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View Full Version : Two questions about the British name "chips"...


Leaper
03-17-2015, 04:13 AM
1) Generally, modern fries don't look anything like any other type of thing I call "chips". Did they use to?

2) Fish and chips and potato chips were invented around the same time. Given that, how did fish and chips end up keeping its name in the United States while still leaving the word "chip" open for potato chips?

MrDibble
03-17-2015, 04:52 AM
1) Generally, modern fries don't look anything like any other type of thing I call "chips". Not even wood chips? (https://www.google.com/search?q=wood+chips&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8)

2) Fish and chips and potato chips were invented around the same time. Given that, how did fish and chips end up keeping its name in the United States while still leaving the word "chip" open for potato chips?Weren't potato chips independently invented in the US, and called that there ("Saratoga Chips") before F&C made it over from the UK? So a better question would be why "fish and chips" didn't morph into "fish and fries" - probably Victorian-American Anglophilia is at the heart of it. That and proper chips aren't like the usual French fry.

Quartz
03-17-2015, 04:57 AM
Fries are the matchstick type. Chips are bigger - much bigger. What Americans call chips we call crisps.

I believe that crisps are a far later invention (1853) than chips (pre 1800).

MrDibble
03-17-2015, 05:39 AM
I believe that crisps are a far later invention (1853) than chips (pre 1800).Chips are earlier, fish-and-chips as a particular, dedicated, retail combo seems to be contemporaneous or possibly even later (1860 being the best date I could find)

TheChileanBlob
03-17-2015, 06:08 AM
Fries are the matchstick type. Chips are bigger - much bigger.

I always picture "chips" as looking like what I'd call "home fries," round fried potato slices. What do they look like really?

GuanoLad
03-17-2015, 06:16 AM
What do they look like really?You've never had fish and chips? Wow, you've missed out.

Hot chips (as we tend to call them, to distinguish them from potato chips here) are chunkier (https://www.google.com.au/search?q=hot+chips&num=100&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=gQwIVfzZOojp8AX194DIAg&ved=0CB0QsAQ&biw=1432&bih=855), or occasionally even crinkle-cut.

Slithy Tove
03-17-2015, 06:36 AM
Brits will eat Chip Butty's: basically a French fry sandwich, which no American above the age of four would eat. Americans eat PB&Js, which Brits think appalling.

John Lennon's comfort food was chips and fried eggs. Elvis's was fried peanut butter and banana sandwiches.

Lennon died two years and eight months younger than Elvis, close enough for comparison: there was never a "Fat John" era. Ergo: French fries aren't as nasty a peanut butter.

TheChileanBlob
03-17-2015, 07:43 AM
You've never had fish and chips? Wow, you've missed out.

Hot chips (as we tend to call them, to distinguish them from potato chips here) are chunkier (https://www.google.com.au/search?q=hot+chips&num=100&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=gQwIVfzZOojp8AX194DIAg&ved=0CB0QsAQ&biw=1432&bih=855), or occasionally even crinkle-cut.

Well, the "fish and chips" pictures I've seen look just like what you'd get from Long John Silver's: french fries and battered fish filet. So, yes, I guess I have had them. I was confused about the "much bigger" part as they just look like regular fries to me.

RealityChuck
03-17-2015, 07:44 AM
I would assume that American "chips" comes directly from the UK chips. They seem to have been invented as a super-thin version of chips, supposedly because a customer kept sending his order back because they were too thick.

In any case, 'french fries" is a much later term, only becoming popular in the 1960s (https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=potato+chips%2Cfrench+fries%2CSaratoga+chips%2Cfried++potatoes&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&search_plus_one=form&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cpotato%20chips%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cfrench%20fries%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2CSaratoga%20ch ips%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cfried%20potatoes%3B%2Cc0). It may have been tied in with the frozen food industry, which marketed frozen fried potato sticks and French fries.

GuanoLad
03-17-2015, 08:00 AM
I was confused about the "much bigger" part as they just look like regular fries to me.A typical hot chip is considerably larger than a french fry, in fact maybe as much as four fries put together. Before we adopted the US nomenclature, fries were commonly labelled "shoestring" chips (http://shop.coles.com.au/online/national/mccain-superfries-potato-chips-shoestring-frozen).

silenus
03-17-2015, 10:11 AM
Last time I had F&C across the pond, the chips were more Red Robin and less McDonalds. So more "steak fries" and less "shoestring."

Johnny L.A.
03-17-2015, 10:17 AM
Not even wood chips? (https://www.google.com/search?q=wood+chips&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8)
The way I've thought of it, I envisioned someone chipping bits of potatoe off with a chisel, much like you might chip pieces off of wood.
Brits will eat Chip Butty's: basically a French fry sandwich, which no American above the age of four would eat. Americans eat PB&Js, which Brits think appalling.
I've eaten them, and the SO says I'm nine!

TriPolar
03-17-2015, 10:33 AM
Fish and Chips is dated to the 19th century based on the formulation of the name for a dish which is quite a bit older. Chips must have been well known before then, and likely were rather large pieces of potato until slicing tools were invented, and I'd assume slicing tools were needed to make US potato chips practical. The original chips for F&C were probably cut to a size where they'd cook in the same time as the typical piece of fish being fried.

bump
03-17-2015, 10:38 AM
A typical hot chip is considerably larger than a french fry, in fact maybe as much as four fries put together. Before we adopted the US nomenclature, fries were commonly labelled "shoestring" chips (http://shop.coles.com.au/online/national/mccain-superfries-potato-chips-shoestring-frozen).

Chips are more like fat french-fries. Where a typical McDonald's french fry is maybe a bit larger than a quarter-inch on a side (~6mm), a chip is more like 5/8" wide by 3/8" thick, and several inches long. Ore-Ida Steak Fries that you get in the freezer section aren't too far off.

silenus
03-17-2015, 10:56 AM
Fish and Chips is dated to the 19th century based on the formulation of the name for a dish which is quite a bit older. Chips must have been well known before then, and likely were rather large pieces of potato until slicing tools were invented, and I'd assume slicing tools were needed to make US potato chips practical. The original chips for F&C were probably cut to a size where they'd cook in the same time as the typical piece of fish being fried.

Slicing tools have been around for a million years, give or take. They're called "knives." :p

George Crum invented the potato chip using only a chef's knife.

TriPolar
03-17-2015, 11:57 AM
Slicing tools have been around for a million years, give or take. They're called "knives." :p

George Crum invented the potato chip using only a chef's knife.

