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tracer
03-17-2015, 04:21 PM
Since St. Patrick's Day is upon us, I'd just like to share with y'all that I've recorded a fake "Irish" folk ballad I heard in a dream back in 2004.

It's here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ooKOJecAAs

(Note that I have ads turned OFF for my YouTube channel, so as to make my videos as un-annoying as possible. I ain't doin' this for any ad revenue, lemme tells ya -- not that a video with 42 total views would rake in the cash even if I was.)

Trinopus
03-17-2015, 04:42 PM
Fun! In my opinion, the falsetto doesn't add anything; I'd love to hear it in a range more fitting to your natural voice. But the writing is delightful, and the tune is a joy! From the tune alone, one could easily think it a true traditional piece.

tracer
03-17-2015, 05:00 PM
It's supposed to be sung by an old Irish woman. I didn't have any old Irish women available, so I had to use my Falsetto.

Hopeful Crow
03-17-2015, 06:57 PM
Loved it! Thanks for sharing. I listened to the Tritium one after, too. You have a great voice, falsetto or not.

Once, back in the day, I dreamed a whole John Denver song that he'd never sung and, way back even before then, that I was a backup singer for Neil Diamond. Of course, by the time I'd awoken, I couldn't remember a single word and barely any of the tunes. That you could dream up a whole song and remember it so well simultaneously astounds me and makes me happy to have gotten to hear the results. Thanks again! You're quite talented!

Shagnasty
03-17-2015, 07:03 PM
I like it even at a first listen! That is an fully developed folk ballad that sounds completely legit. I am impressed you can write full songs like that in your dreams. Great job!

Melbourne
03-17-2015, 07:08 PM
a fake "Irish" folk ballad

Nothing new in the world. Many of the Irish folk ballads (some of which are popular in AUS) were written by professional musicians in California in the 19th Century.

tracer
03-17-2015, 07:15 PM
That you could dream up a whole song and remember it so well simultaneously astounds me

Well ... er ... I didn't hear the whole song in the dream. In fact, I didn't even hear an entire verse. I heard fragments of the tune, and a hint of the lyrics. The rest was all personal embellishment.

If I'd followed the dream exactly, it would have been sung by a woman in a Clorox 2 commercial....

tracer
03-17-2015, 07:18 PM
Here's another tune I heard in a dream, over the approximate amount of time I heard it in the dream. It's so short I haven't even converted it from MIDI yet:

http://www.rogermwilcox.com/midi/Dream%20Fanfare%2020-Nov-2011.mid


EDIT: Note that it sounds suspiciously similar to the 1990s TriStar Pictures logo theme. My dream songs aren't nearly as original as I like to give 'em credit for.

Trinopus
03-17-2015, 09:55 PM
It's supposed to be sung by an old Irish woman. I didn't have any old Irish women available, so I had to use my Falsetto.

Grin! To tell the truth, I kept hearing it as sung by a young Irish woman!

More seriously, I think the vocal integrity is more important than -- what's the term? -- casting? The song would have been every bit as wonderful, transposed down and sung by a bloomin' baritone. As they say in moral-driven American TV, "Be true to yourself." Sing in your best register.

Anyway, I apologize, as I didn't mean to sound overly critical. I enjoyed the song immensely!

Steken
03-18-2015, 01:53 AM
This is awesome. Just awesome.

thelurkinghorror
03-18-2015, 03:49 AM
Don't worry, I have AdBlock.

The "falsetto" is offputting, but I like the rest. You're obviously a dude. I wouldn't mind a second version at all.

My standby fake Irish song is Denis Leary's "Traditional Irish Folk Song (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbeLu_3Wf_k)" (I think it's called). Lyrical content is also accurate.

Nothing new in the world. Many of the Irish folk ballads (some of which are popular in AUS) were written by professional musicians in California in the 19th Century.
Who/what?

An Gadaí
03-18-2015, 01:48 PM
Curious where you came up with the construction "She are green".

ETA: Lovely melody, some Americanisms like Fall :-) I think it would sound amazing sung by Susan McKeown.

An Gadaí
03-18-2015, 01:53 PM
Don't worry, I have AdBlock.

The "falsetto" is offputting, but I like the rest. You're obviously a dude. I wouldn't mind a second version at all.

My standby fake Irish song is Denis Leary's "Traditional Irish Folk Song (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbeLu_3Wf_k)" (I think it's called). Lyrical content is also accurate.


