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View Full Version : Why were the Knack loathed by critics?


pulykamell
10-15-2017, 09:27 PM
I was only a wee tot back in the Knack's heyday. From what I understand -- and please correct me if I'm wrong -- music critics pretty much universally panned the Knack back in their heyday.

Over the last year or so, I finally got around to checking out their debut album, Get the Knack. And you know what? It's fucking great. One power pop treat after another. I mean, seriously great album with wonderful pop songs and great musicians. I really don't think there's a bad song on that album. Bruce Gary on drums just pushes all my buttons for what I love out of a drummer, and Berton Averre's guitar was tastily melodic with great phrasing and tone, with one of the most iconic guitar solos in rock history (in "My Sharona," of course.) And everyone tight as shit from what I've found online from their live performances (Carnegie Hall is a particularly good one.)

So, am I crazy? What the hell did critics think was wrong with this album?

Telemark
10-15-2017, 09:52 PM
I was only a wee tot back in the Knack's heyday. From what I understand -- and please correct me if I'm wrong -- music critics pretty much universally panned the Knack back in their heyday.

Get The Knack was the first album I every bought, along with The Kids are Alright by The Who, so I'm probably a bit biased. But there were many positive reviews of their first album; many critics liked their energetic pop. Most of the backlash came from the huge promotional push and instant success of the band. They thought they were manufactured stars. Most of the criticism wasn't really about the music.

cochrane
10-15-2017, 11:03 PM
They helped Weird Al Yankovic's career get started, so they should be appreciated for that. They liked his parody My Bologna so much, they convinced their record company to offer him a contract.

WordMan
10-16-2017, 06:09 AM
There's a decent documentary on Netflix or Prime. Basically, their manager withheld access to them in some key situations - not doing interviews, skipping a great TV show appearance or two - to foster some feeling of exclusivity that profoundly backfired. The fact that Doug Fieger was a bit of snarky, immature guy and I think the press read the worst into the tactic.

It's so sad. Get the Knack, to me, is a perfect album. I love every track. Fieger's immature boy impulses and horniness are more than fine in a song like Good Girls Don't even if they don't translate well to a persona.

And Burton Averre - man, what a player. That Sharona solo is amazing. But listen to his work throughout Good Girls Don't, or That's What the Little Girls Do - he laces in the tastiest lead fills and Byrds-like jangle fills like in Your Number or Your Name.

and Bruce Gary and Prescott Niles drive it - the songs have a rock edge to them that, coupled with Averre's virtuosity, always keeps the band in the "legit musicians" camp. Kind of a power-pop Van Halen.

Their career is a missed opportunity.

jerez
10-16-2017, 06:12 AM
My guess is that the late 70s was a difficult time to be playing rock if you wanted to sound original and didn't want to piss off the record-buying public.

WordMan
10-16-2017, 06:13 AM
My guess is that the late 70s was a difficult time to be playing rock if you wanted to sound original and didn't want to piss off the record-buying public.

Yeah, artists like Tom Petty ;) cracked a formula that very few figured out.

don't ask
10-16-2017, 06:31 AM
A while ago I read with interest this article (http://ultimateclassicrock.com/the-knack-get-the-knack/) about their demise.

Sex Pistols guitarist Steve Jones was a genuine fan. "I've literally played that album a million times, but I couldn't really tell people -- 'cause it was kind of uncool, being from the Sex Pistols, and that whole era," Jones said in Getting the Knack. "I loved that album. I still have a copy of it!"

I saw the Knack at Manly Flicks in 1979 and they rocked very hard.

cochrane
10-16-2017, 06:43 AM
Interesting, and probably little-known fact: Doug Fieger's brother Geoffrey is a lawyer who represented Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the assisted-suicide physician, and won his acquittal in every case in which he represented him. Kevorkian was convicted in the only case in which he represented himself.

WordMan
10-16-2017, 07:10 AM
A while ago I read with interest this article (http://ultimateclassicrock.com/the-knack-get-the-knack/) about their demise.



I saw the Knack at Manly Flicks in 1979 and they rocked very hard.

Fascinating. Coming from a guy people wanted to deride as punk hamfisted player who also totally rocked.

Yeah - both are great.

campp
10-16-2017, 08:28 AM
I remember a lot of comparisons with early Beatles. The cover and title are reminiscent of Beatles. There was some push back about that and "yawn, another jangle band, this time they think they're the Beatles".

Just what I remember from being in the business.

