could be like Popeye. I dug into it with great enthusiasm, but started spitting it out as soon as I tasted it. I haven't eaten any since, and it's been over 50 years.

Number
05-03-2011, 07:54 AM
Oh yes, I also tried a twinkie weiner sandwich, à la UHF. I used a vegetarian hot dog, just like Al does these days. Those are actually pretty tasty.

aruvqan
05-03-2011, 10:19 AM
One of the times I made butter last year (I do that about four times a year) I tried coloring it by squeezing carrot shavings through cheesecloth, like the Ingalls girls did with Ma in "Little House in the Big Woods" but it didn't work so well.



Do you add the carrot juice to the cream before you churn, or try to color it after you separate out the butter?

You have to add it before you churn, so it tints the butterfat. If you try to add it afterwards it doesn't take. You also have to add way more than you think. The cream needs to be pretty much orange. Same if you are making cheese, you need to add it to the milk before you add the rennet.

Actually cheesemaking is fun, you can add herbs and other stuff to the milk to steep, to flavor it to have flavored cheese without flecks of stuff in it. [you steep it then strain out the flavoring stuff]

Now I am getting an urge to find a farmer who will sell me a few gallons of raw milk to make some cheese...

tumbleddown
05-03-2011, 12:50 PM
Do you add the carrot juice to the cream before you churn, or try to color it after you separate out the butter?
I did it before I churned. I added enough to change the color, the trouble was getting the juice out of the carrots. It took far more physical effort than it was really worth, but like I said, I like my butter to be its pale yellow natural shade.
Actually cheesemaking is fun, you can add herbs and other stuff to the milk to steep, to flavor it to have flavored cheese without flecks of stuff in it. [you steep it then strain out the flavoring stuff]
Do you have any cheesemaking resources you can share? I make mozzarella but I'd love to branch out. I have a source of raw goat milk to make chevre...

Morbo
05-03-2011, 01:31 PM
Slightly off-topic, but there's a scene in Wargames where the father butters a slice of bread, then wraps it around his corn-on-the-cob and twists the corn around it to butter it.

Ever since then that's the way I've buttered my corn-on-the-cob, using the end piece of the bread which I otherwise would throw away.

Feyrat
05-03-2011, 01:55 PM
Put me down as another one of those who tried and hated Turkish Delight because of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe...

And while it's not exactly trying something new, I always want a stir fry or some sushi while I watch anime.... I dunno, I think it's the chopsticks, lol

Darryl Lict
05-03-2011, 02:26 PM
I had a Lucky Dog (http://neworleans.metblogs.com/2006/01/29/the-triumphant-return-of-lucky-dogs/) in New Orleans because of Confederacy of Dunces. I'd probably have had one anyway because I love street food and hot dogs anyhow, but I loved the book and made sure I had one when I got to NOLA.

aruvqan
05-03-2011, 04:34 PM
I did it before I churned. I added enough to change the color, the trouble was getting the juice out of the carrots. It took far more physical effort than it was really worth, but like I said, I like my butter to be its pale yellow natural shade.

Do you have any cheesemaking resources you can share? I make mozzarella but I'd love to branch out. I have a source of raw goat milk to make chevre...

Ah, I just used the really fine grater, and grated it directly into the cream, soaked while the cream aged overnight, strained it all out then churned. Frankly, I just dont care what color my butter is )

I pretty much only make cheddar, I got the recipe from American Cheesemaker years ago. I make it mainly for the curds, I like the way they squeek.

Baker
05-03-2011, 04:46 PM
On Babylon 5 Michael Garibaldi, the head of station security, made an Italian hot oil dip called bagna cauda, which literally means "hot bath" Equal amounts of butter and olive oil are warmed gently together, then a load of finely minced fresh garlic is tossed in to steep, and flavor the mix. Just before serving anchovies are added and blended until they break up. Then you dip chunks of fresh bread or crisp veggies in the oil and enjoy.

As Dr. Franklin said, while eyeing it warily, "I can feel my arteries hardening just being in the same room with it." But tried it and loved it. If you let it cool it firms up a little, and can be spread on French or Italian bread and grilled or broiled.

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-03-2011, 05:02 PM
I too tried vegemite thanks to the "Men at Work" reference.

And I fell in love with it.

Elendil's Heir
05-04-2011, 09:30 AM
I tried madeira, a fortified wine that to my unsophisticated palate tasted a lot like sherry, after reading in a biography that it was George Washington's favorite drink. It was OK but not really my thing. Haven't had it since.

fiddlesticks
05-04-2011, 10:29 AM
Surely I can't be the only child of the 80's who didn't ever try Reese's Pieces until they began the Official Lure of E.T.?!

Elendil's Heir
05-04-2011, 11:00 AM
...Pocari Sweat (which I saw for the first time in Hawaii) after reading a thriller set in Japan called "Tokyo Zero." I really liked it, and wish they had it around here!

Aren't you at all concerned about the cruel process used to wring the sweat out of all those poor little pocaris? I keep wondering when PETA will start a campaign against the drink.

I love calzones (we get them from Dewey's Pizza, here in NE Ohio), but don't remember the Seinfeld reference. Anyone know which episode?

I always assumed a Fruity Oaty Bar was just a garden-variety granola bar with a fruit filling. I can find those at any supermarket.

I liked merlot long before Sideways, and Earl Grey tea long before Star Trek: The Next Generation, and still do.

Did creme brulee have an uptick in popularity after it was mentioned in Amelie? Good stuff.

Skywatcher
05-04-2011, 11:43 AM
Earl Grey teaForgot about that one.

Lightray
05-04-2011, 12:50 PM
Wensleydale cheese, from Wallace and Grommit.

And Number One Nephew insisted on a Harry Potter menu for his last birthday, so "butterbeer" and "cauldroncakes" (... creame soda with whipped cream, and sweet pancakes).

Elendil's Heir
05-04-2011, 03:07 PM
Wensleydale cheese, from Wallace and Grommit....

Ooo, yes! I got some Stinking Bishop cheese after the most recent W&G movie. It was stinky, but not that stinky, and tasted OK, but isn't something I need to have again.

joebuck20
05-04-2011, 03:28 PM
I love calzones (we get them from Dewey's Pizza, here in NE Ohio), but don't remember the Seinfeld reference. Anyone know which episode?



It's been awhile since I've seen the episode. But IIRC, George brings one into work one day, his boss sees it, has a bite and starts raving about it. Soon, he starts asking George to bring them in all the time.

But at the shop where George buys them, the cashier fails to see him putting money into the tip jar and gives him a dirty look. So the next time he makes a calzone run, George tries to make a big show of putting a few bucks in the jar, but the cashier bends down to get something from under the counter and again fails to see him put the money in. George gets frustrated, reaches into the jar, while the cashier's back is turned, to try to retrieve the money so he can put it in again. But the cashier happens to turn around just as George is putting his hand into the jar and banishes him from the store.

There's also a side plot about Kramer heating his clothes in the shop's pizza oven.

Elendil's Heir
05-04-2011, 04:00 PM
Thanks. I'll do a little Googling and see if I can find the episode and season.

MacCat
05-04-2011, 08:09 PM
Some of the Calzone Episode...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1kqkGvutGw

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