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View Full Version : Do you buy specialty bread or plain white bread?


aceplace57
01-25-2014, 10:07 PM
Growing up in the 70's Wonder Bread and Ideal Bread or some other white bread brand was all that was available in the grocery. I can remember why Roman Meal Bread was introduced with great fanfare. Mom started buying it when I was in high school and I bought too in college.

70's commercial for Roman Meal Bread (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiVlOt43tQw)

It was the 90's before there were many specialty bread choices. I buy Nature's Own Honey Wheat and Oroweat Whole Grain Oatnut Bread. Once in awhile I get Ideal for Nostalgia when I want a peanut butter & banana sandwich. A taste from my childhood.

I love raisin bread and have tried all the brands. By far Nature's Own Cinnamon Raisin is my favorite. I got frustrated with Pepperidge Farms paper thin slices. Other brands the bread is gummy.

You still buying white bread? Specialty Bread? Or even bread from a local bakery?

What specialty brands do you like?

j666
01-25-2014, 10:15 PM
We didn't have the same wide selection of whole grain breads in the the last quarter of the last century, but we certainly had decent mass produced bread.

The early '60's were the desperate waste land between high quality and high status breads.

Duckster
01-25-2014, 10:19 PM
Buying white bread is like wearing tighty whiteys.

Trinopus
01-25-2014, 10:20 PM
I don't buy bread...but if I did, it would probably be King's Hawaiian. I've had that a few times, and adore it.

aceplace57
01-25-2014, 10:29 PM
Forgot to mention Ideal Bread was sponsored by our local Bozo show. Lots and lots of nostalgia when I make a P&J or P and banana with it. I only treat myself once every month or two.

delphica
01-25-2014, 10:32 PM
I get my bread from the bakery, but a lot of it is a convenience issue for me - I walk right by a fantastic bakery daily, it's at the end of my street on my way to the subway. The grocery store is farther out of my way, so buying bread on my way home from work means one fewer thing to carry home from grocery shopping at the supermarket.

I even buy a lot of white bread there -- it's good quality but it's essentially regular old white bread with a chewier crust, and I like that I slice it myself to make thicker slices for things like French toast and garlic bread.

Zeldar
01-25-2014, 10:34 PM
Whole Wheat would have made an easy enough choice. So I voted Other.

Antinor01
01-25-2014, 10:35 PM
I wouldn't really think of it as specialty, but I prefer whole wheat.

aceplace57
01-25-2014, 10:42 PM
I included all the whole wheat, multi grains as specialty or premium breads. White bread is the mass produced family cheap option.

I'd buy white bread if I had 5 kids. No way am I buying premium priced bread for kids that eat half their sandwich and leave the rest on the table or floor.

I wouldn't really think of it as specialty, but I prefer whole wheat.

Leaffan
01-25-2014, 10:44 PM
Always multigrain of some sort.

I check the flyers, and multigrain bread that is usually $3.49 on sale for $2.49 (for example) is what I buy.

I've never bought white bread for myself. Blech.

Max the Immortal
01-25-2014, 10:57 PM
I included all the whole wheat, multi grains as specialty or premium breads. White bread is the mass produced family cheap option.


Really? I don't think I've ever seen white bread on a store shelf without 70% whole wheat and 100% whole wheat next to it, made in the same mass produced fashion.

ZipperJJ
01-25-2014, 11:05 PM
I buy mass-produced, just-as-unhealthy, full-of-sodium-and-sugar split-top wheat bread, not white bread, thank you very much.

JKilez
01-25-2014, 11:12 PM
I am one of the bread bakers. It is cheap, and fairly quick and easy after you have done it for a while. The best part is that you can choose your grains. For me, though, making bread is just a side bonus from having the stuff to make bagels. Good bread can generally be found if you look; good bagels, on the other hand, are a rare commodity if you do not live in the right place.

aceplace57
01-25-2014, 11:46 PM
There are some cheap brown breads that are basically the same as white bread without the bleached flour. We used to buy that for our girls when they were still at home. It might be a tiny bit more healthy. But, it's still a lot of over processed flour, sugars etc.

