PDA

View Full Version : What's Your Favourite Piece of Classical Music?


Doctor_Why_Bother
03-17-2015, 07:42 AM
I'm trying to learn a bit more about classical music. Unfortunately, I'm far too lazy and impatient to go about this in any kind of systemised way, so I figured I'd just get a bunch of recommendations and go from there. I know the question's kind of broad, but I don't really know enough about classical music yet to have much of a preference for any particular time period/style/powdered wig, so any and all recommendations are welcome.

Cheers all!

RealityChuck
03-17-2015, 07:46 AM
For well-known pieces, I'd go with Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

For more obscure, there's Darius Milhuad's Le Boeuf sur le Toit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZLfIKYg0Pg)

ETA: I forgot the Dvorak Piano Quintet in A Major. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xn7VmoJ7_AQ)

Quartz
03-17-2015, 07:51 AM
Try the Classic FM Top 300, which is broadcast over the Easter weekend.

vertizontal
03-17-2015, 07:54 AM
You should seek out a subset generally called "Light Classical." You'll find selections in that category to be shorter and more familiar.

RivkahChaya
03-17-2015, 08:00 AM
Holberg Suite, by Edvard Grieg, last movement in particular. Can listen to it over and over.

terentii
03-17-2015, 08:08 AM
Haendel's Music for the Royal Fireworks.

CalMeacham
03-17-2015, 08:08 AM
Beethoven's Symphonies, especially the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 9th.

J.S. Bach. Little Fugue in G, the infamous and overexposed Toccata and Fugue in D, lotsa other stuff

Sergei Prokofieff Scheherazade

Anton Dvorak New World Symphony and others

Gustav Holst The Planets Suite

Ottorino Respighi The Pines of Rome (and the other [whatevers] of Rome0

JKellyMap
03-17-2015, 08:14 AM
ETA: I forgot the Dvorak Piano Quintet in A Major. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xn7VmoJ7_AQ)

Great choice! I love piano quintets in general -- the best ones just happen to have wonderful melodies, interesting progressions, and delightful contrasting sections.

My favorites would be Brahms' F minor Piano Quintet, and Borodin's under-appreciated C minor Piano Quintet. Check out the Borodin -- it's a treat. Gorgeous, galloping Russian folk melodies, with clever and satisfying expositions.

Schumann wrote a terrific piano quintet as well.

CalMeacham
03-17-2015, 08:25 AM
Beethoven's Symphonies, especially the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 9th.

J.S. Bach. Little Fugue in G, the infamous and overexposed Toccata and Fugue in D, lotsa other stuff

Sergei Prokofieff Scheherazade

Anton Dvorak New World Symphony and others

Gustav Holst The Planets Suite

Ottorino Respighi The Pines of Rome (and the other [whatevers] of Rome0

Loach
03-17-2015, 08:25 AM
Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. In particular the 1st movement of Winter. In particular I love the Itzak Perlman version I have. I think it is about the best solo violin part ever written. I have heard it played in a very flashy mechanical manner. Perlman plays with a depth of feeling that others lack.

furryman
03-17-2015, 08:26 AM
The William Tell Overture
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoBE69wdSkQ

Ethilrist
03-17-2015, 08:35 AM
Beethoven's 6th Symphony, "The Pastoral." (the one from Fantasia with the unicorns & such)

Ralph Vaughan Williams' "Fantasia on a theme of Thomas Tallis."

Antonin Dvorak's "New World Symphony."

MrDibble
03-17-2015, 08:50 AM
Not strictly "Classical", because it's Romantic, but I like Sibelius - give the Karelia Suite (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adKwG9ZuzFw) a listen.

kopek
03-17-2015, 09:03 AM
Schubert's Trout Quintet

with Handels Messiah bringing in a really close second.

salinqmind
03-17-2015, 09:06 AM
Even after all these years, I still don't know the names of classical music pieces very well. I am fond of Ravel's 'Bolero', and I enjoy much of Beethoven and Vivaldi.

I used to have an LP 'Hooked on Classics' and that was the only way I found out some names of some pieces, even if they were only minute-long bits, like the French can-can music, the William Tell Overture, and so on.

Les Espaces Du Sommeil
03-17-2015, 09:07 AM
Picking just one piece is impossible so I'll customize 10 imaginary CDs from one composers each ranging from Baroque to Contemporary. Think of it as "10 imaginary desert island discs". Almost as impossible but I'll try.