Sure, but if you have a restaurant and need to make these things in quantity you won't find it practical to be cutting shoestring fries and potato chips without specialized cutting tools. Which is something I'm sure you realized I meant, but of course this is the Dope and slight ambiguities like that cannot be left to fester into the great sliced potato controversy of 2015 :)

silenus
03-17-2015, 12:28 PM
You grok well, Grasshopper. ;)

Son of a Rich
03-17-2015, 12:31 PM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

Ethilrist
03-17-2015, 12:32 PM
The way I've thought of it, I envisioned someone chipping bits of potatoe off with a chisel, much like you might chip pieces off of wood.
Or you could use a big hammer, but you gotta crack those suckers just right...

silenus
03-17-2015, 12:48 PM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

Mayo or fry sauce would be my guess.

bump
03-17-2015, 12:52 PM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

Based on what I know of British food, I'm guessing either butter, vinegar or HP Sauce.

Scougs
03-17-2015, 12:52 PM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

HP Sauce. (http://www.heinz.co.uk/en/Products/HP-Sauce)

Revenant Threshold
03-17-2015, 01:01 PM
Or ketchup, too.

Son of a Rich
03-17-2015, 01:10 PM
HP Sauce. (http://www.heinz.co.uk/en/Products/HP-Sauce)

Like everything else, available on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Sauce-15-Ounce-Plastic-Bottles-Pack/dp/B001E5DWZU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1426615668&sr=8-1&keywords=HP+Sauce). I might have to try a bottle (but not on french fry sandwiches).

Hail Ants
03-17-2015, 01:21 PM
Well, the "fish and chips" pictures I've seen look just like what you'd get from Long John Silver's: french fries and battered fish filet. So, yes, I guess I have had them. I was confused about the "much bigger" part as they just look like regular fries to me.For as long as I can remember American restaurants that serve anything called 'fish & chips', even specialty fast food joints like LJS (or, going back further, Arthur Treacher's Fish & Chips), the 'chips' are always just American french fires. Though not the thinnest of shoestring variety, usually somewhat thicker. I used to love Arthur Treacher's, everything deep fried in 100% evil, artery clogging peanut oil!

rowrrbazzle
03-18-2015, 01:32 AM
Cecil on chips and French fries http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2033/whats-the-origin-of-french-fries

Smid
03-18-2015, 04:56 AM
One thing which is typical of british chips, is that they are served with a heavy amount of salt and vinegar. So even if you get a similar type of product, in say Belgium, (where you may well get thicker cut chips than your typical french fry), you'll won't be getting any vinegar to go with them...

I'm not so sure what other foods typically use vinegar as a condiment. It is strong tasting and goes well with chips...

Cartoonacy
03-18-2015, 10:36 AM
Like everything else, available on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Sauce-15-Ounce-Plastic-Bottles-Pack/dp/B001E5DWZU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1426615668&sr=8-1&keywords=HP+Sauce). I might have to try a bottle (but not on french fry sandwiches).

This site (http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/11/21/10-american-substitutes-british-grocery-staples/) says that HP Sauce is essentially the same thing as A1 Steak Sauce. Kind of. Maybe.

bump
03-18-2015, 10:45 AM
This site (http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/11/21/10-american-substitutes-british-grocery-staples/) says that HP Sauce is essentially the same thing as A1 Steak Sauce. Kind of. Maybe.

A1 seems to be a more intense version of HP sauce- more sour and less sweet, but with a very similar taste profile otherwise.

Smid
03-18-2015, 10:47 AM
This site (http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/11/21/10-american-substitutes-british-grocery-staples/) says that HP Sauce is essentially the same thing as A1 Steak Sauce. Kind of. Maybe.

Nah. Not really. Brown sauce is tarmarind sauce and is thicker. I see what you mean, they are similar, but not the same...

silenus
03-18-2015, 11:15 AM
I have both sauces in the pantry. They aren't the same. In the same family, but not the same sauce.

Lukeinva
03-18-2015, 11:32 AM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

Stuffed in a Gyro of slow roasted pork sliced and served Plaka style stuffed with fries, tomatoes, onions and tzatziki. (https://www.google.com/search?q=plaka+gyro+stuffed+with+fries&biw=1455&bih=731&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=LacJVc6kMMyYgwS5rIKoBw&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#imgdii=_&imgrc=EA8yzn98jwvTtM%253A%3BpN-noSyKRx5p6M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fs3-media4.fl.yelpcdn.com%252Fbphoto%252FVKdTJnklYiQJgkZuULmkdQ%252Fo.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.yelp. com%252Fbiz_photos%252Fplaka-grill-vienna%253Fselect%253DVKdTJnklYiQJgkZuULmkdQ%3B1000%3B750)

chaika
03-18-2015, 11:46 AM
The chip butty is one of the (IMO) odd sandwich combinations one encounters in the UK. See also the fish finger sandwich. And of course that staple of the British diet: beans on toast.

Peanut butter has gained currency in the UK, I'm happy to report, with or without jam. I have one British acquaintance who likes peanut butter and tomato sandwiches, which sounds distinctly unappealing to me. But many Brits enjoy PB&J.

DrDeth
03-18-2015, 12:00 PM
I have both sauces in the pantry. They aren't the same. In the same family, but not the same sauce.

Yeah, like H57 sauce, they arent quite the same, but you'd be hard pressed to tell them apart once put on a burger.

You can make a sauce that tastes a little the same by stirring worcestershire sauce into ketchup.

actualliberalnotoneofthose
03-18-2015, 08:38 PM
I'm American and not a fan of "shoestring" fries and do not think of them when I think of french fries, FWIW. I rarely eat lunch/dinner at any food places that serve them (for example, Steak n Shake). Five Guys would be the closest thing to a mass market version of what I think of as typical fries. Any time I've had "fish and chips," it's close to typical fried fish and french fries.

Acsenray
03-18-2015, 08:43 PM
A typical hot chip is considerably larger than a french fry, in fact maybe as much as four fries put together. Before we adopted the US nomenclature, fries were commonly labelled "shoestring" chips (http://shop.coles.com.au/online/national/mccain-superfries-potato-chips-shoestring-frozen).

Chips are more like fat french-fries. Where a typical McDonald's french fry is maybe a bit larger than a quarter-inch on a side (~6mm), a chip is more like 5/8" wide by 3/8" thick, and several inches long. Ore-Ida Steak Fries that you get in the freezer section aren't too far off.

