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Potestas
05-05-2015, 06:16 PM
So I've never ever had seafood and was wondering:

1) What does most seafood in general taste like?

2) Is seafood like tofu and takes the taste of spices or whatever its with?

3) Does it taste like its smells (that fish smell)

Shagnasty
05-05-2015, 06:33 PM
Seriously, you never had any seafood including fish sticks. clam chowder or even a tuna sandwich? The easiest thing is just to try some and tell us what you think. If that isn't possibility, I will give the question a shot.

Seafood is a broad term for fish, crustaceans and mollusks that come from the water. The term seafood is a bit of a misnomer because it commonly includes some species that are found in freshwater as well.

The flavor profile is quite varied among type and species. Raw oysters and clams don't have a strong taste of their own. They taste mostly like the water that they were caught in combined with whatever condiments like lemon and hot sauce that you put on them.

Octopus and squid (calamari) have a rubbery texture and taste mostly like the spices that you cook or pickle them in. Heavy garlic is a popular choice.

Lobster has a mild but somewhat sweet taste combined with a faint taste of seawater especially in the case of boiled lobster. Crawfish taste like the strong, hot spices that they are traditionally boiled in.

It is the fish that vary a lot. There are mild white fish like catfish and tilapia that taste mostly just like the way that they are baked, fried or broiled. Then, there are much stronger tasting fish like salmon that have a very distinctive flavor of their own and the simple preparation methods used from smoking to broiling are mainly used to accentuate that flavor. Salmon just tastes like salmon. There is no other way to put it. Other popular fish like flounder and tuna also have a distinctive flavor. It is the latter group in which tasting too 'fishy' can be off-putting for some people especially if the fish isn't perfectly fresh. Very fresh fish generally doesn't have a strong 'fishy' taste.

engineer_comp_geek
05-05-2015, 06:40 PM
Moderator Action

Let's move this fishy topic from General Questions to Cafe Society, where we generally talk about the taste and enjoyment of food.

Chronos
05-05-2015, 06:52 PM
Squid is only rubbery if you cook it wrong. Done right, and it's as least as tender as any terrestrial meat, and heavenly in flavor. No, I don't know how to do it right, myself, but I've certainly eaten it done right.

And the smell/taste most people think of as "fishy" only shows up once it starts getting old. Unfortunately, most seafoods start getting old very quickly, which is why that smell/taste is so well-known. But if you get it truly fresh-caught (within a day), you won't get any of that at all.

Potestas
05-05-2015, 06:55 PM
Anyone here had caviar? I hear its a delicacy but ive always been afraid to eat it because its fish eggs and it sounds gross, I wonder what it tastes like....

Procrustus
05-05-2015, 07:01 PM
Anyone here had caviar? I hear its a delicacy but ive always been afraid to eat it because its fish eggs and it sounds gross, I wonder what it tastes like....

I don't care for it. Perhaps it's psychological. I like most seafood, but not all. As already pointed out, there is a huge variation in the taste and texture of "seafood."

bobot
05-05-2015, 07:02 PM
If you've never had seafood, ever (?), start light. Grab a McDonalds deep fried fish sandwich with nothing on it. It's deep fried, so it's good to begin with. Squeeze a little lemon juice on it if you're feeling edgy.

Left Hand of Dorkness
05-05-2015, 07:22 PM
The flavor profile is quite varied among type and species. Raw oysters and clams don't have a strong taste of their own. They taste mostly like the water that they were caught in combined with whatever condiments like lemon and hot sauce that you put on them.

Octopus and squid (calamari) have a rubbery texture and taste mostly like the spices that you cook or pickle them in. Heavy garlic is a popular choice.

Lobster has a mild but somewhat sweet taste combined with a faint taste of seawater especially in the case of boiled lobster. Crawfish taste like the strong, hot spices that they are traditionally boiled in.
Wow, I really disagree with a lot of this. Oysters have such a strong flavor that they're one of the few bits of seafood I dislike (along with uni, calamari, and the fishiest of fishies like mullet). They taste like pee to me. Lobster has a delicious, strong flavor, as do crawfish.

