Straight Dope Message Board

Straight Dope Message Board (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/index.php)
-   Cafe Society (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/forumdisplay.php?f=13)
-   -   Did the day after scare you? (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=881615)

bionic_man 09-06-2019 06:45 PM

Did the day after scare you?
 
In the 80s a t.v.movie aired about nuclear war in akansas town.also there were the British film threads.if you watched it did you find it scary to watch?

silenus 09-06-2019 06:47 PM

Not in the least. Lawrence, Kansas needs nuking!

Beckdawrek 09-06-2019 06:48 PM

Hell yeah. Scared me and my sibs silly.

Alpha Twit 09-06-2019 06:57 PM

I didn't think too much of it but as a pre-teen, I might have missed some of the impact. As I was living about 90 minutes from Lawrence at the time, it gained a small bit of significance for me.

Quote:

Originally Posted by silenus (Post 21845768)
Lawrence, Kansas needs nuking!

I don't dispute this in any way but I'm curious as to your reasons. I have my own reason to bring about the end of Jayhawk basketball via nuclear conflagration but I welcome your thoughts.

Two Many Cats 09-06-2019 07:04 PM

As nuclear doomsday movies go, it was below average. Dull, dull, dull.

The only nuclear disaster film to scare me was a compilation of Cold War propaganda films called The Atomic Cafe. "Holy crap! These people were morons! And they had the Bomb? Jesus Christ, it's a wonder the world survived!" These were my very frightened thoughts while watching it.

silenus 09-06-2019 07:10 PM

It's Kansas. I would say drop one on Palco, but I may be the only person who knows where that is, or cares. Old family feuds.

snfaulkner 09-06-2019 07:14 PM

My wife was emotionally scarred for life by The Day After as a kid. I remember being slightly concerned for a short while, then I quickly forgot about it. Neither of us have seen threads, but I'd like to.

hogarth 09-06-2019 07:14 PM

I thought it was more depressing than scary.

Alpha Twit 09-06-2019 07:18 PM

Thanks for sharing, silenus. Yeah, Palco is kind of the middle of nowhere, even by Kansas standards.

In other news, best nuclear war film IMHO: By Dawn's Early Light.

Darren Garrison 09-06-2019 07:56 PM

Only saw bits and pieces of it as a kid. The one I remember is Special Bulletin.

MacTech 09-06-2019 07:57 PM

TDA was nothing compared to Threads or When the Wind Blows

Threads scared the crap out of you with it's gritty realism

When the Wind Blows simply *CRUSHES* your SOUL, simply the most depressing, disheartening and gut-wrenching film I've ever seen, saw it once in high school and it stuck with me ever since, rewatching it again on YT , it has lost none of it's impact, it still tears my heart out of my chest, shows it to me, then utterly stomps it into a fine red paste....


"Shall we get into the paper bags again....?"......:(:(

CalMeacham 09-06-2019 08:03 PM

No, I was already terrified by The War Game*


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_War_Game

http://www.script-o-rama.com/movie_s...me-script.html

Threads, a British follow-up, was almost as scary. Both these films depict harsh realities that The Day After shied away from.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threads




*NOT the Matthew Broderick War Games, but the BBC dramatic recreation of atomic war. Much, much scarier than the (by comparison) much tamer American TV movie.

Snowboarder Bo 09-06-2019 08:04 PM

It didn't scare me but I already had a very, very clear idea of what nuclear devastation would look like and be like to live thru.

ETA: I agree that Threads was much more devastating to watch.

CalMeacham 09-06-2019 08:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Two Many Cats (Post 21845789)
As nuclear doomsday movies go, it was below average. Dull, dull, dull.

The only nuclear disaster film to scare me was a compilation of Cold War propaganda films called The Atomic Cafe. "Holy crap! These people were morons! And they had the Bomb? Jesus Christ, it's a wonder the world survived!" These were my very frightened thoughts while watching it.

I love this film, and own a copy of it. The brilliant part of it is that it's simply a compilation of films and TV programs with no voice-over narration, or any dialogue that's not in the original.