Bach: St Matthew Passion. The full version lasts almost 3h but it's some of the most moving music that Bach ever wrote. You can find several CDs that contain only the "highlights". Just make sure that you have the opening and closing choruses ("Kommt, ihr Töchter, helft mir klagen" and "Wir setzen uns mit Tränen nieder") + the aria "Erbame dich".

Beethoven: Piano sonatas n°14 ("Moonlight") + 15 ("Pastoral") + 26 ("Les adieux") + 32.

Mozart: Highlights from Don Giovanni (must include "Madamina, il catalogo è questo", "Là ci darem la mano" and first and foremost "Don Giovanni! A cenar teco m'invitasti")

Schubert: Winterreise (Winter Journey)

Brahms: Clarinet Quintet in B minor op. 115 + Three Intermezzi for piano op. 117 + Six Pieces for piano op.118.

Tchaïkovsky Piano concerto n°1 + Violin concerto.

Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun + Syrinx for solo flute + Préludes Book 1 for piano + Images Book 2 for piano.

Stravinsky: The Firebird + The Rite of Spring

Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet (the highlights can fit on a single CD).

Ligeti: Musica Ricercata + Lux Aeterna + Lontano + Violin concerto

VunderBob
03-17-2015, 09:08 AM
Hands down, Beethoven's Ode to Joy. Coming in second is anything JS Bach wrote for the pipe organ, and third is Handel's Hallelujah Chorus.

Tim R. Mortiss
03-17-2015, 09:15 AM
Beethoven's 6th Symphony, "The Pastoral." (the one from Fantasia with the unicorns & such).....

That's what I came in to say.

Also, Bach's Brandenburg Concertos are worth a listen.

And anything by Strauss. (The "Blue Danube" Strauss; I think there are several of those guys)

RealityChuck
03-17-2015, 09:39 AM
Great choice! I love piano quintets in general -- the best ones just happen to have wonderful melodies, interesting progressions, and delightful contrasting sections.I first discovered the Dvorak when it was played by the instructors of a music camp near my home town -- including Itzhak Perlman (the camp was the Perlman Music Program).

I'm also a fan of the Rossini overtures, especially The Barber of Seville, William Tell, La Gazza Ladra.

Since it sneaks into the classical repertoire, there's also Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue,* Second Rhapsody, and An American in Paris.

*The best version I've ever heard was by Nachito Herrera and the Cuban Symphony Orchestra. Herrera did some amazing things with the piano part.

RTFirefly
03-17-2015, 09:42 AM
Beethoven's Symphonies, especially the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 9th.Ditto. I actually think the 5th is the best of the bunch. And while with the 7th Symphony, the second movement gets all the love, I'm a big fan of the first movement. I love the way he builds up the anticipation, and then, after the first, understated, statement of the main theme, he pulls the trigger, brings the whole orchestra in, and you're off on this wild, wonderful ride.

Handel's Water Music is a longtime favorite of mine. Ditto Vivaldi's The Four Seasons.

Anyone here listened to Beethoven's Wig? A guy named Richard Perlmutter added lyrics to various classical pieces, and the results are a lot of fun. Here's "Please Don't Play Your Violin At Night (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ay1K5Ek0TLo)" to the tune of Mozart's "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik," and "Please Keep Your Bull Outside the China Shop (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYoxNh4D1J8)" to the Toreador Song from Bizet's Carmen.

solost
03-17-2015, 09:49 AM
Anything by Mozart- I'm surprised he hasn't been mentioned more. My favorite Mozart pieces are Symphony No. 29 and String Quartet No. 19 in C Major (nicknamed the Dissonance Quartet).

stillownedbysetters
03-17-2015, 10:03 AM
Classical music is so diverse, it's hard to know what will speak to an individual, but here are some of my favorites:

Bach's 2nd Brandenburg Concerto - so full of joy and confidence and yet still so mathematically structured. If you love math, you'll love Bach.

Mozart's Clarinet Quintet in A Major - this is achingly beautiful and the precision of the interplay between the instruments is amazing.

Dvorak's New World Symphony - This is the gateway to classical musical for many people. It's eminently listenable to the rookie because the music is so evocative you can easily see the pictures Dvorak is painting. The little donkey's theme is sure to bring a smile to your face.

