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View Full Version : Rear Window -- on the big screen


Johnny L.A.
03-22-2015, 07:33 PM
TCM presented Rear Window in several theatres today. (It's also playing this Wednesday, the 25th.) What a treat! We never realised there was so much music in it, and we enjoyed seeing the details on the sets.

The best part of the film was when Jimmy Stewart got out his flash unit and flash bulbs. A young boy in the audience said, 'What's that, daddy?' :D

purplehearingaid
03-22-2015, 08:02 PM
Was it in black and or color ? Turner is destroying all the classic b & m movies
by making them in color! I love b & m movies and hate to see them being messed with by Turner .

Johnny L.A.
03-22-2015, 08:07 PM
Rear Window was shot in Eastmancolor, and the prints were in Techincolor.

The Second Stone
03-22-2015, 08:14 PM
Rear Window was shot in color. It was Grace Kelly's best film, in my opinion. Jimmy Stewart plays Hitch's alter ego and is just creepy as hell. Raymond Burr's character, by comparison, was at least understandable, despite having only a few lines.

JohnGalt
03-22-2015, 09:32 PM
We saw it a couple decades ago when it was in the big theater, then later on television. It's amazing how much detail there was on the scenes of the other balconies, something you couldn't see on TV.

Yes, the bright flash bulbs were really cool in a dark theater.

toast pakora
03-23-2015, 09:08 AM
It was filmed on a studio set but awhile back, I read that it was based on an actual courtyard/backyard/whatever you call it in Greenwich Village I think. Here's an article (http://nypost.com/2014/08/06/inside-the-real-greenwich-village-apartment-that-inspired-rear-window/), the pictures aren't very good though.

CalMeacham
03-23-2015, 09:47 AM
Although I grew up watching Rear Window on Saturday Night at the Movies, I got to see it and four other Hitchcock films on the Big Screen when they re-released them, in restored versions, to theaters in 1983. Besides Rear Window, they released Rope, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much (the color version, with Jimmy Stewart and Doris Day, but no Peter Lorre), and Vertigo.

MovieMogul
03-23-2015, 12:34 PM
Was it in black and or color ? Turner is destroying all the classic b & m movies
by making them in color! I love b & m movies and hate to see them being messed with by Turner .

Did this post teleport in from the 90s? For while it may have been closer to being true two decades ago, it is not even remotely accurate now.

Turner Classic Movies is the single best source of uncut, non-commercial classic movie watching of any cable network anywhere. They never show colorized films, and never cut for time, content, or ads.

Are there still colorized films available for sale out there on the internet? Sure, you can find them on DVD (mostly films in public domain, so don't blame Turner). But they are hardly mainstream and while the technology to do it has improved, it's generally been demonstrated that most people have rejected these options and it is not what anyone would call a lucrative revenue stream. Colorization was a fad that hasn't completely died, but is hardly a danger or threat to any film anywhere anymore.

CalMeacham
03-23-2015, 12:43 PM
Did this post teleport in from the 90s? For while it may have been closer to being true two decades ago, it is not even remotely accurate now.

Turner Classic Movies is the single best source of uncut, non-commercial classic movie watching of any cable network anywhere. They never show colorized films, and never cut for time, content, or ads.

Are there still colorized films available for sale out there on the internet? Sure, you can find them on DVD (mostly films in public domain, so don't blame Turner). But they are hardly mainstream and while the technology to do it has improved, it's generally been demonstrated that most people have rejected these options and it is not what anyone would call a lucrative revenue stream. Colorization was a fad that hasn't completely died, but is hardly a danger or threat to any film anywhere anymore.

Not completely -- Ray Harryhausen supervised colorizations of the 1935 film She and of H.G. wells' Things to Come. Harryhausen is on record as generally hating colorization, but She was supposed to be a color film that got its funding severel reduced just before production, so he felt he was restoring what was rightfully its due. I haven't seen his Things to Come, so I don't know his rationalization there. But these were done circa 2008, so this isn't exactly ancient history.

jharvey963
03-23-2015, 03:28 PM
I had never seen the original Rear Window. We saw it last night in the theater. I thought it was a decent movie, and very good by 1950's standards. However, I didn't feel much suspense in it. I guess I've gotten too jaded by recent movies, where twists happen too regularly. This movie was pretty straightforward. You could pretty much predict what was going to happen.

On the other hand, the acting -- especially by Jimmy Stewart -- was pretty good. I also really wasn't aware how gorgeous Grace Kelly was. I didn't really see how they could be together, with so little in common.

J.

Don Draper
03-23-2015, 03:35 PM
Grace Kelly's first appearance in the film, an extreme close-up as she closes in to kiss a dozing-off Stewart, has got to be one of the most erotic images in the whole history of Hollywood. I swear, I'm gay and yet I get excited seeing zoom into view. Whew!

