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DCnDC
12-03-2014, 12:15 PM
In any subway system, what two stations, on the same line, are the closest together, by distance?

On the DC Metro system, Metro Center and Gallery Place/Chinatown are just three blocks apart, about 1/3 mile, or 1600 feet. From either station platform you can look down the tunnel and see people standing on the platform at the other station.

DCnDC
12-03-2014, 12:23 PM
Too late to edit: note, 1600 feet is the distance from subway entrance to subway entrance at the street level; the tunnel itself from one station to the next is only about 800 feet.

Leo Bloom
12-03-2014, 12:41 PM
NYTimes:
By MICHAEL POLLAK
Published: August 30, 2008
(www.nytimes.com/2008/08/31/nyregion/thecity/31fyi.html?ref=thecity):)

According to Glenn Lunden, director of rail systems planning for New York City Transit [...]

“There are several pairs of stations that are a very short distance apart — slightly over two-tenths of a mile,” Mr. Lunden continued in an e-mail message. “They are: Bowling Green and Wall Street on the 4 and 5, Wall Street and Fulton Street on the 2 and 3, and Park Place and Chambers Street on the 2 and 3.”

But Antonio Cabrera, assistant chief officer for track engineering, said that the shortest distance is actually between Beverley Road and Cortelyou Road on the Brighton line B and Q — slightly less than 500 feet. (Ron Schweiger, Brooklyn borough historian, said that those two stations preceded the subway lines, and served a grade-level steam railroad, the Brooklyn, Flatbush and Coney Island Railroad.)

Don't Panic
12-03-2014, 12:59 PM
On the London Underground, the shortest distance is between Covent Garden and Leicester Square (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covent_Garden_tube_station#Proximity_to_Leicester_Square), on the Piccadilly Line.
The journey between Leicester Square station and Covent Garden takes only about 20 seconds, and measures only 260 metres (0.161 miles), the shortest distance between two adjacent stations on the Underground network. The stations are so close that a pedestrian standing halfway between them on Long Acre can see both tube stations by turning around 180°.

yabob
12-03-2014, 01:07 PM
Are you going to exclude people movers in large buildings, and things like the Capitol Subway System (http://www.belowthecapital.org/capitol/)?

DCnDC
12-03-2014, 01:10 PM
Are you going to exclude people movers in large buildings, and things like the Capitol Subway System (http://www.belowthecapital.org/capitol/)?

Yes.

enalzi
12-03-2014, 01:17 PM
There's less than 1000 feet between the Monroe station and the Jackson station on the Chicago red line. You can actually walk from one platform to the other underground. Before the Washington station closed it was around 600 feet from the Lake station.

MikeS
12-03-2014, 01:25 PM
In Chicago, both the Red Line and the Blue Line have stops at Monroe St. and at Jackson St. Monroe and Jackson run parallel to each other, separated by only two blocks (about 900 feet, or 280 meters.) This is a bit of a cheat, though, since the passenger platform is continuous between these two stations. The trains still stop at each location along the platform, so it's technically two stops; but it can be debated whether they are separate "stations".

naita
12-03-2014, 01:38 PM
The downtown stations of Nationaltheatret, Stortinget, Jernbanetorget and Grønland in Oslo are .7, .5 and .5 km apart. So beaten by London.

friedo
12-03-2014, 01:55 PM
But Antonio Cabrera, assistant chief officer for track engineering, said that the shortest distance is actually between Beverley Road and Cortelyou Road on the Brighton line B and Q — slightly less than 500 feet.

That was going to be my vote. Brighton Line FTW.

CalMeacham
12-03-2014, 02:10 PM
A lot of the stops on Boston's T near downtown are so close, you have to wonder why there are separate stops. Downtown Crossing and Park Street are a block apart on the red line.

The Park Street kiosk and the Downtown Crossing station entrance are only about 600 feet apart


In fact, the stations are actually connected underground -- you can WALK from one to the other, and damn the trains.


Park Street and Boylston on the Green line aren't much farther apart:

The Park Street kiosk is visible up Tremont Street, steps away from the Boylston kiosk. They’re 1,500 feet apart, a walk of less than six minutes. Pick a new song on your iPod, and you’re halfway there.