Baker 09-06-2019 08:07 PM

I live in Topeka, a short half hour from Lawrence. I figure I would have been toast, as the first nukes we saw were in KC, and Topeka is between KC and Lawrence. It scared me, but Threads was even worse, That last scene where the girl sees her baby and opens he mouth to scream, and the story ends, shudder.

snfaulkner 09-06-2019 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacTech (Post 21845871)
TDA was nothing compared to Threads or When the Wind Blows

Threads scared the crap out of you with it's gritty realism

When the Wind Blows simply *CRUSHES* your SOUL, simply the most depressing, disheartening and gut-wrenching film I've ever seen, saw it once in high school and it stuck with me ever since, rewatching it again on YT , it has lost none of it's impact, it still tears my heart out of my chest, shows it to me, then utterly stomps it into a fine red paste....


"Shall we get into the paper bags again....?"......:(:(

Would you say it it is more soul crushing than The Road? If so, I need to see it, and then hate myself for doing so.

Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor 09-06-2019 08:17 PM

It shook me, rather than scare.

MacTech 09-06-2019 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by snfaulkner (Post 21845898)
Would you say it it is more soul crushing than The Road? If so, I need to see it, and then hate myself for doing so.

I never saw The Road, It looked interesting, but I heard it was pretty heavy-handed on the religion side, and I hate glurge, i'll see if it's available on any of the Big 3 streaming services...

WTWB is getting harder to find, I haven't seen a YT copy in a while, and the only DVD I've been able to find on Amazon is an unauthorized burn from a pirated source, WTWB needs to be re-released, either streaming or on DVD/Blu-Ray

SciFiSam 09-06-2019 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacTech (Post 21845871)
TDA was nothing compared to Threads or When the Wind Blows

Threads scared the crap out of you with it's gritty realism

When the Wind Blows simply *CRUSHES* your SOUL, simply the most depressing, disheartening and gut-wrenching film I've ever seen, saw it once in high school and it stuck with me ever since, rewatching it again on YT , it has lost none of it's impact, it still tears my heart out of my chest, shows it to me, then utterly stomps it into a fine red paste....


"Shall we get into the paper bags again....?"......:(:(

Threads is just so straightforward - it really looks like a documentary about the end of the world, albeit set in the 80s.

It did scare me as a child and it scared my 1998 born child and her friends too.

Quote:

Originally Posted by snfaulkner (Post 21845898)
Would you say it it is more soul crushing than The Road? If so, I need to see it, and then hate myself for doing so.

When the Wind Blows is animated, so that may change how it affects you. It's about two elderly British people doing everything they're told to. There is no outright horror and very little happens. But it's fairly unusual to watch it and not be upset at least, I'd say.

It's like the first section of Up, but the world ends.

The Day After, I only saw on YouTube a couple of years ago after it was recommended on here, and the effect was dimmed by having seen Threads as a child, but it was still well done and yeah, pretty scary.

Quimby 09-06-2019 08:53 PM

I was very affected by the people turning into skeletons when the bombs went off in The Day After. It scared me for days.

Like others, Threads also terrified me. Especially the ending. It gave me nightmares for a long time.

dalej42 09-06-2019 08:59 PM

Threads did, The Day After didn’t.

MacTech 09-06-2019 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SciFiSam (Post 21845949)
Threads is just so straightforward - it really looks like a documentary about the end of the world, albeit set in the 80s.

It did scare me as a child and it scared my 1998 born child and her friends too.



When the Wind Blows is animated, so that may change how it affects you. It's about two elderly British people doing everything they're told to. There is no outright horror and very little happens. But it's fairly unusual to watch it and not be upset at least, I'd say.

It's like the first section of Up, but the world ends.

<Snip>

This is a great video review of WTWB;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCEASf5TegE

Yes WTWB is animated, and that's part of the reason it takes you off guard, it starts slow, very slow, you get to see this endearing elderly couple live their daily life, they become *real* to you, they remind you of your parents, or grandparents, it's just the two characters, you simply fall in love with this wonderful, endearing couple, who are clearly still madly in love after decades together....