Pork Rind
10-16-2017, 10:23 AM
And Burton Averre - man, what a player. That Sharona solo is amazing.

Every now and again, I’ll be driving around without my own playlist going. Sooner or later, My Sharona will come on. And if it's the version with the abridged solo, well, it puts me in a mood that makes me understand the source of some of the worse road rage incidents. I just wanna start ramming cars off the road*...

* This is not a good idea, ever, but especially not when I’m riding my motorcycle.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 10:24 AM
There's a decent documentary on Netflix or Prime. Basically, their manager withheld access to them in some key situations - not doing interviews, skipping a great TV show appearance or two - to foster some feeling of exclusivity that profoundly backfired. The fact that Doug Fieger was a bit of snarky, immature guy and I think the press read the worst into the tactic.

Yeah, that actually does remind me that they also had this reputation, rightly or wrongly, of being totally full of themselves and being commercial, "manufactured" rock or something b.s. like that. But being arrogant asshats or not, that debut really speaks for itself. I mean, hate the band all you like, but criticize the music on its merits. (Though it does seem the reviews I find today of that album are generally very good.)

I haven't really listened through the follow-up albums yet. It seems that there is some consensus they didn't really quite live up to their debut, but I've heard fairly positive things about them. I am familiar with "Baby Talks Dirty," but that almost sounds like it's trying a little too hard to recapture the magic of "My Sharona."

John DiFool
10-16-2017, 10:50 AM
I thought the backlash came precisely because they were unable to follow up the debut with anything substantial.

TriPolar
10-16-2017, 10:58 AM
The Knack arrived at a time when people were looking for the type of music that would follow the classic rock era of the 60s and 70s. It was being followed by all sorts of variations of rock that couldn't satisfy everyone, and to a great extent that's all the earlier rock era was anyway. So, on top of the more specific reasons given above, just about every new band and sound was derided by many critics, and the as John DiFool mentions, unable to follow up on their initial success the reputation of critics pans stuck with them. They seemed to me to be following in the footsteps of so many 70s one-hit-wonder bands. Personally, I found them just as good as any band of that time , although I am more of a general listener than an aficionado.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 11:04 AM
I thought the backlash came precisely because they were unable to follow up the debut with anything substantial.

I'm not sure. From what I'm reading, the whole "Knuke the Knack" campaign started in July of 1979, well before the follow-up album or anything. The Knack hate had fomented by then.

Don Draper
10-16-2017, 11:28 AM
I was pretty young when they appeared (10 years old in 1979), but from what I understand they were a band like Boston in that they did not emerge out of any particular regional scene or movement. They were the product of a corporate record-label boards carefully studying then-current trends, assembling a bunch of competent rather than talented musicians, and producing a prefabricated product meant for mass consumption. Nowadays, most of pop culture is very blatantly packaged for mass consumption to the lowest common denominator, but in the late 70s a band had to at least appear to be (if not actually be) "authentic".

There was also a certain level of arrogance in the marketing of the Knack. Their Lp "Get the Knack" had a cover photo that obviously aped the look of early Beatles Lp covers as if to say "We are the new paradigm-shaping, standard-setting band which all future bands will have to be compared to." If you're gonna make a statement like that, you'd damn well better have the raw talent to back up the claim. And the Knack really didn't.

Personally, the only Knack song I know well is "My Sharona." While it does have a lot of energy, I find it simplistic, repetitive, and one of those grating ear-wormy songs that get lodged in the brain so that I would rather blow my brains out rather than hear it one more time.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 11:40 AM
I They were the product of a corporate record-label boards carefully studying then-current trends, assembling a bunch of competent rather than talented musicians

Except, as musicians, they weren't merely competent. They were pretty fucking amazing. And, also, they don't seem to be a corporate assembly of musicians from the bios that I've read. It seems Doug Fieger arrived in LA, met Averre, and they started a songwriting partnership. Doug also knew Bruce Gary from years before. Not sure how Prescott Niles got into the band, but it all seems to be centered around Fieger and him assembling the band, not some corporate process.

WordMan
10-16-2017, 11:54 AM
puly - you're correct.

Don - sorry; none of that's true.

The hate started well before the second album came out. I recall everyone loving Sharona, but it got played to death on the way to being the #1 song of the year. Add Fieger's persona and the idiot manager and you have a Blurred Lines situation - good song that people ended up angry over.

blondebear
10-16-2017, 11:57 AM
Funny bit o' trivia: the "real" Sharona still uses the song on her Real Estate website.