In the United States, these are all french fries. We don't distinguish between fat ones and thin ones—some places serve fatter ones and some serve thinner ones, but we consider them basically the same thing.

You do sometimes see references to "shoestring" fries, but that's only at some places that want to emphasize the thinness of their fries. We still don't consider that materially different from any other kind of french fry.

pulykamell
03-18-2015, 08:53 PM
I have both sauces in the pantry. They aren't the same. In the same family, but not the same sauce.

I find Heinz 57 to be closer to HP, but still different. Heinz 57 does seem to contain tamarind (I don't have a bottle of it handy, but an ingredient list I found does have it.) A1 I find much sharper and way more overpowering than either of these. (I could have sworn that had tamarind, too, in addition to the raisin paste that is the bulk of the fruitiness, but apparently, it does not.)

Ken001
03-19-2015, 01:55 AM
In the United States, these are all french fries. We don't distinguish between fat ones and thin ones—some places serve fatter ones and some serve thinner ones, but we consider them basically the same thing.

You do sometimes see references to "shoestring" fries, but that's only at some places that want to emphasize the thinness of their fries. We still don't consider that materially different from any other kind of french fry.

Didn't know that.

In NZ potato chips come in at least 5 distinct forms as evidenced at my local supermarket, not a mile from this very door.

1. Crisps, but often just referred to as chips.

2. Chips - straight standard model, about as fat and long as a forefinger.

3. Crinkle-cut chips - as above but zig-zag sides. Cook slightly faster and were regarded as fancy when I were a lad. Larger surface area means they hold more fat/oil + salt = tastier.

4. Wedges usually with skin on to hold the shape. Very popular in bars and restaurants with sour cream and chilli sauce.

5. Shoestring chips - nice enough, not common really, only McDonalds and KFC serve them. Or buy a bag of frozen.

Here's a manufacturer's site: http://www.watties.co.nz/Our-Products/Frozen-Foods/Frozen-Potatoes

Guinastasia
03-19-2015, 02:21 AM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

Coleslaw (http://www.primantibros.com/the-food/)

Smid
03-19-2015, 03:39 AM
Peanut butter has gained currency in the UK, I'm happy to report, with or without jam. I have one British acquaintance who likes peanut butter and tomato sandwiches, which sounds distinctly unappealing to me. But many Brits enjoy PB&J.

I can't say because I don't like the stuff, but isn't what the brits call peanut butter quite different from what the US call peanut butter? The US version being a lot sweeter? Does the US version have lumps in it (I think the uk one does)?

Filbert
03-19-2015, 05:43 AM
The UK's a modern country, we can get peanut butter with or without lumps, I'll have you know!

From comparison to import US peanut butter, UK stuff isn't as sweet in general, but I prefer it savoury, and tend to stick to the varieties I like, so maybe that's just a biased sample.

Chip butties can be served with ketchup, brown sauce (HP or similar, known by this appetising name) or possibly barbecue sauce or mayo. Fry sauce isn't really a thing here. The bread is usually buttered, and vinegar may be added to the chips, though this is not universal.

Ken001
03-19-2015, 05:55 AM
Which reminds me of poor student days when were happy with a fried slice of bread - with tomato sauce (ketchup) of course. Yum.

Mahaloth
03-19-2015, 07:17 AM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

Have you ever had the fry-lover's burger at Rally's or Checkers? It's pretty good. (http://cdn.foodbeast.com.s3.amazonaws.com/content/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/fry-lovers-checkers-rallys-burger.jpg)

pulykamell
03-19-2015, 07:28 AM
Have you ever had the fry-lover's burger at Rally's or Checkers? It's pretty good. (http://cdn.foodbeast.com.s3.amazonaws.com/content/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/fry-lovers-checkers-rallys-burger.jpg)

Yeah, but that is an actual hamburger with all sorts of stuff on it, like meat, cheese, pickles, etc. A chip buttie is just chips on bread. Like here. (http://cmsfish.co.uk)

theR
03-19-2015, 07:46 AM
Didn't know that.

In NZ potato chips come in at least 5 distinct forms as evidenced at my local supermarket, not a mile from this very door.

1. Crisps, but often just referred to as chips.

2. Chips - straight standard model, about as fat and long as a forefinger.

3. Crinkle-cut chips - as above but zig-zag sides. Cook slightly faster and were regarded as fancy when I were a lad. Larger surface area means they hold more fat/oil + salt = tastier.

4. Wedges usually with skin on to hold the shape. Very popular in bars and restaurants with sour cream and chilli sauce.

5. Shoestring chips - nice enough, not common really, only McDonalds and KFC serve them. Or buy a bag of frozen.

Here's a manufacturer's site: http://www.watties.co.nz/Our-Products/Frozen-Foods/Frozen-Potatoes

We have all those in the USA, too. Most people just don't bother distinguishing when they're talking about them, but certainly restaurants or the frozen packages will distinguish if they're not the most common kind. Here is how yours translate in the USA:

1. Chips of course
2. Fries, or sometimes steak fries (steak fries are usually much wider and a bit thicker than common American fries)
3. Crinkle cut fries
4. It sounds like you're describing potato skins with toppings, but it could also be steak fries. Skins are partially hollowed potato pieces (like halves or quarters) with skin that are then topped with all sorts of things.
5. Fries
6. Waffle fries (e.g., the kind Chick Fil-A serves)
7. Curly fries (e.g. from Arby's)

Tator tots are also very popular in the USA (at least in my house), but aren't truly fries. They're more like shaped hash browns.

pulykamell
03-19-2015, 08:21 AM
4. It sounds like you're describing potato skins with toppings, but it could also be steak fries. Skins are partially hollowed potato pieces (like halves or quarters) with skin that are then topped with all sorts of things.


#4 sounds to me like what I would call potato wedges. Like here (https://www.google.com/search?q=potato+wedges&espv=2&biw=1866&bih=1056&site=webhp&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=D80KVeKtO-vLsATSkoG4BA&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&dpr=0.9).

Acsenray
03-19-2015, 09:08 AM
Also in the U.S.. If someone said "shoestring fries," we wouldn't expect to see McDonald's-style fries. Those are just fries—thin cut, but still within the just plain old fries category.

If I heard something described as shoestring fries, I would expect them not only to be very thin, but also curled, that is, not generally straight, like McDonald's fries.