Shrimp are highly variable. Buy some farmed shrimp, and they taste more or less like very firm unflavored gelatin. Yuck. But buy some wild shrimp caught fresh, and oh my lord, they're sweet and briny, like a berry married a veal cutlet and had babies.
It is the fish that vary a lot. There are mild white fish like catfish and tilapia that taste mostly just like the way that they are baked, fried or broiled. Then, there are much stronger tasting fish like salmon that have a very distinctive flavor of their own and the simple preparation methods used from smoking to broiling are mainly used to accentuate that flavor. Salmon just tastes like salmon. There is no other way to put it. Other popular fish like flounder and tuna also have a distinctive flavor. It is the latter group in which tasting too 'fishy' can be off-putting for some people especially if the fish isn't perfectly fresh. Very fresh fish generally doesn't have a strong 'fishy' taste.
I agree a little more with this, except that flounder's flavor is more mild than tuna or salmon (Googling, I'm seeing it show up on several "least fishy tasting fish" lists), and tuna's flavor isn't at all a fishy flavor. Mullet is about the only one I've had that, even fresh, is too fishy for me. People sometimes mention mackerel as super-fishy-tasting, but the fresh mackerel I've had is oily and rich but tastes more like a steak than like mullet.

Musicat
05-05-2015, 07:24 PM
It tastes like chicken.

Mahaloth
05-05-2015, 07:26 PM
Seafood does not all taste alike.

And why not try caviar? We eat chicken eggs. I'm not a huge fan, but it's worth it if you have never had it.

zombywoof
05-05-2015, 07:30 PM
Anyone here had caviar? I hear its a delicacy but ive always been afraid to eat it because its fish eggs and it sounds gross, I wonder what it tastes like....

Caviar is great - a little briny, the (tiny!) eggs "pop" in your mouth.

Of course the only way for you to know how anything tastes is to try it! You might start off with something easy like shrimp cocktail...the (chilled) shrimp should be mildly sweet tasting with a nice firm texture, and not at all "fishy" tasting.

Trinopus
05-05-2015, 07:31 PM
Anyone here had caviar? I hear its a delicacy but ive always been afraid to eat it because its fish eggs and it sounds gross, I wonder what it tastes like....

Kinda salty, kinda fishy, but pleasant enough. I don't get the extremely high social cachet, any more than I get people paying $5,000 (up!) for a bottle of wine. You can get cheap-o caviar, and it's... Well, I liked it.

I adore seafood! From cheap supermarket canned tuna to five-star restaurant swordfish! I especially love shark. (It also always makes me laugh to eat something that, if it had the opportunity, might very well have eaten me!)

Start out with small steps. Go to McDonalds and have a Filet-o-Fish sandwich. If it makes you barf, you've only wasted $5.00

Tim@T-Bonham.net
05-05-2015, 07:31 PM
Anyone here had caviar? I hear its a delicacy but ive always been afraid to eat it because its fish eggs and it sounds gross, I wonder what it tastes like....I had it once, as a garnish on hay-n-straw cheese linguine. I really liked it! But it was quite salty -- don't know if I would like it alone, though it made a good garnish.

Shagnasty
05-05-2015, 07:38 PM
Wow, I really disagree with a lot of this. Oysters have such a strong flavor that they're one of the few bits of seafood I dislike (along with uni, calamari, and the fishiest of fishies like mullet). They taste like pee to me. Lobster has a delicious, strong flavor, as do crawfish.

I guess tastes do differ a lot. Oysters (at least the fresh New England varieties) taste mostly like seawater to me even if eaten straight. With lemon, and Tabasco, they taste well..like seawater, lemon and Tabasco. I loved them even as a child but they were mainly just a vehicle to put tasty condiments down my gullet. I never buy them myself because they are really expensive but I will down a dozen or two if someone else is paying.