The Chopin Nocturnes for solo piano - Most of these are fairly short, so good for a beginner. And I guarantee they will move you , particularly the E Flat nocturne. It's astonishing how much emotion Chopin could put into these pieces with such economy of notes.

Knorf
03-17-2015, 10:13 AM
Sergei Prokofieff Scheherazade

You have two choices for a piece entitled "Scheherazade" in the standard repertoire, none by Prokofiev:

Rimsky-Korsakov, Scheherazade (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheherazade_%28Rimsky-Korsakov%29).

Ravel, Shéhérazade (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sh%C3%A9h%C3%A9razade_(Ravel)). Note that this one is either a song-cycle based on poetry about Scheherazade, not the original stories, or an unknown orchestral work. Odd that there are orchestra pieces by Ravel that are unknown! But so it is.

ETA: As for the OP, I couldn't possibly choose. I'd be hard pressed to even choose a favorite composer from each major time period.

Knorf
03-17-2015, 10:18 AM
Ligeti: Musica Ricercata + Lux Aeterna + Lontano + Violin concerto

Yay, Ligeti!

But no Lutosławski (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-nxHSu9Uu8)?

DCnDC
03-17-2015, 10:26 AM
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 18 - the first movement in particular. It was the first classical piece I really enjoyed that wasn't one that is instantly recognizable by laypeople. It still remains my favorite.

funky little lee
03-17-2015, 10:32 AM
If you're interested in checking out the Romantics:

Gustav Holst: Brook Green Suite; Saint Paul's Suite

Maurice Duruflé: Quatre Motets sur des Thèmes Gregoriennes

Modest Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

Gerald Finzi: Five Bagatelles; Three Soliloques from "Love's Labor's Lost;" Severn Rhapsody

David Diamond: Rounds for String Orchestra

This is what I would call Modern Classical, or most people would say Classical Lite. But it's beautiful, emotionally affecting music.

Knorf
03-17-2015, 10:44 AM
All right, I've give this a shot. Here's a shortish list of pieces that have been massively important to me (as you can see, I couldn't even stick with just one piece by one composer in some cases!):

Josquin: Missa pange lingua
J.S. Bach: Passacaglia in C Minor, BWV 582
Mozart: Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 in B-flat Major, Op. 60 or Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68 "Pastorale"
Schubert: String Quartet in G Major, D. 887
Verdi: Falstaff
Bruckner: Symphony No. 8 in C Minor (really hard to just pick just one Bruckner Symphony)
Strauss: Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30 or Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Mahler: Symphony No. 3 in D Minor, or Symphony No. 6 in A Minor, or Symphony No. 9
Nielsen: Symphony No. 4, Op. 29 "The Inextinguishable"
Sibelius: Symphony No. 3 in C Major, Op. 52, or Symphony No. 4 in A Minor, Op. 63
Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps, Symphony of Psalms, or Requiem Canticles
Bartók: String Quartet No. 4 or Concerto for Orchestra
Debussy: La Mer
Ravel: String Quartet in F
Schoenberg: Variations for Orchestra, Op. 31 or Chamber Symphony No. 1, Op. 9
Berg: Wozzeck or Lyric Suite
Webern: Five Pieces for String Quartet, Op. 5 or Symphony, Op. 21 or Cantata No. 1, Op. 29
Varèse: Arcana
Holst: The Planets
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 13 "Babi Yar"
Boulez: Notations I-IV for orchestra
Lutosławski: Symphony No. 3
Ligeti: Lontano, Chamber Concerto, Horn Trio, or Lux Aeterna
Carter: Variations for Orchestra
Adams: Harmonielehre or Guide to Strange Places

Yeah, a barely manageable list. Sorry, folks. I actually hit submit to prevent myself from adding more to it.

Just Asking Questions
03-17-2015, 10:50 AM
My favorite piece ever is /Adagio in G minor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adagio_in_G_minor), nominally attributed to Tomaso Albinoni, but actually composed by Remo Giazotto. Nevertheless, it is quite the haunting piece. It is often used in films - it was used effectively in the original Rollerball, and is the entirety of the soundtrack for Orson Wells' Kafka's The Trial.

My second would be the Waltz from Sleeping Beauty, by Tchaikovsky. I always want to sweep around the ballroom when I hear that one.