Who/what?

I think melbourne is mistaken about California but NY songsmiths did create many songs that are now considered part of the Irish ballad tradition.

I'll Take You Home Again Kathleen http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27ll_Take_You_Home_Again,_Kathleen is the first example that springs to my mind but there are plenty of others.

An Gadaí
03-18-2015, 02:04 PM
I think melbourne is mistaken about California but NY songsmiths did create many songs that are now considered part of the Irish ballad tradition.

I'll Take You Home Again Kathleen http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27ll_Take_You_Home_Again,_Kathleen is the first example that springs to my mind but there are plenty of others.

Oops, just rereading that wiki I see that this writer was in Indiana but the phenomenon of professional NYC songwriters writing Irish style ballads did exist.

tracer
03-18-2015, 07:13 PM
Curious where you came up with the construction "She are green".

Did I mention that my knowledge of fake Irish phraseology comes almost entirely from Lucky Charms commercials? ;)

But seriously, folks, I think this odd phrasing came from the dream. It sounded British-Isles-ish enough for my subconscious, I guess.

tracer
03-18-2015, 07:19 PM
BTW, since the time I put it up on YouTube, I've tweaked the accompaniment a bit to clean up some of the rough spots. (The falsetto is still noticeable in a couple of places, though.)

The slightly-cleaned-up version is here:
http://www.rogermwilcox.com/audio/She%20Are%20Green.mp3

Unfortunately, YouTube doesn't let me replace the audio track of a given video with another audio track, and if I uploaded a whole new video it would put it at a new URL.

BrainGlutton
03-18-2015, 08:49 PM
It's supposed to be sung by an old Irish woman. I didn't have any old Irish women available, so I had to use my Falsetto.

You could pretend she's an alto.

BrainGlutton
03-18-2015, 08:54 PM
Ah, those Irish songs! (https://screen.yahoo.com/irish-songs-000000345.html)

tracer
03-18-2015, 10:38 PM
You could pretend she's an alto.

I DID pretend she was an alto. If she were a soprano, I'd have had to be in falsetto the entire time!

tracer
03-19-2015, 05:26 PM
ETA: Lovely melody, some Americanisms like Fall :-)

I suppose I could have instead phrased the second verse like so:

"But just as the springtime gives way to the summer
And summer gives way to the autumn,
The green of my youth slowly waned from its zenith
Until at last it hit rock bottom."

... but that would've sounded awfully hokey. ;)


Other ideas that didn't make it into the final product include this rendition of the second chorus, for what should be obvious reasons:

"She are green! She are green!
Green like the neophyte,
Green like the traffic light,
Lord count the ways she are green!"

RTFirefly
03-19-2015, 06:26 PM
Don't worry, I have AdBlock.

The "falsetto" is offputting, but I like the rest. You're obviously a dude. I wouldn't mind a second version at all.

My standby fake Irish song is Denis Leary's "Traditional Irish Folk Song (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbeLu_3Wf_k)" (I think it's called). Lyrical content is also accurate.

Mine is Tom Lehrer's "The Irish Ballad":

About a maid I'll sing a song,
Sing rickety-tickety-tin,
About a maid I'll sing a song
Who didn't have her family long.
Not only did she do them wrong,
She did ev'ryone of them in, them in,
She did ev'ryone of them in.

An Gadaí
03-19-2015, 08:19 PM
Done by an Irish guy but fake, "Flow River Flow (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yyPiOTLLOY)" by Ding Dong O'Reilly is kinda funny.

Trinopus
03-19-2015, 09:57 PM
. . . "She are green! She are green!
Green like the neophyte,
Green like the traffic light,
Lord count the ways she are green!"

Green like green kryptonite,
she are green!

;)

Rick
03-19-2015, 10:55 PM
Since St. Patrick's Day is upon us, I'd just like to share with y'all that I've recorded a fake "Irish" folk ballad
That's not an Irish ballad.
This (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47bKTtIwrO4) is an Irish ballad.
;)

eschereal
03-19-2015, 11:29 PM
Sorry to be kind of jerkish, but I am going to make a stupid suggestion: the chorus ought to be "Are she green. Are she green." Because the Celtic language naturally puts the verb at the beginning of a sentence, and, well, "are she" sounds vaguely like "Irish".