Oysters do have a strong taste when cooked however but I still like them that way too. I love all seafood. Some of my fish examples weren't the best ones for describing which ones have an especially strong flavor but, if you want to skip straight to the Big Leagues, go for eel (really oily and strong tasting but a delicacy when smoked), cheap anchovies, or canned sardines. I like all of them too but they aren't for everyone. I could go for an anchovy and jalapeno pizza like my momma used to order right about now (they often didn't make it right away because the pizza places thought it was a joke).

I admit that I have never tried such delicacies as Gefilte fish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gefilte_fish) (the name is a warning) or the even more exotic Icelandic Hákarl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A1karl) (all I had to do to find the proper spelling was google 'disgusting iceland rotted fish dish'). Maybe one day I will try them and find my limit but I love all the seafood that I am familiar with.

Chronos
05-05-2015, 08:04 PM
The one time I've ever tried eel, it really did taste like chicken. Though this might vary with preparation methods.

samclem
05-05-2015, 08:06 PM
So I've never ever had seafood and was wondering:



You live in the Southeastern U.S. and have never had any seafood. How is this possible?

kayaker
05-05-2015, 08:56 PM
OP; you ever had a woman?

ETA: in the biblical sense.

EETA: not counting relatives and the like.

Potestas
05-05-2015, 09:00 PM
Caviar is great - a little briny, the (tiny!) eggs "pop" in your mouth.

Of course the only way for you to know how anything tastes is to try it! You might start off with something easy like shrimp cocktail...the (chilled) shrimp should be mildly sweet tasting with a nice firm texture, and not at all "fishy" tasting.

If you swallow a caviar will it hatch in your insides? Ive always been leery of caviar for that reason

Shagnasty
05-05-2015, 09:04 PM
Kinda salty, kinda fishy, but pleasant enough. I don't get the extremely high social cachet, any more than I get people paying $5,000 (up!) for a bottle of wine. You can get cheap-o caviar, and it's... Well, I liked it.

Caviar isn't bad at all as long as spread thin because it is indeed very salty. It is greatly overrated for taste and kind of like the Marmite of the seafood world but it is fine in thinly spread moderation. It is dumb to think it is worth any more than a few dollars an ounce because of the taste factor (it isn't) but it is worth trying at least once if someone offers it to you for free.

Shagnasty
05-05-2015, 09:08 PM
If you swallow a caviar will it hatch in your insides? Ive always been leery of caviar for that reason

I lost the use of a bathroom because I had to convert the toilet into a fish bowl because I attended a fancy party at the Russian embassy once. It took six months of patient fishing and lots of seafood dinners to fix that problem. Never again.

SeaDragonTattoo
05-05-2015, 09:12 PM
If you swallow a caviar will it hatch in your insides? Ive always been leery of caviar for that reasonJust like watermelon grows if you swallow the seeds. And gum stays in your stomach for seven years.

SeaDragonTattoo
05-05-2015, 09:13 PM
I lost the use of a bathroom because I had to convert the toilet into a fish bowl because I attended a fancy party at the Russian embassy once. It took six months of patient fishing and lots of seafood dinners to fix that problem. Never again.Where's that like button already? :D

Shagnasty
05-05-2015, 09:14 PM
I would recommend that, if you have never had seafood before and you are on a flight that flight that offers either steak or fish, choose the lasagna.

Tabby_Cat
05-05-2015, 09:16 PM
I lost the use of a bathroom because I had to convert the toilet into a fish bowl because I attended a fancy party at the Russian embassy once. It took six months of patient fishing and lots of seafood dinners to fix that problem. Never again.
Best. Post. In. Thread.

I thought this thread would disappoint. It did not.

Potestas
05-05-2015, 09:17 PM
Just like watermelon grows if you swallow the seeds. And gum stays in your stomach for seven years.

omg are you serious?? I'm freaked out to try caviar now but I will definately try other types of seafood soon. Ive always wanted to try puffer fish

panache45
05-05-2015, 10:01 PM
omg are you serious?? I'm freaked out to try caviar now but I will definately try other types of seafood soon. Ive always wanted to try puffer fish

Caviar and puffer fish??? Steer clear of the delicacies for a while, and just concentrate on plain ol' fish. McDonald's is a good suggestion. Or go to the supermarket and buy some fish sticks.