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/10/18/10_boston_subway_rides_you_should_consider_skipping/

Celidin
12-03-2014, 02:11 PM
Three stops on the Philadelphia PATCO line (formerly known as the Locust St Subway) are within 5 blocks:

9th-10th & Locust
12th-13th & Locust
15th & 16th & Locust

Google Maps: https://goo.gl/maps/CJsQ0
PATCO's "Street Level Access" map showing the stairs - http://www.ridepatco.org/stations/9th_access.html


You can't see from one to the other because there's a slight elevation change in the tracks.

The Hamster King
12-03-2014, 02:35 PM
It's not underground, but the Expo Line in L.A. has two stations that are a little over 1000' apart: Vermont and Expo Park/USC.

The Downtown Long Beach and 1st Street stations on the Blue Line are also about that far apart.

Kent Clark
12-03-2014, 08:02 PM
There are a couple of stretches on the St. Louis Metrolink system where the stops are about 1,200' or so apart.

scr4
12-03-2014, 09:18 PM
1600 feet is the distance from subway entrance to subway entrance at the street level...

If that's what we're going by, on the Tokyo Metro Hibiya line, Exit A1 of the Hibiya station and Exit C1 of the Ginza station are about 120 ft apart. (https://www.google.com/maps/@35.6730114,139.7618571,18z)

md2000
12-03-2014, 10:11 PM
Don't have the measurements, but Yonge to Bay stations or St. George to Spadina on the Toronto Bloor line looks to be pretty short, less than 200m.

Spoons
12-04-2014, 12:45 AM
Don't have the measurements, but Yonge to Bay stations or St. George to Spadina on the Toronto Bloor line looks to be pretty short, less than 200m.Yonge to Bay is extremely short. I don't know the distance, but 200 m sounds about right. When I was a student at U of Toronto, I used to walk from St. George to Yonge, bypassing both St. George and Bay stations (I needed a Yonge train), as it was usually faster than waiting for Bloor trains and connecting at Yonge.

In Toronto, Queen to King is pretty short too. It's three blocks--I could probably walk the distance on the surface in the time it takes me to walk down to Queen, pay my fare, wait for a train, and ride it to King.

DCnDC
12-04-2014, 08:14 AM
If that's what we're going by, on the Tokyo Metro Hibiya line, Exit A1 of the Hibiya station and Exit C1 of the Ginza station are about 120 ft apart. (https://www.google.com/maps/@35.6730114,139.7618571,18z)

They're not on the same track.

scr4
12-04-2014, 11:27 AM
They're not on the same track.

Both are on the Hibiya line, which is the dashed line running NW-SE.

DCnDC
12-04-2014, 11:30 AM
Touche.

DCnDC
12-04-2014, 11:36 AM
But do they go to separate stations?

Kiros
12-04-2014, 11:40 AM
A lot of the stops on Boston's T near downtown are so close, you have to wonder why there are separate stops. Downtown Crossing and Park Street are a block apart on the red line.

The Green Line west of downtown is even worse, on the B and C branches. There are something like ten T stops within a mile and a half in the Boston University area, and the C line stops every 500-1000 feet for about two miles. It's insane, and I'm happy that they're finally talking about making some changes, at least on the B branch.

scr4
12-04-2014, 11:42 AM
But do they go to separate stations?

Yes. One is the entrance for the Ginza station, and labeled as such. The other is for the Hibiya station, and labeled as such. They are two separate stations: the Hibiya line train stops at one, then the other.

Now, the two stations are connected by an underground walkway, and these entrances are just adjacent entrances to this walkway. But officially they are entrances to 2 separate stations.

DCnDC
12-04-2014, 11:45 AM
And how far apart are the stations? Distance from entrance to entrance at the street level is NOT what we're going by.

Peremensoe
12-04-2014, 11:50 AM
Yes. One is the entrance for the Ginza station, and labeled as such. The other is for the Hibiya station, and labeled as such. They are two separate stations: the Hibiya line train stops at one, then the other.

