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-   -   Movies/TV Shows/etc moments that seem really dated now... (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=135264)

Freudian Slit 09-13-2002 12:39 AM

Movies/TV Shows/etc moments that seem really dated now...
 
The cell phone thread got me to thinking about a comment my mom once made about "Seinfeld"- where Jerry is kvetching about a baseball player not having the time to call him- something that wouldn't really happen in this day and age, what with cell phones.

And watching older shows like "Leave it to Beaver" where Wally dates a girl who's a drop out, who <gasp> drinks beer appear really quaint today. As does the fact that dear Wally passes up the opportunity to neck with said girl...
Plus, the fact that in one other episode of the show, June advises Wally to order for his date. Oh yes, and the bitching about paying 80 cents for a bowl of soup. All VERY quaint today. (Or in some cases, downright sexist...)

What moments like this have occurred to you?

ZipperJJ 09-13-2002 03:52 AM

I think the whole movie "Saturday Night Fever" is really dated (albeit a good movie). The premise would never happen today (young man obsessed with disco dancing) . I don't think it would even happen if you switched disco to another type of music. If it does, it's not commonplace.

Lamia 09-13-2002 04:46 PM

Any of the random musical numbers that used to appear in otherwise non-musical films. Found in films ranging from Stagecoach to The Pink Panther.

Anything involving Evil Godless Commie Soviets as the villains.

Anything with a white actor in black/red/yellowface.

The gratuitous rollerskating scene in The Hunger, complete with those clunky old-fashioned pre-rollerblade skates. As my friend said, "Were we supposed to think this was cool in the '80s?"

Ankh_Too 09-13-2002 09:37 PM

St. Elsewhere. The character stories are still engrossing, but the difference between what was considered to be cutting edge medical drama and what we have today is just a little discordant. I caught it on Bravo one afternoon and the doctors were conferencing over one patient... all i could think was "give him and MRI and find out." Then I realized they didn't have MRIs.

WSLer 09-13-2002 10:16 PM

Re: Movies/TV Shows/etc moments that seem really dated now...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Zoggie
Plus, the fact that in one other episode of the show, June advises Wally to order for his date. (Or in some cases, downright sexist...)
How exactly, is ordering for your date sexist?

Ratnor did it in Fast Times. It's not like you are choosing what your date is going to eat. Sheeesh:rolleyes:.

CalMeacham 09-13-2002 10:45 PM

I'm surprised how poorly All in the Family has aged. I just can't watch i nymore.

A lot of 1960s stuff has aged badly, too, but the thing is -- I was aware of it at the time. The late 60's seemed so proud of itself -- breaking free of old taboos, starting a new philosophy. Things did change (they alwas do), but not in the earth-shaking way they thought. "Consciousness III" and all that. "Future shock". I'm reading som Spider Robinson stuff right now, and it is painfully stuck in the early 1970s.



It's kind of odd to go back and re-read Neil Simon's old plays. In Come Blow Your Horn it is treated as shocking when the older brother's girlfriend suggests going to bed together. (She uses it as an ultimatum, and she had to get herself drunk to suggest it). Everyone skates ervously around the issue, and no one goes to bed with anyone.


Times has changed.

Torgo 09-13-2002 11:18 PM

Early episodes of recent hit shows; first season episodes of "Friends", "Seinfeld" and others showcasing early 90s hairstyles and clothes (a little too close to the 80s for my tastes). Early "Friends" are particularly hard to watch, not because they're dated, but because they're so damned awful.

The truly great shows never feel dated. I don't feel like I'm watching a 60s show when I watch "The Andy Griffith Show," or "The Dick Van Dyke Show". Likewise with their respective decades for Barney Miller, Cheers and the latter-half Seinfeld.

Max Torque 09-14-2002 12:25 AM

In my quest to see all the Best Picture Oscar winners, I saw Ordinary People a while back. Apparently, it was rather revolutionary back in 1980 for (guess who?) ordinary people to see a psychiatrist. I mean, sure, psychiatrists weren't novel at that time or anything, but until then it seems that the entertainment media only showed psychiatrists dealing with people with obvious mental problems. The idea of regular folks going to a psychiatrist just to talk stuff out was, evidently, kinda new and strange.

Horatio Hellpop 09-14-2002 12:40 AM

There was one movie from the 50s--I think it was GENTLEMEN'S AGREEMENT--where one character was trying to entice Gregory Peck to come to a party he was throwing. "There'll be some people there. And some girls." That line got some hoots in my 1982 film class...

Also, the scene in MARNIE where Sean Connery forces sex on his new bride Tippi Hedren doubtless was filmed with very different intentions back then than what a modern viewer might read into it. Come to think of it, an awful lot of Sean Connery scenes where he manhandles the ladies as 007 have kind of an icky edge today.

Sinatra and Lawford smacking masseuse asses in OCEAN'S ELEVEN can draw hoots today.

---------------------------------------

As for ORDINARY PEOPLE, I think the Bob Newhart show broke a lot of ground for normal people in therapy in popular entertainmnet. The revolutionary thing about ORDINARY PEOPLE was that Mary Tyler Moore's character could be such a heavy, or that the matriarch of a "nice" family could mess her kid's mind up so badly. Laura Petrie and Mary Richards were still a recent memory for most people back then; it would be like watching Jennifer Aniston strangle a puppy or something today.

tetsusaru 09-14-2002 06:01 AM

Tron. There are little people in my computer, riding motorcycles, throwing frisbees and wearing neon party hats? Come to think of it, this may well explain why the boards are so slow. Get back to work, ya little fucks!

FriarTed 09-14-2002 11:40 AM

the WORST example of TV datedness
 
MARY HARTMAN, MARY HARTMAN one year after the series ended.

At the time, my parents & I watched every episode & usually found it to be hilarious (and we're conservative Christians btw- we LOVED Loretta Hagers/Mary Kay Place), but after MHMH ran its course we
could never watch it in repeats again as it was so dated.

THE BEVERLY HILLBILLIES on the other hand! CLASSIC COMEDY FOR ALL GENERATIONS! Hell, when real-life Enterprises are traveling the galaxies, TBH will still be funny.

Max Torque 09-14-2002 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Krokodil
As for ORDINARY PEOPLE, I think the Bob Newhart show broke a lot of ground for normal people in therapy in popular entertainmnet. The revolutionary thing about ORDINARY PEOPLE was that Mary Tyler Moore's character could be such a heavy, or that the matriarch of a "nice" family could mess her kid's mind up so badly. Laura Petrie and Mary Richards were still a recent memory for most people back then; it would be like watching Jennifer Aniston strangle a puppy or something today.
Well, I thought about that, but the few times I saw the old Bob Newhart Show, it seemed to me that his patients were, well, wingnuts. Wingnuts who didn't need to be committed, of course, but still, compulsive liars, kleptomaniacs, whatever. People with obvious problems, like I said earlier.

Walloon 09-14-2002 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Lamia
The gratuitous rollerskating scene in The Hunger, complete with those clunky old-fashioned pre-rollerblade skates.
Rollerblade® appreciates your assistance in protecting the Rollerblade brand name by following the guidelines listed below, should you have occasion to write about or mention Rollerblade brand products or the sport of in-line skating.

TRADEMARKS ARE PROPER ADJECTIVES (AND THEREFORE CAPITALIZED) AND SHOULD BE FOLLOWED BY THE GENERIC TERMS THEY DESCRIBE.

WRONG: rollerblade, rollerblades
RIGHT: Rollerblade® brand in-line skates
Coolblade® skates
RS™ model

Walloon 09-14-2002 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Ankh_Too
St. Elsewhere. . . all i could think was "give him and MRI and find out." Then I realized they didn't have MRIs.
I don't know if St. Eligius Hospital had MRIs, but MRIs were first demonstrated in 1980, and St. Elsewhere was on 1982-1988.

TheeGrumpy 09-14-2002 01:32 PM

Somewhere around the mid-90s, it became unlawful to smoke in government buildings. If you ever see a cop show where the detectives smoke in the squad room (early "Homicide:LOTS"), it looks bizarre today. Speaking of TV cops, the '50s version of "Dragnet" pre-dated the 1966 Miranda ruling. Joe Friday didn't start reading suspects their rights until the revived "Dragnet" in 1967.

You'd think that "2001: A Space Odyssey" would seem dated, since it's now set in the past. Luckily, it seems so far removed from real-life that you're not conscious of the alleged year. "2010" on the other hand seems strange because of the tension between Russian and American astronauts. Little did they know we'd be sending joint crews to a space station.

LolaCocaCola 09-14-2002 01:41 PM

The pretty-in-pastel Crockett and Tubbs in Miami Vice.

I don't know if I want them to catch a thief or redecorate my apartment.

*two snaps*

NYPD Blue they are NOT.

TheeGrumpy 09-14-2002 01:46 PM

The cell phone thread reminded me of another. "The Sure Thing." 1985. Anthony Edwards is lounging by the pool, calling John Cusack on the phone. "I'm talking to you cordless!" he boasts. A phone without a cord! I'm hitching a ride cross-country for that!

Freudian Slit 09-14-2002 02:51 PM

Well, sure, WSLer, but it shouldn't be EXPECTED that he'll order for his date. He isn't a cad if his date finds herself having to converse with the waitstaff.

As for cigarettes- "The Exorcist" is dated iin that same way. A doctor lights up, and for a moment I knew something was wrong but couldn't put my finger on what...but then I realized. And according to my dad, some of the procedures they do in that movie are things that are needlessly painful now. And there's smoking in "Eye of the Beholder"- a Twilight Zone episodes, circa the 1950's.

neutron star 09-14-2002 03:53 PM

My vote would go to pretty much any TV show from the 60s and how they depict women as, well, pretty much men's property. All I can say is that as a married adult male, I couldn't stand living like that (well, except for the cooking and cleaning part, maybe).

An easy example can be found right in the theme song to Green Acres

Him : "You are my wife."
Her : "Goodbye city life!"
Both : "Green Acres we are there!"

There was also quite a bit more sexism in the Flintstones that one would have expected from a cartoon. I can't remember a specific example, but there were many.

Speaking of the Flintstones and datedness, there's a rather amusing video making the rounds on the Internet right now. You may be able to find it with a certain file sharing program. It's a really old, black and white animated commercial for Winston cigarettes featuring Fred and Barney.

Choice lines from the commercial :

Fred : "That's right, Barney. Winston is the one filtered cigarette that delivers flavor 20 times a pack."