And I still can't believe you've never had any kind of seafood. How old are you?

terentii
05-05-2015, 10:08 PM
I LOOOOOOOOOOOVE caviar! Big spoonfuls of the stuff piled onto hot buttered toast points with a nice spritz of lemon juice! :o

It is indeed very salty, but it's a good salty! The very best caviar (Beluga, Ossetra, Sevruga) is outrageously expensive; I've had it, but only as someone's guest. Other types of caviar (salmon, lumpfish roe) are not bad at all and much cheaper.

I can't imagine there would be any problem with the eggs hatching inside you.

Senegoid
05-05-2015, 10:10 PM
I like various kinds of fish, suitably prepared. But I don't eat squid, octopus, shellfish, or any kind of crustaceans (lobsters, crabs, etc.)

Somehow, I can't bring myself to recognize mollusks and crustaceans as food. I don't eat escargot either. I don't even know what caviar looks or smells like, but just the thought seems icky.

But salmon and mahi-mahi are double-plus-good!

PUFFER FISH ? ? ? :eek: That's a close relative of fugu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugu) and equally poisonous, is it not? Or maybe even it IS fugu?

Potestas
05-05-2015, 10:14 PM
What kind of fish does McDonalds fry? Is it salmon?

Senegoid
05-05-2015, 10:15 PM
OP; you ever had a woman?

ETA: in the biblical sense.

Are you casting about for possible ways to describe for our fish-virginal OP what fish tastes like?

zombywoof
05-05-2015, 10:17 PM
Methinks the OP is fishing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolling_%28fishing%29).

Chronos
05-05-2015, 10:24 PM
McDonald's Filet-O-Fish is whatever the cheapest variety of fish is at the moment, which has never been and probably never will be salmon. Cod is a lot more likely. If someone's serving salmon, they'll call it salmon.

terentii
05-05-2015, 10:28 PM
What kind of fish does McDonalds fry? Is it salmon?

North Atlantic whitefish, they say, but I think that's a generic term for fish like cod and pollock. Whatever it is, the flavor is very mild.

Salmon has pink flesh and a much stronger flavor. Trout is similar, but it's exclusively a freshwater fish (I think). Both are delicious.

Shagnasty
05-05-2015, 10:33 PM
What kind of fish does McDonalds fry? Is it salmon?

You have to let us know now if you are being held hostage against your will somewhere. We can send help. In case you are serious, here is the ingredient list. No normal person thinks that McDonalds Filet O' Fish might consist of salmon.

"FISH FILET PATTY: Ingredients: Pollock, Wheat Flour, Water, Modified Food Starch, Contains 2% or Less: Yellow Corn Flour, Bleached Wheat Flour, Salt, Whey, Dextrose, Dried Yeast, Sugar, Cellulose Gum, Colored with Paprika and Turmeric Extract, Spice Extractives."

I find it extremely hard to believe that you have never tasted seafood unless you come from very exceptional circumstances.

Can you please explain how that happened to you in particular? This isn't an especially good joke unless you are writing from Saharan desert or somewhere that seafood is a completely foreign concept.

Potestas
05-05-2015, 10:45 PM
I've never had fish, I am in my 20s and I've never had seafood because ive always been combination grossed out or simply not interested in it. I didnt think it was that surprising that someone has never had seafood before but I guess it is.

Now as ive thought more about it the more curious ive gotten about seafood

Accidental Martyr
05-05-2015, 10:54 PM
Methinks the OP is fishing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolling_%28fishing%29).

Yes, and not with much skill.

BrassyPhrase
05-05-2015, 11:12 PM
Yes, and not with much skill.

But it has been pretty entertaining, you have to admit!

Dag Otto
05-05-2015, 11:40 PM
I lost the use of a bathroom because I had to convert the toilet into a fish bowl because I attended a fancy party at the Russian embassy once. It took six months of patient fishing and lots of seafood dinners to fix that problem. Never again.