TriPolar
03-19-2015, 09:14 AM
Also in the U.S.. If someone said "shoestring fries," we wouldn't expect to see McDonald's-style fries. Those are just fries—thin cut, but still within the just plain old fries category.

If I heard something described as shoestring fries, I would expect them not only to be very thin, but also curled, that is, not generally straight, like McDonald's fries.

No, those are shoestring fries, thin cut, that's all it means.

chaika
03-19-2015, 09:17 AM
Sorry, duplicate.

chaika
03-19-2015, 09:20 AM
I can't say because I don't like the stuff, but isn't what the brits call peanut butter quite different from what the US call peanut butter? The US version being a lot sweeter? Does the US version have lumps in it (I think the uk one does)?

It's possible to buy peanut butter with sugar added in both the US and the UK. I tried the sweet version a couple of times many years ago but didn't care for it so I wouldn't buy it now. But obviously some people do like that kind of PB on both sides of the Atlantic. And you can have smooth or chunky versions of PB in both countries.

pulykamell
03-19-2015, 09:53 AM
No, those are shoestring fries, thin cut, that's all it means.

Yes, I would call McDonald's fries "shoestring fries," as well, if the designation were necessary.

Acsenray
03-19-2015, 09:59 AM
No, to me, shoestring fries are bendable and not stick-shaped., and often served in a tangled mound — like these —

http://www.thecookierookie.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/fries2-1024x768.jpg

I would never call firm, straight fries shoestring fries.

pulykamell
03-19-2015, 10:02 AM
No, to me, shoestring fries are bendable and not stick-shaped., and often served in a tangled mound — like these —

http://www.thecookierookie.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/fries2-1024x768.jpg

I would never call firm, straight fries shoestring fries.

That's fine, but to me and many other Americans,, "shoestring fries" is just thin cut fries. Like see upper left here. (http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/French_fries/Gallery) Yours can also be called that, or petite-cut fries or potato shoestrings,

DrDeth
03-19-2015, 11:51 AM
That's fine, but to me and many other Americans,, "shoestring fries" is just thin cut fries. Like see upper left here. (http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/French_fries/Gallery) Yours can also be called that, or petite-cut fries or potato shoestrings,

To me McD's arent quite thin enough to be shoestring fries. Close, but no.

pulykamell
03-19-2015, 11:56 AM
To me McD's arent quite thin enough to be shoestring fries. Close, but no.

:shrug: They are known as such among many folks, in my experience. Just google "shoestring fries" and look at the images. There may (most likely are) regional differences. I am familiar with the longer type that is pretty much just as thin. Look at the photo here (http://www.gastronami.com/?p=2357), for example, for what a diner in Sag Harbor, NY, calls "shoestring fries." Those look like McDonald's-sized fries to me.

TriPolar
03-19-2015, 12:56 PM
To me McD's arent quite thin enough to be shoestring fries. Close, but no.

McDonalds uses 3/16" fries I think, they don't get much smaller than that.

Lukeinva
03-19-2015, 01:30 PM
Here is my official unofficial size chart for the four basic fries size... :p

Shoestring Fries (https://www.google.com/search?q=shoestring+fries&biw=1455&bih=731&tbm=isch&imgil=mGLwyJ09nXJp5M%253A%253BGwJ7zsbOrX8KfM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.thecookierookie.com%25 252Fshoestring-potatoes-a-giveaway%25252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=mGLwyJ09nXJp5M%253A%252CGwJ7zsbOrX8KfM%252C_&usg=__936cPR0GE7BTuQm1fMYZrgDSMSA%3D&ved=0CDQQyjc&ei=bBQLVZ3AAc7-sATl5oCwCA#imgrc=mGLwyJ09nXJp5M%253A%3BGwJ7zsbOrX8KfM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.thecookierookie.com%2 52Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2014%252F03%252Ffries2-1024x768.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.thecookierookie.com%252Fshoestring-potatoes-a-giveaway%252F%3B1024%3B768)

Boardwalk (regular) fries (https://www.google.com/search?q=thrashers+fries&biw=1455&bih=731&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=phQLVYOSHoH7sATi6YKoDQ&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg#imgdii=_&imgrc=B7103zTWxRKDpM%253A%3B77x3MmZ0Bf76BM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fthrashersfries.com%252Fimages%252Ffr ies.png%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fthrashersfries.com%252F%3B262%3B262)

English fish & chips (https://www.google.com/search?q=english+fish+%26+chips&biw=1455&bih=731&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=BxULVd_DEYmrggToxoCICw&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#imgdii=_&imgrc=EIUQQfWCI6HX5M%253A%3B1zI-oErtoWEDHM%3Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fmariahjuneofficial.files.wordpress.com%252F2012%252F12%252Ffish-and-chips-adventure-7.jpg%253Fw%253D1200%3Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fmariahjuneofficial.wordpress.com%252F2012%252F12%252F22%2 52Fmy-fish-and-chips-adventure%252Ffish-and-chips-adventure-7%252F%3B1200%3B795)

Steak Fries (https://www.google.com/search?q=steak+fries&biw=1455&bih=731&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ORULVe2aHo3asASwt4CYAw&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#imgdii=_&imgrc=zUx9fHUBWlGeYM%253A%3BWsLCA945e088tM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Ffoodnetwork.sndimg.com%252Fcontent%2 52Fdam%252Fimages%252Ffood%252Ffullset%252F2003%252F10%252F16%252F0%252Ftm1b68_oven_steak_fries.jpg. rend.sni12col.landscape.jpeg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.foodnetwork.com%252Frecipes%252Frachael-ray%252Foven-steak-fries-recipe.html%3B405%3B305)

GuanoLad
03-19-2015, 06:40 PM
I'm hungry.

silenus
03-19-2015, 06:44 PM
When we make fish & chips, I use waffle fries.

TBG
03-19-2015, 09:53 PM
I would not call what McD's serves "shoestring" under any circumstances. Shoestring fries are even thinner, you could easily get a couple, maybe more, of them out of a single McD fry.