Barney : "Filter blend makes the big taste difference and only Winston has it, up front where it counts. Here, ahead of the pure white filter. Winston packs rich tobaccos specially selected and specially processed for good flavor and filter smoking."

Also dated are old, racist cartoons that never get shown on TV anymore. Here, again, the Internet is the only way to see what people were really watching back then. I have a WWII-era cartoon called "Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips." Terrible, but still interesting to watch just for the jaw-dropping affect it tends to have on me.

I also got a chuckle from an old Twilight Zone episode that featured an aspiring writer trying to get noticed in Hollywood. Someone told him something along the lines of "Hollywood is only looking for good, talented writers with original ideas." That practically made me spit my coke all over my desk.

Bryan Ekers 09-14-2002 04:02 PM

There's a lot of television references, but I'll cite a movie.

2010: The Year we Make Contact (1984). Okay, you've got the big bad Soviets... um....

Zap_Rowsdower 09-14-2002 04:17 PM

I cannot think of a specific example now, but how about some of those old 50's movies where the leading man will take a woman and spank her. A while back, while flipping through the channel I saw one of those scenes and I could just hear Tom Servo and Crow cracking up over it.

ratty 09-14-2002 07:49 PM

I suppose what really seems dated to me is how futuristic technology was portrayed in various movies. Sci-fi from the 50's and 60's always had space ships with fins on them, while in the 70's, it was all about space ships in strange shapes. In the 80's, it seemed like everything electronic or mechaical had to be in the shape of a cube. And let's not forget those super-computers sci-fi movies were always showing, those giant silver filing cabinets with flashing red lights on them. And the HUGE display screens.

I guess what really makes movies and TV shows dated is how big everything seems- look at the cutting edge cellular phones from the late 80's- they weigh about 10 pounds. Cars were huge, hair was huge. Sometime in the early 90's people figured out the wave of the future was to make everything smaller, not bigger. Now in movies you see tiny computers, tiny spy devices. Even old James Bond gadgets seem clunky compared to today. I imagine in twenty years we'll be having this discussion again and everything will still seem to be the wrong size in old movies and TV shows, either too big or small.

Social conventions can be jaw-droppingly dated, as well. Look at the crinoline 'house dresses' in shows like Donna Reed and Leave It To Beaver. It would have been sort of shocking to see women in pants on television then, I suppose. And the seperate beds for married couples! They were all over TV and movies until maybe the late 60's. The crazy thing is, nobody in real life who was married actually had double beds. But I guess seeing even straight, married couples with children in the same bed would have offended some people and been called 'indecent'.

And the racist stereotypes! Holy shit! They were not only completely acceptable, they were believed! The madness! Things that many people would find utterly offensive today were displayed openly and without any reservation. Remember Three's Company? The whole premise of the show was John Ritter pretending to be gay so he could stay in the apartment with two women. And this was hilarious. Because being gay was so weird for mainstream America. It was so unheard of in mainstream circles that the show didn't even know how to stereotype gay people. (Which may actually have been a good thing.)

It seems like TV and movies made a complete reversal somewhere in the early 90's- sex, violence, and profanity became acceptable, but any sort of racial/religious/gender-based/sexual-orientation-based/ethnic stereotyping or mocking were completely unallowed. (Well, basically unallowed. I don't watch much TV anymore, but I'm sure there are stil offensive shows of this ilk out there somewhere.) It kind of boggles the mind. I wonder what will seem dated in five, ten, and twenty years?

BiblioCat 09-14-2002 08:05 PM

TV Land had a mini Soap marathon on last night and it was pretty funny to realize that when it was originally on, some stations refused to air it because it was so shocking. A gay man! People having sex when they're not married! A woman having an affair with a priest!

Seeing it now, it's just so tame.

voguevixen 09-14-2002 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by tetsusaru
Tron. There are little people in my computer, riding motorcycles, throwing frisbees and wearing neon party hats?
Along similar lines, I was just watching a Simpsons episode that had a KnightRider gag in it and I was thinking you'd never get a premise that stupid on TV today, no matter how badass the car. (Please, please tell me it'd never make it to TV today.) Yet at the time it was so wild and different and the car was so "cutting edge."

grendel72 09-14-2002 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by ratty
And let's not forget those super-computers sci-fi movies were always showing, those giant silver filing cabinets with flashing red lights on them.
One of the coolest examples of this is the film Silent Running. The effects are amazing, then you see the huge computers that Bruce Dern at one point reprograms using punch cards, and you laugh at the silliness of such ancient computers... until you realise that means the awesome effects you've been seeing were all done by hand!

Walloon 09-14-2002 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by ratty
Social conventions can be jaw-droppingly dated, as well. Look at the crinoline 'house dresses' in shows like Donna Reed and Leave It To Beaver. It would have been sort of shocking to see women in pants on television then, I suppose.
Not really. Lucy Ricardo wore pants often enough. And she smoked, too -- because Phillip Morris was their sponsor.

[/QUOTE]And the racist stereotypes! . . . Remember Three's Company? The whole premise of the show was John Ritter pretending to be gay so he could stay in the apartment with two women.[/QUOTE]

Gays are a race?

Freudian Slit 09-14-2002 08:32 PM

Along the lines of the gay thing....an episode of "Cheers" was actually really well done, and it portrays Norm pretending to be gay so that people will take him seriously as an interior decorator. Although they don't really come out and use the word "gay" until the end...something I was sort of wondering about. They're a lot more subtle about it than they would be on a TV episode around now. It wasn't offensive, just again, more subtle.

Alphagene 09-14-2002 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Walloon
TRADEMARKS ARE PROPER ADJECTIVES (AND THEREFORE CAPITALIZED) AND SHOULD BE FOLLOWED BY THE GENERIC TERMS THEY DESCRIBE.
You got a lot of Moxie to be jumping on this guy like he's a Trampoline. Did someone put Vaseline in your Cornflakes or Heroin in your Granola? Don't act like you got your Zipper caught in an Escalator. Take some Aspirin, slap on a Band-Aid and cry into a Kleenex, you Pablum puking Yo-Yo. Otherwise, I'll Mace you, beat you with a Phillips Screw driver, wrap you in Cellophane and Scotch Tape, dunk you in Kerosene, toss you into a Sytrofoam container with Dry Ice in the back on my Jeep and leave you in a Dumpster with some Sheetrock. Then we'll read about how you were turned into a Popsicle in some Tabloid.

No actual hositility is intended, I've just always wanted to do that. :)

Back on topic, Hawaii Five-O is a gold mine for dated material. I always enjoyed the scene where one of McGarrett's underlings was tailing a bad guy. When asked for an update he replied, in all seriousness: "He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.

KGS 09-15-2002 03:55 AM

I don't watch a lot of old TV, but I do like watching the old game shows on Game Show Network. Match Game in particular -- I don't know what's funnier, the outlandish 70's clothes or the porno theme music.

There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!

Also on GSN, I saw an episode of the Dating Game with 3 pre-teen "bachelorettes" and a young Celebrity Bachelor, Danny Bonaduce (from the "Partridge Family" era.) Oh how cute, I thought -- until Danny started asking questions like, "If we were alone in your parents house and I wanted to make out, would you stop me?" :eek:

Koxinga 09-15-2002 05:52 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by KGS
There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!
In the British version, the contestant would have said "shag".

Or maybe not . . .

Fern Forest 09-15-2002 06:08 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by voguevixen
Along similar lines, I was just watching a Simpsons episode that had a KnightRider gag in it and I was thinking you'd never get a premise that stupid on TV today, no matter how badass the car. (Please, please tell me it'd never make it to TV today.) Yet at the time it was so wild and different and the car was so "cutting edge."
Has it already been 5 years since Team Knight Rider.



Not just TRON but almost anything with computers in it like Max Headroom. And anything where men wear little bitty shorts.

Miss Mapp 09-15-2002 09:17 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Zoggie
As for cigarettes- "The Exorcist" is dated iin that same way. A doctor lights up, and for a moment I knew something was wrong but couldn't put my finger on what...but then I realized. And according to my dad, some of the procedures they do in that movie are things that are needlessly painful now. And there's smoking in "Eye of the Beholder"- a Twilight Zone episodes, circa the 1950's.
This reminds me of something that always makes me laugh in The Day the Earth Stood Still: After Klaatu is shot near the beginning, he is taken to a hospital. Two doctors who have just examined him are standing around, talking about the alien's incredible health; one of them says something like, "His life-span must be twice as long as ours,"--and they both light up cigarettes!

A couple of TV examples that make me think about how much things have changed sociologically:

There's an episode of Bewitched where a woman moves in next door to the Stevenses; she's moved to the suburbs to get away from her extremely jealous football-player boyfriend, who has threatened her if he ever sees her with another man. Darren expresses concern, but no one else seems worried, even the police, even when the football player shows up and finds Darren in her living room. It's all played for laughs, and in the end the woman goes back to her boyfriend.

On the Mary Tyler Moore show, there's an episode where Murray's 15-year-old daughter is working at the station. A college student (played by Bruce Boxleitner!) who also works there wants to date her. Murray is upset when the two go out, but this is seen as his being an overprotective worry-wart, and everyone else laughs off his concerns.

AHunter3 09-15-2002 01:13 PM

Another Telephone Moment

In the movie In and Out, "Cameron" (the Matt Dillon character) leaves his anorexic model girlfriend in a small motel in a mid-American town in Indiana. She threatens to call her agent and goes to the phone and stares at the rotary dial in perplexity, then makes ineffective button-pushing motions at the numbers in the holes and starts to cry. Cute and funny but ony to an audience that would know and appreciate that there was a time when the modern coastal cities and business establishments had push-button phones while homes and smaller-town businesses still had rotary phones, and that therefore the cosmpolitan-but-dumb city model wouldn't know how to operate a rotary phone...

Quote:

And anything where men wear little bitty shorts.
Fashion is different. In 2011, audiences will rent old DVDs from the turn of the century and laugh their heads off to see guys wearing shorts and cutoff jeans and swim trunks where the legs go nearly down to their knees. No one would be caught dead in anything so old-fashioned in 2011, except maybe Grandpa. And don't even get me started on those baggy-ass jeans!

robertliguori 09-15-2002 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Alphagene



"He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.
Um, three and both?