I'd add Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, Strauss' Blue Danube, the already mentioned Rimsky-Korsakov Scheherazade, and the dances from The Nutcracker Suite.

wonky
03-17-2015, 10:59 AM
Dvorak: Serenade for Strings
Debussy: Clair de Lune
Paganini: 24 Caprices
Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez

Philliam
03-17-2015, 11:06 AM
Great topic here - I offer:

Sibelius Violin Concerto

Vaughn Williams (early and late)

Norfolk Rhapsody, In the Fen Country, The Lark Ascending, Serenade to Music and Symphony No. 7

Henryk Gorecki Symphony No. 3

Thudlow Boink
03-17-2015, 11:12 AM
Here are a few I haven't seen mentioned yet:

Some of Handel's Organ Concertos showed me that organ music could actually be fun. Op. 4 #4 is a catchy one. For a more modern take on the organ concerto, try Poulenc's.

String quartets: Haydn wrote a lot of them that are clear and easy to appreciate. Try "The Lark" (Op. 66 #5). Then for something a bit more Romantic, try Dvorak's "American" string quartet (#12).

Piano Trios: Definitely start with Beethoven's "Archduke" trio. It's what turned me on to this particular form.

Mahler's 5th symphony is long, intense, and emotionally satisfying.

There are a lot more pieces I could mention, but that could take all day...

Learjeff
03-17-2015, 11:39 AM
I don't have much to add here, but I want to second this:

Modest Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

I'm surprised it's mentioned only once above.

panache45
03-17-2015, 01:33 PM
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concertos #2 and #3; Symphony #2.

Chopin: just about everything he wrote.

Tchaikovsky: All the Symphonies; all the ballets; Piano Concerto #1; Violin Concerto.

Brahms: Symphonies, especially #3; Violin Concerto; Piano Concertos.

Verdi: Rigoletto.

Bizet: Carmen.

Mozart: Symphonies #39, #40, #41; Clarinet Concerto; Clarinet Quintet.

Beethoven: Symphonies #3, 5, 7, 9. Piano Concertos.

Kabalevsky: The Comedians.

Saint-Saëns: Piano Concerto #2; Violin Concerto #3; Carnival of the Animals.

Lehar: The Merry Widow.

Bach: Brandenburg Concertos.

Ponch8
03-17-2015, 02:07 PM
A couple well-known Mozart piano pieces:
Rondo alla Turca
Piano Sonata in C Major, KV545

Les Espaces Du Sommeil
03-17-2015, 02:18 PM
Yay, Ligeti!

But no Lutosławski (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-nxHSu9Uu8)?

There you go :) :

Lutoslawski: Symphony n°3 + Piano concerto + Trois Poèmes d'Henri Michaux.

Which forces me to add:

Dutilleux: Tout un Monde Lointain (for cello and orchestra) + Ainsi la Nuit (for string quartet) + Symphony n°1

ryan
03-17-2015, 03:24 PM
Tchaikovsky : Violin Concerto in D major op.35

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAkw_Wi4yIo

Trinopus
03-17-2015, 03:40 PM
It's rather obscure, but Vivaldi's Concerto for Diverse Instruments, in C. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehv35TdZV-Q)

Rodgers01
03-17-2015, 04:22 PM
I'm surprised I'm the first person to mention Mendelssohn. The first movement of the Italian Symphony is among the most accessible and enjoyable classical pieces for newbies. And if you know "A Midsummer Night's Dream," the overture he wrote is wonderful, too.

The Second Stone
03-17-2015, 06:52 PM
Beethoven's 9th Symphony is arguably the best music ever written. And Beethoven was almost, if not completely, deaf at the time he wrote it. It is from the Romantic period, so technically not "classical", which would be from the end of Baroque (J.S. Bach and such) to the start of Romantic (Beethoven and his crowd). Classical includes the Haydn boys, Mozart, Saliere and those gang bangers.

The Second Stone
03-17-2015, 06:53 PM
The William Tell Overture
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoBE69wdSkQ

It is the sign of cultural maturity when a grown man can hear the William Tell Overture and not think of The Lone Ranger.

wonky
03-17-2015, 06:56 PM
It is the sign of cultural maturity when a grown man can hear the William Tell Overture and not think of The Lone Ranger.

Someone's been looking at Dave Berg.

JohnT
03-17-2015, 10:12 PM
Mozart:

Piano concertos, especially #'s 10, 20, 21, 23, 26, and 27.