I'm not sure but didn't the white bread makers add some extra nutrients in the 80's? I don't think todays Wonder Bread is the same empty loaf that was sold in the 50's and 60's. But, I really don't know for sure.

Really? I don't think I've ever seen white bread on a store shelf without 70% whole wheat and 100% whole wheat next to it, made in the same mass produced fashion.

Son of a Rich
01-25-2014, 11:47 PM
It'd be Roman Meal Split Top all the way except the bastards don't sell it here anymore :mad:

don't ask
01-25-2014, 11:55 PM
Since I buy 12 or less loaves of bread a year I always buy something special. It would be literally decades since I ate plain white bread.

aceplace57
01-26-2014, 12:14 AM
I'm jealous. I'd buy fresh from the oven too if we had a really good bakery close by.
I get my bread from the bakery, but a lot of it is a convenience issue for me - I walk right by a fantastic bakery daily, it's at the end of my street on my way to the subway. The grocery store is farther out of my way, so buying bread on my way home from work means one fewer thing to carry home from grocery shopping at the supermarket.

I even buy a lot of white bread there -- it's good quality but it's essentially regular old white bread with a chewier crust, and I like that I slice it myself to make thicker slices for things like French toast and garlic bread.

zoid
01-26-2014, 12:30 AM
The best grocery bread is Brownberry Natural Wheat with the Catherine Clark original recipe. (http://brownberry.com/products/sliced-breads/natural/natural-wheat)

Panera bakes bread daily and sells whole loves at a really good price.
I think baguettes and sourdough boules are like $3.00 and the quality is quite good. I rarely eat there but I buy bread from them at least once a week.

DMark
01-26-2014, 01:33 AM
We rarely buy white bread unless it is for French Toast or some specific reason.

One interesting tidbit I have noticed at Walmart, of all places:

About a year ago, a local bread company started making seven grain bread that was quite good, and about a dollar cheaper than most of the other breads. They started off with about ten loafs wide on the shelf, and three shelves.

Apparently, when good, healthy bread is sold for a fair price, people start buying it. Now that brand of bread is about twenty five loafs wide on the shelf, and five shelves high!
I see people making a beeline for that brand of whole grain, fairly healthy bread and am somewhat impressed they are not buying the cheapo white bread loafs.

Broomstick
01-26-2014, 04:01 AM
I included all the whole wheat, multi grains as specialty or premium breads. White bread is the mass produced family cheap option.
That may have been true at one time, but at my local stores there are more whole wheat options than white these days, so there's "plain wheat bread" and it's priced comparably to the white. And by "wheat" I am referring to 100% whole wheat or whole grain.

TriPolar
01-26-2014, 07:17 AM
We buy plain white bread occasionally for retro versions of french toast, grilled cheese, and BLTs. Otherwise we get specialty breads. For general purposes we'll get multi-grained. We got 5 grain bread, then 7 grain, then 10 grain, 12 grain, and finally a 15 grain bread. But in that last one I think sawdust and bird seed were a couple of the grains, so it's usually just 7 or 10 now.

IvoryTowerDenizen
01-26-2014, 07:21 AM
All of the above. I bake, I but white sometimes, bakery bread, and whole wheat or other breads from store. We bought whole wheat from the store as a kid (from the 1970s on) as well as rye and pumpernickel, so it was definitely available.

Athena
01-26-2014, 07:34 AM
I've never eaten store-bought white bread with any regularity. I grew up with either Roman Meal, or my Dad's homemade bread. He started baking bread when I was a kid (heck, maybe even before I was around) and I'd say at least 60-70% of the time we had his bread. It was generally white bread, but homemade American-style white bread. I'm sure it's not great nutritionally, but it's heads and shoulders better tasting than store-bought.

He still bakes, though he's in his late 70s. Just last week we had a loaf of his bread; this time he cut it with some whole-wheat flour. Delicious.