KSO 09-15-2002 03:42 PM

I saw Wall Street a few months ago and it looked very dated to me--Michael Douglas' clothes, and the cordless phone on the beach that was the size of a toaster oven, not to mention the gargantuan computer in his office...

Max Torque 09-15-2002 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by KGS
There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!
You reminded me of one that I've mentioned before in another thread: Card Sharks. You remember, the game where they surveyed 100 people, and you had to guess how many agreed or disagreed with the statement? Well, before they would make their guesses, the contestants were, I guess, encouraged to milk it a little and talk about why they're choosing the number they're choosing.

So, the question is, "How many people out of 100 said that they had slapped their own face?" And the contestant says, "Well, I know sometimes when you've been drinking you do that to wake yourself up before you drive home..." And no one was one bit shocked!

Gr8Kat 09-15-2002 06:30 PM

The other night, I caught the tail end of a movie on TCM called something like "First Yank into Tokyo." It was a very obvious propaganda film made in 1945 about, I don't know, the need to bomb the hell out of the Japanese. Even though I know we were at war with Japan and they committed atrocities in China, blah blah blah, it was still shocking how hateful and racist the movie was.

The lead character was an American spy who'd supposedly undergone extensive plastic surgery to look Japanese. Funny thing is, the first time I saw him on the screen I said, "Look, it's a guy in yellow face!" I still can't believe anyone would honestly think he'd fool anyone. Yet not only did he supposedly fool all his dumb gaijin compatriots (his girlfriend, played by Perry Mason's Barbara Hale, refused to believe it was him until he gave details of their history together that only he would know), but the Japanese General he was working under only recognized him as his old college roommate(!) because of his habit of clenching his fist when he was angry. And he tried so hard to have a "Japanese" accent, including mispronouncing all his Ls as Rs. But none of the real Japanese actors talked like that!

Speaking of the real Japanese actors, I can't believe the lines they were made to spout! Like ranting about how the Americans promulgate such backward ideas that women have value and are equal to men! And the General's description of a female American prisoner (Hale) whom he intended to have his way with, "She has the face of a gazelle, and the skin of a peach blossom." The only word of Japanese any of them spoke was "Bonsai!!!!"

Really, it was hilarious, and very easy to MST, too. But it was still shocking and cringe-inducing. It's hard to imagine Hollywood churning out obvious, stereotype filled war-mongering pieces like that today, even about Al-Qaeda and Bin Laden. Maybe if Ann Coulter ran Hollywood ;)

pesch 09-15-2002 06:50 PM

During my college days, Max, that's exactly what I had to do some times.

I used to love watching Match Game '77, which specialized in risque humor. I don't think it was only indicative of the times -- spousal abuse didn't have as high a profile in the media then -- as it was also a way of getting a rise out of the audience. It was a linear descendent of "The Newlywed Game," "The Dating Game," and a foreshadowing of "The Gong Show."

-- pesch
game-show authority

effac3d 09-15-2002 08:27 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by KGS
I don't watch a lot of old TV, but I do like watching the old game shows on Game Show Network. Match Game in particular -- I don't know what's funnier, the outlandish 70's clothes or the porno theme music.

There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!

Also on GSN, I saw an episode of the Dating Game with 3 pre-teen "bachelorettes" and a young Celebrity Bachelor, Danny Bonaduce (from the "Partridge Family" era.) Oh how cute, I thought -- until Danny started asking questions like, "If we were alone in your parents house and I wanted to make out, would you stop me?" :eek:

Pre-teen?!
I am pretty sure that was considered kind of weird even then.

samarm 09-15-2002 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Gr8Kat
Speaking of the real Japanese actors, I can't believe the lines they were made to spout.
That reminded me of The Pink Panther (already mentioned by someone). Not sure which film it was but Peter Seller's character Inspector Clouseau (sory, Chief Inspector) says "My little yellow friend", referring to his Japanese manservant Kato!

An example from a TV show that springs to mind is the episode The Germans from Fawlty Towers . Theres a piece of dialogue between Basil Fawlty and the Major about Indians and West Indians. Suffice to say the word "Ni---rs" was used. This would be unthinkable now.

Fern Forest 09-15-2002 11:05 PM

When Michael J. Fox orders a Tab in Back To The Future I'm sure a lot of young'uns scratch their heads/

Apollyon 09-16-2002 12:15 AM

Hi Osiris, just watched all three Back to the Future flicks on DVD and was pleasantly suprised to see how well they've aged.
The Tab (and the Pepsi Free) that Marty orders needed to be drinks that were popular mid-80's but not exist in 1955 -- I guess it's odd that neither of them really survived the 80's either.

One of the things the commentary track brought out was how carefully the film makers had chosen some of the props/gags -- Pepsi was chosen over Coke as the '55 Coke logo and the '85 version were essentially the same, whereas the Pepsi logo had changed significantly in the 30 years.

Overall though, technology wasn't the focus (even though technically a sci-fi movie) and so doesn't look so badly dated as most sci-fi 15+ years on. And, IMHO at least, the DeLorean still looks great. :)

As to the OP, well I'm still a Star Trek fan, but boy has the original series dated. Partially its the clunky looking computers and gadgetry, but also the acting style and pacing, and the attitudes. Any scene with Kirk and a woman is likely to be especially cringeworthy.

Fern Forest 09-16-2002 12:43 AM

True, true Apollyon. The only scene in the series that I would call dated was the Biff as step-dad scene in the second one which has an 80s Dice Clay vibe.

And you're bang on for Star Trek too. I see exactly 3 knobs and no sliding bits on my computer. I think we're doing better making futuristic things now though. For instance Flight of the Navigator of 1986 still looks good.

Logan's Run looks hilarious, although I still like story and it makes the movie worthwhile to watch. Clunky robots just don't cut it with me.

Fern Forest 09-16-2002 02:44 AM

You know what else? All those 70s Hannah Barbara cartoons. Although it might just be they were always dated but nothing feels more lik the 70s then they do.

JThunder 09-16-2002 03:17 AM

TV's Batman is horribly dated. C'mon, Batman, get yourself a pager or a cell phone! A Bat-laptop would be nice, too.

Miller 09-16-2002 03:59 AM

I was watching Henry V the other day, and everyone was running around hitting each other with swords! I mean, who uses swords anymore?

Cubsfan 09-16-2002 03:59 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by ratty
I suppose what really seems dated to me is how futuristic technology was portrayed in various movies. Sci-fi from the 50's and 60's always had space ships with fins on them,
Uhh you do know that all of our space ships DO have fins on them right now? In real life even!

effac3d 09-16-2002 04:06 AM

Why do spaceships have fins and streamlining?

Since space has no air,and therefore no resistance shouldn't a ship shaped as donald duck work just as well as a nice phallic rocket.

:)

Walloon 09-16-2002 04:21 AM

It's the getting to outer space, effac3d. Lots of atmosphere to plow through.

Cubsfan 09-16-2002 04:22 AM

All of our ships still need to be manuverd in the atmosphere to GET into space. Any ship that is going to land on, or take off from a planet that has any atmosphere is going to need fins for manuvering unless we come up with some new technology or something.

Cubsfan 09-16-2002 04:23 AM

Dammit Walloon, you stole my chance to sound smart for once on this board.

Oh well, back to the "Hot Chicks" threads. :(

Lamia 09-19-2002 07:49 PM

I guess this post got lost when the boards went down...good thing I thought to save for once!

Quote:

Originally posted by JThunder

TV's Batman is horribly dated. C'mon, Batman, get yourself a pager or a cell phone! A Bat-laptop would be nice, too.

You want dated, just listen to Bat Girl's theme song. "Who's baby are you?" indeed!

Quote:

Originally posted by Theological Ninja
I'm sorry that I don't have a cite available, but I recall seeing a TV program a while back about the Mary Tyler Moore show. During the show, it's mentioned that the original premise would be that she was divorced and had moved to another city to start over. The idea was axed by the network, and part of the reason was that they were afraid that they'd confuse the character of Mary Richards with Laura Petrie, and think that she'd divorced Dick Van Dyke. Anyone else remember this or have a cite?
I heard the same thing on Nick at Nite. Mary's divorce was changed to a broken engagement for the show -- this may be what jayjay was thinking of.

Quote:

Originally posted by Apollyon

The whole dome city looks like a giant mall with permanent elevator Muzak.

It was a giant mall -- the Dallas Market Center. My uncle was a security guard there and got a small part in the movie since he was 1) available and 2) one of the few people in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area in the '70s who didn't have much of a tan, since he worked nights. I believe all his lines were cut in the editing process, though.

Mr. Blue Sky 09-19-2002 08:00 PM

Take a closer look at the computer equipment on Max Headroom and compare it to the computers in Brazil: old-fashioned typewriters mated to televisions and so forth.


To the OP:

Welcome Back, Kotter has NOT aged well.

scott evil 09-19-2002 09:11 PM

Giant computers with random, completely pointless, blinking lights that were UNLABELLED.

What, were they really into Christmas decorations or something?

PunditLisa 09-20-2002 08:26 AM

I loved Lost in Space as a kid. I saw an episode or two on cable recently and the whole thing was just so bad! I swear you could see the aluminum foil marks on the spaceship.

ivylass 09-20-2002 09:32 AM

Well, I guess my nominations got eaten.

West Side Story. The idea of clean shaven gang members grand jeteing their way down the streets of Manhattan and then agreeing to a fist fight instead of guns...how quaint.

War Games The huge floppy disks, the monotone computer screen...the phone handset modem...also very quaint.

Rilchiam 09-23-2002 05:33 AM

Rebel Without a Cause. Let's see...the "delinquent" guy conforms to the school dress code? Drinks milk? Passively waits for the girl to kiss him, and doesn't follow up?

Another cordless-phone reference: Terms of Endearment. Towards the end of the film, Emma visits her well-to-do friend, Patsy. Emma's husband calls; Patsy answers and hands the phone to Emma; Emma looks at the phone in mild amazement before talking into it.

And The Prisoner! The phones on that show were cordless, and that was supposed to be truly bizarre. My official Prisoner companion helpfully explains "Cordless phones had not been invented in 1967".

There was an episode of Dick Van Dyke where Rob and Laura thought their marriage wasn't valid, and hastened to rectify it. It was supposed to be outlandish when Laura said, "But we can't get married tonight; I couldn't get a babysitter!"