Pork Rind
10-16-2017, 12:06 PM
...from what I understand they were a band like Boston in that they did not emerge out of any particular regional scene or movement. They were the product of a corporate record-label boards carefully studying then-current trends, assembling a bunch of competent rather than talented musicians, and producing a prefabricated product meant for mass consumption.

It's a strange position for me to be in, jumping to the defense of Boston. Every story I've heard about the recording of this album, up to and including the detailed breakdown on Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_(album)#Recording_and_production), tells a tale of clueless (and deliberately misinformed) record label execs that did not know that Boston was essentially just one dude in a basement, that the final tapes were not recorded in the booked studio in LA, and as far as I can tell, Scholz presented the entire album as a finished take-it-or-leave-it product.

Dinsdale
10-16-2017, 12:11 PM
I'll have to give it a re-listen. Sharona hooked me when I first heard it, and i bought the album, but IIRC it didn't stick with me. Just sorta faded like the Romantics or any number of other pop groups.

During that summer, I was operating a parper compactor with only a top-40 radio - seemed like the only 2 songs played were My Sharona and Heart of Glass!

At the time I was focussing more on Elvis/Stiff, Pretenders, Talking Heads...

Don Draper
10-16-2017, 12:15 PM
Except, as musicians, they weren't merely competent. They were pretty fucking amazing.

Well they certainly don't display it in "My Sharona."

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 12:16 PM
It's a strange position for me to be in, jumping to the defense of Boston. Every story I've heard about the recording of this album, up to and including the detailed breakdown on Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_(album)#Recording_and_production), tells a tale of clueless (and deliberately misinformed) record label execs that did not know that Boston was essentially just one dude in a basement, that the final tapes were not recorded in the booked studio in LA, and as far as I can tell, Scholz presented the entire album as a finished take-it-or-leave-it product.

Yeah, that's basically what I know of it: that it was essentially a Tom Scholz solo project. It's really a technically amazing album, with reasonably catchy songs, and I can't imagine what it would have been like to hear it for the first time when it came out. It must have sounded (audio quality-wise) so different than everything else at the time.

by-tor
10-16-2017, 12:56 PM
Don Draper, you have got to be kidding. That guitar solo is amazing and definitely hard to play.

Doubticus
10-16-2017, 12:56 PM
I think "Get the Knack" is one of the few great start to finish albums out there. IIRC, the criticism I heard was about how most of the songs were about trying to get sex with under age girls, such as "Good Girl's Don't".

Tom Tildrum
10-16-2017, 12:57 PM
Personally, the only Knack song I know well is "My Sharona." While it does have a lot of energy, I find it simplistic, repetitive, and one of those grating ear-wormy songs that get lodged in the brain so that I would rather blow my brains out rather than hear it one more time.

ObSimpsons: "That song is a pop culture footnote!"

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 01:04 PM
Well they certainly don't display it in "My Sharona."

Wow. No comment.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 01:13 PM
I think "Get the Knack" is one of the few great start to finish albums out there. IIRC, the criticism I heard was about how most of the songs were about trying to get sex with under age girls, such as "Good Girl's Don't".

Yeah, and if you know the Sharona story, it does get a little skeevy there, too. But with my two daughters in the house, 3 1/2 and 1 1/2, I have to listen to that song pretty much damn near every day, multiple times a day, because they love it so. There is something so primordially catchy about that song. It's funny, because with my older daughter's limited playlist, there's only two bands with male singers on it that she likes: The Knack (with "My Sharona") and Twisted Sister (with "We're Not Gonna Take It" and "I Wanna Rock.") The rest of her playlist is Bangles, Go-Gos, Sleater-Kinney, St. Vincent, Bikini Kill, and the original Powerpuff Girls theme. She seems to be very beat/rhythm-driven from the songs she likes, which is how I am, too.

NDP
10-16-2017, 01:17 PM
I wasn't a fan of The Knack but I didn't hate them. "My Sharona" was the song that delivered the mortal blow to disco and for that I am eternally grateful.

Dinsdale
10-16-2017, 01:41 PM
Hmm - that is some good guitar work. And definitely catchy tunes. Maybe the lyrics were a little stupid, even for pop.

Funny how I could be a HUGE fan of something as pop as Rockpile, but was somewhat dismissive of this album.

