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View Full Version : More tomatoes than pie holes. Or ways to use fresh tomatoes.


Biggirl
09-19-2012, 08:09 PM
This year I grew two slicing tomato plants and two plum tomato plants. It is now that time of year. Don't want to make another jar of tomato sauce. I've got pico de gallo to spare and if I can't toss another salad because I've run out of dirty jokes to crack. And yet the plants keep making more tomatoes.

Nobody wants to be the annoying person who tries to palm off excess produce on their too-nice-to-say-anything co-workers nor do I want them to rot on the vine-- the tomatoes, I mean. I did make chicken puertoricatore (cacciatore, except with poblano peppers instead of sweet italians and beer instead of white wine-- tasted great) But I need more. More!

Tell me please, what can I do with all my tomatoes?

NGC2024
09-19-2012, 08:50 PM
I have made this many, many times this summer. I absolutely love it. I make it with a regular pie crust rather than the crust included in the recipe.

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2011/08/tomato-and-cheddar-pie

Balance
09-19-2012, 08:51 PM
Bruschetta. (http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/bruschetta_with_tomato_and_basil/) Or just slice them and eat them with a dash of salt and pepper (and possibly with cucumbers--which is the combination I just had with my supper).

zombywoof
09-19-2012, 09:04 PM
Sun- (or oven-) dried?

InsomniaMama
09-19-2012, 09:06 PM
Wash them and throw them in a ziplock bag. In the winter, you can make chili, etc.

Also, roasted tomato soup. Mmmm, soup. You can make that and freeze it, too.

Rachellelogram
09-19-2012, 09:09 PM
Well, you could eat them. I'm also led to believe there are starving children in China who would LOVE to have that food, young lady!

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/310603

TriPolar
09-19-2012, 09:52 PM
Stewed tomatoes. Pennsylvania Dutch style. Peel and seed the tomatoes, cook slowly over low heat with a little added water initially. As it turns to sauce stir in butter, sugar, and a little flour. Continue to heat until the sauce is thick. Season more with salt and pepper, pour into individual cups, bowls, or ramikens and bake at 350 to form a skin over the top if desired.

Sahirrnee
09-20-2012, 08:39 AM
I'd come get them.
The squirrels ate all of ours.

Coustralee
09-20-2012, 09:40 AM
margherita pizzas

Labrador Deceiver
09-20-2012, 09:41 AM
I take my Roma (plum) tomatoes and slice an "x" in the skin on the bottom. Then I drop them in boiling water for 20-30 seconds, move them to an ice bath, then peel them.

Then I slice them in half, lengthwise, and place them cut side up on a baking sheet with some thyme. Drizzle olive oil and a tiny sprinkle of salt over them and place in your oven on its lowest setting for 6-8 hours. I like them just short of chewy.

It's quick, and it's insanely delicious. They're great on salads.

Hello Again
09-20-2012, 09:46 AM
I've been blanching my extra tomatoes to remove the skin, then pureeing and freezing the puree for later. However, I just saw this recipe, and it reminded me that last year I made a creamy tomato soup with pasta and mini meatballs, and it was great.

Creamy tomato soup (http://www.annarbor.com/entertainment/food-drink/unexpected-tomato-bounty-leads-to-delicious-soup/#.UFnjkL-s3Qw)

kayaker
09-20-2012, 10:12 AM
Boboli pizza shell, brushed with olive oil. Tear a bunch of fresh basil, spinach, etc then pile on the sliced roma tomatoes. Shred your favorite cheese(s). Grill or bake.

Tamarin
09-20-2012, 10:22 AM
I have tons of grape (Juliet) tomatoes this year. My favorite thing to do with them is just cut them in halves, drizzle with olive oil, add salt, pepper, basil and oregano and eat them that way. Also good if you have really fresh, soft mozzarella. Mmmm.

I have saved all the recipes in this thread too though. We are overloaded with tomatoes. I can't wait to make the pie this weekend.

