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-   -   "Strong-arm robbery": This is a real criminal code charge? (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=856804)

Leo Bloom 06-14-2018 12:42 PM

"Strong-arm robbery": This is a real criminal code charge?
 
From Suspected Walmart robber tries to carjack two different cars, both drivers pull out guns
...According to Fox 30, Jacksonville police officers arrested 36-year-old Christopher Raymond Hill, charging him with strong-arm robbery, carjacking with firearm or deadly weapon, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and trespassing...
I know each state has its own codes, so maybe it's just a Florida thing. Never heard of it before, though. Where else is it real, or is it journalese?

Darren Garrison 06-14-2018 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo Bloom (Post 21022309)
I know each state has its own codes, so maybe it's just a Florida thing. Never heard of it before, though. Where else is it real, or is it journalese?


Browsing Google News for "strong-arm robbery" in quotes, I'm seeing it used in Georgia, Illinois, California, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Maryland, etc.


ETA: IIRC you are in New York, so here are some examples from there.

Jasmine 06-14-2018 12:55 PM

I'm having a hard time determining the difference between "armed robbery" and "strong-arm robbery". Perhaps the latter encompasses any show of force without need of an actual weapon?

Czarcasm 06-14-2018 12:56 PM

From here: "taking or stealing something from a person using force or threats but without using a weapon."

Little Nemo 06-14-2018 12:59 PM

nm

Bear_Nenno 06-14-2018 01:58 PM

Strong-arm robbery in Florida is a 2nd Degree Felony. While the actual text of the statute, ss. 812.13(c), does not use the term "strong-arm", the "Criminal Punishment Code; Offense severity ranking chart" found in State Statute 921.0022 parenthetically describes the offense as such. It lists the offense as, "Robbery, no firearm or other weapon (strong-arm robbery)."

Basically, if you try to steal something it is just a theft. The second that someone tries to stop you and you use any type of force (to include threat of force, or "putting [the victim] in fear") to complete your thievery, it becomes a robbery. So shop-lifting becomes strong-arm robbery when the store clerk or security tries to stop the person at the door and the thief shoves them out of the way, etc.

Lucas Jackson 06-14-2018 03:11 PM

The term is used in the move Heat.

PastTense 06-14-2018 03:31 PM

Basically if you look at the earlier state criminal codes they used dozens of separate offenses like this. In later years they consolidated the offenses into robbery 1st degree, robbery 2nd degree, robbery 3rd degree types of classifications.

Loach 06-14-2018 05:42 PM

In New Jersey we just have robbery. You have to look into the statute to get the grading. What we call strong arm robbery is 2nd degree robbery. If a weapon is used it is 1st degree robbery. One is 5-10 years, the other is 10-20.

There are multiple crimes that are called by certain terms informally but it doesn’t appear in the statute. The word rape doesn’t appear in any of our statutes.

muldoonthief 06-15-2018 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucas Jackson (Post 21022639)
The term is used in the move Heat.

Odd, since the robberies in Heat were all armed robberies. Very heavily armed robberies.

md2000 06-15-2018 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by muldoonthief (Post 21023892)
Odd, since the robberies in Heat were all armed robberies. Very heavily armed robberies.

Were they? (I assume a 30 year old movie doesn't need spoiler alerts) I recall at one point they dropped everything and walked away and the only thing they could be charged with was trespassing and vandalism? Some were armed, some weren't.

Really Not All That Bright 06-15-2018 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bear_Nenno (Post 21022497)
Strong-arm robbery in Florida is a 2nd Degree Felony. While the actual text of the statute, ss. 812.13(c), does not use the term "strong-arm", the "Criminal Punishment Code; Offense severity ranking chart" found in State Statute 921.0022 parenthetically describes the offense as such. It lists the offense as, "Robbery, no firearm or other weapon (strong-arm robbery)."

Nitpick: the Florida Statutes are properly cited as "§xxx.xx, Fla. Stat.," "F.S. xxx.xx" or "Fla. Stat. §xxx.xx." But otherwise, an excellent answer.

Elendil's Heir 06-15-2018 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2000 (Post 21024232)
...I recall at one point they dropped everything and walked away and the only thing they could be charged with was trespassing and vandalism?....

Reminds me of this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7fs...t_radio=1#t=20

Leo Bloom 06-15-2018 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PastTense (Post 21022681)
Basically if you look at the earlier state criminal codes they used dozens of separate offenses like this. In later years they consolidated the offenses into robbery 1st degree, robbery 2nd degree, robbery 3rd degree types of classifications.

Interesting.

PastTense 06-15-2018 05:14 PM

What you might look at is the American Model Penal Code from the 1960s and the subsequent state criminal code revisions:
Quote:

Rather than a collection of offenses, where each offense is an independent creature, often the result of a political campaign prompted by a particular crime or event, the Model Penal Code adopts a system of offenses, in which offenses are designed to work together as acomplementary group.

Offenses typically avoid both gaps and overlaps in coverage. By considering all offenses together, the legislature can better insure that the penalties associated with each offense properly reflect the relative seriousness of that offense in relation to other offenses. Part of this systematic approach to creating and defining offenses is to organize offenses conceptually-offenses against the person, offenses against property, etc.-and within each general group to organize offenses into related subcategories.
https://scholarship.law.upenn.edu/cg...ty_scholarship

Defensive Indifference 06-15-2018 06:50 PM

I've heard the term a number of times, most notably in reference to Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO. He was accused of having stolen from a convenience store by threatening the owner physically but without a weapon. The phrase "strong arm robbery" was tossed around a lot to describe the allegations. A brief googling leads me to believe that, like the states listed above, there's no separate crime called "strong arm robbery" in Missouri, but it would just be charged as a Whatever-Degree robbery.

muldoonthief 06-18-2018 09:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2000 (Post 21024232)
Were they? (I assume a 30 year old movie doesn't need spoiler alerts) I recall at one point they dropped everything and walked away and the only thing they could be charged with was trespassing and vandalism? Some were armed, some weren't.

But that one wasn't a robbery, it was a burglary, since no one was present at the precious metals depository.

My point was that in the movie, they never performed a "strong-arm" robbery, in both robberies they were heavily armed.

Oddball_92 06-18-2018 05:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jasmine (Post 21022341)
I'm having a hard time determining the difference between "armed robbery" and "strong-arm robbery". Perhaps the latter encompasses any show of force without need of an actual weapon?

An armed robbery, (aka aggravated robbery) is where the robber displays some sort of weapon in order to get the victim to comply. A strong armed robbery is where the robber just takes the victims property by force without displaying any weapons.


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