And what KFC serves, not even close. Those are potato wedges (that's even what they call them), they must serve something else entirely in foreignville, because you'd have to be blind to call those things shoestring.

http://images.fatsecret.com/food/ec8a4e02-fb93-4afc-9575-b9ef01aab460.jpg

Hail Ants
03-19-2015, 11:19 PM
It's possible to buy peanut butter with sugar added in both the US and the UK. I tried the sweet version a couple of times many years ago but didn't care for it so I wouldn't buy it now. But obviously some people do like that kind of PB on both sides of the Atlantic. And you can have smooth or chunky versions of PB in both countries.Well, AFAIK all peanut butter in America always has roughly the same amount of sugar in it. I'm diabetic and I've never seen anything called 'sugar-free' peanut butter. The only thing I can think of would be so-called 'natural' peanut butter, the stuff where the oil separates when it sits and you have to stir it before using. Peanut butter used in candy, like Reese Cups, always has extra sugar in it.

I've always thought that Brits love their 'jam', but come to think of it I've never seen peanut butter mentioned in British TV shows or movies. So I guess it could be as foreign & gross sounding to them as things like 'blood pudding' is to us... :eek:

Johanna
03-20-2015, 12:02 AM
In Belgium, the land that invented "French" fries, they like mustard on them. I have caroused with Belgians, drinking beer, playing foosball, and snarfing pommes frites à la moutarde. Good times.

eschereal
03-20-2015, 12:57 AM
4. It sounds like you're describing potato skins with toppings, but it could also be steak fries. Skins are partially hollowed potato pieces (like halves or quarters) with skin that are then topped with all sorts of things.

Or perhaps something like the thing we have here called "jo-jos", which are long quarter potato cuts typically having a seasoned floury coating. Often eaten with a ranch dip.

Now I must strongly curse you all, every one, for it is late, and between fits of gagging over some of these twisted cuisine ideas, I am wracking my memory for a place within ten miles of here where I can get decent pedestrian F&C. There might be a Skippers at the bottom of the hill, but the cannot be open at this hour.

Guinastasia
03-20-2015, 01:16 AM
The best condiment for fries is cheese. Gotta be cheese.

MrDibble
03-20-2015, 01:53 AM
they must serve something else entirely in foreignville
KFC here serves chips (http://kfc.co.za/c/meal/chips-large/), which would not be out of place in a fish-and-chips place if not for their uniformity and crispiness, but are in the ballpark sizewise. What you have there are what I'd call potato wedges, too.

Smid
03-20-2015, 04:14 AM
In Belgium, the land that invented "French" fries, they like mustard on them. I have caroused with Belgians, drinking beer, playing foosball, and snarfing pommes frites à la moutarde. Good times.

Really? I lived there four and a half years and have never heard of this...

Of course Belgium has a few regions, lived in Antwerp and Brussels though...

BigT
03-20-2015, 05:10 AM
Cecil on chips and French fries http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2033/whats-the-origin-of-french-fries

I know we all like to pretend Cecil isn't a real person, but there's absolutely no way he's actually Dex.

Slithy Tove
03-20-2015, 05:54 AM
I've always thought that Brits love their 'jam', but come to think of it I've never seen peanut butter mentioned in British TV shows or movies. So I guess it could be as foreign & gross sounding to them as things like 'blood pudding' is to us... :eek:

After WWII the British tried to boost African economy and nutrition with the Great Tanganyika Groundnut Scheme. It was an utter failure because, no matter the virtues, who wants to eat something called "groundnut paste?"

Tibby
03-20-2015, 06:15 AM
Brits will eat Chip Butty's: basically a French fry sandwich, which no American above the age of four would eat. Americans eat PB&Js, which Brits think appalling.

Leave it to those wacky Brits to come up with some god-awful sounding cuisine like “chip butty”, no doubt a veritable heart attack on a plate! :eek:

Why can’t they just eat normal food, like my “bacon, scrapple, cheese & ketchup on buttered toast club sandwich”? (Sometimes I slide a leaf of lettuce between the bacon and scrapple, if I’m in the mood to eat healthy).

BTW: anyone know where I can score some cheap Orlistat?

Tibby
03-20-2015, 06:28 AM
Leave it to those wacky Brits to come up with some god-awful sounding cuisine like “chip butty”, no doubt a veritable heart attack on a plate! :eek:

And, please, permit me to apologize; I don’t mean to pick on the Brits. It wouldn’t surprise me in the least if those nutty Canadians, South Africans, Kiwis and Aussies eat chip butty sandwiches, too. Of course in the Land of Oz, they probably call them Chip & Marmite Buttys.

chaika
03-20-2015, 08:50 AM
Well, AFAIK all peanut butter in America always has roughly the same amount of sugar in it. I'm diabetic and I've never seen anything called 'sugar-free' peanut butter. The only thing I can think of would be so-called 'natural' peanut butter, the stuff where the oil separates when it sits and you have to stir it before using. Peanut butter used in candy, like Reese Cups, always has extra sugar in it.

I've always thought that Brits love their 'jam', but come to think of it I've never seen peanut butter mentioned in British TV shows or movies. So I guess it could be as foreign & gross sounding to them as things like 'blood pudding' is to us... :eek:

The peanut butter I buy is made from peanuts and salt, nothing else. No sugar or oil added.

And PB is well known in the UK these days.

MrDibble
03-20-2015, 09:15 AM
It wouldn’t surprise me in the least if those nutty Canadians, South Africans, Kiwis and Aussies eat chip butty sandwiches, too.
Don't be ridiculous.

South Africans eat Chip Rolls!

Unless they can get a Gatsby ....

RobDog
03-20-2015, 09:17 AM
So I guess it could be as foreign & gross sounding to them as things like 'blood pudding' is to us... :eek:

Not really. It's very much a standard item here. The online supermarket I use stocks the following brands:

Meridian, Sun-Pat, Biona, Whole Earth, Jif, Skippy, Eskal, Smuckers, Black Cat and their own brand; Waitrose (pretty much every major supermarket here has their own brand including Tesco, Morrisons, Asda, Sainsburys, Marks & Spencer etc)

Varieties of the above include smooth, creamy, crunchy, organic, palm-fat free, peanut & raisin, peanut & chilli, peanut & grape jelly, peanut & strawberry jelly.

Then there's the almond butter, no-nut butter (sunflower seeds), 3-nut butter, mixed nut butter, peanut butter ice cream, Reese's cups, and crunchy peanut butter Kit Kat.

Oh, and two varieties of peanut butter for birds; original and with mealworms!

Fuzzy_wuzzy
03-20-2015, 09:31 AM
Leave it to those wacky Brits to come up with some god-awful sounding cuisine like “chip butty”, no doubt a veritable heart attack on a plate! :eek:

Why can’t they just eat normal food, like my “bacon, scrapple, cheese & ketchup on buttered toast club sandwich”? (Sometimes I slide a leaf of lettuce between the bacon and scrapple, if I’m in the mood to eat healthy).