Shark Sandwich
09-20-2012, 10:25 AM
Nobody wants to be the annoying person who tries to palm off excess produce on their too-nice-to-say-anything co-workers nor do I want them to rot on the vine-- the tomatoes, I mean.

I don't understand this at all. If someone from my office brought in garden-fresh tomatoes of any kind, I'd snatch up as many as I could.

My wife and I love to make provencal tomatoes (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/provencal-tomatoes-recipe/index.html). Not sure if you could stuff 'em and then freeze them, but if you have enough you could do a test batch.

TriPolar
09-20-2012, 10:29 AM
I don't understand this at all. If someone from my office brought in garden-fresh tomatoes of any kind, I'd snatch up as many as I could.


I agree. I haven't grown tomatoes for years now, but I never had a problem getting rid of the extras. People would make requests.

sachertorte
09-20-2012, 10:29 AM
Nobody wants to be the annoying person who tries to palm off excess produce on their too-nice-to-say-anything co-workers nor do I want them to rot on the vine-- the tomatoes, I mean.

Add me to the "I have no idea what you are talking about" list.
Give them away. People who like tomatoes love fresh tomatoes. and FREE!
I don't know how your work is set up, but at my old workplace a pile of free tomatoes in the breakroom would be gone by lunch.

Motorgirl
09-20-2012, 10:30 AM
I oven roast them, using a method very close to this one (http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/08/slow-roasted-tomatoes/), but without any garlic or herbs. Then once they are done I freeze them in small ziplock baggies and use them all winter on pizza, in sandwiches, etc.

The link says it takes around 3 hours, but I find they take closer to 5, so check them often until you figure out how your oven behaves.

Kimballkid
09-20-2012, 11:06 AM
There are more canning recipes than just tomato sauce. You can also can them whole or diced and not made into anything at all.

Taomist
09-20-2012, 11:30 AM
I like the dried tomato suggestions, but don't understimate tomato jelly :) It's actually pretty good, especially on bagels.

Charley
09-20-2012, 11:30 AM
Put 'em in boiling water for 30 seconds, then peel them, quarter them and pull out the innards so you're left with just the flesh. Drain as much as possible. Mix 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar, half a cup of olive oil, juice of a lemon(and zest if you like it, I don't), 2 cloves garlic crushed and a couple of chopped chilies. After draining the tomatoes fling them in the mixture and leave for a minimum of half an hour or so. Serve stirred into hot fresh spaghetti, handfuls of shredded basil and a metric tonne of freshly shaved parmesan.

Easy as pie and so so so good. Mostly it's a Bill Granger recipe, we make it at least every couple of weeks.

pulykamell
09-20-2012, 11:34 AM
Besides all the recipes, with all our excess, we'd just dunk 'em in boiling water to peel, stick 'em in plastic bags, and just freeze 'em (Sometimes I seed 'em, sometimes I don't). There is no such thing as having an oversupply of tomatoes in this house. They will get used up eventually.

Biggirl
09-20-2012, 11:39 AM
Thanks all! These are great. I may try every single one of them.

As for the co-worker thingy-- you guys were right. At my old job people would bring in tomatoes and they would go bad in the breakroom. My new job-- well, I got requests. I was slicing one to put on a sandwich and the smell bought 3 people over.

Casey1505
09-20-2012, 11:46 AM
Baked tomatoes and good hardrolls.

Voyager
09-20-2012, 12:20 PM
Add me to the "I have no idea what you are talking about" list.
Give them away. People who like tomatoes love fresh tomatoes. and FREE!
I don't know how your work is set up, but at my old workplace a pile of free tomatoes in the breakroom would be gone by lunch.

I bring both tomatoes and squash to work (our French zucchini volunteer produced 80 fruit, at least, so far) and they are gone within minutes. In the Bay Area it seems a lot of people had trouble growing tomatoes this year, though ours are great.

Besides the other ideas, we slice them, put some oil and breadcrumbs on them, and bake them for a while.