BeeGee
10-16-2017, 02:09 PM
I wasn't a fan of The Knack but I didn't hate them. "My Sharona" was the song that delivered the mortal blow to disco and for that I am eternally grateful.

Yep! I was a senior in high school when this came out and I was sick to death of glam, slick, over-produced disco schtick. Fly, robin, fly? Really?

I've got this on my kindle and will be getting the knack this afternoon.

Gatopescado
10-16-2017, 02:11 PM
..... I can't imagine what it would have been like to hear it for the first time when it came out. It must have sounded (audio quality-wise) so different than everything else at the time.

I can tell you. Cranked waaay up on a Sansui Quadraphonic blasting out of huge, 18" JBL Studio monitors.

Incredible! :cool:

jerez
10-16-2017, 02:59 PM
...I have to listen to that song pretty much damn near every day, multiple times a day, because they love it so.
Made me laugh out loud, twice. They/you might like Aserejé (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0PisGe66mY).
About skeeviness, the leering grin of that guy on the cover doesn't help matters.
I just had a fresh listen to the My Sharona solo. It's good but it's not that hard.
The Cars are from around the same period. They were more successful because they were better all around, IMO.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 03:04 PM
Made me laugh out loud, twice. They/you might like Aserejé (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0PisGe66mY).
About skeeviness, the leering grin of that guy on the cover doesn't help matters.
I just had a fresh listen to the My Sharona solo. It's good but it's not that hard.
The Cars are from around the same period. They were more successful because they were better all around, IMO.

I can’t speak to how hard it is, and I don’t really care. (My favorite guitar solo is probably not at all technically difficult—“Marquee Moon” solo, but it is perfect.) It’s fucking tasty, though. Gorgeous solo. And, seriously, one of the most iconic rick solos in history. It’s dfinitely got to be top twenty if not top ten.

ETA: Oh, god, not the Ketchup song. I have just about erased it from my memory. Damn you. And, yeah, the Cars were good, too.

jerez
10-16-2017, 03:10 PM
Haha! You know the words are nonsense, right?

My Sharona was on the radio in my last years in high school. One of the teachers hated it ("What the hell is that?") which confirmed its greatness, in our minds.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 03:17 PM
Had no idea about the nonsense lyrics, but I remember that being huge back in, what, 2001 plus or minus a couple years? I just remember living in Budapest at the time and it being one of the marquee concerts.

jerez
10-16-2017, 03:31 PM
Yeah, it's gibberish. It's said that they're aping Rapper's Delight.

I've just listened to Marquee Moon for the first time. Ten-minute track, long solo starts at about 5:00. Very good stuff. The solo sounds very original. The My Sharona solo is good too, but it's more or less a series of riffs (ideas in circulation). I'm not trying to put it down and agree that it's one of the greats (top 50, I'd say). Elliot Easton (The Cars) is another who sounded original. This relates to what I said upthread about it being a hard time to be original in rock.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 03:45 PM
Hah! I always thought it was reminiscent of Rappers Delight. I thought it was just me.

Dinsdale
10-16-2017, 03:46 PM
Television is one of those groups with a big rep that I never appreciated back then. Should prolly give them another listen.

The Cars 1st album was pretty strong start to finish. But man - were they boring live. I saw them back up - I forget who - in Springfield IL. The headliner was more traditional rock - I'm thinking someone like Pat Travers or Rory Gallagher. And the crowd had NO IDEA what to make of these skinny black clad guys posing and jerking around! :D

jerez
10-16-2017, 03:49 PM
Hah! I always thought it was reminiscent of Rappers Delight. I thought it was just me.
I've just seen that it's actually just the chorus. There are apparently lyrics in several languages.

Anyway, what I've said about The Knack isn't exactly on topic as it has more to do with my preferences.

jaycat
10-16-2017, 03:50 PM
The Knack had the misfortune to appear just about the time that lots of exciting new, raw music was coming out - Ramones, Clash, Elvis Costello, the Jam, etc. etc. In contrast they sounded like well-crafted prefab pop, not bad but the competition was Stiff.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 04:59 PM
I've just seen that it's actually just the chorus.

Well, that's the part where I want to sing along with the beginning of the Rapper's Delight rap, so that sounds just right!

NDP
10-16-2017, 05:28 PM
The Knack had the misfortune to appear just about the time that lots of exciting new, raw music was coming out - Ramones, Clash, Elvis Costello, the Jam, etc. etc. In contrast they sounded like well-crafted prefab pop, not bad but the competition was Stiff.