BTW: anyone know where I can score some cheap Orlistat?


We take no lectures from a nation that eats hotdogs.

Im a fan of American fast food. I remember the miserable hamburger joints we had here in the UK before McDonalds came to our shores. But my god, hotdogs come straight from Satan's ass!

BrainGlutton
03-20-2015, 10:05 AM
Fries are the matchstick type. Chips are bigger - much bigger.

I believe they're the same thing as what we call "steak fries" here.

eschereal
03-20-2015, 10:20 AM
We take no lectures from a nation that eats hotdogs.

Im a fan of American fast food. I remember the miserable hamburger joints we had here in the UK before McDonalds came to our shores.
Never count on the bottom, sometimes things can actually get even worse. I say "I need a McDonalds" as a discreet way to ask where is the nearest loo.

But my god, hotdogs come straight from Satan's ass!

Were hotdogs not invented by the Germans?

BrainGlutton
03-20-2015, 10:20 AM
But my god, hotdogs come straight from Satan's ass!

Frankfurters are all meat (wouldn't get any more specific than that, but all meat). What are your British bangers made of, breadcrumbs and slaughterhouse floor-sweepings?

glee
03-20-2015, 10:38 AM
In my personal experience:

- chip butties are served with tomato ketchup and some salt (N.B. I live in the South of England, so expect that up North brown sauce is preferred)

- Belgians like mayonnaise best on their chips

- although Americans have some excellent cuisine, I cannot accept criticism from a culture that offers squeezy cheese :smack: ('http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easy_Cheese')

Tibby
03-20-2015, 11:07 AM
..., I cannot accept criticism from a culture that offers squeezy cheese :smack: ('http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easy_Cheese')
Yeah, well, on the other hand, we have mouth-watering scrapple (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple), so put that in your bonnet and smoke it, mate!

But, I will admit, I decided to change the name of my sandwich to a “bacon, scrapple, cheese & ketchup triple decker toasted BUTTY”, and it does sound more appetizing that way!

TriPolar
03-20-2015, 11:13 AM
In my personal experience:

- chip butties are served with tomato ketchup and some salt (N.B. I live in the South of England, so expect that up North brown sauce is preferred)

- Belgians like mayonnaise best on their chips

- although Americans have some excellent cuisine, I cannot accept criticism from a culture that offers squeezy cheese :smack: ('http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easy_Cheese')

Really? The English looking down upon OUR food? Maybe the Italians or the French could take such an attitude but we don't eat Stargazey pie or Black Pudding.

pulykamell
03-20-2015, 11:39 AM
Frankfurters are all meat (wouldn't get any more specific than that, but all meat). What are your British bangers made of, breadcrumbs and slaughterhouse floor-sweepings?

Yeah, and some are explicitly all primal cuts beef. (Chicago's very own Vienna Beef is 100% beef brisket). It ain't all lips and assholes here, and I assume New York kosher dogs are similar. (Though Vienna Beef aren't kosher, being natural casing.)

Stanislaus
03-20-2015, 11:40 AM
... we don't eat Stargazey pie or Black Pudding.

Exactly our point!

Hail Ants
03-20-2015, 04:44 PM
The peanut butter I buy is made from peanuts and salt, nothing else. No sugar or oil added.Do live in the US? Where do you buy it and what is it called?

We take no lectures from a nation that eats hotdogs.

Im a fan of American fast food. I remember the miserable hamburger joints we had here in the UK before McDonalds came to our shores. But my god, hotdogs come straight from Satan's ass!Even in America hot dog quality can vary wildly. Cheap, generic supermarket-brand hot dogs are disgusting and inedible. Hebrew National, Nathan's, and Oscar Meyer are all pretty good. And always buy beef, not pork ones.


And in terms of US fast food in the UK:

Do you guys have all the franchises there? Is Wendy's generally deemed superior than McDonald's or Burger King? (IMO it's no contest...)

RobDog
03-20-2015, 04:54 PM
...
Do you guys have all the franchises there? Is Wendy's generally deemed superior than McDonald's or Burger King? (IMO it's no contest...)

McDonald's and Burger King are pretty ubiquitous. There was a Wendy's in the West End (of London) I went to many years ago, but I've not seen one anywhere since, which is a shame, because I remember them being delicious.

pulykamell
03-20-2015, 04:57 PM
And always buy beef, not pork ones.

Pork (or pork & beef) ones can also be quite good, but those tend to be smaller-scale productions. My favorite hot dog is the pork & beef one from Sahlen's (Buffalo, NY). Probably heretical for me as a Chicagoan to say, but it's my favorite.

eschereal
03-20-2015, 05:02 PM
Do live in the US? Where do you buy it and what is it called?

This is a common brand (http://www.adamspeanutbutter.com/product) that can be found in most stores around here.

Tibby
03-20-2015, 06:57 PM
Let's not forget, the Brits have a long history of eating awful, something most of us right minded Americans find absolutely offal.

Fuzzy_wuzzy
03-20-2015, 08:11 PM
Frankfurters are all meat (wouldn't get any more specific than that, but all meat). What are your British bangers made of, breadcrumbs and slaughterhouse floor-sweepings?

British bangers may be made of all these things but they still taste great.

Fuzzy_wuzzy
03-20-2015, 08:18 PM
Do live in the US? Where do you buy it and what is it called?

Even in America hot dog quality can vary wildly. Cheap, generic supermarket-brand hot dogs are disgusting and inedible. Hebrew National, Nathan's, and Oscar Meyer are all pretty good. And always buy beef, not pork ones.


And in terms of US fast food in the UK:

Do you guys have all the franchises there? Is Wendy's generally deemed superior than McDonald's or Burger King? (IMO it's no contest...)

Fair enough, it may just be the cheap crap I have tasted.

As far as franchises go in the UK: to be honest im not sure. We get your McDees, KFC, Burger King(which may be British?) etc. I haven't personally seen a Wendy's. All we had before McDonalds came along was the British hamburger chain Wimpy. A more depressing experience was barely imagineable than a meal at Wimpy's. I distinctly remember raw(or as good as raw) onions on the burgers. For all the criticism of McDonalds they were a corporate breath of fresh air at one time.

eschereal
03-20-2015, 08:31 PM
You guys have curry shops on every corner – like where I live, you cannot spit without hitting a teriyaki place.