TriPolar
09-20-2012, 12:34 PM
One great dish is as simple as can be. Lay alternating slices of tomato and fresh mozzerella on a plate, toss on a dash of salt and some chopped fresh parsley, drizzle some olive oil over the top.

purplehorseshoe
09-20-2012, 04:33 PM
Slice about 1/2" thick, salt (and whatever else you like) liberally, sprinkle with sliced garlic, and drizzle very liberally with good olive oil. Arrange so they overlap at the edges, and bake at about 300 F for an hour or two, until the tomato juices have been replaced with the oil. Mmmmm ... roasted tomato slices. Also, the oil in the pan takes on a lovely tomato flavor and makes a great salad dressing base.

Antigen
09-20-2012, 04:54 PM
I need to grow tomatoes next year so I can make these oven-roasted tomatoes you're all talking about!

To use up a few of the big tomatoes, I recommend stuffed tomatoes. Here's how I do it (http://antijenicdrift.blogspot.com/2011/01/whats-for-dinner-grandmaman-adeles.html), but it's pretty flexible.

teela brown
09-20-2012, 05:04 PM
Have you seen those plastic containers of little mini-mozzarellas in the deli section of the supermarket? They're each about the size of a cherry tomato.

Drain them out of the watery whey they're suspended in, mix them with tomatoes diced into roughly the size of the cheeses, and then add minced garlic, white wine vinegar, and gobs of good olive oil. Chopped basil and a little cayenne pepper, too. It makes a gorgeous red, white and green main dish salad.

salinqmind
09-20-2012, 05:25 PM
Could you give them to a food pantry or soup kitchen? Leave them in a basket on the church doorstep? Put them on a card table in front of your house with an 'honor box' - or if you really want them to disappear fast, a sign saying "free".

Chefguy
09-20-2012, 06:19 PM
I just threw together a pasta dish on the fly this evening.

Cherry tomatoes, halved
Fresh basil, chiffonade
Grated parmesan
Two strips of bacon, cut across the strip into small pieces
olive oil and butter
Crushed red pepper flakes
Spaghetti

Put on a pot of water for the pasta. Meanwhile, heat the oil and butter in a small skillet at medium, add the pepper flakes and bacon. Saute until the bacon is done and remove from the heat. Remove the bacon to a plate, but reserve the fat.

Place tomato halves, basil, bacon and cheese in a pasta bowl. Drain the pasta when done, return to the pan and toss with the fat/pepper flake mixture. Place pasta on top of the other ingredients and toss together with a fork.

It was pretty damn tasty.

medstar
09-20-2012, 08:19 PM
Once you're done with all the food recipes, take the overripe tomatoes and throw them at people.


::d&r::

nikonikosuru
09-21-2012, 05:16 AM
Tomato sandwiches. I've lost count how many my boyfriend and I have eaten this summer, but we're not complaining! Take some soft white Italian bread (I also like the 3-cheese miche from Panera,) spread one side with a good amount of mayo. Add sliced tomatoes, and sprinkle a nice amount of salt (or "crack", as my boyfriend likes to say reflecting the addictiveness of the sandwiches.) There's something about the combination of the salt, acidity of the tomatoes, and mayo that makes for an awesome combination and one of the best sandwiches ever. It's at it's best when you can use fresh, home-grown tomatoes!

Snickers
09-21-2012, 09:14 AM
I've made this cheesy tomato-bacon pie (http://www.cookingclub.com/Recipes/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/8146), and it was good. (I hope you don't have to log in; let me know and I'll see if I can repost somehow.) I used a regular Pillsbury crust (available in the refrigerated section by the cookie dough) instead of making a real crust, because I'm pants at crust making. I remember it being a little watery and definitely on the greasy side, so next time I'd use less mayo and see if there was a better way to drain the tomatoes. It seems there are a bunch of tomato pie recipes out there, so maybe search for a similar one? This (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/tomato-pie-i/) one seems similar, and might be less greasy.

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