...and then you watch as their world, and they, simply fall apart..... physically, and mentally....

sorry, gotta go scare off those invisible ninjas cutting onions that have somehow snuck in....

be warned, WTWB *WILL* crush your soul!

if you feel nothing after watching this then you are not human and have no soul.

Two Many Cats 09-06-2019 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalMeacham (Post 21845887)
I love this film, and own a copy of it. The brilliant part of it is that it's simply a compilation of films and TV programs with no voice-over narration, or any dialogue that's not in the original.

Remember that panel talk show with the politician who wanted to use nuclear bombs in the Korean War?

War Hawk Politician: "Yes, there are several targets north of the Yalu River we could use. We could destroy them! We could destroy them and contaminate them!"

Me watching movie: Down boy! Down, I say! Down!

But what I found most amusingly disturbing, beside Bert the Turtle of course, were the little topical songs they played. Such as:

"There were no atheists in a foxhole.
And men who never prayed before
Lifted up their eyes and hearts to heaven,
And begged the Lord to end that awful war.

They prayed to Him about their homes and loved ones,
And how they would love to be there.
I think the bomb that hit Hiroshima
Was the answer to a fighting boy's prayer."


The quotes are approximate from memory of years ago, but you can see, I watched it a number of times, and it made an enormous impression on me.

JKellyMap 09-06-2019 10:06 PM

I thought Testament was the best ‘80s nuclear war drama. A low-key production, originally for PBS, starring Jane Alexander as the mother of a California family that gradually dies off from radiation poisoning.

(And I hate to correct my old neighbor Baker, but Lawrence is between Topeka and KC. I think she just misspoke).

Loach 09-06-2019 10:19 PM

I was 15 or 16 when it aired. I dont remember being scared even though I was prime age to be. A vague feeling of a memory makes me want to say I thought it was too slow.

Hilarity N. Suze 09-06-2019 10:21 PM

On the Beach scared me. Failsafe scared me. By the time of The Day After I was toughened to it all.

squeegee 09-06-2019 10:49 PM

I was 21 when it aired, and it didn't frighten me but it was hella depressing.

Banksiaman 09-06-2019 10:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacTech (Post 21845871)
TDA was nothing compared to Threads or When the Wind Blows
...

When the Wind Blows simply *CRUSHES* your SOUL, simply the most depressing, disheartening and gut-wrenching film I've ever seen ...

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalMeacham (Post 21845884)
No, I was already terrified by The War Game*

Both of these were incredibly affecting, and terrifying. I'm not sure if the When The Wind Blows film aired in Australia, I read the Raymond Briggs graphic novel on which it was based.

Gray Ghost 09-06-2019 10:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by snfaulkner (Post 21845799)
My wife was emotionally scarred for life by The Day After as a kid. I remember being slightly concerned for a short while, then I quickly forgot about it. Neither of us have seen threads, but I'd like to.

Threads is on dailymotion, in two parts. Used to be on YouTube in its entirety. Worth your time, but consider when it was made.

Two Many Cats 09-07-2019 06:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JKellyMap (Post 21846034)
I thought Testament was the best 80s nuclear war drama. A low-key production, originally for PBS, starring Jane Alexander as the mother of a California family that gradually dies off from radiation poisoning.

I was profoundly moved by "Testament". There's a scene where Jane Alexander's character is watching her youngest child burn in a mass cremation. She falls wailing to her knees, and scoops up handfuls of poisoned earth, screaming rage at the "leaders" who brought this upon everyone.

It deserves to be an iconic scene in movies. Like "STELLA!!!" or "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn."

Jonathan Chance 09-07-2019 07:05 AM

Not a bit, even though they clearly expected it to. Units in high school, special features on television and magazines and so forth.

But fuck, unless you were oblivious, we Gen X kids had been living under the constant threat of death en masse since we were born. Weird All made satirical songs about it, for heaven's sake.

Some asshole television execs saying we could be 'deeply effected' by their show only shows they weren't really paying attention, either.