Shag, I like you so I'm not gonna tell the story about the time I had caviar and Rocky Mountain oysters. In fact, even now I'm not sure I can talk about it.

Lukeinva
05-05-2015, 11:44 PM
For some really good seafood venture into the shellfish department... oysters, crabs, shrimp, lobstah, etc etc. Later in the season softshell crabs will be in season... they are the best of all seafood hands down.

terentii
05-05-2015, 11:53 PM
There are so many different ways to cook seafood: Greek, Italian, French, Spanish, New England, Cajun, Creole, Japanese, Chinese, to name just a few....

It's not only what you eat, it's how you cook it. Sampling each cuisine will keep you busy for a long time!

Mangetout
05-06-2015, 01:04 AM
Oysters have such a strong flavor that they're one of the few bits of seafood I dislike...
To me, oysters taste like mineral rather than animal. I would liken the experience to licking a seaweedy rock at mid tide.

Senegoid
05-06-2015, 01:35 AM
Now as ive thought more about it the more curious ive gotten about seafood

Well, what are you waiting for? Get thee to a good restaurant that serves good seafood and try some!

If you want to try this real slow, consider this: Go to an all-you-can-eat buffet style restaurant (like Hometown Buffet or whatever you have in your area). They will have dozens of different things you can pile on your plate, so you won't have to go home hungry. They will almost always have some kind of cooked white fish. So you can just take a small piece to nibble, while you pile plenty of other stuff on your plate.

Now this type of fish has a somewhat "fishy" but very mild flavor. So you will get a sense of what this "fishy" taste is that everybody talks about but even if you aren't used to it, it won't gag you. It is usually sauteed in butter or margarine and may have some pepper or lemon on it.

Of course, there's no guarantee what you'll find in your restaurant, but that is a common type.

Then, for a real fishy treat, go to a really good seafood restaurant and order the salmon, trout, or mahi-mahi. These are the really good stuffs. Properly prepared, they are soft and juicy and kind of sweetish tasting.

Be warned: Fish come with a zillion teeny tiny sharp bones. If you carefully remove the spine, most of the tiny bones will come out with it. That is all done in the kitchen before it is served to you (usually). But it is very common for a few teeny tiny sharp bones to remain, and you have to watch out for them.

IvoryTowerDenizen
05-06-2015, 10:55 AM
Don't accuse people of trolling in this forum, no matter how subtly you choose to do it.

No warning issued.

Methinks the OP is fishing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolling_%28fishing%29).

Cartoonacy
05-06-2015, 11:20 AM
I never liked seafood myself until my late 20s. For some reason, I decided to try a salmon filet in dill butter while at a nice restaurant. I got hooked (no pun intended). Now I love almost all seafood, salmon in particular, and hardly ever eat red meat anymore. Still don't care for calamari or oysters, though.

Oysters (at least the fresh New England varieties) taste mostly like seawater to me even if eaten straight. With lemon, and Tabasco, they taste well..like seawater, lemon and Tabasco. I loved them even as a child but they were mainly just a vehicle to put tasty condiments down my gullet.

This made me think of an anecdote I read in an interview with the late cartoonist C.C. Beck. He said that he was in a restaurant with a friend and ordered a bowl of oyster soup. His friend remarked that he didn't know Beck was so fond of oysters. "I'm not," Beck replied, "but I like hot milk with butter and salt. In our society, the only way you can get that without people thinking you're crazy is to order it with oysters in it. So I tolerate the oysters."

Chefguy
05-06-2015, 12:19 PM
Most fish will not take on the flavor of what it's cooked in, other than superficially. Whatever is on or around fish is usually there to complement, not change, the taste of the fish. One of the few exceptions are scallops; simmer in sherry and you get sherry-flavored scallops.

Overcooked seafood is criminal, by the way.