When I'm not eating his bread, it's either bread from our local European-style bakery, or the Brownberry that zoid linked. I completely agree that's the best store-bought bread, hands down. I started buying it when I was looking for lower-carb bread, and keep eating it because it's so damn good that there's no reason to go back to what I was buying previously. Really high quality bread and available in every grocery store in my area.

SerafinaPekala
01-26-2014, 07:48 AM
Sounds delish!

Im gluten free so I dont eat bread per se, but I like quinoa as a side instead.

WordMan
01-26-2014, 08:52 AM
I get my bread from the bakery, but a lot of it is a convenience issue for me - I walk right by a fantastic bakery daily, it's at the end of my street on my way to the subway. The grocery store is farther out of my way, so buying bread on my way home from work means one fewer thing to carry home from grocery shopping at the supermarket.

I even buy a lot of white bread there -- it's good quality but it's essentially regular old white bread with a chewier crust, and I like that I slice it myself to make thicker slices for things like French toast and garlic bread.

+1 - when I first got to the NYC area, I realized it was a great bread town. Lots of local Italian bakeries. When you can have Zurro's rounds at your grocery store fresh every morning (they sell out early), or local bakeries a few minutes away, it's a good thing.

What's hilarious is that once in a blue moon we'll end up with big-brand bread - some multi-grain attempt. It can be in our bread shelf for weeks and still be fine, whereas the Zurro's is good for a couple of days...

So - I guess I am an opportunistic bread snob. It's good, it's close by - yay.

chela
01-26-2014, 09:00 AM
I look for the whole grain breads, pepperidge farms i usually buy.

Omega Glory
01-26-2014, 09:17 AM
I buy the store brand white. I don't eat enough bread to be picky about it.

Antigen
01-26-2014, 09:29 AM
I don't usually buy much bread, but when I go on a sandwich or toast binge, I get one of the multigrain varieties without HFCS. Whatever is on sale - I don't have any sort of brand loyalty. I prefer the fresher stuff from the store's own bakery, but it's a lot more expensive, so I keep it for fancy occasions or a treat for myself.

I bake my own sometimes but I haven't progressed past the no-knead, dutch-oven bread. I find bread baking intimidating.

Baal Houtham
01-26-2014, 09:29 AM
The best grocery bread is Brownberry Natural Wheat with the Catherine Clark original recipe. (http://brownberry.com/products/sliced-breads/natural/natural-wheat)

Panera bakes bread daily and sells whole loves at a really good price.
I think baguettes and sourdough boules are like $3.00 and the quality is quite good.

We buy a large Panera sourdough loaf about once a week. Apart from quality homemade bread it makes the best buttered toast I've had. $4.40. The asiago cheese loaf -- toasted and spread with salmon cream cheese -- is exceptional, if you love savory stuff.

However, the Panera breads are only prime for two or three days so we usually have a backup loaf grocery bread. Often, Brownberry Oatnut.

monstro
01-26-2014, 09:36 AM
I don't make a lot of sandwiches, so I don't buy loaves of bread. But I do eat a tortilla or pita with hummus for lunch. Usually whole wheat.

Chefguy
01-26-2014, 09:42 AM
There's a bakery one block from my house, so I buy our bread there. It depends on what I'm hungry for, but I usually choose either campagnola (a multigrain) or sourdough. They also have croissants for a change of pace.

StGermain
01-26-2014, 09:56 AM
I bake Julia Child's sandwich bread white loaves. Just walked my sister through it yesterday. Easy, cheap, smells good and tastes better.

StG

rucciface
01-26-2014, 10:00 AM
Bread is one of the few non-whole foods that I eat and, at that, on average one slice a day (I make a fold-over sandwich when I'm on the run). So I almost always buy the cheap store-brand 100% whole-wheat or multi-grain. Not picky about flavor, and I don't care to bake.

ktribe808
01-26-2014, 10:10 AM
I use my bread machine all the time. It takes about 5 minutes to load the ingredients, turn on the machine, and 5 minutes later you check the consistency of the dough, and 3 hours later you have amazing homemade bread. Bread machines are dirt cheap in the thrift shops - get the largest one you can find. My last loaf was bean bread and it is amazing. My herb-green onion, oatmeal, and beer breads are family favorites. I also make doughs using the dough setting for pizza dough and rolls. My butter-rosemary rolls are to die for. The bean bread I just made will be served with the venison stew that is simmering in the crockpot.