An Gadaí
03-19-2015, 11:42 PM
Sorry to be kind of jerkish, but I am going to make a stupid suggestion: the chorus ought to be "Are she green. Are she green." Because the Celtic language naturally puts the verb at the beginning of a sentence, and, well, "are she" sounds vaguely like "Irish".

No, still sounds wrong. I would go with "She's/she is green" or "Is she green?" or "Throatwarbler Mangrove".

Trinopus
03-20-2015, 01:30 AM
There's also this offering from Dennis Leary: (http://www.metrolyrics.com/traditional-irish-folk-song-lyrics-dennis-leary.html)

They come over here and they take all our land
They chop of our heads and they boil them in oil
Our children are leaving and we have no heads
We drink and we sing and we drink and we die
We have no heads, no we have no heads

tracer
03-20-2015, 02:24 PM
Dennis Learey's fake Irish song doesn't sound too far off from the actual "Wearin' of the Green".

thelurkinghorror
03-20-2015, 03:45 PM
There's also this offering from Dennis Leary: (http://www.metrolyrics.com/traditional-irish-folk-song-lyrics-dennis-leary.html)
It was especially relevant two days ago;)

tracer
03-20-2015, 04:09 PM
And let us not forget the most important St. Patrick's Day tradition:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOVKdvkVAqQ

Trinopus
03-20-2015, 05:56 PM
It was especially relevant two days ago;)

I apologize. I actually did search for it, but failed to spot it.

We drink and we die and continue to drink.

Idle Thoughts
03-20-2015, 07:17 PM
There's also this offering from Dennis Leary: (http://www.metrolyrics.com/traditional-irish-folk-song-lyrics-dennis-leary.html)

They come over here and they take all our land
They chop of our heads and they boil them in oil
Our children are leaving and we have no heads
We drink and we sing and we drink and we die
We have no heads, no we have no heads

I shaved some off, just a reminder not to post the full lyrics to anything on here.

Trinopus
03-20-2015, 07:25 PM
I shaved some off, just a reminder not to post the full lyrics to anything on here.

Oops! Sorry. Thanks for the edit.

(Sigh...ninjaed and noted! I gonna go eat worms!)

(But...damn, it's a wonderful fun song!)

BrainGlutton
03-20-2015, 07:27 PM
Green like green kryptonite,
she are green!

;)

Green grow the rushes, oh?

BrainGlutton
03-20-2015, 07:35 PM
It's supposed to be sung by an old Irish woman. I didn't have any old Irish women available . . .

Would you like to buy some?

eschereal
03-20-2015, 07:46 PM
Would you like to buy some?

Maybe just short-term rental would suffice?

BrainGlutton
03-20-2015, 07:54 PM
(Sigh...ninjaed and noted! I gonna go eat worms!)

Oh, Paddy dear, and did you hear the news that's crawlin' round?
Our protein sweet by law's forbid to dig from Irish ground!
The humble Irish dinner bowl no more shall writhe and squirm
For there's a cruel law agin' the eatin' of the worm!
The eatin' of the worm!
The eatin' of the worm!
For there's a cruel law agin' the eatin' of the worm!

BrainGlutton
03-20-2015, 09:04 PM
Is "St. Brendan's Fair Isle" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EC1umOD9tWw) a traditional folk song or a modern composition?

BrainGlutton
03-20-2015, 09:06 PM
Another question, if anyone knows: In view of their history . . . how did the Irish ever get a reputation for luck, of all things?!

eschereal
03-20-2015, 09:29 PM
Maybe Teela Brown would know. She should be the expert on luck. It is in her genes.

tracer
03-20-2015, 10:49 PM
I think an Irish person is only supposed to be lucky if (s)he's carrying a 4-leaf shamrock. Them things is hard to find, y'know.

Trinopus
03-20-2015, 11:20 PM
Oh, Paddy dear, and did you hear the news that's crawlin' round?
Our protein sweet by law's forbid to dig from Irish ground!
The humble Irish dinner bowl no more shall writhe and squirm
For there's a cruel law agin' the eatin' of the worm!
The eatin' of the worm!
The eatin' of the worm!
For there's a cruel law agin' the eatin' of the worm!

I love you and want to go pub crawling with you till we both topple, puke, and continue to sing!

Trinopus
03-21-2015, 07:50 PM
Is "St. Brendan's Fair Isle" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EC1umOD9tWw) a traditional folk song or a modern composition?