Quimby 09-07-2019 02:38 PM

I think I might have been confusing Threads and Testament. Which is the one that ends on the terrified mother freeze frame? That's the one I meant.

DinoR 09-07-2019 02:52 PM

No.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jonathan Chance (Post 21846299)
Some asshole television execs saying we could be 'deeply effected' by their show only shows they weren't really paying attention

I'm another one of those Gen-X that was supposed to be terrified by a risk I'd already internalized. If anything it was a risk that was on a downward trend.In 1983 the Soviet Union was already limping towards the glasnost and perestroika era that began just a few years later.

Atomic Alex 09-07-2019 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alpha Twit (Post 21845806)
In other news, best nuclear war film IMHO: By Dawn's Early Light.

I agree, that one is by far my favourite as well. I was just old enough to really understand the Cold War when it came to an end, and that movie was released in the same period so I probably watched it at a formative time. I did watch it again not so long ago and thought it really stood up, one of those occasions where the movie is better than the book its based on.

As for The Day After I only watched it fairly recently and it was better than I expected, the attack sequence is very well done in my opinion. It didn't scare me, but then I wasn't watching it in the early 1980's.

RikWriter 09-07-2019 03:45 PM

I was a teenager and I did not find it scary.

JKellyMap 09-07-2019 04:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Quimby (Post 21846837)
I think I might have been confusing Threads and Testament. Which is the one that ends on the terrified mother freeze frame? That's the one I meant.

Must be Threads (which Id never heard of until now). Testament ends rather hopefully (all things considered), with the mother and surviving son deciding to not commit suicide after all.

silenus 09-07-2019 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jonathan Chance (Post 21846299)
Not a bit, even though they clearly expected it to. Units in high school, special features on television and magazines and so forth.

But fuck, unless you were oblivious, we Gen X kids had been living under the constant threat of death en masse since we were born. Weird All made satirical songs about it, for heaven's sake.

Some asshole television execs saying we could be 'deeply effected' by their show only shows they weren't really paying attention, either.

Gen X? Try growing up a Baby Boomer and living about a good 3-iron from the largest MATS base in Southern California, about 15 miles from a key SAC base and the same from the largest rail marshaling yards on the West Coast. We didn't even bother with "duck & cover" drills.

Dewey Finn 09-07-2019 05:36 PM

For whatever reason, I never saw Threads or The Day After, but we did see another movie with a similar subject called Special Bulletin. It was presented as if it was live news reports from the scene of a hostage-taking in Charleston, South Carolina by a group with a home-made nuclear bomb.

Dallas Jones 09-07-2019 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baker (Post 21845889)
I live in Topeka, a short half hour from Lawrence. I figure I would have been toast, as the first nukes we saw were in KC, and Topeka is between KC and Lawrence. It scared me, but Threads was even worse, That last scene where the girl sees her baby and opens he mouth to scream, and the story ends, shudder.

They are still out there. In the corn fields. The missile silos, that is. They are still targets for our adversaries. Even the deactivated ones.

Sleep well.

Gray Ghost 09-07-2019 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DinoR (Post 21846857)
No.

I'm another one of those Gen-X that was supposed to be terrified by a risk I'd already internalized. If anything it was a risk that was on a downward trend.In 1983 the Soviet Union was already limping towards the glasnost and perestroika era that began just a few years later.

I was in elementary school in '83, but I wasn't terrified of the Day After. Just more resigned it was going to happen, so be prepared, and enjoy the spectacle. Which I did, when watching that broadcast. Much better eye candy than Threads. The rockets launching, and weird optical effects when the bombs detonated, were really cool.

I'm surprised it didn't happen, those last 10 years of the Cold War, and the first few afterwards. The Coup against Gorbachev ended far better than anyone could have hoped. Ditto the unrest with Yeltsin.

Gray Ghost 09-07-2019 06:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dallas Jones (Post 21847078)
They are still out there. In the corn fields. The missile silos, that is. They are still targets for our adversaries. Even the deactivated ones.