Anyone remember a TV show from the '70s called James at 15? My parents made me watch it, thinking it would "prepare" me for adolescence. Anyway, ol' James is going to Go All The Way with his SO, after being told [gag] "Be good...and if you can't be good, be careful." [Shudder]. By way of being "careful", James trades his official NHL hockey puck and his Bobby Orr hockey stick for the expired condom his friend nicked from his parents' nightstand. God almighty. How did we ever survive the '70s.

hazel-rah 09-23-2002 06:55 AM

Quote:

War Games The huge floppy disks, the monotone computer screen...the phone handset modem...also very quaint.
Quaint, maybe, but it's still the most realistic portrayal of a hacker you're ever going to get from Hollywood.

Sublight 09-28-2002 06:15 AM

I just thought of one today. So as not to make unfair assumptions, I'll aska question first:

In South Pacific, when Nellie dumps Emile, is it because he was previously married, or because his first wife was Polynesian?

If the former, that just seems weird by today's standards. If the latter (which I'd always assumed it was), however, then I can't imagine an audience today being expected to sympathize with such a racist little bitch.

sugaree 09-28-2002 08:36 AM

It's been a long time since I've seen if, but IIRC the whole subtext of South Pacific was racism, so, yes, that's why Nellie dumps Emile. The movie was one of the first sympathetic looks at interracial relationships on the big screen, so you can't judge Nellie by today's standards. The audience is expected to remember society's attitudes in the early forties and know that she is shocked because interracial relationships are unthinkable. Literally, something that Nellie had never really thought about. The most interesting part of the story is Nellie coming to terms with the idea.

Sublight 09-28-2002 08:57 AM

Well, ok, but can I still hate Lt. Cable for dumping poor Liat?

Walloon 09-28-2002 08:16 PM

I don't remember Lt. Cable "dumping" Liat. Lt. Cable was killed in combat, wasn't he?

Alfishius 03-28-2016 07:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walloon (Post 2447507)
I don't know if St. Eligius Hospital had MRIs, but MRIs were first demonstrated in 1980, and St. Elsewhere was on 1982-1988.

It was all in that kid's head, anyway.

rsat3acr 03-28-2016 08:06 PM

FWIIW this is 14 year old thread and Walloon hasn't posted since 2010

Kent Clark 03-28-2016 08:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walloon (Post 2447507)
I don't know if St. Eligius Hospital had MRIs, but MRIs were first demonstrated in 1980, and St. Elsewhere was on 1982-1988.

St. Elsewhere installed its MRI in 1987 (Season 6.) It turned out to be improperly shielded, leading to TV sets flickering, beds shaking and other happenings one might associate with a Halloween episode.

buddha_david 03-28-2016 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers (Post 2447838)
2010: The Year we Make Contact (1984). Okay, you've got the big bad Soviets... um....

Ain't it funny how the world turns...

smokey78 03-28-2016 09:54 PM

An Officer and a Gentleman
-or maybe not?

OH, and how a big deal it was for couples to live together w/o marriage, the whole premise to Three's a Crowd!

Nobody 03-28-2016 11:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AHunter3 (Post 2449579)
Fashion is different. In 2011, audiences will rent old DVDs from the turn of the century and laugh their heads off to see guys wearing shorts and cutoff jeans and swim trunks where the legs go nearly down to their knees. No one would be caught dead in anything so old-fashioned in 2011, except maybe Grandpa. And don't even get me started on those baggy-ass jeans!

So, how did your prediction turn out? :D

Don Draper 03-28-2016 11:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ankh_Too (Post 2446298)
St. Elsewhere. The character stories are still engrossing, but the difference between what was considered to be cutting edge medical drama and what we have today is just a little discordant. I caught it on Bravo one afternoon and the doctors were conferencing over one patient... all i could think was "give him and MRI and find out." Then I realized they didn't have MRIs.

My Dad was a doctor and a fairly senior staff member (basically someone like Dr. Westphall or Dr. Auschlander from "Elsewhere") and even during the original run of the series, he would be gnashing his teeth, grimacing, and sometimes even groaning and guffawing out loud at the mispronounced medical jargon, the ridiculous "life or death" drama over what were routine medical procedures, and just what he viewed as the contrived and inept portrayal of what actual hospitals are like.


Quote:

Originally posted by Zoggie
As for cigarettes- "The Exorcist" is dated iin that same way. A doctor lights up, and for a moment I knew something was wrong but couldn't put my finger on what...but then I realized. And according to my dad, some of the procedures they do in that movie are things that are needlessly painful now. And there's smoking in "Eye of the Beholder"- a Twilight Zone episodes, circa the 1950's.
My dad also smoked up to the day he died in 1988. I recall going to the hospital with him and sitting in the doctor's lounge, and just CLOUDS of cigarette smoke.

Recently, I watched a few episodes of "Twin Peaks" for the first time in, well, decades. Even though the show is supposed to be set in a sort of retro 50's Americana town, all I could see was the gigantic, owl-rimmed glasses that Ben Horne, Madeleine, and the Log Lady all wore. Also, Agent Cooper's incessant speaking into a tape recorder to tape messages for his secretary "Diane" back in D.C. seems hopelessly dated now. He could just call her on a phone now.

edwards_beard 03-29-2016 12:53 PM

I'm feeling dated by saying this, but I was watching a DVD over the weekend of the show CHiPs.

Ponch and John were on their bikes and John said "The best things in life are free" and Ponch responds "FREE? We had to pay 25 cents to go over the bridge!"

ftg 03-29-2016 01:02 PM

Another thread reminded me of Chasing Amy recently. And the scene at the train station where Banky and Holden are going to go to a Con.

Banky has a bag full of porn mags. Now it would be just a cell phone full of it. Maybe a couple extra microSD cards. Not nearly as good for the visuals.

Holden is paged on a beeper by Alyssa. That's right, paged. He then goes over to a pay phone to call her. Again, it'd be all cell phones now.

Most of that scene would be quite different if done today.

Alfishius 05-02-2016 07:35 PM

St. Elsewhere was all in that kid's head, and so was every other show because that web site showed that they were all in the same universe. Even the real world is somehow inside that kid's head. I don't understand it totally but St. Elsewhere showed that the whole universe is fake. I stopped going to church.

Mean Mr. Mustard 05-02-2016 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by edwards_beard (Post 19218084)
I'm feeling dated by saying this, but I was watching a DVD over the weekend of the show CHiPs.

Ponch and John were on their bikes and John said "The best things in life are free" and Ponch responds "FREE? We had to pay 25 cents to go over the bridge!"

I remember a Dragnet episode where, in the intro, Sgt. Friday says something like, "this is L.A., where some of these homes cost upwards of $100,000".


mmm

Bricker 05-02-2016 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walloon (Post 2473708)
I don't remember Lt. Cable "dumping" Liat. Lt. Cable was killed in combat, wasn't he?

Yes, he was -- but after he dumped Liat. He sings, bitterly, about his own impossible-to-overcome racist background and family in "You've Got To Be Carefully Taught."

Emile returns safely from the mission and Nellie realizes how foolish her earlier concerns were. The kids sing Dites-Moi. The End.

installLSC 05-02-2016 11:02 PM

Any show that heavily uses Freudian psychology to explain character's actions. In the 50s/60s psychoanalysis was treated as holy writ, and now it's considered in the same light as dowsing.
In a more specific note, I can't imagine that the MASH episodes where they botch medical care for a bloodthirsty general or help out a South Korean trying to avoid army service would be done today. Can you imagine a show, a sitcom no less, where an Iraqi kid who didn't want to fight ISIS was helped out by Army doctors? You'd be considered somewhere between insensitive to treasonous.

nightshadea 05-03-2016 06:00 AM

the waltons..........i know it was the 30s but dads adding up the bills and complaining saying they need to go to bed earlier so they wouldn't use so much

ma says thell try then says "oh by the way how much is the bill?"
pa says "1.75 that's right a dollar seventy five for a month of electric

our average bill is 100-150 ...................................

CalMeacham 05-03-2016 07:59 AM

Zombies are never dated.


I re-watched Project Moonbase a while ago. It was an effort by Robert Heinlein nto make a hard SF TV show in the 1950s, only the producers took the footage, condensed it down into a single movie, and released it as a one-shot.


Technically, it's pretty good. It's a low-cost technically accuratye SF movie about the first trip to the moon, done in true von Braun fashion with a Space Station waystop (albeit a non-rotating one, so no artificial gravity.) and atomic rockets (a la rocket Ship Galileo, and other Heinlein offerings). There are lots of cute throwaway bits that aren't explicitly commented on -- the telephones with handsets not connected to the deskset with wires (they have antennas, like cordless phones from three decades later); people using different frames of reference on the space station (and there are signs: No Walking on the Walls). Even the fact that the President of the United States is a woman.



On the other hand, the human drama and interaction is appalling. Captain Breiteis is condescended to, and called "Bright Eyes" *. It's pretty neat that the first human into space is female, but she has to put up with this kind of abuse.

The female columnist gets it even worse. She's every prattling female ignoramus from every Heinlein story, only turned up to 11.


Anyone who's ever defended Heinlein's depiction of women in his works has to watch this at least once and try to avoid cringing.

psychonaut 05-03-2016 09:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rsat3acr (Post 19216473)
FWIIW this is 14 year old thread and Walloon hasn't posted since 2010

That's because Walloon is dead.

ivylass 05-03-2016 11:22 AM

V the original was on El Rey over the weekend.

Damn, but the graphics were bad. I know it was cutting edge back in 1983, but it hasn't aged well.

Tim R. Mortiss 05-03-2016 11:35 AM

I'm always amazed by how primitive the credits were not too long ago, even in big-budget movies. Looking as if they were generated by the internal captioning system on a 1980s consumer video camera.

ftg 05-03-2016 01:39 PM

A couple mentions up thread about the retro look of computers and such in Max Headroom. That was deliberate on their part. They used some stuff that was already out of date by decades even when they made it.

Some parts of the show got cyberspace concepts right ahead of their time.

But the TV channel stuff is really off.

People in that universe only watched what a limited number of channels were airing as it aired. Versus the huge number of options now plus DVRs. (We almost never watch a show as it is actually airing. About of 1/3 of our nighttime TV are shows that aired months to years ago.)

So the key concept of real-time ratings monitoring where shows get replaced midway thru an episode if their ratings fall too low is quaint. How 80s!

Plus there's the pirate TV station run by Blank Reg. What's the point of a pirate TV shation now? How are people going to even know it's there. People, if they have antennas, run one setup scan at the beginning and forget it. If you want to show weird videos, start a YouTube channel.