Now, the two stations are connected by an underground walkway, and these entrances are just adjacent entrances to this walkway. But officially they are entrances to 2 separate stations.
OK, why does the train make two stops effectively in the same place?

scr4
12-04-2014, 03:33 PM
OK, why does the train make two stops effectively in the same place?
The actual platforms are about 1200 ft apart - and they're that close because each of these stations connect to other, different train lines.

Subway stations in Tokyo typically have large networks of underground walkways for passenger comfort and safety (not having to walk across surface roads). In case of these two train stations, the walkways connect to each other. These two exists are designated as exits for different stations, but they're just adjacent exits on this walkway.

scr4
12-04-2014, 03:34 PM
And how far apart are the stations? Distance from entrance to entrance at the street level is NOT what we're going by.
That's how you defined the distance in the OP, hence my reply.

scr4
12-04-2014, 03:42 PM
p.s. For Tokyo, the closest distance along the track between two stations is 0.3 km (~1000 ft), on the Marunouchi line, between Shinjuku and Shinjuku-Sanchome. That's the operational distance between the two stations, i.e. the distance the train moves. The trains are about 400 ft long, so the length of the tunnel between the stations should be less than 600 ft.

EmilyG
12-04-2014, 03:47 PM
In any subway system, what two stations, on the same line, are the closest together, by distance?

On the DC Metro system, Metro Center and Gallery Place/Chinatown are just three blocks apart, about 1/3 mile, or 1600 feet. From either station platform you can look down the tunnel and see people standing on the platform at the other station.

Peel and McGill here in Montreal. 296.52 metres, ~973 feet. You can see one station from the other, like you described in the quote above. You can also do that between a few other stations here.

dtilque
12-04-2014, 03:56 PM
Portland's lightrail Blue line (it has a single underground station; I don't know if that qualifies it as a subway, but probably not) has two very close stations: KingsHill/SW Salmon and Providence Park. I'm not sure how far apart they are but roughly a block and a half. One complicating factor in measuring the distance is that the east and west bound lines are not quite adjacent at Providence Park. The line splits going through downtown Portland and the Providence Park station is the westernmost along the split section.

Another complicating factor is that the line goes around a corner between the two stations. So it depends on whether you're measuring along the line or as the crow flies.

I've tried to find the distance between them on the internet, but without success. But Portland has very small blocks, so they may be as close as 200 ft or even less.

P-man
12-04-2014, 03:58 PM
I know there are a couple of stations on the 3 line in Brooklyn that are really close together. I used to hate it when there would be an announcement that there was a train stopped at the station ahead of us, but I could look and see that there wasn't one anywhere close.

Hari Seldon
12-05-2014, 08:13 AM
The Market St. Subway in Philadelphia has stops at 11th, 13th, and 15th Streets, which I estimae makes 3 stops within a third of a mile (say 1800 ft.) You can walk underground not on subway platforms, but alongside them, from 7th Street to 17th Street (you come out for a short distance by City Hall, but are still under cover).

Oukile
12-05-2014, 10:12 AM
Lots of stations in Paris are very close. I found a distance of 780 feets between the exits of Filles du Calvaire and Saint-Sebastien - Froissart on Metro line 8.

bonzer
12-05-2014, 11:34 AM
On the London Underground, the shortest distance is between Covent Garden and Leicester Square (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covent_Garden_tube_station#Proximity_to_Leicester_Square), on the Piccadilly Line.

True for the Underground, but that isn't Transport for London's shortest journey. For if we're including other urban rail networks - and it's as much a "subway" as most of Chicago's L - then the Docklands Light Railway beats it handily.
Integrated with the tube network, this covers the East End, mainly using elevated tracks, but with several underground sections and stations. Some of the stations are very close together, particularly around the Canary Wharf financial district where the trio of Heron Quays-Canary Wharf-West India Quay are each only a single span bridge apart. It's perhaps 200-300 feet between the end of one station platform and the start of the next. If there was a direct walking route, you could trivial walk between the stations faster than you have to wait for most trains.
The reason for closeness is that there aren't such direct walking routes. It's an area with a very high density of office skyscrapers, but separated by the basins of the original docks. Hence you essentially get stations on opposite quays with rail bridges spanning the water.