Sinfonia Concertante in E-Flat Major (K364 - we have a poster by that name!)

Mass in C-Minor

Requiem

Ukulele Ike
03-17-2015, 10:58 PM
I've been listening to this stuff for over forty years. I can't tolerate hearing any of Beethoven's symphonies any more. (I've worked in the art music field and I am NOT the only person who says this.)

Y'know what Beethoven I've NEVER gotten sick of, though? The A major violin sonata #9. The "Kreutzer." I'm listening to it right now. The first movement never fails to snap my stix.

His late string quartets, too.

panache45
03-17-2015, 11:11 PM
I've been listening to this stuff for over forty years. I can't tolerate hearing any of Beethoven's symphonies any more. (I've worked in the art music field and I am NOT the only person who says this.)

I've been listening to this stuff for over 60 years, and there's not one piece that I've ever gotten tired of hearing.

panache45
03-17-2015, 11:13 PM
I'm surprised I'm the first person to mention Mendelssohn. The first movement of the Italian Symphony is among the most accessible and enjoyable classical pieces for newbies. And if you know "A Midsummer Night's Dream," the overture he wrote is wonderful, too.

Yes, the Italian Symphony is one of the greats! Also, his violin concerto in e.

Ukulele Ike
03-17-2015, 11:22 PM
I've been listening to this stuff for over 60 years, and there's not one piece that I've ever gotten tired of hearing.

The first movement of the Fifth? Really?

panache45
03-17-2015, 11:45 PM
The first movement of the Fifth? Really?

Really. I can listen to music as if I'd never heard it before. Plus . . . there is so much that I enjoy, that I don't listen to any one piece very often.

rowrrbazzle
03-18-2015, 12:43 AM
I have many favorites. Here are just a few.

Beethoven: Symphony No. 9
Debussy: Nocturnes for orchestra https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QiuVU46jLfo
Ravel: Daphnis and Chloe (ballet music). The final section (opens with "Daybreak"): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FXbZJndsCU
Ravel: Shéhérazade (song cycle) - #2: La Flute Enchantee; #3: L'Indifferent (lyric translation in "show more") https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiQTqfPBU9s#t=1m20s
Holst: Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda, Group 3, for Women's chorus and harp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N763QUbSs4c
Wagner: Overture to "Tannhauser" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QbEusFcxfc
Wagner: Overture to the opera "Parsifal" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ciq9Sefqun8
Orff: Carmina Burana - the whole thing. STAGED! very bawdy and funny! with English closed captions! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gj-tBVq61as

Search for "classical" in Cafe Society thread titles for lots of recommendations.

rowrrbazzle
03-18-2015, 01:19 AM
Bach:

Concerto for Two Violins 1st movement (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vesrqFeq9rU) - 2nd movement (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axFUvA_he-o) - 3rd movement (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6gOeE5QTXk)

Violin Concerto in E Major https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZwU41V3zgU

Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYOWdONwSyY

Cantata No. 29 - (listen to the first 7 minutes) http://allofbach.com/en/bwv/bwv-29/detail/

Fantasia and Fugue in G Minor ("Great") http://allofbach.com/en/bwv/bwv-542/detail/

rowrrbazzle
03-18-2015, 01:25 AM
Also very informative and entertaining are Leonard Bernstein's Omnibus programs at Snagfilms http://www.snagfilms.com/search/?q=bernstein+omnibus

Also Bernstein's Young People's Concerts on YouTube (all in multiple parts) such as
What is Classical Music (part 1 of 4) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJ1b6hSUosU

Also on YouTube, his Harvard Norton Lectures https://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en#q=leonard+bernstein+norton+lectures&newwindow=1&hl=en&tbm=vid

lawoot
03-18-2015, 03:12 AM
Another vote for Pictures at an Exhibition. I have (at least) 5 different recordings of it, including the Emerson, Lake and Palmer version (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7NAGTq_IJQ) and the Tomita version (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVvQQMrEUzQ).

Tchaikovsky's 4th Symphony, Finale, allegro con fuoco (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mctpTyIBt_I)

furryman
03-18-2015, 09:34 AM
It is the sign of cultural maturity when a grown man can hear the William Tell Overture and not think of The Lone Ranger.