(OTOH, it does appear that pirate radio is booming in some areas to serve otherwise ignored subpopulations.)

Jennshark 05-03-2016 02:24 PM

Anything with a Trans Am in it -- especially if it's the super-duper one with the giant eagle decal on the hood!

Jim's Son 05-03-2016 02:33 PM

There are some episodes of "Space 1999" where they have the computer chose people for a mission, most notably the episode "Earthbound" with Christopher Lee. There is also one where the mention the Boston Red Sox beating the St Louis Cardinals in the 1998 world Series. Actually, they were only off by 8 years.

Pantastic 05-03-2016 03:16 PM

CRT screens are jarring to me now, especially in science fiction where the computers are supposed to be advanced. Babylon 5, for example, has a lot of shots where they have a fairly high-tech looking computer but an obviously curved CRT screen instead of a modern flat screen, and places where the workings clearly takes up quite a bit of room behind the screen. (I suspect shows like TNG and Farscape would do the same thing if I rewatched them). It's noticeable to me because the sets, including the computers, look reasonably futuristic in all ways except the monitor/TV, so it glares out. Star Wars screens don't jump at me the same way because they Star Wars goes for a lower tech look with manual switches and dials.

CalMeacham 05-03-2016 05:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pantastic (Post 19303201)
CRT screens are jarring to me now, especially in science fiction where the computers are supposed to be advanced. Babylon 5, for example, has a lot of shots where they have a fairly high-tech looking computer but an obviously curved CRT screen instead of a modern flat screen, and places where the workings clearly takes up quite a bit of room behind the screen. (I suspect shows like TNG and Farscape would do the same thing if I rewatched them). It's noticeable to me because the sets, including the computers, look reasonably futuristic in all ways except the monitor/TV, so it glares out. Star Wars screens don't jump at me the same way because they Star Wars goes for a lower tech look with manual switches and dials.

the original film 2001 didn't use real computer screens for their displays. As a result, they don't look like CRTs.

On the other hand, the sequel, [b} 2010[/B], DID use them, because they were the currently available technology.

As a result, the displays in 2001 actually look more futuristic than the real (but dated CRT) displays in 2010, which was made later and set at a later time.

TBG 05-03-2016 08:25 PM

I find it jarring that the TV's seen on Gotham in 2016 seem to all be SD CRT sets. Even the one in boy billionaire Bruce Wayne's mansion. Yet it's not like the show's a period piece or anything (they have cellphones).

Little Nemo 05-03-2016 09:47 PM

I was just rewatching a scene from The Rocky Horror Picture Show yesterday. Frank is talking to Brad and Janet and asks Brad if he has any tattoos. Brad says "certainly not". So Frank then turns and asks Janet if she has any.

It was a punchline back then because the idea that a young woman would have a tattoo seemed crazy back in 1975.

nightshadea 05-03-2016 10:07 PM

What gets me is when they have a xb 360 or later with a snes controller playing a game that's Atari pacman in the 3 seconds ya see it

Jim's Son 05-04-2016 01:09 AM

If you see the 1978 Playoff game between the Yankees and Red Sox, early on Yankee broadcaster describes Red Sox pitcher Mike Torrez (who is from Topeka, KS) as "an excitable Latin type". Try that now Scooter and you will get a louder reaction than the time you left Babe Ruth off your all-time Yankee team.

Although I have met Torrez and he is quite animated, friendly, likes to tell funny stories and looks every inch of his 6'5" height. Wears his 1977 Yankees world champions ring. Because of Reggie jackson, people forget Torrez had two complete game wins in the world series, as well as 5 shutout innings coming out of the bullpen in the decisive ALCS game 5.



Watching "Perry Mason" people are always running off to Mexico or Las Vegas for quickie divorces, with worrying about how long it takes for California to recognize them.

CalMeacham 05-04-2016 07:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBG (Post 19303919)
I find it jarring that the TV's seen on Gotham in 2016 seem to all be SD CRT sets. Even the one in boy billionaire Bruce Wayne's mansion. Yet it's not like the show's a period piece or anything (they have cellphones).

Maybe they're going for that "Timeless" vibe by throwing in technology and styles from several different decades, the way the first Tim Burton Batman movie did.

Nava 05-04-2016 09:08 AM

I think it's partly a way to on one hand point out that "this is neither your universe nor That Other DC Universe (or that other one, or that...)", partly part of the retro look of Gotham in general, and also the retro details are always purely aesthetic ones (such as having TVs that look old fashioned) but never functional ones (no having to chase down a landline).

Little Nemo 05-04-2016 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nava (Post 19305049)
I think it's partly a way to on one hand point out that "this is neither your universe nor That Other DC Universe (or that other one, or that...)"

How about this one?

Chicken Fingers 05-07-2016 12:59 PM

Try watching "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" with your teenager. With me trying to explain them sniffing freshly dittoed test papers, and the concept of rock concerts and ticket scalpers, and why everyone had jobs at the mall in addition to going to school, he found it all too nonsensical and wandered off.

Lumpy 05-08-2016 11:13 PM

Sorry I can't give a cite but there was an episode of some show back in the late '60s/early '70s- was either a sitcom or possibly an episode of Love American Style- where they did the "Housewives discover Women's Lib" shtick. Of course, it ended with their husbands putting their feet down to restore the natural order of things and the wives returning to their roles as obedient domestics. A painfully dated fable.

Alfishius 06-05-2016 08:12 PM

Anyway so yeah all these shows were in that kid's head. Crazy stuff.

rowrrbazzle 06-06-2016 02:00 AM

There's an episode of "Father Knows Best" titled "Crisis Over a Kiss". You can view it on Hulu at http://www.hulu.com/watch/792944. A college student takes Betty on a date. Later they drive to Prospect Point and he tries to kiss her. She resists and gets out of his car. Bud (up there with his date trying the exact same thing) drives her home.

In the last segment her date shows up at the house, and Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have a VERY serious discussion with him (and Mr. Anderson says he'll have a similar discussion with Bud later). That segment is really worth watching to see how radically things have changed.

This episode seemed very quaint. But considering the way colleges have begun handling accusations of sexual misconduct, it can be viewed in a whole new light.

Quote:

Originally Posted by KGS (Post 2449033)
I don't watch a lot of old TV, but I do like watching the old game shows on Game Show Network. Match Game in particular -- I don't know what's funnier, the outlandish 70's clothes or the porno theme music.

There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!

Those of us still here almost 14 years after the above post will probably recognize that if the genders are reversed, it'd get the same laugh or an even bigger one.

TBG 06-06-2016 07:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19382822)
Anyway so yeah all these shows were in that kid's head. Crazy stuff.

Not they weren't. Just because a kid dreams about something doesn't mean that something can't also exist outside of his fantasies. Like Cheers. Maybe he watched Cheers and it somehow got mixed up into his own headverse. Doesn't mean Cheers itself doesn't exist on its own (particularly because the "crossover" didn't have anyone from the kid's head show up on Cheers, just Cheers characters show up in his head).

terentii 06-07-2016 01:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gr8Kat (Post 2450152)
The only word of Japanese any of them spoke was "Bonsai!!!!"

Uhhh ... are you sure it wasn't "Banzai!!!!"? :dubious: :confused:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonsai

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banzai_charge

terentii 06-07-2016 01:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lamia (Post 2451133)
You want dated, just listen to Bat Girl's theme song. "Who's baby are you?" indeed!

"Whose," not "who's," DUH! :smack: :eek:

Alfishius 06-19-2016 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBG (Post 19385501)
Not they weren't. Just because a kid dreams about something doesn't mean that something can't also exist outside of his fantasies. Like Cheers. Maybe he watched Cheers and it somehow got mixed up into his own headverse. Doesn't mean Cheers itself doesn't exist on its own (particularly because the "crossover" didn't have anyone from the kid's head show up on Cheers, just Cheers characters show up in his head).

Read, dude.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b00e2cd5e8118a

They all actually exist only in that kid's head. The evidence is overwhelming.

Little Nemo 06-19-2016 10:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19417795)
Read, dude.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b00e2cd5e8118a

They all actually exist only in that kid's head. The evidence is overwhelming.

TBG's right. In the final scene we saw Tommy's father and grandfather. Tommy had imagined them as characters in his globe but they were also real people in his life. There's no reason to assume the other characters in Tommy's mind weren't also based on real people.

Lumpy 06-20-2016 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokey78 (Post 19216688)
An Officer and a Gentleman
-or maybe not?

OH, and how a big deal it was for couples to live together w/o marriage, the whole premise to Three's a Crowd!

It might not have been a big deal for a lot of people (and in San Francisco no less), but at the time it wasn't implausible that the landlord might be an older person with conservative (pre-1960s) values.

smokey78 06-20-2016 08:33 PM

Will mention the opposite problem: when films/stories depict a certain future year, and then that year comes up and we still haven't seen over the air hoverboards (well not commercially) ala Back to the Future.

The other example I recall was my teacher sheepishly saying, "well the author thought that would happen" I think it was a Ursula Le Guin short story set in 1987 where folks were colonized on the moon.

The Other Waldo Pepper 06-20-2016 09:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokey78 (Post 19420290)
Will mention the opposite problem: when films/stories depict a certain future year, and then that year comes up and we still haven't seen over the air hoverboards (well not commercially) ala Back to the Future.

The other example I recall was my teacher sheepishly saying, "well the author thought that would happen" I think it was a Ursula Le Guin short story set in 1987 where folks were colonized on the moon.

The best example has to be Asimov's story about Everest; sure, he did a bad job of predicting the future when he wrote it -- but by the time it saw print, "I predicted that Mount Everest would never be climbed, five months after it was climbed."

Alfishius 08-06-2016 07:15 PM

...and with all these shows being in that kid's head, I think someone has shown that our own world i.e. the "Real" world..is also in that kid's head. Mind=blown, amirite?

Mean Mr. Mustard 08-06-2016 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19301033)
St. Elsewhere was all in that kid's head...Even the real world is somehow inside that kid's head...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19382822)
Anyway so yeah all these shows were in that kid's head...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19417795)
They all actually exist only in that kid's head...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19535395)
...and with all these shows being in that kid's head...the "Real" world..is also in that kid's head.