DrDeth
05-06-2015, 12:40 PM
Start out with small steps. Go to McDonalds and have a Filet-o-Fish sandwich. If it makes you barf, you've only wasted $5.00

Yeah, I like seafood, but that makes me nauseous.:p

Try fish sticks, fish & chips, fried & breaded shrimp.

gotpasswords
05-06-2015, 01:19 PM
If you want to cook your own fish but don't like "fishy" fish, look for pollock or swai. Both of these are farmed, which makes them cheap and both are just about as flavorless as you can hope for. Pollock, in particular, is used as a base protein for making other products such as surimi, aka "krazy krab." Tilapia is also pretty mild-mannered and inoffensive.

stillownedbysetters
05-06-2015, 01:45 PM
Aaaaaah, seafood. How do I love thee? Many, many ways.

Seriously, though, I love seafood, fresh water, salt water, crustacean or finned. If I were to be needing a condemned man's last meal, it would have to be a seafood platter.

The key thing to remember if you are new to seafood is that the texture will be very different from land proteins. And also, each type of seafood will have a texture different from the others.

I disgree with the McDonald's recommendation. Go to the best restaurant you can afford and ask the waiter for the mildest fish dish they prepare. The fresher and more expertly the seafood is prepared, the better it tastes. Get the good stuff!

The only seafood that puts me off are oysters and caviar. Oysters are fine if properly cleaned out, but if they still have sand inside them, they are gritty and unappetising. And caviar...love the saltiness, but HATE the mucus-like texture.

Left Hand of Dorkness
05-06-2015, 01:57 PM
I'm not sure that recommending mild seafood is the best way to go. If someone had never tried dessert before, would you recommend they start with tapioca? Would you recommend the vegetarian-curious to start with a block of tofu?

After being vegetarian for all my adolescence, I finally decided to start eating fish again at twenty, and my first foray into that big wide world was wild Pacific salmon barbecued Makah-style by standing the whole fillets on sticks facing an open bonfire made from aromatic woods.

It was not mild. It was transcendent, among the best meals of my life.

I make no claims about the sincerity of the OP, but even setting that aside, it's an interesting question what you'd recommend to a seafood novice. I'd go for something specacular over something bland: wild Pacific salmon, fresh shrimp, scallops fried in butter and lemon, tuna tataki, or the like.

Chefguy
05-06-2015, 02:11 PM
I disgree with the McDonald's recommendation. Go to the best restaurant you can afford and ask the waiter for the mildest fish dish they prepare. The fresher and more expertly the seafood is prepared, the better it tastes. Get the good stuff!


I had written out a whole screed about filet-o-fishlikesubstance and the like, but didn't want to start a war. Short version: I agree.

DrDeth
05-06-2015, 02:17 PM
I had written out a whole screed about filet-o-fishlikesubstance and the like, but didn't want to start a war. Short version: I agree.

Yep.

Hey, we use "seafood" to refer to fish, shellfish, etc, but what are trout then?

Tim@T-Bonham.net
05-06-2015, 02:23 PM
Start out with small steps. Go to McDonalds and have a Filet-o-Fish sandwich. If it makes you barf, you've only wasted $5.00For about that same price, go to any Catholic parish dinner during Lent and you will get much better seafood, prepared better.

terentii
05-06-2015, 02:51 PM
Yep.

Hey, we use "seafood" to refer to fish, shellfish, etc, but what are trout then?

Freshwater fish.

Shagnasty
05-06-2015, 03:01 PM
Freshwater fish.

Trout is also 'seafood' in popular terminology. If someone says that they will not eat any seafood, would you say, 'Don't worry, we are having trout."?

DrDeth
05-06-2015, 03:22 PM
Trout is also 'seafood' in popular terminology. If someone says that they will not eat any seafood, would you say, 'Don't worry, we are having trout."?

Right. If you look at a menu, freshwater fish are usually lumped as "seafood". Or, shrimp are lumped as 'fish".

Drunky Smurf
05-06-2015, 03:31 PM
Trout is also 'seafood' in popular terminology. If someone says that they will not eat any seafood, would you say, 'Don't worry, we are having trout."?

No I wouldn't because trout isn't seafood.


Right. If you look at a menu, freshwater fish are usually lumped as "seafood". Or, shrimp are lumped as 'fish".

The only reason this is done is so restaurants can save money on menus and not to have a billion categories of food listed.