Wikipedia claims (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canary_Wharf#Docklands_Light_Railway) that these "are in fact the three closest train stations on the same line in the world", but without a cite.

Don't Panic
12-06-2014, 02:37 AM
True for the Underground, but that isn't Transport for London's shortest journey. For if we're including other urban rail networks - and it's as much a "subway" as most of Chicago's L - then the Docklands Light Railway beats it handily.
Good point. I should have thought of that.

panache45
12-06-2014, 07:29 PM
The 42nd Street Shuttle, connecting NYC's Times Square to Grand Central, is 0.8 miles.

Marion_Wormer
12-06-2014, 07:53 PM
I feel like a game of Mornington Crescent after all this subway talk.

Silophant
12-06-2014, 09:40 PM
Not a subway, but the light rail stations in downtown Minneapolis are frustratingly close together. Nicollet Station and Hennepin Station are one block and ~575 feet apart, and Government Plaza is then only 2 blocks and ~875 feet past Nicollet. This isn't counting Target Field Station, which now has two sequential platforms separated by about 25 feet from the west end of one to the east end of the other. The trains stop at both.

friedo
12-06-2014, 09:55 PM
The 42nd Street Shuttle, connecting NYC's Times Square to Grand Central, is 0.8 miles.

Which is still about five times the distance of the Beverly/Cortelyou stretch mentioned above.

staili
12-07-2014, 05:46 AM
In Paris, the Chatelet Metro station and the Les Halles Metro station were both connected in the mega-station Chatelet-Les Halles in the late 1970s, although Line 4 still stops at both Chatelet and Les Halles. The distance between the 2 stations isn't unusually short (~1500 ft), although it is a rare (?unique) case in which one can make a free transfer to 2 different stops on the same line by walking through a station.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
12-07-2014, 11:32 PM
Wilshire/Western to Wilshire/Normandie stations in L.A. are atypically close to each other (for L.A.), at 0.4 miles, even if that's not as close as some of the ones I've read about here. Still it seemed odd to me, the one time I happened to stand right behind the operator's booth with a clear view of the tunnel ahead, with its typical dim lighting. Immediately on pulling out of Wilshire / Western, I could see the brightly lighted platform of Wilshire / Normandie directly ahead.

It seems like it was a waste to put in a station at Normandie, when that money might have gone for a Hollywood Bowl station on the North Hollywood line.

Dervorin
12-08-2014, 05:34 AM
On the London Underground, the shortest distance is between Covent Garden and Leicester Square (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covent_Garden_tube_station#Proximity_to_Leicester_Square), on the Piccadilly Line.

OP: Are you including any sort of mass transit system in your reckoning, or must the stations actually be underground? On the Docklands Light Railway in London (technically not part of the Underground network), West India Quay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_India_Quay_DLR_station) and Canary Wharf are only 0.124 miles apart (199m), which is the closest separation on the whole system. Both these stations are above ground, though.

amanset
12-08-2014, 05:55 AM
OP: Are you including any sort of mass transit system in your reckoning, or must the stations actually be underground? On the Docklands Light Railway in London (technically not part of the Underground network), West India Quay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_India_Quay_DLR_station) and Canary Wharf are only 0.124 miles apart (199m), which is the closest separation on the whole system. Both these stations are above ground, though.

South Ealing to Northfields is pretty damn close to that as well, although again they are overground. You can see how close the platforms are here (https://www.google.se/maps/place/South+Ealing+Station,+S+Ealing+Rd,+London+W5+4QB,+Storbritannien/@51.5002694,-0.3100267,378m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x48760d92dee31ad9:0xa0dd58d032b41c62). This site (http://littleealinghistory.org.uk/node/93) claims that "at less than 300 yards between platforms they are the two closest over-ground stations on the whole tube network", but it has no reference for that information.

Cmdroverbite
12-08-2014, 09:21 AM
The Green Line west of downtown is even worse, on the B and C branches. There are something like ten T stops within a mile and a half in the Boston University area, and the C line stops every 500-1000 feet for about two miles. It's insane, and I'm happy that they're finally talking about making some changes, at least on the B branch.