Really people, homemade bread ROCKS. Plus the smell of baking bread is an aphrodisiac! Just saying...

Tom Tildrum
01-26-2014, 10:20 AM
I like Arnold specialty breads. My wife eats Nature's Own Double Fiber -- it has half as many Weight Watchers points, presumably because one craps it out twice as fast.

Chimera
01-26-2014, 10:26 AM
I usually buy Brownberry Oatnut.

silenus
01-26-2014, 11:00 AM
Other. It entirely depends on what we need at the moment. We have several very good local bakeries for bagels and baguettes, the local farm stand for semi-local specialty loaves like Jalapeno Shepherd's bread or garlic and cheese French loaves, and the local grocery if we need a loaf of Roamn Meal or the like. There is also a tortilleria a block from home. I also bake when I feel like it.

RealityChuck
01-26-2014, 11:21 AM
I buy both. My wife liked white, and I find it good for certain things where the flavor of the bread might overpower other flavors. I also love rye for sandwiches, Italian to go with pasta, and Joseph's Flax Pita Bread if I'm watching carbs.

Chefguy
01-26-2014, 11:24 AM
If you get Dave's Killer Bread in your area, give it a try. It's whole seed bread, in large part. We used to buy the 21 seed bread, which was excellent. It's got a bit of sweetness to it, probably from molasses or honey.

Rhythmdvl
01-26-2014, 11:41 AM
Mostly as grainy as possible (or bake our own). While multi-grains are tasty and can work for some comfort-food staples, some things call out for white bread---grilled cheese, peanut butter and jelly, and creamcheese and jelly are ideal when served on Wonder. Then there's Mother Goose Liverwurst, a slutty delight that's home on both white bread with mayo or a robust dark bread with mustard.

Ají de Gallina
01-26-2014, 02:12 PM
For breakfast we get Peruvian-style French bread (Hint: it aínt even remotely French bread, but we call it "pan francés"), but it goes stale very quickly. The workhorse is name-brand white bread because nothing is better than white bread when you simply want a 1-minute sandwich.

I love sourdough, but here in Peru you can only find it one bakery, it's far away and ridiculously expensive, so it's a once-in-a-blue-moon treat. Also, some German Vollkornbrot is nice, but also an acquired taste in Peru. There is no tradition of whole-grain bread in Peru. Most is done with wheat although cornbread is also eaten (very different from what an American would call cornbread).

Skywatcher
01-26-2014, 02:35 PM
We get seeded Italian from Schmidt, the same company that makes Roman Mean and Sunbeam.

Sometimes I'll pick up a La Brea Jalapeño Ceddar Bread for some spicy French toast.

Biggirl
01-26-2014, 02:53 PM
I put other because we buy whole wheat, which is not a specialty bread.

Sherrerd
01-26-2014, 02:57 PM
Genuine sourdough is my favorite (but there's no good source around here, and making my own isn't a practical option at the moment). I guess it's white, but it's not soft.

I'd rather eat no bread at all than the mushy white Wonder Bread type.

dracoi
01-26-2014, 03:44 PM
I'll sometimes pick up the generic store brand of wheat bread, but never white and never Wonderbread. (I wonder if it is bread.)

The closest I come to white bread will be sourdough, something crusty from the bakery section, or something like a hot dog or hamburger bun.

I like the Oroweat brand as my overall go-to, especially their ryes, Oatnut and 12-grain.

Unless I'm getting some kind of baguette or other crusty bread, I avoid bakeries. They can't do sliced sandwich bread to save their lives even when they're charging twice as much for it. I really don't understand.

Mister Rik
01-26-2014, 03:46 PM
White bread for me. I got turned off of "whole grain" breads when my mother went on a years-long "specialty bread" kick (she loves that Poulsbo Bread). These are breads that I call "birdseed bread" because they're stuffed full of seeds and grains that haven't even been ground into flour.