Hey Alfishius, just wondering if you think it's all in that kid's head. Please clarify.


mmm

Patch 08-06-2016 10:18 PM

Stumbled across an episode of Adam-12 a few years ago. The main pair of cops had pulled someone over for some offense or other, and the guy was being a jerk. One of the cops took the guy's license, went to his car, spread peanut butter on it, and ate it in front of the guy (licenses were paper then). He then wrote a guy a ticket for driving without a license, stating "Go ahead and challenge it. Tell the judge I spread peanut butter on your license and ate it. He'll think you're nuts."

Yup, because what we want is our officers fabricating tickets then committing perjury in court.

Bryan Ekers 08-06-2016 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patch (Post 19535699)
Stumbled across an episode of Adam-12 a few years ago. The main pair of cops had pulled someone over for some offense or other, and the guy was being a jerk. One of the cops took the guy's license, went to his car, spread peanut butter on it, and ate it in front of the guy (licenses were paper then). He then wrote a guy a ticket for driving without a license, stating "Go ahead and challenge it. Tell the judge I spread peanut butter on your license and ate it. He'll think you're nuts."

Yup, because what we want is our officers fabricating tickets then committing perjury in court.

It's a good thing black people didn't exist on television back then or things coulda got violent.

alphaboi867 08-06-2016 11:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalMeacham (Post 19301976)
...On the other hand, the human drama and interaction is appalling. Captain Breiteis is condescended to, and called "Bright Eyes" *. It's pretty neat that the first human into space is female, but she has to put up with this kind of abuse...

IIRC the only reason she was the 1st human in space was because she was smaller & weighed less than the male astronauts. Also didn't the President promote the male lead at the ender (after she married the couple) because naturally a husband had to outrank his wife (I guess POTUS is a widow or spinster)? :rolleyes:

Dave Hartwick 08-07-2016 12:34 AM

Interesting to read such a long-lived thread.

For me it's not attitudes, prop technology, or prices that date some entertainment so badly as to make me disconcerted (although some items, like Mickey Rooney's performance in Breakfast in Tiffany's make it unwatchable) it's more about passe techniques.

The big one for me is the psychedelic montage. I was reminded of it recently when Cracked made some jokes about the Nixon campaign ad "Convention". The film adaptation of "Flowers for Algernon" (Charly) had a notable one. Obviously, 2001 had a famous one at the end.

I think Kubrick liked the psychedelic montage-- and was good at them-- and they don't stand out so much in his work, and thus don't date them. I suspect that the ones that I dislike (and I really didn't like the one in Charly, a film I otherwise didn't mind) are imitations of Kubrick.

Bryan Ekers 08-07-2016 01:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Hartwick (Post 19535852)
I think Kubrick liked the psychedelic montage-- and was good at them-- and they don't stand out so much in his work, and thus don't date them. I suspect that the ones that I dislike (and I really didn't like the one in Charly, a film I otherwise didn't mind) are imitations of Kubrick.

That montage in Charly was just awful, but I have a particular dislike for the "running from yourself" dream sequence here, with distractingly bad double-exposure photography that must have seemed primitive even in 1968.


But of course Cliff Roberston got the Academy Award - he didn't go full retard.

Ranger Jeff 08-07-2016 01:55 AM

I've been watching The Monkees season 1 lately. Vox Super Beatle amps? A Gretsch bass guitar? Come on!

NDP 08-07-2016 03:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers (Post 19535892)
That montage in Charly was just awful, but I have a particular dislike for the "running from yourself" dream sequence here, with distractingly bad double-exposure photography that must have seemed primitive even in 1968.


But of course Cliff Roberston got the Academy Award - he didn't go full retard.

Beating out Peter O' Toole for A Lion in Winter who should've gotten it.

Dave Hartwick 08-07-2016 05:49 AM

I had no idea Robertson got an Oscar for that. Here's a link to the montage scene, which shows off his performance. Sure, the double exposure sequence is also bad, but holy crap.

Speaking of the Monkees, I think I remember that their show had a lot of this sort of thing as well.

Lumpy 08-07-2016 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokey78 (Post 19420290)
Will mention the opposite problem: when films/stories depict a certain future year, and then that year comes up and we still haven't seen over the air hoverboards (well not commercially) ala Back to the Future.

The other example I recall was my teacher sheepishly saying, "well the author thought that would happen" I think it was a Ursula Le Guin short story set in 1987 where folks were colonized on the moon.

Anything done in the 1960s was hyper-optimistic where spaceflight is concerned. At the time people took the early space launches as the equivalent of Kitty Hawk, and presumed that spaceflight would advance as fast as technological development would allow. In fact they'd have been disbelieving if you told them that there'd be an interregnum where we'd putter about in low orbit for fifty years before even considering doing as much as returning to the moon.

Bryan Ekers 08-08-2016 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lumpy (Post 19537282)
Anything done in the 1960s was hyper-optimistic where spaceflight is concerned. At the time people took the early space launches as the equivalent of Kitty Hawk, and presumed that spaceflight would advance as fast as technological development would allow. In fact they'd have been disbelieving if you told them that there'd be an interregnum where we'd putter about in low orbit for fifty years before even considering doing as much as returning to the moon.

Heh, reminds me of a comment by an aerospace engineer who'd been involved in Apollo along the lines of "If you'd told me in 1970 where we'd be in 1995, I'd've asked 'was there a major war?' "

MsJinx 08-08-2016 01:22 AM

Drunk driving was sometimes treated humorously in old shows. A car on a spewing fire hydrant was always good for a few laughs.

Eclipse Chaser 08-08-2016 03:08 PM

Back on topic, Hawaii Five-O is a gold mine for dated material. I always enjoyed the scene where one of McGarrett's underlings was tailing a bad guy. When asked for an update he replied, in all seriousness: "He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.[/QUOTE]

Even way back then, it infuriated me the way whenever there was a pretty girl from the mainland in the plot, the guys would immediately switch to the Hawaiian language in front of her and start making personal comments about her.

terentii 08-08-2016 03:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eclipse Chaser (Post 19538861)
Back on topic, Hawaii Five-O is a gold mine for dated material. I always enjoyed the scene where one of McGarrett's underlings was tailing a bad guy. When asked for an update he replied, in all seriousness: "He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.

My favorite line was when McGarrett asked Chin Ho how much a bunch of figures came to: "I don't know. I don't have my abacus with me."

Just Asking Questions 08-08-2016 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patch (Post 19535699)
Stumbled across an episode of Adam-12 a few years ago. The main pair of cops had pulled someone over for some offense or other, and the guy was being a jerk. One of the cops took the guy's license, went to his car, spread peanut butter on it, and ate it in front of the guy (licenses were paper then). He then wrote a guy a ticket for driving without a license, stating "Go ahead and challenge it. Tell the judge I spread peanut butter on your license and ate it. He'll think you're nuts."

Yup, because what we want is our officers fabricating tickets then committing perjury in court.

I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!

I've seen all the episodes recently, not only is that not there, it doesn't even fit the tone of the show. Jack Webb would never show characters doing crap like that. Let alone, them carrying a jar of peanut butter around just for jerk-assed tricks like that.

Stephe96 08-08-2016 04:26 PM

In the 1990's movie Beautiful Girls, one of the characters is showing his friends around the restaurant he just opened. He says something like, "We've got a full bar, lots of seating, we've got apps.."
"Apps?"
"Appetizers."
"Oh."

Funny to think that 20 years ago, 'apps' had to be explained as 'appetizers,' when today it would mean something else entirely.

JackieLikesVariety 08-08-2016 06:28 PM

Quote:

I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!
+1

Jim's Son 08-08-2016 07:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terentii (Post 19539020)
My favorite line was when McGarrett asked Chin Ho how much a bunch of figures came to: "I don't know. I don't have my abacus with me."

Used to work with a guy whose wife was from Okinawa (and she was always reluctant to say she was Japanese). He swore his wife was better with an abacus than he was with a calculator..and he was a pretty sharp guy.

The Other Waldo Pepper 08-08-2016 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions (Post 19539037)
I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!

I've seen all the episodes recently, not only is that not there, it doesn't even fit the tone of the show. Jack Webb would never show characters doing crap like that. Let alone, them carrying a jar of peanut butter around just for jerk-assed tricks like that.

I betcha it was POLICE STORY.

Morbo 08-08-2016 07:44 PM

One scene in The Parallax View is pretty shocking these days. Warren Beatty is following someone who gets on a plane, so he climbs a fence, sneaks onto the runway and onto the plane.

After they have taken off, the stewardess approaches him, writes down the fake name he gives her into a legal pad, asks him if he's flying Round Trip, and then says something like "That'll be $73."

Patch 08-08-2016 11:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions (Post 19539037)
I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!

I've seen all the episodes recently, not only is that not there, it doesn't even fit the tone of the show. Jack Webb would never show characters doing crap like that. Let alone, them carrying a jar of peanut butter around just for jerk-assed tricks like that.

I don't remember enough of the old cop shows to take a guess, but it was around the same era. I tried searching on YouTube for the scene, and the police cars in the show looked familiar so I figured it was that one.

Patch 08-08-2016 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper (Post 19539552)
I betcha it was POLICE STORY.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

Found a post on another forum where someone mentioned it It was Police Story. The actor Don Meredith did it.

yesanything 08-09-2016 12:18 AM

Sheldrake tossing a tip to the boy.
 
In the apartment when Fred McMurray finishes getting his shoes shined he flips the colored shoe shine boy (actually a man) a tip!

terentii 08-09-2016 02:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yesanything (Post 19540047)
In the apartment when Fred McMurray finishes getting his shoes shined he flips the colored shoe shine boy (actually a man) a tip!

Okay ... he tips the guy who shines his shoes (and also happens to be black). So? :dubious:

What was he supposed to do? Pat him on the head? Toss him a slice of watermelon? :confused:

When I was in fifth or sixth grade, I used to go with my dad to get our shoes shined at a place downtown. The guy who did it was black, and we always tipped him, even though I'm sure he was paid to be there anyway. It was his job, fer chrissakes!

I've never heard of anyone who provides a service (and is good at it) not being pleased when someone gives him (or her) a gratuity.

terentii 08-09-2016 02:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim's Son (Post 19539497)
Used to work with a guy whose wife was from Okinawa (and she was always reluctant to say she was Japanese). He swore his wife was better with an abacus than he was with a calculator..and he was a pretty sharp guy.

Not surprising. I've worked with abacuses too (until recently, they were ubiquitous in Russia), and I know they're really fast!