A quick bit of hunting and pecking on Google Maps indicates that the single most perverse pair of stops on the MBTA Green Line may actually be on the E branch, between Brigham Circle and Fernwood Road, a 1 block/361 foot walk. Of course, this is a streetcar, not a subway, so not strictly relevant to the question, but still...

suranyi
12-08-2014, 12:35 PM
Wilshire/Western to Wilshire/Normandie stations in L.A. are atypically close to each other (for L.A.), at 0.4 miles, even if that's not as close as some of the ones I've read about here. Still it seemed odd to me, the one time I happened to stand right behind the operator's booth with a clear view of the tunnel ahead, with its typical dim lighting. Immediately on pulling out of Wilshire / Western, I could see the brightly lighted platform of Wilshire / Normandie directly ahead.

It seems like it was a waste to put in a station at Normandie, when that money might have gone for a Hollywood Bowl station on the North Hollywood line.

I remember when the design decisions were being made, and there was a lot of controversy about whether to put a stop at the Hollywood Bowl. The basic points were: Yes, it would get a lot of traffic at Bowl events, but it would be almost empty all other times.

eltro102
12-08-2014, 12:38 PM
Here's a video of a man racing the tube between two stations on the underground:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PH_Z8Ghuq6E

CalMeacham
12-08-2014, 12:40 PM
A quick bit of hunting and pecking on Google Maps indicates that the single most perverse pair of stops on the MBTA Green Line may actually be on the E branch, between Brigham Circle and Fernwood Road, a 1 block/361 foot walk. Of course, this is a streetcar, not a subway, so not strictly relevant to the question, but still...

Well, not exactly -- the Green Line is definitely a subway, going through tunnels underground when it's in central Boston. Even when it's in the suburbs, though, the green line has designated stations and stops, and doesn't stop at intermediate points. It's not like a streetcar or bus that you can request a stop at various points.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
12-08-2014, 11:24 PM
A lot of the stops on Boston's T near downtown are so close, you have to wonder why there are separate stops. Downtown Crossing and Park Street are a block apart on the red line.

In fact, the stations are actually connected underground -- you can WALK from one to the other, and damn the trains.

Don't older subway systems have a lot of this? The placement of stations suggests that the designers wanted not only to serve the rider who wanted to go, for example, from Flushing to the Bronx, but also the one who merely wanted to ride four or five blocks--in the latter case I assume the goal was to eliminate as much surface traffic as possible. (And after that the streets of Mahattan would light of traffic and freely flowing, forevermore!. :D ). J

With newer systems we don't see this so much.

CalMeacham
12-09-2014, 07:47 AM
Don't older subway systems have a lot of this? The placement of stations suggests that the designers wanted not only to serve the rider who wanted to go, for example, from Flushing to the Bronx, but also the one who merely wanted to ride four or five blocks--in the latter case I assume the goal was to eliminate as much surface traffic as possible. (And after that the streets of Mahattan would light of traffic and freely flowing, forevermore!. :D ). J

With newer systems we don't see this so much.

Not that I'm aware of. The direct walking connection between Downtown Crossing and Park Street is unique in my experience. Do you know of any others?

I'm not talking about connecting stations -- there are lots of those in subway systems, necessarily, where you can go from one line to another. I don't know of any other cases where I can walk underground from one station to another on the same line.

DoggyDunnit
12-09-2014, 08:36 AM
Dallas' light-rail system has two stations Downtown that are but 1,500 feet apart--West End and Akard (http://goo.gl/maps/l1Alj).

Yeah, yeah, I know it's not a subway system. But, frankly, above-ground light-rail is about all you get in Texastan.

The tracks run at street level through Downtown, and the trains often do not get signal priority (!), so it's possible to get off of a train at either station, then beat said train to the other.

Hari Seldon
12-09-2014, 08:50 AM
Not that I'm aware of. The direct walking connection between Downtown Crossing and Park Street is unique in my experience. Do you know of any others?

I'm not talking about connecting stations -- there are lots of those in subway systems, necessarily, where you can go from one line to another. I don't know of any other cases where I can walk underground from one station to another on the same line.