My problem with these breads is their overpowering (and usually, to me, bitter) flavor. I take the position that the bread is mainly there to keep my fingers out of the mayonnaise and peanut butter. When I make a sandwich, I want to taste what's inside the sandwich. So many of these "specialty" breads are so overpowering on their own that I can barely taste the PBJ or the meat.

The one exception I'll make is rye bread. And then only if it's filled with pastrami/corned beef and appropriate condiments (mustard, sauerkraut, etc.) Fillings that have strong enough flavors of their own to balance out and compliment the strong flavor of the bread.

actualliberalnotoneofthose
01-26-2014, 04:46 PM
I included all the whole wheat, multi grains as specialty or premium breads. White bread is the mass produced family cheap option.

I'd buy white bread if I had 5 kids. No way am I buying premium priced bread for kids that eat half their sandwich and leave the rest on the table or floor.

I have kids, and buy them wheat bread. I don't care for bread in general myself. Wheat isn't exactly exotic and high priced these days. Grocery stores have many mass produced breads made with whole grains and even some without HFCS. The difference between the worst white value bread and the highest end bread I encounter in a typical grocery story is perhaps 10 cents per slice. I am not wealthy but I will gladly waste 10 cents to feed my kids something other than loaves of melty sugar.

Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor
01-26-2014, 05:03 PM
Anything with a little extra fiber.

Eugene of Sandwich
01-26-2014, 05:51 PM
Always have a bag of loaf bread for sammies. Usually 100% whole wheat store brand or Natures Own. Don't eat much bread otherwise. Haven't bought regular white loaf bread in what 30 years?

InternetLegend
01-26-2014, 06:18 PM
I buy 100% whole wheat (or other whole grain) bread for sandwiches the rest of the family makes - I don't think of it as specialty bread because it's really not that different from the white bread as far as texture and flavor go, although the fiber content is way better. I bake my own all-whole-grain bread for my own use, even for grilled cheese or pb&j, because I really, really like strong-flavored bread. The only white breads I ever get are french or sourdough loaves to have with Italian food (whole wheat garlic bread is a little weird even for me) and one loaf of mass-produced supermarket-brand white bread per year to round out the stuffing at Thanksgiving.

SCAdian
01-26-2014, 06:21 PM
Buying white bread is like wearing tighty whiteys.

I wear tighty whiteys. I do not buy white bread.

Slithy Tove
01-26-2014, 07:04 PM
(Warning: rant ahead)

"Artisan?" I mean, really; just...fuck you.

Dimitri Shostakovich slept fully-dressed through the 1930 because he could be dragged off to the Gulag at any moment for his art. The guys who baked bread for Stalin had to bake really good bread, but they didn't have those kinds of worries. Go ahead and call it "craft bread," like craft beer. But I've yet to bite into a slice of bread that gave any stunning radical insights into to human condition. And I've had good bread.

aceplace57
01-26-2014, 07:14 PM
The poll says a lot about the sdmb. Very few plain white bread people hear. The stores still have a large display of the stuff. Somebody is buying it. I'd guess for families on a tight budget.

zoid
01-26-2014, 07:25 PM
(Warning: rant ahead)

"Artisan?" I mean, really; just...fuck you.

Dimitri Shostakovich slept fully-dressed through the 1930 because he could be dragged off to the Gulag at any moment for his art. The guys who baked bread for Stalin had to bake really good bread, but they didn't have those kinds of worries. Go ahead and call it "craft bread," like craft beer. But I've yet to bite into a slice of bread that gave any stunning radical insights into to human condition. And I've had good bread.

I've yet to see a painting "that gave any stunning radical insights into to human condition" - it's all variations on a theme and need to be considered in relation to other works. Therefore there's no art?