Sleep well.

The Russians maybe---I doubt they have enough weapons anymore to go 2 to 1 in a counter force strike---and the Soviets certainly, but AIUI, the Chinese deterrent is counter value in nature. Though I suspect public knowledge of their deterrent pales in comparison with its actual magnitude. If it's countervalue though, I guess it's worse for most of the people here at the SDMB.

I expect Chinese missiles to fly before I expect Russian ones to, not that I think the Russians are friendly. We'll see. Made it 74 years so far...

RikWriter 09-07-2019 07:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dewey Finn (Post 21847046)
For whatever reason, I never saw Threads or The Day After, but we did see another movie with a similar subject called Special Bulletin. It was presented as if it was live news reports from the scene of a hostage-taking in Charleston, South Carolina by a group with a home-made nuclear bomb.

YES! Now that one was a bit disturbing. MUCH better than The Day After.

Two Many Cats 09-07-2019 08:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Quimby (Post 21846837)
I think I might have been confusing Threads and Testament. Which is the one that ends on the terrified mother freeze frame? That's the one I meant.

That's "Threads". Haven't seen it.

Prof. Pepperwinkle 09-07-2019 08:11 PM

I saw The Day After. It didn't scare me. I'd heard about all of that repeatedly in high school. That had already scared me.

Kent Clark 09-07-2019 08:34 PM

Scared? No. I grew up in the "duck and cover" era. I was in my 30s when The Day After came out.

Of course, TDA depressed me. Testament depressed me a lot more. My wife got so depressed she got up and walked out - the only time that's ever happened.

susan 09-07-2019 08:46 PM

No. It wasn't well made, and I had thought about its topic before.

carrps 09-07-2019 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Two Many Cats (Post 21845789)
As nuclear doomsday movies go, it was below average. Dull, dull, dull.

The only nuclear disaster film to scare me was a compilation of Cold War propaganda films called The Atomic Cafe.

That's I thought. And the movie that scared me the most was The War Game from 1965. It seemed so much more plausible.

carrps 09-07-2019 08:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalMeacham (Post 21845884)
No, I was already terrified by The War Game*


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_War_Game

http://www.script-o-rama.com/movie_s...me-script.html

Threads, a British follow-up, was almost as scary. Both these films depict harsh realities that The Day After shied away from.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threads




*NOT the Matthew Broderick War Games, but the BBC dramatic recreation of atomic war. Much, much scarier than the (by comparison) much tamer American TV movie.

Damn. I knew I should finish reading the thread before posting!

I also found Testament somewhat scary, but mostly so so sad.

carrps 09-07-2019 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by silenus (Post 21846979)
Gen X? Try growing up a Baby Boomer and living about a good 3-iron from the largest MATS base in Southern California, about 15 miles from a key SAC base and the same from the largest rail marshaling yards on the West Coast. We didn't even bother with "duck & cover" drills.

Yep. I had atom bomb nightmares when I was a kid in the 50s and 60s. I was in SoCal, too. I always figured we'd be one of the first targets.

DorkVader 09-07-2019 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jonathan Chance (Post 21846299)
Not a bit, even though they clearly expected it to. Units in high school, special features on television and magazines and so forth.

But fuck, unless you were oblivious, we Gen X kids had been living under the constant threat of death en masse since we were born. Weird All made satirical songs about it, for heaven's sake.

Some asshole television execs saying we could be 'deeply effected' by their show only shows they weren't really paying attention, either.

This, and Special Report or whatever it was called, the one that was broadcastas though it was a live event (iirc even the commercials were part of the show) were really cool at the time, the whole family watched together. They only thing my parents were worried about was if I would get bored part way through.

The one movie that really affected me was the japanese anime, I can't think of the name, about a boy dealing with the death of his little brother. He carried him to where he thought he would get help but he was already dead. I want to say it was written by and based on the experience of a man who actually did survive the bombing of Hiroshima. My recall of specific details is fuzzy but the overall theme and story was very saddening for me.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2019 STM Reader, LLC.