CalMeacham
03-23-2015, 03:43 PM
Grace Kelly's first appearance in the film, an extreme close-up as she closes in to kiss a dozing-off Stewart, has got to be one of the most erotic images in the whole history of Hollywood. I swear, I'm gay and yet I get excited seeing zoom into view. Whew!

If you look at the end credits for the restored version of Rear Window (the one done for the 1983 re-release I mention above), they have specifically given credits for the people who worked on restoring this very scene.


I don't know of any other restored film where they call out a particular scene like that.

AK84
06-13-2015, 02:39 AM
I saw it last night at our local community theatre which is doing a Hitch marathon.

Its just simply amazing. All the twists and turns have been parodied and copied so often over the last 60 odd years, yet they still appear fresh.

Grace Kelly's first appearance in the film, an extreme close-up as she closes in to kiss a dozing-off Stewart, has got to be one of the most erotic images in the whole history of Hollywood. I swear, I'm gay and yet I get excited seeing zoom into view. Whew!
Sexuality and Gender is no excuse not to love Grace Kelly. :D

If she wants her way with you, you simply enthusiastically consent and thank the universe for such beauty.

;)

Johnny L.A.
06-13-2015, 10:24 AM
One thing I hadn't noticed before was that that shot was slowed down.

John Mace
06-13-2015, 11:03 AM
Yeah, great film. I normally hate Jimmy Stewart as an actor, but not in this film. Hitchcock was a genius!

madsircool
06-13-2015, 12:08 PM
Yeah, great film. I normally hate Jimmy Stewart as an actor, but not in this film. Hitchcock was a genius!
May I ask what it is about Stewart that you dont like?

I know some people say he's to aww-shucks but have they seen Vertigo? Or the above mentioned Rear Window? They are very dark complex roles.

Johnny L.A.
06-13-2015, 12:09 PM
I liked him best in Strategic Air Command. (Well, him and the B-36s and B-47s.)

John Mace
06-13-2015, 12:27 PM
May I ask what it is about Stewart that you dont like?

I know some people say he's to aww-shucks but have they seen Vertigo? Or the above mentioned Rear Window? They are very dark complex roles.

The aww-shucks is a big part of it, and his voice is often like fingernails on a blackboard for me.

madsircool
06-13-2015, 12:39 PM
The aww-shucks is a big part of it, and his voice is often like fingernails on a blackboard for me.

OK I see that. Thank you for responding. Maybe watch his films dubbed in a foreign language? :p

madsircool
06-13-2015, 12:40 PM
I liked him best in Strategic Air Command. (Well, him and the B-36s and B-47s.)

Did you like Flight of the Phoenix?

ThelmaLou
06-13-2015, 12:43 PM
The aww-shucks is a big part of it, and his voice is often like fingernails on a blackboard for me.Same here. NO sex appeal at all. And I couldn't figure out what Grace Kelly's character saw in him-- the judgmental, stuffy fussbudget. He didn't even seem to notice her until she pulled that stunt at the end of the movie.

She makes the film. I love it when she (in case there's someone who hasn't seen it)
crawls over the murderer's balcony in that gigantic organza skirt!I do love the movie, however, especially the premise. I used to live in an apartment complex where all the balcony-patios faced each other across an interior space--three stories. It was like a beehive with each story unfolding in its own little cell. It was fascinating to sit out there with a beer and just watch the comings and goings. And no, I didn't own a telescope (but it would have been interesting).

madsircool
06-13-2015, 12:53 PM
He didn't even seem to notice her...

There you have it. ;)

Brynda
06-13-2015, 11:12 PM
Grace Kelly's first appearance in the film, an extreme close-up as she closes in to kiss a dozing-off Stewart, has got to be one of the most erotic images in the whole history of Hollywood. I swear, I'm gay and yet I get excited seeing zoom into view. Whew!

I got to see Rear Window in the theater at my colleges years ago. Before that, I had only seen stills of Grace Kelly and thought she was a bit plain. Then I saw This scene and suddenly got what the fuss was about. Yowza.

bienville
06-14-2015, 06:08 AM
One thing I hadn't noticed before was that

One thing I hadn't noticed before was that Ross Bagdasarian aka David Seville, adoptive father of Alvin, Simon, and Theodore, played the piano player neighbor.
Well, o.k., I still have never noticed it but I recently read it and thus became informed of it.

Bagdasarian played minor roles in films, the best known of which is his appearance in Alfred Hitchcock's 1954 murder mystery Rear Window. Bagdasarian portrays a piano-playing songwriter who composes, plays, and sings the song "Lisa". His character lives in an apartment opposite the protagonist's; in keeping with the screenplay's theme of social voyeurism, his dialogue is never clearly heard, and he appears only in long shots, sometimes seen through a window. He stands next to Hitchcock in his signature cameo appearance. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_Bagdasarian,_Sr.)

Mr Downtown
06-14-2015, 10:51 PM
"Did Mr. Doyle think I stole this case?"

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