You know you've been watching too many cartoons when all you can think of when you listen to the Overture to Tannhauser is this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jDcWAWRRHo

norvalnormal
03-18-2015, 09:56 AM
Missa Solemnis (Beethoven); B-Minor Mass (Bach); Dvorak Requiem; Turangalila Symphony (Messiaen); Grosse Fuge (op. 133) and String Quartet, op. 132 (both Beethoven); Haydn string quartets, op. 20 (really, almost _any_ Haydn string quartet or Schubert string quartet); Schubert string quintet; Bach cello suites 1-6; Bruckner symphony #8; Schumann "Fairy Tales" (opus 132); Mozart string quintets, especially K. 516 + 593.

2 can't-go-wrong composers: Gesualdo and Byrd

PatrickLondon
03-18-2015, 10:04 AM
Oh crumbs, thousands of pieces I like.

If you're exploring, try:

(these are in chronological order, but sample as you will -they should all be on Youtube)

Bach: Double Violin Concerto
Mozart: Piano Concertos No 21 and/or 23
Schubert: "Death and the Maiden" String Quartet, and his Octet
Mendelssohn: Octet
Saint-Saens: Organ Symphony
Sibelius: 5th symphony (or the 2nd)
Stravinsky: Rite of Spring

Also, there are lots of podcasts, recorded concerts and request programmes at www.bbc.co.uk/radio3 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3)

funky little lee
03-18-2015, 11:24 AM
Another vote for Pictures at an Exhibition. I have (at least) 5 different recordings of it, including the Emerson, Lake and Palmer version (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7NAGTq_IJQ)

I never thought to include organ music, but there's a ton of great stuff out there, including:

Louis Vierne: Carillon de Westminster

César Franck: Pièce Heroïque

J.S. Bach: Sleepers, Wake!

Marcel Dupré: Cortège et Litanie; Vêpres du Commun de la Sainte-Vièrge

Charles-Marie Widor: Symphony for Organ no. 5

Jean Langlais: Chanson de l'Eglise Eternelle

The compositions of Langlais are fascinating, meditative, trancelike. He included bird calls, bits of Tantric chant, and other assorted sources to create some of the most original and divine music ever written for the organ. Plus--the one thing no one knows about me--He had dinner with us at our house! (My dad was an organist and choirmaster, and Langlais was on tour in the U.S. I was only a toddler, but my parents say he adored me.) :)

Not that I'm braggin' or nuthin', just sayin'.

funky little lee
03-18-2015, 11:38 AM
Oops, messed up, it wasn't Langlais but Olivier Messaien, and the pieces are: Apparition de l'Eglise Eternelle and L'Ascension. For Langlais I should have written Trois méditations sur la Sainte Trinité. My bad.

Messaien was the guy who used the bird calls and chants in his pieces.

No umlaut for U
03-18-2015, 11:39 AM
Anything Rachmaninoff, especially the piano concerto #2.
Mozart's works for clarinet are all wonderful, even if you hate the high pitched reeds.
Stravinsky's Firebird Suite.
Depending on how you define classical, most Aaron Copland is very accessible. I especially like Fanfare for the Common Man.

Personal favorite: Moonlight Sonata (Beethoven).

Personally, I don't care for Bach or Brahms.

divemaster
03-18-2015, 11:45 AM
Oh crumbs, thousands of pieces I like.

If you're exploring, try:

...
Saint-Saens: Organ Symphony
...


I, too have many favorites, but this one is way, way up there. When that organ kicks in in the 4th movement...wow. It also has special meaning to me b/c my father (who was a great friend to me and died way too young) was an organist. The first concert he took me to (I must have been 5 years old) was Virgil Fox.

Anyway, my dad introduced me to Saint-Saens' organ symphony and I tear up every time I listen to it. In fact, I'm tearing up a bit now...

Dendarii Dame
03-18-2015, 11:54 AM
Sheep May Safely Graze by J.S. Bach. Preferably as a piano solo.

Les Espaces Du Sommeil
03-18-2015, 01:57 PM
Personally, I don't care for Bach or Brahms.

Ouch.

Brahms: not even his late piano pieces? His works for clarinet (trio, quintet, sonatas)? The violin sonatas? The cello sonatas :( ?

Bach: not even... everything :D ?

panache45
03-18-2015, 02:38 PM
Anything Rachmaninoff, especially the piano concerto #2.
This!!! Plus the Piano Concerto #3 and Symphony #2 . . . and all his piano pieces. Extra points if you can PLAY any of it.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.