True, but it's worth noting that The Knack did better commercially than all those artists combined (which is probably the main reason why the group was so loathed).

by-tor
10-16-2017, 07:16 PM
jerez you must be quite good if you think that that solo is "not that hard" to play. The finger strength alone, to play all those bends in perfect tune, as well as the fast right hand picking, would for me, disqualify it from the "not that hard" category.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7eunR1qg1g

jaycat
10-16-2017, 07:29 PM
jerez you must be quite good if you think that that solo is "not that hard" to play. The finger strength alone, to play all those bends in perfect tune, as well as the fast right hand picking, would for me, disqualify it from the "not that hard" category.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7eunR1qg1g

I agree, not so easy. That doesn't make it good, though...

WordMan
10-16-2017, 07:34 PM
Stuck in meetings all day. Ugh.

The Sharona solo is hard. Jerez, it's not Jeff Beck but it's up there with Knopfler's work on Sultans.

Elliott Easton is a great player and yeah, has a distinct voice. I love the Cars first couple of albums, but they didn't target rocking as hard as The Knack did. The Cars were poised, not edgy.

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 08:17 PM
I agree, not so easy. That doesn't make it good, though...

No, that doesn't make it good, but the musicality does.

RTFirefly
10-16-2017, 08:50 PM
Nearly four decades later, "My Sharona" still rocks. There are a small handful of songs where, if I'm just sitting around and one of them comes on the radio, I just have to get up and bounce around to the music. "Sharona" is one of those.

The rest of Get the Knack is, IMHO, good but not great. I've got the album, and other than "Good Girls Don't," I honestly would have to look at the jacket to have my memory jogged about what was on it. And YMMV, but even at the time I found "Good Girls Don't" dated, like hadn't the whole notion that 'good girls don't' gone totally out the window sometime between 1967 and 1969?

pulykamell
10-16-2017, 09:54 PM
Nearly four decades later, "My Sharona" still rocks. There are a small handful of songs where, if I'm just sitting around and one of them comes on the radio, I just have to get up and bounce around to the music. "Sharona" is one of those.

The rest of Get the Knack is, IMHO, good but not great. I've got the album, and other than "Good Girls Don't," I honestly would have to look at the jacket to have my memory jogged about what was on it. And YMMV, but even at the time I found "Good Girls Don't" dated, like hadn't the whole notion that 'good girls don't' gone totally out the window sometime between 1967 and 1969?

"Good Girls Don't" may be my favorite song on the album. "My Sharona" as iconic as it is, is somewhere around my fourth or fifth favorite song on the album. "Oh Tara," "Your Number or Your Name" would round out my favorites, then maybe "My Sharona," but I'm sure some of that has to do with overexposure to the song. "She's So Selfish" is strong, as well, though I'm a little soured by the lyrical content. And "Let Me Out" is as great an album opener as you get.

jerez
10-17-2017, 03:51 AM
jerez you must be quite good if you think that that solo is "not that hard" to play. The finger strength alone, to play all those bends in perfect tune, as well as the fast right hand picking, would for me, disqualify it from the "not that hard" category...

I'm average at what I do, but I've been playing for a long time, and guitarists' hands get a lot stronger after a certain point.

ETA: Thank you for saying "for me." It takes so little humility and makes it so much easier for others to maintain a conversation.

jerez
10-17-2017, 03:55 AM
...I love the Cars first couple of albums, but they didn't target rocking as hard as The Knack did. The Cars were poised, not edgy.
Agreed.

Jack Batty
10-17-2017, 04:53 AM
That guitar solo in My Sharona is one of the best. End of sentence. And not only was it lightening in a bottle, but the guitarist could recreate it. That is not an easy solo - lots of muting and 16th notes and bending and weird shit - I saw a live TeeVee performance of the song somewhere along the line and that guy nailed that solo note for friggin' note.

WordMan
10-17-2017, 09:50 AM
That guitar solo in My Sharona is one of the best. End of sentence. And not only was it lightening in a bottle, but the guitarist could recreate it. That is not an easy solo - lots of muting and 16th notes and bending and weird shit - I saw a live TeeVee performance of the song somewhere along the line and that guy nailed that solo note for friggin' note.

Ah! You know who that sounds like you're describing? Randy Rhoads. Totally disciplined and a total pro at replicating complex work. Had never connected those dots but that actually works. Interesting...