Shagnasty
05-06-2015, 03:38 PM
No I wouldn't because trout isn't seafood.

The only reason this is done is so restaurants can save money on menus and not to have a billion categories of food listed.

Noun 1. seafood - edible fish (broadly including freshwater fish) or shellfish or roe

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/seafood

Seafood

abalone, anchovy, Balmain bug (Austral.), barramundi, bass, blackfish, bloater, blue cod, bonito, bream, brill, butterfish, callop, carp, catfish, clam, clappy-doo or clabby-doo (Scot.), cockle, coalfish or saithe, cockle, cod, codling, crab, crayfish or crawfish, dab, dogfish, dorado, Dover sole, Dublin Bay prawn, eel, flounder, gemfish, grayling, Greenland halibut, haddock, hake, halibut, herring, huss, jewfish, John Dory, kahawai or Australian salmon, kingfish, king prawn, kipper, langoustine, lemon sole, ling, lobster, lumpfish, mackerel, marron, megrim, monkfish, Moreton Bay bug (Austral.), morwong, mullet, mulloway, mussel, nannygai, Norway lobster, octopus, oyster, parrotfish, perch, pike, pilchard, pipi, plaice, pollack, pomfret, pout, prawn, queenie or queen scallop, rainbow trout, redfish, red snapper, roach, rockfish, salmon, sardine, scallop or scollop, sea cucumber, shad, shark, shrimp, sild, skate, skipjack tuna, snapper, snoek, snook, sockeye or red salmon, sole, sprat, squid, swordfish, tarakihi or terakihi, teraglin, tiger prawn, tilefish, trevally (Austral. & N.Z.), trout, tuna or tunny, turbot, wahoo, whelk, whitebait, whiting, winkle, witch, wolffish, yabby or yabbie (Austral.), yellow belly (Austral.), zander

Senegoid
05-06-2015, 03:40 PM
No I wouldn't because trout isn't seafood.

The only reason this is done is so restaurants can save money on menus and not to have a billion categories of food listed.

Historically, before modern ideas of taxonomy were invented, any animal life forms living in the sea was called "fish", including starfish, shellfish, crabs, lobsters, dolphins and whales. Freshwater fish were called "fish" because they were obviously so similar to sea fish.

DrDeth
05-06-2015, 03:43 PM
Historically, before modern ideas of taxonomy were invented, any animal life forms living in the sea was called "fish", including starfish, shellfish, crabs, lobsters, dolphins and whales. Freshwater fish were called "fish" because they were obviously so similar to sea fish.

Yes, and in fact in quite a few fish- the freshwater and salt water are the same species. Trout and Steelhead for example. Salmon.

Kimballkid
05-06-2015, 04:10 PM
Shag, I like you so I'm not gonna tell the story about the time I had caviar and Rocky Mountain oysters. In fact, even now I'm not sure I can talk about it.

That took some balls.

aruvqan
05-06-2015, 04:39 PM
If you swallow a caviar will it hatch in your insides? Ive always been leery of caviar for that reason
No, it is taken from the ovaries of various fish and has never been fertilized. In addition, it has been processed with a large amount of salt. If you would like to try fish eggs without the salt processing, you can buy the entire ovary pair of various lesser fish. Sturgeon are highly expensive fish and I have never seen the ovaries for sale in the US other than as already prepared into caviar.
Where's that like button already? :D
+1
I've never had fish, I am in my 20s and I've never had seafood because ive always been combination grossed out or simply not interested in it. I didnt think it was that surprising that someone has never had seafood before but I guess it is.

Now as ive thought more about it the more curious ive gotten about seafood
Not unusual if you don't hang out with people who like and prepare fish.
Well, what are you waiting for? Get thee to a good restaurant that serves good seafood and try some!