Your Great Darsh Face
03-21-2015, 03:15 AM
Really? The English looking down upon OUR food? Maybe the Italians or the French could take such an attitude but we don't eat Stargazey pie or Black Pudding.

Black pudding is delectable and I pity your benighted ignorance that you are unable to appreciate this. As to the pie, it's one of the most regional foods in existence, being proper not to England as a whole, nor even Cornwall as a whole nor yet even a part of the county, but the single tiny fishing port of Mousehole (Mowz'l), so I've heard of it but never eaten it. I imagine actually eating the heads is not compulsory.

JustinC
03-21-2015, 03:00 PM
In my personal experience:

- chip butties are served with tomato ketchup and some salt (N.B. I live in the South of England, so expect that up North brown sauce is preferred)

- Belgians like mayonnaise best on their chips

- although Americans have some excellent cuisine, I cannot accept criticism from a culture that offers squeezy cheese :smack: ('http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easy_Cheese')

Do Belgians drown their chips in that shit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYSt8K8VP6k) or is there some variation? I'm not doubting you but wondering if this is misinformation from a very popular film.

I used to love chip butties, buttered slices of bread or a big bread bun, some ketchup, salt and throw the chips in. Now I don't appreciate is so much, it kinds of sticks in my gullet, doesn't go down well.

Now, a proper fish and chip supper I'll drive 30 miles for. If the restaurant is near the sea, has fresh haddock and cod, knows how to cook the chips (you should cook them partially, then again so they're cooked at least twice), plus has unlimited salt and vinegar for the chips and good tartar sauce for the fish, I'll go out of my way to eat there.

I have family near Skeggie (Skegness, a popular holiday resort by the sea) and there are about 6/7 decent chippies there. They're cheap and satisfying but the sauces are shop bought and chips frozen. Nice big, chunky chips so they hold their heat longer in the face of the North Sea breeze, but they still taste a bit powdery.

Plus the batter is cheap. I make a better batter at home using beer, I check the temperature of the fryer and make sure it's big enough to not drop too low and make soft, gelatinous fish batter and chips. The tartar source is homemade, the vinegar brown, the salt's from the sea and the ketchup is for the kids. Mayo never goes anywhere near a good fish and chips supper. Me and my family have never even brought a mayo jar out when we're eating fish and chips. That would be like adding chutney to a good steak! Wrong, wrong, wrong.

Baron Greenback
03-21-2015, 04:40 PM
Do Belgians drown their chips in that shit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYSt8K8VP6k) or is there some variation? I'm not doubting you but wondering if this is misinformation from a very popular film.


Chips with mayo is an amazingly good combo - and yes the Belgians do that by default. It's a thick, almost yellowish mayo, not runny at all and it is delicious.

Johanna
03-21-2015, 08:38 PM
The mustard-fries-snarfing Belgians I caroused with were mostly from Bruges, if that makes any difference. I remember them firmly insisting that mustard was the only Belgian fries condiment, and they savored the combination with much esteem and huzzahs as a reminder of home This took place in France during my wayward youth, nearly 40 years ago. Maybe mayonnaise has taken over since then.

Quartz
03-22-2015, 04:04 AM
In Belgium, an alternative to Mayo is Bearnaise sauce. yum!

Mangetout
03-22-2015, 04:19 AM
Jeeze, a french fry sandwich sounds pretty bland. How are they typically condimented?

Lots of butter on the bread. Salt and vinegar on the chips.

RobDog
03-22-2015, 04:40 AM
Lots of butter on the bread. Salt and vinegar on the chips.
It's not really a proper chip butty unless a bit of melted butter has dripped down as far as your wrist.

Mangetout
03-22-2015, 06:44 AM
It's not really a proper chip butty unless a bit of melted butter has dripped down as far as your wrist.

Indeed, but there should also be cool slivers of unmelted butter inside, so each mouthful is a blend of sensations.

Smid
03-23-2015, 03:56 AM
In Belgium, an alternative to Mayo is Bearnaise sauce. yum!

Lived in Belgium where I picked up a love for Bearnaise sauce for my steak, but never heard of it used on fries... Still, sounds good... Anything with Bearnaise sauce.

Smid
03-23-2015, 04:06 AM
As far as franchises go in the UK: to be honest im not sure. We get your McDees, KFC, Burger King(which may be British?) etc. I haven't personally seen a Wendy's. All we had before McDonalds came along was the British hamburger chain Wimpy. A more depressing experience was barely imagineable than a meal at Wimpy's. I distinctly remember raw(or as good as raw) onions on the burgers. For all the criticism of McDonalds they were a corporate breath of fresh air at one time.

Burger King is not british. It bought out the Wimpy chain, but was here before that happened (a lot of Wimpys changed to BK's).

Brits have a weird collective recall of Wimpys. It's my favourite hamburger chain, and their quarter pounder with cheese IMHO is by far the best chain burger in the UK (ok, not tried this recent gourmet ones, but compared to the shit that BK or McD serve, seriously? People rate that crap?) Very hard to find nowadays, now that the mass hypnosis on the overcooked 2cm thick BK burgers and the tiny "Big mac" experience has took over...

No Wendy's though. McD's doesn't sell root beer here anymore, it did a long time ago. Regionally it sold other stuff, like Irn Bru in Glasgow McD's. But the dominant burger chain is McD's now. The battle is over. Tiny burgers named big won.

Burger King has actually kind of failed as a high street chain nowadays. For instance, the BK in Wolverhampton shut down about 7 years ago, and never reopened. It's now a niche fast food chain, in railway stations and service stations. I guess some cities still have them on the high street, but compared to the fact that there's about 4 McD's and around 7 Subways and no BK's local to me, shows the brand failure there. I get the impression its not doing very well in the US either.

Chain pubs like Wetherspoon do a reasonable burger and chips with a drink (alcoholic or not) for about same price as a chain meal, so I guess that's where the rest of the custom went...

Oh, and interesting comment on raw onions on Wimpy burgers. It's raw onion on every BK burger.

Ken001
03-23-2015, 04:35 AM
Take you to the cinema
And leave you in a Wimpy Bar
You tell me that we've gone too far
Come running up to me...

eschereal
03-23-2015, 09:26 AM
Did Wimpys gladly extend you credit to Tuesday?

amanset
03-23-2015, 11:32 AM
Really? The English looking down upon OUR food? Maybe the Italians or the French could take such an attitude but we don't eat Stargazey pie or Black Pudding.