As I mentioned upthread in Philly you can walk underground parallel to the tracks (but separated by a barrier) from 8th to 11th to 13th and, with a minor excursion still under cover, to 15th. So four consecutive stops you can walk along.

In Montreal, there is this entire underground city in which you can, without going outside, hit 4 stations (Lucien l'Allier, Bonaventure, Victoria Square, Champ de Mars) on one line and 3 stations (Place des Arts, McGill, Peel) on another. However you are not going parallel to the tracks and going from adjacent stations Place des Arts to McGill, a distance of about 1/4 mile, would require walking well over a mile. This underground city includes the hockey arena, an exhibit hall, the convention center, the concert halls, and literally hundreds of retail establishments.

Mr Downtown
12-09-2014, 11:19 PM
As mentioned upthread, both Chicago's downtown subways have continuous platforms several blocks long, at which trains made three (at one point, four) separate stops, each stop having a different name. The State Street subway was long known as the world's second-longest railway platform. Because platform crowding was a concern, originally northbound trains berthed at different locations from southbound ones. Thus the distance from the southbound berthing position of the Monroe stop to the northbound berth of the Jackson stop might have been as little as 150 feet. A similar arrangement was found on some parts of the Loop L early in the 20th century.

In the mid 1980s, I used to use this continuous platform arrangement to go back and forth between office buildings a couple of blocks apart, without need of a coat or umbrella. I just went down and walked along the platform, never boarding a train. I carried a monthly pass in those days, so the fare to get through the turnstile wasn't a problem.

EdwinAmi
12-10-2014, 12:59 PM
I can tell you that in my area (Bergen County, New Jersey), on the Pascack Valley line, the Park Ridge station and the Montvale station are super close. Like less than a mile. They're in the same strip mall/shopping center of town. I always thought it was kind of stupid and funny

This is an above ground train, NTW

Space Vegetable
12-10-2014, 10:07 PM
Pittsburgh's light rail system is underground within its small downtown, but above ground elsewhere. Fallowfield Station, above ground*, is 250 feet from the next outbound stop, Hampshire. When an outbound train is stopped at Hampshire, the back end of a typical train of two subway cars, each 90 feet long, is a good deal closer to Fallowfield. If they ever ran a three-car train, the last car would still be in the previous station when the first was stopped at the next.

An attempt was made a few years ago to eliminate the Hampshire stop, but residents insisted they needed both, and the decision was reversed.

* Literally. One end of Fallowfield Station rests on the ground. The other end is perhaps 45 feet off the ground, as the station forms one end of a bridge that carries the tracks across a steep valley.

Dr. Strangelove
12-10-2014, 10:28 PM
This... doesn't really count, but the Beach Pneumatic Transit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beach_Pneumatic_Transit) stations were 312 feet apart.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
12-21-2014, 02:14 AM
Don't older subway systems have a lot of this?
Not that I'm aware of. The direct walking connection between Downtown Crossing and Park Street is unique in my experience. Do you know of any others?

I apologize; I was being inadvertently vague here. I was referring to numerous stops and closely placed stations along a given subway line, without necessarily being able to walk from one to the next, all underground.

Don't Panic
12-21-2014, 03:49 AM
I was referring to numerous stops and closely placed stations along a given subway line, without necessarily being able to walk from one to the next, all underground.
Yeah, it seems like it, a bit. For instance, the center of Paris is littered with Metro stops, all within a short distance from each other, but the system mostly covers just the inner parts of the city, and not the suburbs. You wouldn't construct a system like that today, I think.

BTW, the older subway systems, like London, Paris and New York, generally just blow my mind. "We'll dig up this whole city, and create a vast network of underground railroads!" And those systems are just gigantic. Today, even a single line or an extension seems to take a jillion years to build, cost a bazillion dollars, and always goes through an endless amount of planning and faffing around, before maybe your grandkids get to ride on it. See the Second Avenue Subway in Manhattan for an example of that. When something new does get built in a city these days, it's seems that it's more often light rail or at least something above ground. It seems like there was more of a "can do" attitude about it back then.

Although, come to think of it, aren't pretty big systems being constructed in China? I know way too little about Chinese cities, unfortunately. I think I'll look into what is going on over there.

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