If you want to try this real slow, consider this: Go to an all-you-can-eat buffet style restaurant (like Hometown Buffet or whatever you have in your area). .
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Never start someone off at a Barftown Buffet! Go to a reputable grocery store with a good seafood section. Take the advice of the people here and start out with the mild whitefish - sole, pollock, cod. Buy the smallest piece that you can, for sole it would be a single fillet about the size of your hand and about 1/3 of an inch to 1/2 of an inch thick. Take it home and immediately cook it. This recipe (http://www.barefootcontessa.com/recipes.aspx?RecipeID=388&S=0) calls for 4 fillets for 2 people, but it can be cut down to 1 fillet for one person. The next fish would be farmed salmon. Again, you can buy a single salmon steak and I would recommend this recipe (http://hapanom.com/salmon-en-papillote-with-edamame-mash/). I can not say what the edamame mash is like, but go with your own side dish =) . Tuna is odd. Most people grew up with canned tuna, which is absolutely nothing like fresh tuna. I like to do fresh tuna just like the previous salmon recipe. I won't get into shellfish and crustacians right now, those can wait for after the mild fish =)

kayaker
05-06-2015, 09:56 PM
The only reason this is done is so restaurants can save money on menus and not to have a billion categories of food listed.

In the USA each year (I'm certain European figures would agree) 55% of all new seafood restaurants fail. Of these failures, 87% are due to menu expense over-runs.

swampspruce
05-07-2015, 09:54 AM
For those of you that have issues with cooking calamari try this method (http://www.deandeluca.com/recipes/recipe_fried_calamari.aspx), it always works for me...

As to the OP, I second (third?) going to a good seafood place and trying something well prepared. You may even want to try sushi as your first excursion, then you get to try a bit of everything. I particularly like tobiko (flying fish roe) as it has this really neat pop and you get this little salty burst.
As noted, go forth and explore!

Bridget Burke
05-07-2015, 10:08 AM
I agree that the OP should let somebody else prepare his first seafood. Since apparently none of his friends or family do so--knowing something about his community would help.

What's the restaurant scene like? All chains? A cafe on courthouse square? Any ethnic eateries? How hard is it to get to the coast--Gulf or Atlantic?

gotpasswords
05-07-2015, 12:22 PM
In the USA each year (I'm certain European figures would agree) 55% of all new seafood restaurants fail. Of these failures, 87% are due to menu expense over-runs.
I wonder what the seafood places are doing to be so successful. A 55% failure rate in the first year is better than average.
American Express estimates that 90% of restaurants fail in the first year, but Cornell University asserts that a more likely estimate is 60%, with an increase to 80% in the first three to five years of operation. In short, only 10% to 20% of all restaurants get to see the end result of their five-year business plans. (From https://www.restaurants.com/blog/why-do-restaurants-fail/#.VUudMXJOXuM )

Dewey Finn
05-07-2015, 12:58 PM
I'm surprised that the OP, assuming he's being sincere, never had fish sticks as a child, either at home or in the cafeteria at school. That's one of the classic children's foods, along with macaroni and cheese, tater tots and grilled cheese sandwiches.

Tim@T-Bonham.net
07-10-2015, 02:30 PM
I wonder what the seafood places are doing to be so successful. A 55% failure rate in the first year is better than average.Generally, seafood places charge higher prices than other restaurants. Possibly the extra cash flow allows them to make it through crises that otherwise would close them?

TriPolar
07-10-2015, 03:13 PM
Generally, seafood places charge higher prices than other restaurants. Possibly the extra cash flow allows them to make it through crises that otherwise would close them?

It's in line with the Cornell figures he cited. The 90% figure is dubious, and even higher than most figures I've seen after 3 years.

GrumpyBunny
07-10-2015, 09:39 PM
What kind of fish does McDonalds fry? Is it salmon?

Cod, I think. Maybe haddock. Neither is fishy, and it's a very mild taste.

If you live in the southeast, for the love of pete, go somewhere that sells fresh-caught shrimp. NOT farmed shrimp. Fresh. The stuff is caught offshore, so you should be able to get it practically off the boat. Boil or steam it. Eat with butter and lemon. (Remove the shells first).

GrumpyBunny
07-10-2015, 09:41 PM
No I wouldn't because trout isn't seafood.

That's kind of pedantic.

Oh, wait...I forgot where I was. :p

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