Guest-starring: Id!
10-17-2017, 08:39 PM
I think "Get the Knack" is one of the few great start to finish albums out there. IIRC, the criticism I heard was about how most of the songs were about trying to get sex with under age girls, such as "Good Girl's Don't".


When their second album came out I made a morbid note to myself to find out how many times "little girls" were mentioned in the first two albums, but never got around to it, and just retreated, plenty skeeved.

Re the Cars first album - What stood out for me was probably the finest production values I'd heard (at that time) since Pink Floyd.

ETA: Boston's production was pretty amazing too, but I didn't think they had anywhere near the crystalline brilliance of sound that that Cars album had.

Guest-starring: Id!
10-17-2017, 08:51 PM
Ah! You know who that sounds like you're describing? Randy Rhoads. Totally disciplined and a total pro at replicating complex work. Had never connected those dots but that actually works. Interesting...


To derail a little further...The honour of seeing RR with the Blizzard of Oz in '80 was a wondrous flying V clinic, to be sure.
Held the thing almost vertically the whole time.

Jack Batty
10-17-2017, 09:01 PM
Live TeeVee performance (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1T71PGd-J0) previously mentioned. I repeat, killer solo (it starts at about 2:40 if you want to skip the foreplay).

pulykamell
10-17-2017, 09:17 PM
When their second album came out I made a morbid note to myself to find out how many times "little girls" were mentioned in the first two albums, but never got around to it, and just retreated, plenty skeeved.

Yeah, that's the one neg point I have is that I really have to turn off listening to the lyrics too closely sometimes. "I always get it up, for the touch of the younger kind" does cause me to cringe a bit.

by-tor
10-18-2017, 12:40 PM
The bass player is rocking a Vigier in that video. Talk about ahead of the times.

Chefguy
10-18-2017, 03:53 PM
My Sharona is one of those perfectly crafted rock songs that I still crank up when it comes on, along with The Hollies' Long Cool Woman and others.

drad dog
10-18-2017, 07:35 PM
I think the Knack were guys who had been around awhile. Fieger was like just a year younger than Tom Waits. So he had had plans, and the knack was not a spontaneous thing, or the new thing. Christ, they were beatles fans, and then they told you they were comparable. It seems like there was a lot of hype there, and a little desperation. That and the little girl talk wasn't too cool then. But I don't think the critics stopped them from having hits. They seemed to do that themselves.
Too soon?

jaycat
10-18-2017, 07:37 PM
I think the Knack were guys who had been around awhile. Fieger was like just a year younger than Tom Waits. . . .

In the SAME SENTENCE!?!?!

drad dog
10-18-2017, 08:02 PM
In the SAME SENTENCE!?!?!

Sorry. I had Robert Plant in mind but that wasn't as compelling. Plant is 4 years older than Feiger.

I am going to listen to the Knack, based on the recommendations here.

But at the time there was this feel from them of "Let's get some of that power pop $. We want our groupies too!"

Gatopescado
10-18-2017, 10:42 PM
I'm convinced all music is created in the aim to get that pussy.

Just Asking Questions
10-18-2017, 11:21 PM
A a person who was the right age to be the target audience for that album, I must say, we didn't need critics to slag it. We could tell all by ourselves.

But to answer the main question, rock critics don't write to actually review songs or bands. Critics write for each other. It's like the secret nerd club, and you can get in if you hate what they hate. So of course, critics are going to slam The Knack, whether they were good, bad, or whatever. They were an easy target. If they can get average people to agree, it's like the ultimate trolling.

I realized rock critics were useless when I read the Rolling Stone review on Triumph. They slammed the band's entire output with a one-sentence review based on one song. Like the, hate them, think them a second-rate Rush, they deserve a bit more effort in a review than that.

pulykamell
10-19-2017, 12:15 AM
They slammed the band's entire output with a one-sentence review based on one song.

Which, of course, puts to mind the famous Spinal Tap (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWqKiqTfXuA) moment.

ch51
10-21-2017, 11:37 AM
When the first album came out I was the target age. We could see the packaging and the hype - but the music was good. Perhaps it was management, perhaps it was something else. I saw them in concert. They presented themselves as mid 60s Beatles. A good energetic set. Short. Very short. If there was an encore - that was short. The tickets, however cost More than normal. When we all realized the show was over - that's when the "13 year old" hating started. Can't speak for others but u suspect this cash grab cost them any traction for a sustained career. Good album though.

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