Slithy Tove
01-26-2014, 07:31 PM
Ignorance, not tight budget. That drawing of the blonde girl biting into Sunbeam bread was done 50 years ago, and the woman who modeled for it still has bits of the undigested bread in her colon. There is store-brand wheat (albeit with HFCS in it, but even the shampoo and tampons have HFCS in them) right next to store-brand white, at identical prices. It's due to an ancient claptrap that the poor ate brown bread and the rich ate white.

Ají de Gallina
01-26-2014, 11:12 PM
Ignorance, not tight budget. That drawing of the blonde girl biting into Sunbeam bread was done 50 years ago, and the woman who modeled for it still has bits of the undigested bread in her colon. There is store-brand wheat (albeit with HFCS in it, but even the shampoo and tampons have HFCS in them) right next to store-brand white, at identical prices. It's due to an ancient claptrap that the poor ate brown bread and the rich ate white.

Unless she was shot right after eating the slice, no trace of the bread would be found after a day.

I'd love to eat more whole-wheat but name-brand whole bread is simply not nice to eat, it has no taste or something close to cardboard.

White bread tastes delicious and, apparently, any run-of-the-mill bajer can produce a good loaf. Most whole/multigrain stuff is mediocre catering more to health conscious that thos looking for taste.

Realy tasty multigrain (because 100% whole wheat bread CANNOT be tasty) is expensive and goes stale like it's in a hurry-

Here in Peru there is no rich/poor white/whole claptrap, in fact, whole is the realm of the well-to-do. Still, white bread rulz.

Voyager
01-27-2014, 12:29 AM
This reminds me of the scene in Hannah and Her Sisters, I think, where Woody decides to become Catholic and starts taking his purchases out of a bag - a crucifix, rosary beads, and a loaf of Wonder Bread.

I mostly buy various types of wheat bread, though we get great crusty bread from our Costco which gets it from a local bakery. Sometimes we get rolls from the stand in the farmers' market. I used to work a few blocks from the Orowheat bakery which had a thrift shop which sold an amazing diversity of breads and Entemann's for half price. Orowheat rye is okay, but nothing like the rye we got from the bakery when I was young.

30 years ago when our kid was little my wife baked bread, and even sold some to a local restaurant, but no time for that now.

Ellis Aponte Jr.
01-27-2014, 12:45 AM
100% whole wheat bread CANNOT be tasty

white bread rulz.

Right. That's why white bread dominated for many centuries before this abomination called 100% whole wheat was invented in the 19th Century.

Oh wait, it was the other way around...

panache45
01-27-2014, 01:11 AM
I don't remember the last time I ate white bread. Or white rice. Or white flour. Or white sugar.

Cazzle
01-27-2014, 05:09 AM
I remember I wouldn't eat anything but white as a child, so I've never given my children an opportunity to get a taste for it. We only buy white bread if there is literally nothing else left on the shelf (which does happen a couple of times a year... no fresh bread delivered to the supermarkets on the weekend).

We usually buy wholemeal or light rye because my other half dislikes wholegrain. Before I met him, it was wholegrain all the way.

even sven
01-27-2014, 06:17 AM
I default towards chewy, crusty, delicious sourdough, as that's what I grew up with. But here on the east coast, it's harder to find good sourdough, so I don't buy a lot of bread. I may pick up a baguette or roll now and then, and I've always got tortillas around. But without sourdough, bread seems kind of a waste. :-(

LawMonkey
01-27-2014, 08:12 AM
Generally buy specialty type breads, if for no other reason than that I am but one man, and a gigantic honkin' loaf of Wonder-type bread will go stale/moldy before I have a chance to eat it.

Broomstick
01-27-2014, 08:17 AM
You can freeze bread, you know? Put half a loaf in the freezer while you eat the other half.

silenus
01-27-2014, 08:35 AM
I don't remember the last time I ate white bread. Or white rice. Or white flour. Or white sugar.

Racist.





:p

theR
01-27-2014, 09:08 AM
I like Arnold specialty breads. My wife eats Nature's Own Double Fiber -- it has half as many Weight Watchers points, presumably because one craps it out twice as fast.