The business with the dragon makes me think it's modern.

BrainGlutton
03-22-2015, 01:32 AM
I love you and want to go pub crawling with you till we both topple, puke, and continue to sing!

Challenge accepted.

BrainGlutton
03-22-2015, 01:33 AM
The business with the dragon makes me think it's modern.

:confused: Were there no dragons in traditional Irish folklore? I mean, they had everything else!

Trinopus
03-22-2015, 01:50 AM
Challenge accepted.

And worms! All the worms we want! No edict from the daft Lunnuners is gonna get 'tween me and a big writhin' handful of squirmy, wormy goodness!

:confused: Were there no dragons in traditional Irish folklore? I mean, they had everything else!

I dunno... It just felt modern. The words "barbecue" and the phrase "ten million miles" seem unlikely to be in a real traditional work.

By the way (checking that no one else has mentioned it) do you know Shaun Davey? His "The Brendan Voyage" is a delight. Unquestionably modern, but miraculously lovely. Here's a YouTube segment that gives you a clue to the spirit of the work. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzF92y8e7pc)

(My two faves of Davey's are "Granuaille" and "The Pilgrim." Lovely stuff!)

thelurkinghorror
03-22-2015, 02:23 AM
Barbecue is from the New World; the earliest English usage is in 1661. It was Long John Silver's nickname (1881-1883).

BrainGlutton
03-22-2015, 02:37 AM
BTW, here's (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=719514) a thread I ran not long ago about Irish music in the American Civil War, the which one might almost think an extension of British Isles politics on a continental scale if it weren't for the black-slavery thing, the latter having no very great salience in most of British history, but much in American.

eschereal
03-22-2015, 03:08 AM
By the way (checking that no one else has mentioned it) do you know Shaun Davey? His "The Brendan Voyage" is a delight. Unquestionably modern, but miraculously lovely. Here's a YouTube segment that gives you a clue to the spirit of the work. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzF92y8e7pc)

(My two faves of Davey's are "Granuaille" and "The Pilgrim." Lovely stuff!)

Is that the guy who did the song at the end of Waking Ned Devine?

BigT
03-22-2015, 03:25 AM
Fun! In my opinion, the falsetto doesn't add anything; I'd love to hear it in a range more fitting to your natural voice. But the writing is delightful, and the tune is a joy! From the tune alone, one could easily think it a true traditional piece.

You stole everything I wanted to say. When you aren't in falsetto, you even have a vaguely Irish folksy sound--for a male.

I get what you are doing, but I think your falsetto is too light to sound like an older woman, and you'd give more verisimilitude if you lower your voice. Your natural voice is just light enough.

And one of the things about old folk songs is that they are often sung by someone else that for whom they were originally intended. They spread to everyone.

BrainGlutton
03-22-2015, 02:12 PM
Here's (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=719514) a tangentially related CS thread I ran.

Trinopus
03-22-2015, 03:57 PM
Barbecue is from the New World; the earliest English usage is in 1661. It was Long John Silver's nickname (1881-1883).

But what's the earliest Irish folk song it appears in? (The fun thing about the information age is that this question actually could be answered, although I don't demand that anyone actually put in the research hours. God, I love the information age!)

Is that the guy who did the song at the end of Waking Ned Devine?

Aye: Shaun Davey did the music for Waking Ned Devine. Also The Tailor from Panama. In a more "classical" vein, he wrote "The Relief of Derry Symphony (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNdaRHyEpxw)." (YouTube link to first movement, 13 minutes. If you like modern classical music or Irish music or both, this is an inspiring work, with an inspiring history.)

tracer
03-22-2015, 04:20 PM
Just for the record ... I think my next song is going to be about the digits of pi....

thelurkinghorror
03-22-2015, 05:39 PM
But what's the earliest Irish folk song it appears in? (The fun thing about the information age is that this question actually could be answered, although I don't demand that anyone actually put in the research hours. God, I love the information age!)
I don't know, except a lot of Irish people were "forcible moved" to Barbados and such. Looks like the source I used in the past is gone (archive (http://web.archive.org/web/20070814204044/http://www.triskelle.eu/music/lyrics.php?index=080.010)). Doesn't have that song, does have "St. Brendan's Voyage), confusingly the song in this thread seems to use both names. The one on the site is Christy Moore so obviously modern. This (http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5139&Title=SAINT%20BRENDAN%27S%20VOYAGE) says Jimmy Driftwood; modern if he actually wrote it.