I don't think that was quite what Chin's line was intended to convey, though. ;)

John Bredin 08-09-2016 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terentii (Post 19540238)
Okay ... he tips the guy who shines his shoes (and also happens to be black). So? :dubious:

What was he supposed to do? Pat him on the head? Toss him a slice of watermelon? :confused:

Hand it to him. :smack: I think the operative word in yesanything's post is "flipped." Sheldrake flipped or tossed the shoeshine man his tip rather than handing it to him.

terentii 08-09-2016 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Bredin (Post 19540983)
Hand it to him. :smack: I think the operative word in yesanything's post is "flipped." Sheldrake flipped or tossed the shoeshine man his tip rather than handing it to him.

So? He caught it, didn't he? :dubious:

This is a sign of disrespect? :confused:

John Bredin 08-09-2016 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terentii (Post 19541049)
So? He caught it, didn't he? :dubious:

This is a sign of disrespect? :confused:

I'd argue so; why exactly won't Sheldrake let his hand near the shoeshine man's hand? :confused:

Even if it's not disrespectful, it's definitely dated, which is the topic of this thread.:smack: When was the last time you saw someone (a) tip a server of any kind with only a coin, and (b) do so by throwing it at them? :p

terentii 08-09-2016 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Bredin (Post 19541149)
When was the last time you saw someone (a) tip a server of any kind with only a coin, and (b) do so by throwing it at them? :p

To tell the truth, I've never really given the matter much thought.

Back in 1960, though, a 50 cent piece was worth at least $2.50 in today's money, so tipping with a coin wasn't exactly cheap.

That Don Guy 08-09-2016 02:25 PM

The first one that came to mind was the ending - in fact, pretty much the entire premise - of the Peanuts special Charlie Brown's All-Stars, where Charlie Brown decides not to accept sponsorship for his team into a "better" league because...
SPOILER:
No Girls (or dogs) Allowed - which was a firm (as in, "Your choice: don't let any girls into your league, or don't bother sending a team to the tournament that leads to the Little League World Series") regulation in Little League until 1974

Derleth 08-09-2016 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Morbo (Post 19539605)
One scene in The Parallax View is pretty shocking these days. Warren Beatty is following someone who gets on a plane, so he climbs a fence, sneaks onto the runway and onto the plane.

After they have taken off, the stewardess approaches him, writes down the fake name he gives her into a legal pad, asks him if he's flying Round Trip, and then says something like "That'll be $73."

Speaking of Bell-Bottom Paranoia, pretty much anything to do with the phone system in Three Days of the Condor is just wonderfully dated. Really, anything where it takes time to trace a call and someone can defeat a trace by hanging up really fast is indicative of either ancient technology or ancient minds, with the latter being more in evidence these days than the former.

Speaking of, there's some interesting and historical information about payphone phreaking in the 1995 cinematic classic Hackers, when Razor and Blade teach you how to trick payphones into thinking you've deposited money by recording the sounds played in the handset when you deposit coins and playing them back into the mouthpiece later. Aside from the fact payphones in and of themselves are indicative of a previous epoch, that specific trick was likely all but obsolete by the time the film came out, and is certainly useless today.

Don Draper 08-09-2016 05:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derleth (Post 19541724)
Speaking of Bell-Bottom Paranoia, pretty much anything to do with the phone system in Three Days of the Condor is just wonderfully dated. Really, anything where it takes time to trace a call and someone can defeat a trace by hanging up really fast is indicative of either ancient technology or ancient minds, with the latter being more in evidence these days than the former.

Speaking of, there's some interesting and historical information about payphone phreaking in the 1995 cinematic classic Hackers, when Razor and Blade teach you how to trick payphones into thinking you've deposited money by recording the sounds played in the handset when you deposit coins and playing them back into the mouthpiece later. Aside from the fact payphones in and of themselves are indicative of a previous epoch, that specific trick was likely all but obsolete by the time the film came out, and is certainly useless today.

There's actually an interesting scene in the original version of Black Christmas where they show how they traced calls, albeit with very dated equipment.

And once I thought about that, I began to think about how dated the premise of the original BC was -- the main heroine is pregnant, but adamant that she wants to have an abortion. She even breaks up with her boyfriend because he wants her to keep it and for the two of them to get married. You would NEVER see that plot-line in a movie today, especially with the main character with whom the audience are meant to identify with and root for.

Alfishius 08-10-2016 06:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Draper (Post 19541871)
There's actually an interesting scene in the original version of Black Christmas where they show how they traced calls, albeit with very dated equipment.

And once I thought about that, I began to think about how dated the premise of the original BC was -- the main heroine is pregnant, but adamant that she wants to have an abortion. She even breaks up with her boyfriend because he wants her to keep it and for the two of them to get married. You would NEVER see that plot-line in a movie today, especially with the main character with whom the audience are meant to identify with and root for.

I was a camp counsellor for years. Young people today are very anti-abortion which is surprising.

BrotherCadfael 08-10-2016 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim's Son (Post 19539497)
Used to work with a guy whose wife was from Okinawa (and she was always reluctant to say she was Japanese). He swore his wife was better with an abacus than he was with a calculator..and he was a pretty sharp guy.

When I was in college, I needed a good calculator, so my dad bought me one. We set up some test problems, and I worked them with the calculator and he with his slide rule. He beat me to the answers every time. He was GOOD with that thing!

Lumpy 08-10-2016 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19542931)
I was a camp counsellor for years. Young people today are very anti-abortion which is surprising.

Selective effect- the people born today are the children of people who didn't abort them? :p

akrako1 08-12-2016 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff (Post 19535924)
I've been watching The Monkees season 1 lately. Vox Super Beatle amps? A Gretsch bass guitar? Come on!

Not sure if this is an attempt at a Whoosh... but you realize that vintage gear like this has only gotten more desirable over the years? Most of yer favorite 'modern' musicians seek out vintage gear.

foolsguinea 08-12-2016 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19382822)
Anyway so yeah all these shows were in that kid's head. Crazy stuff.

St. Elsewhere, maybe. But probably not the shows it crossed over with. Fictional characters can exist in more than one continuity. Some characters, like Jenny Everywhere and Mikhail Gorbachev, basically have the super-power to actually exist in any continuity you can think of. (Well, I think Gorby is usually only used in settings that include Russia at the end of the Cold War, but he does exist in many fictional universes, including ours.)

Happy Birthday, Jenny!

Alfishius 09-02-2016 10:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foolsguinea (Post 19550426)
St. Elsewhere, maybe. But probably not the shows it crossed over with. Fictional characters can exist in more than one continuity. Some characters, like Jenny Everywhere and Mikhail Gorbachev, basically have the super-power to actually exist in any continuity you can think of. (Well, I think Gorby is usually only used in settings that include Russia at the end of the Cold War, but he does exist in many fictional universes, including ours.)

Interesting!

But still...if a fictional character exists only in one person's mind, and yet someone meets that fictional character...then they must also be in that person's mind, no?

digs 09-03-2016 09:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19602299)
Interesting!

But still...if a fictional character exists only in one person's mind, and yet someone meets that fictional character...then they must also be in that person's mind, no?

Dude, let it go.

But, wait, if you're obsessed ... I'm not sure you could do that if you were just a character in some kid's head...

monstro 09-03-2016 09:58 PM

I'm starting to think maybe he is the kid.

Lumpy 09-04-2016 11:30 AM

Any television or movie western from before the Sergio Leone era that depicted astonishingly clean and well-dressed cowboys.

TBG 09-04-2016 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19417795)
Read, dude.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b00e2cd5e8118a

They all actually exist only in that kid's head. The evidence is overwhelming.

Dracula has appeared in my head. Guess that means there's not any Dracula fiction in the real world, just what's in my head, right? :rolleyes:

Harvey The Heavy 09-05-2016 08:53 AM

I really don't understand all the debate over the Tommy Westphall Universe. It's quite simple: He fantasized about characters he saw on TV. The connections happened in his head, that's all. He was watching the same unconnected shows that we do and just tied them all together in his head.

I also don't believe that the entirety of St. Elsewhere was a fantasy of Tommy's. St. Elsewhere was probably a real hospital that he had been to (where else would you get a snow globe like that one?), and his fantasies were a mix of real people and TV characters.

akrako1 09-07-2016 12:59 PM

Almost any early CGI, especially on TV. Babylon 5 is a great example. Wonderful stories, but oh-so-terrible graphics by today's standards. While watching, you feel like you're playing a late 90's video game. Even today's browser-run games have better graphics. Unfortunately, there's probably too many CGI shots to redo if it were to get the Star Trek TOS treatment where they recreate all of the exterior shots. Probably not enough profit to be made from doing it.. I hope eventually the current level of eye-tricking CGI will get cheap enough to make it workable.. Or the network will just opt to do the upteenth reboot intead...

Lumpy 09-07-2016 09:00 PM

I'd like to see all my favorite Harry Hausen films with the animation upgraded with blur motion.

WotNot 09-08-2016 04:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lumpy (Post 19612753)
I'd like to see all my favorite Harry Hausen films with the animation upgraded with blur motion.

I'm going to assume you mean Ray Harryhausen, and hope nobody ever does anything of the sort.

Lumpy 09-08-2016 08:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WotNot (Post 19613423)
I'm going to assume you mean Ray Harryhausen, and hope nobody ever does anything of the sort.

I woke up in the middle of the night last night and said "did I really do that?" :smack::smack:

Alfishius 11-23-2016 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBG (Post 19605712)
Dracula has appeared in my head. Guess that means there's not any Dracula fiction in the real world, just what's in my head, right? :rolleyes:

That argument is weak!

ftg 11-24-2016 08:59 AM

We watched a season 1 episode of The Simpsons the other night: Homer's Night Out. The one where Bart takes a picture of Homer dancing with Princess Jasmine.

Egad. How antiquated. First, Bart orders a "spy" camera. One with film. He takes pictures of various things including the infamous Homer and Jasmine one.

He temporarily joins the school photography club so he can get it developed. The picture gets copied and handed around. (Most using a photocopier, which doesn't work for this, btw.) It ends up being posted on bulletin boards and such.

Wow, just wow.

Today: Bart would use his smartphone, post it online, people would email/tweet/etc. it to friends. It'd be on the Internet not a bulletin board. Etc.

(Plus it would be considered too tame and actually be of little interest. Image what kind of photos Bart would be sharing with his friends today.)