Nature's Own also doesn't use HFCS and seems to have less added sugar than most bread, so it has about 2/3 the carbohydrates of similarly sized bread slices from many other brands. This means it also tends to be fewer calories than other bread, so it's the calories plus the fiber that make it fewer Weight Watchers points.

epbrown01
01-27-2014, 10:13 AM
I make white bread every week, and everyone that's had some enjoys it. Mass-produced versions have given it a bad rap, I think. Home-made white bread can make Egg in the Basket, Cinnamon French Toast and even just buttered toast and jam into a decadent experience.

A friend of mine and his wife bake but he's a health nut and everything has no salt, sugar, flour... it's basically a way of converting trail mix into loaf form. It's healthy, it's not bad tasting, but not pleasurable. And he will absolutely flip out if you butter it. :D

Ají de Gallina
01-27-2014, 05:41 PM
Right. That's why white bread dominated for many centuries before this abomination called 100% whole wheat was invented in the 19th Century.

Oh wait, it was the other way around...

I'll give you a chance to see the gigantic holes in your argument.

Ellis Aponte Jr.
01-27-2014, 06:40 PM
I'll give you a chance to see the gigantic holes in your argument.

I simply meant that people found whole wheat tasty for a long long time. All kinds of factors helped white bread get popular, but it wasn't because whole wheat lacked taste.

Moe
01-27-2014, 10:00 PM
When I was living in the US, it was multigrain loaves from the supermarket. Since moving to Germany, the role (heh) of bread in my life has changed. Bread IS a way of life here. There are more bakeries here than Starbucks in NYC. It would be difficult for me to take a walk around town without passing at least 7 places to buy fresh bread. Germans don't even know what "white bread" (in the fluffy Wonder Bread sense) is. They call that "toast bread" since it is supposed to be only for toasting. (Incidentally, they also don't understand peanut butter at all here, but that's another topic).

To be honest, I'm often feeling quite sick of bread. But you can't escape it. It's just there. It's ALWAYS there.

(but recently English Muffins have made their way into my local grocery store so that's primarily what I'm buying lately, but there's generally also always a loaf from a local bakery somewhere in my kitchen as well).

mack
01-27-2014, 10:18 PM
We get these big round loaves of Italian bread. It's white but more tasty than Wonder and more fun since the middle slices are huge and have holes that cheese oozes from when I make grilled cheese. I'm not much into the taste of whole wheat except for this 7 grain bread they serve at a couple companies I worked at in NJ. It's made at a bakery in NJ but not available to the public. And some homemade (not by me).

jabiru
01-28-2014, 02:21 AM
I buy wholemeal, wholegrain bread from the supermarket. I wouldn't describe it as a specialty bread, though.

Omega Glory
01-28-2014, 07:35 AM
Maybe the store-bought whole wheat bread has changed since the last time I bought it a few years ago, but the brands I tried were hard and dry. Unless things have changed, it's not surprising that so many people still eat white bread.

BigT
01-28-2014, 10:08 AM
Other. We tend to do both. We get the cheapest bread (usually somewhat older white) when we just need bread. But when we can splurge, we get my mom specialty bread that has fewer carbs and more fiber, as she has diabetes (although it appears to be in remission right now).

aruvqan
01-28-2014, 10:40 AM
Another baker here. There is no reason to buy bread, I have all the time in the world during the day to pop out one or more loaves of bread. I even keep King Arthur Flour's european type bread flour, a much finer low protein cake flour and a stouter semolina flour on hand along with rye, barley, various nut flours and assorted crunchies to add in. It really is a shame that as a diabetic I really can't eat most of what I make, but mrAru takes stuff in to work and the ravening horde of goddaughters helps out as well.

Our favorites are classic San Francisco sourdough, sourdough cibatta and a sourdough unbleached whole wheat with crunchies.

jrsone
01-28-2014, 11:45 AM
I usually buy some kind of whole wheat bread or multi-grain bread. I do love Italian bread though, lots of great Italian bakeries around. I second Panera on making great bread. I worked with a guy once who had a son that worked at Panera and he bought loaves of bread for me all the time and that stuff was great.

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