You are aware that variants of black pudding exists in French and Italian cuisine, right? Blood in cooking, especially in sausages, is pretty common all over the place. It always amazes me that the Brits somehow get blamed for it.

TriPolar
03-23-2015, 11:37 AM
You are aware that variants of black pudding exists in French and Italian cuisine, right? Blood in cooking, especially in sausages, is pretty common all over the place. It always amazes me that the Brits somehow get blamed for it.

It's kind of traditional to blame the English for bad food. If the French make it then it's a delicacy. If the English make it then it's garbage not fit for a mangy cat to eat.

RobDog
03-23-2015, 11:43 AM
I think it's mostly a naming problem. Boudin Noir and Morcella sound exotic and lyrical. Black pudding, although absolutely not inferior (IMHO) to the French and Spanish equivalents, sounds lumpen.

eschereal
03-23-2015, 12:18 PM
Are American hot dogs really anything other than bite-size haggises?

TriPolar
03-23-2015, 12:29 PM
Are American hot dogs really anything other than bite-size haggises?

I don't know that any hot dogs are made from sheep although it's possible to do. But no, if you are talking about contemporary American hot dogs the vast majority of them are made solely with beef and/or pork muscle meat. There are some things called hot dogs made from chicken or turkey meat, which should be illegal, but it's impossible to actually prove they exist because they cause such great cognizant dissonance that the victim represses all memories of even having seen them.

pulykamell
03-23-2015, 12:49 PM
Are American hot dogs really anything other than bite-size haggises?

A typical recipe might be whole muscle meat, mix of pork and beef, somethiing like totally 20% fat or so. The sausage is usually spiced with dry mustard, paprika, sometimes mace or nutmeg, salt, pepper, etc. The sausage is then emulsified into a paste so when it's cooked it is completely smooth. It is also often lightly smoked.

pulykamell
03-23-2015, 12:51 PM
Here's a good rundown (http://ruhlman.com/2006/11/dog/) of good American hot dogs.

pulykamell
03-23-2015, 01:03 PM
I should add, hot dogs may contain offal or off-cuts, but it's hardly a rule, and the more expensive brands tend to use whole meat cuts. For me, the main points that define a hot dog are that it is an emulsified forcemeat, it is lightly smoked and cooked through before heating and serving. They tend to be stuffed in sheep's casings (or no casings at all) so you have a thin and long end product. The spicing also tends to be garlicky, a bit of pepper, and some kind of "sweet" spice like mace/nutmeg, coriander, or ginger.

TriPolar
03-23-2015, 01:21 PM
I should add, hot dogs may contain offal or off-cuts, but it's hardly a rule, and the more expensive brands tend to use whole meat cuts. For me, the main points that define a hot dog are that it is an emulsified forcemeat, it is lightly smoked and cooked through before heating and serving. They tend to be stuffed in sheep's casings (or no casings at all) so you have a thin and long end product. The spicing also tends to be garlicky, a bit of pepper, and some kind of "sweet" spice like mace/nutmeg, coriander, or ginger.

Ah yes, sheep's casings are sometimes used so there is a near overlap with the ingredients of haggis. I go for all beef, but I want that casing, it gives the dog that snap when you bite into it.

pulykamell
03-23-2015, 01:58 PM
Ah yes, sheep's casings are sometimes used so there is a near overlap with the ingredients of haggis. I go for all beef, but I want that casing, it gives the dog that snap when you bite into it.

For me, without the sheep casing and the snap it provides, it's just not quite "right." That's why a lot of the New York kosher dogs are a non-starter for me. That said, even here in Chicago, it's getting more and more difficult to find natural casing dogs, which is why some intrepid soul came up with a natural casing map for Chicago. (http://chicago.seriouseats.com/2011/11/sausage-city-presenting-the-natural-casing-hot-dog-map.html) My area of town, near Midway airport, has tons of hot dog joints. There's hardly any on the map, which jibes with my experience of the difficulty of finding them. Luckily, there's always Portillo's. If I'm in a part of town craving a hot dog, and I don't know the area, I end up at Portillo's.

MrDibble
03-24-2015, 01:30 AM
I think it's mostly a naming problem. Boudin Noir and Morcella sound exotic and lyrical. Black pudding, although absolutely not inferior (IMHO) to the French and Spanish equivalents, sounds lumpen.

I suggest "Midnight Bangers" as a new name? Or "Sooty Sausage"...

RobDog
03-24-2015, 03:38 AM
I suggest "Midnight Bangers" as a new name? Or "Sooty Sausage"...
Not bad, but sound ever so slightly like a range of black dildos. ;)

MrDibble
03-24-2015, 09:33 AM
Not bad, but sound ever so slightly like a range of black dildos. ;)

You've seen right through my alternative marketing campaign :)

Johanna
03-25-2015, 10:17 PM
Chewing through your Wimpy dreams, they eat without a sound. Digesting England by the pound.

Tibby
03-26-2015, 02:20 AM
Here's a good rundown (http://ruhlman.com/2006/11/dog/) of good American hot dogs.
Indeed, the American hot dog is beyond reproach. It’s respectable and magically delicious. And, there are so many sanctioned toppings you may put on a hot dog (e.g. mustard, ketchup, coleslaw, relish, chili, sauerkraut, onions, tomatoes, sliced dill pickle, gummi bears, etc.), that if you attempted every possible combination, you would never eat the same hot dog twice in your life…even if you ate an infinite number of hot dogs per day and lived to infinity years.

I make things simple for myself: like my intellectual doppelgänger, Albert Einstein, who allegedly had a closet full of the same identical suit so that he didn’t have to waste mental time thinking about what to wear each day, I just put all possible toppings on my hot dogs all at once. Like a small snake eating a big pig, I’ve got to unhinge my jaws to get it in, but it’s worth the effort.

Of course, if you’re an Evel Knievel-type risk-taker, you can dance with the devil and enter the world of non-sanctioned toppings for your hot dog. The beautiful thing about it is, no matter what you put in a hot dog bun, as long as a wiener is buried in there somewhere, it’s called a “hot dog.” You can stick a hot dog and bun on top of a 22oz T-bone steak and it’s still simply called a "steak dog." There was intense controversy here in the States a few years back when the hamburger-people claimed that the combination of hamburger and hot dog should legally be called a "dog burger", but those people mysteriously giant airquote"disappeared"giant airquote from the face of the earth. Good riddance I say.

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