Yeah, it's a great age. Makes pub trivia sketchy though.

Musicat
03-22-2015, 05:54 PM
The falsetto doesn't ruin it for me, and Og knows, traditional Irish Washerwomen are hard to find nowadays, and they cost a lot if you need studio work. Damn unions. :)

When I heard only the opening bars, I was thinking of downloading the song and adding some of my Wurlitzer to it for kicks, but you have mixed the song with sweetening already -- I think it sounds great!

Tracer, would it be OK if I used your song (underneath some generic video and announcements) for my cable TV station's "continuity" for a few days? That's the video file that plays when nothing else is scheduled. Of course I'll give you credit for the audio (PM me if you want to specify the text wording).

tracer
03-24-2015, 05:57 PM
Tracer, would it be OK if I used your song (underneath some generic video and announcements) for my cable TV station's "continuity" for a few days? That's the video file that plays when nothing else is scheduled. Of course I'll give you credit for the audio (PM me if you want to specify the text wording).

:eek:

SURE!!! The more people who hear it, the better!

If you're asking how my name is spelled, it's "Roger M. Wilcox." With the M. Never forget the M.

tracer
03-24-2015, 06:04 PM
Oh! P.S. -- if you're just going to use the audio, I'd recommend you use the MP3 file rather than the audio portion of the YouTube video. I've made a few tweaks to the audio since the time the YouTube video went live. The MP3 file is at http://www.rogermwilcox.com/audio/She%20Are%20Green.mp3.

Musicat
03-24-2015, 07:34 PM
Oh! P.S. -- if you're just going to use the audio, I'd recommend you use the MP3 file rather than the audio portion of the YouTube video. I've made a few tweaks to the audio since the time the YouTube video went live. The MP3 file is at http://www.rogermwilcox.com/audio/She%20Are%20Green.mp3.Thanks, but too late. I'll save your MP3 file for the next St. Patty's Day. I'm sure the two mixes sound radically different to you, but I don't see a big difference, and the YT sound is just ducky.

Melbourne
03-24-2015, 08:46 PM
Oops, just rereading that wiki I see that this writer was in Indiana but the phenomenon of professional NYC songwriters writing Irish style ballads did exist.

mmm... possibly "came to Australia" from California, (what with us being on Pacific side)

tracer
03-25-2015, 12:06 AM
I don't see a big difference, and the YT sound is just ducky.

Now I'm hearing the sound of Donald Duck going berserk in my head....

Musicat
03-25-2015, 07:02 AM
Now I'm hearing the sound of Donald Duck going berserk in my head....There's your next project. An Irish Donald O'Duck?

eschereal
03-25-2015, 11:44 AM
Well, you could at least spell the Duck's name right, so that it would look Irish. "Doigheniaghld O'Duck"

tracer
03-25-2015, 07:53 PM
I thought it was pronounced "Throat-warbler mangrove."

eschereal
03-25-2015, 11:08 PM
Wasn't I just thinking of that great Irish band The Raspberries (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgxhqWovAJQ)

BrainGlutton
03-25-2015, 11:15 PM
There's your next project. An Irish Donald O'Duck?

Nah, the McDucks are Scottish. Or Jewish, whatever. There's no difference really, Jews are reputedly picky eaters, but they would eat sheeps' lungs, and Scots would eat gentile babies' blood if it would save money on the black pudding. Eat that, Walt Disney!

tracer
03-26-2015, 10:00 AM
... and Scots would eat gentile babies' blood if it would save money on the black pudding.

Don't eat black pudding. It'll deal 2d6 acid damage on contact.

tracer
03-26-2015, 08:20 PM
I heard another snippet of music in a dream last night, again.
This time, though, it was a waltz.

I'm convinced I was channelling the Ghost of Johann Strauss Jr., but I can't for the life of me recognize the tune. Here's a MIDI rendition of it I made today. Does anybody recognize this waltz?

http://www.rogermwilcox.com/midi/Dream%20Waltz%2026-Mar-2015.mid

Trinopus
03-26-2015, 08:34 PM
Can't place it, but it's lovely, and very much in the Strauss character! A delight! I hope you can finish it!

You have a very creative unconscious mind! Keep on dreamin'!

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