This is how long The Simpsons have been on the air. A complete changeover of technology.

Alfishius 12-23-2016 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ftg (Post 19805868)
We watched a season 1 episode of The Simpsons the other night: Homer's Night Out. The one where Bart takes a picture of Homer dancing with Princess Jasmine.

Egad. How antiquated. First, Bart orders a "spy" camera. One with film. He takes pictures of various things including the infamous Homer and Jasmine one.

He temporarily joins the school photography club so he can get it developed. The picture gets copied and handed around. (Most using a photocopier, which doesn't work for this, btw.) It ends up being posted on bulletin boards and such.

Wow, just wow.

Today: Bart would use his smartphone, post it online, people would email/tweet/etc. it to friends. It'd be on the Internet not a bulletin board. Etc.

(Plus it would be considered too tame and actually be of little interest. Image what kind of photos Bart would be sharing with his friends today.)

This is how long The Simpsons have been on the air. A complete changeover of technology.

Hmmm is Simpsons actually in that kid's head? I can't remember if Simpsons is tied to St. Elsewhere.

Brodi 12-23-2016 10:39 PM

This is a kids show, but Nickelodeons The Rugrats has some pretty dated stuff in it. The computer the parents have, the game system Angelica has in one episode, the size of Charlottes cell phone.

Annie-Xmas 12-24-2016 09:48 AM

I remember an episode of Room 222 that I only saw twice. The students were ragging on an effeminate boy they thought was "queer." The teachers and principal got together and had this dialog:

Principal: Are we dealing with one or two problems here?
Teacher: What do you mean?
Principal: Is the boy a homosexual?

When I saw this episode years later in syndication, that scene was cut.

msmith537 12-28-2016 04:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ftg (Post 19218106)
Another thread reminded me of Chasing Amy recently. And the scene at the train station where Banky and Holden are going to go to a Con.

Banky has a bag full of porn mags. Now it would be just a cell phone full of it. Maybe a couple extra microSD cards. Not nearly as good for the visuals.

Holden is paged on a beeper by Alyssa. That's right, paged. He then goes over to a pay phone to call her. Again, it'd be all cell phones now.

Most of that scene would be quite different if done today.


Lesbians were so edgy back in 1997!

msmith537 12-28-2016 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19874625)
Hmmm is Simpsons actually in that kid's head? I can't remember if Simpsons is tied to St. Elsewhere.

According to this chart, pretty much everything is in that damn kid's head:

Alfishius 03-30-2017 08:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by msmith537 (Post 19882701)
According to this chart, pretty much everything is in that damn kid's head:

I know! Maybe even the entire real world.

Alfishius 05-02-2018 06:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Torgo (Post 2446513)
Early episodes of recent hit shows; first season episodes of "Friends", "Seinfeld" and others showcasing early 90s hairstyles and clothes (a little too close to the 80s for my tastes).


The 80s were fucking awesome. I wish all the girls fashions of the 80s would come back. The hair, the clothes, the makeup...nothing hotter than an 80s chick and if you don't think so, you're a dope.

HowSoonIsThen 05-03-2018 04:04 AM

The 90s gave us both a Senfeld episode and a Simpsons episode where the characters get an illegal cable hook up.

Its quite interesting just how worried and guilty the characters feel about stealing tv. I mean, watching tv without paying for it? The nerve! I'm sure glad that never took off...

Alfishius 06-22-2018 06:22 AM

The 80s were such an awesome time, the 90s just cant compare. Every decade since then has sucked hard.

As I get older and older I keep waiting for an awesome decade like the 80s to come along. Maybe it will before I run out of decades I'm alive for, but I'm starting to doubt it. Oh well, only 2 more years before the next decade starts. Maybe...!

F. U. Shakespeare 06-22-2018 09:33 AM

This thread reminded me of an episode of Dragnet ("The Kidnapping", Season 1, Episode 3) where a cosmetics entrepreneur named Adele Vincent had been kidnapped. A woman who worked for Vincent had come to the police to report the crime. In setting up the rescue operation, Friday and Gannon were getting descriptions of Miss Vincent and the man who'd kidnapped her.

I (correctly) remembered the woman describing Miss Vincent as "lovely, ...." I had thought this was a sign of the sexism of the times.

But when I went back to view the episode, I learned that the woman also included in her detailed description of the kidnapper's looks and clothing that he was "not bad looking".

Maybe it's not just sexism that people's hotness was included in their descriptions. Maybe it was also a reflection of the fact that TV in that era was a mostly white world? And that with a more uniform standard of beauty in place, it made practical sense for police to note how attractive someone was in describing them?

Either way, it seems very dated.

Alfishius 08-24-2018 06:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alphagene (Post 2448418)
You got a lot of Moxie to be jumping on this guy like he's a Trampoline. Did someone put Vaseline in your Cornflakes or Heroin in your Granola?

Heroin isn't a brand name...(neither is granola).

Charlie Tan 08-24-2018 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 21166277)
Heroin isn't a brand name...(neither is granola).

It was


Quote:

Heroin (diacetylmorphine), now illegal as an addictive drug, was trademarked and marketed by Bayer as a cough suppressant and non-addictive substitute for morphine from 1898 to 1910.[19] Bayer scientists were not the first to make heroin, but their scientists discovered ways to make it, and Bayer led commercialization of heroin.[20] Heroin was a Bayer trademark until after World War I.[21]

Alfishius 09-26-2018 07:28 PM

Well fuck me sideways!

ftg 09-27-2018 09:58 AM

We are currently watching an episode a night of Mad About You. The one last night was based on Jaimie and Paul using some non-refundable tickets Paul's father bought. So they had to pretend to be Burt and Sylvania ;) Buchman. The starting point was at the airport.

The airport. They were using someone else's tickets to get on a plane. How does that work? Doesn't the TSA check these things?

Really takes you out of the show for a bit.

Also, the resort they went to had no phones or TV. But I bet they had WiFi or no one would go there.

Alfishius 01-13-2019 07:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ftg (Post 21233270)
We are currently watching an episode a night of Mad About You. The one last night was based on Jaimie and Paul using some non-refundable tickets Paul's father bought. So they had to pretend to be Burt and Sylvania ;) Buchman. The starting point was at the airport.

The airport. They were using someone else's tickets to get on a plane. How does that work? Doesn't the TSA check these things?

Really takes you out of the show for a bit.

Also, the resort they went to had no phones or TV. But I bet they had WiFi or no one would go there.

People watch Mad About You? By choice??

Darren Garrison 01-13-2019 10:55 AM

I envision a world a hundred years from now, civilization has collapsed--the sporadic survivors are mostly Thunderdoming each other, but a few wisps of the old Web remain, almost entirely forgotten. Then, one day, Alfishius makes his next reply to this thread (probably a "lol".)

Chronos 01-13-2019 12:57 PM

Alfishius, do you ever make any post without waiting at least three weeks, first?

davidm 01-13-2019 02:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AHunter3 (Post 2449579)
...

In 2011, audiences will rent old DVDs
...

Even this thread is dated!

dropzone 01-13-2019 07:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Draper (Post 19216856)
My Dad was a doctor and a fairly senior staff member (basically someone like Dr. Westphall or Dr. Auschlander from "Elsewhere") and even during the original run of the series, he would be gnashing his teeth, grimacing, and sometimes even groaning and guffawing out loud at the mispronounced medical jargon, the ridiculous "life or death" drama over what were routine medical procedures, and just what he viewed as the contrived and inept portrayal of what actual hospitals are like.

I think it was the first episode of St Elsewhere where in the first five minutes someone was performing CPR incorrectly. Wife was medical and was incensed they would show it because viewers might try it and people would die. Medical dramas were off the menu until House.

Quote:

Originally Posted by terentii (Post 19540241)
Not surprising. I've worked with abacuses too (until recently, they were ubiquitous in Russia), and I know they're really fast!

I don't think that was quite what Chin's line was intended to convey, though. ;)

I thought Chin meant, "I'll show you my fucking abacus, Roundeyes."

Ashtura 01-14-2019 11:43 AM

Honestly, I think anything that wouldn't appear "dated" if you were doing it as a modern period piece shouldn't count. Not having cell phones is not "dated", it would an anachronism.

BwanaBob 01-14-2019 12:05 PM

I hope to god this whole thread is one big whoosh. Seriously, all those movies set in the Roman empire are stupid. Why use those chariots when they could use a hemi-engined SUV? Get places much faster. And those dumb doctors in the 1880's, sitting around watching people die of tuberculosis. Give the poor schmucks some antibiotics already....

It seems like nearly everyone in this thread can't bear to watch anything set in the past because duh we have better technology and different social views.

caligulathegod 01-14-2019 03:54 PM

I think you've missed the point. It's just a look at films and TV shows that were ostensibly modern when they were made but now are amusingly relics of their time.

Max Torque 01-14-2019 04:20 PM

I've posted this one elsewhere, but why not: the "let's all learn how to use a fax machine" scene in Die Hard 2. Pretty silly by today's standards. Plus, a fax machine isn't the greatest way to send an image of a fingerprint, and a 1990s fax machine would probably just turn it into a smudge. If you have a really clear print, it'll work, but it'll have scan lines; even an amateur can spot a faxed print.

Alfishius 02-15-2019 06:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chronos (Post 21428045)
Alfishius, do you ever make any post without waiting at least three weeks, first?

I don't think so...

Gyrate 02-15-2019 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by akrako1 (Post 19611451)
Almost any early CGI, especially on TV. Babylon 5 is a great example. Wonderful stories, but oh-so-terrible graphics by today's standards. While watching, you feel like you're playing a late 90's video game.

Yeah, I doubt there's any financial incentive to re-CGI it. The CGI at the beginning and end of "Labyrinth" likewise looks terrible (not to mention Bowie's tights).

Funnily enough, B5 deliberately put a dated reference into the show. The bar had a prominent "ZIMA" sign, which IIRC JMS stuck in as a joke, knowing full well that Zima was in no way going to be the drink of the future.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 20936704)
The 80s were fucking awesome. I wish all the girls fashions of the 80s would come back. The hair, the clothes, the makeup...nothing hotter than an 80s chick and if you don't think so, you're a dope.

I remember the 80's, and if you think shoulder pads and puffball skirts are "hot", well...it's debatable which one of us is a "dope".

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 21489497)
I don't think so...

ISWYDT.

CalMeacham 02-15-2019 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lumpy (Post 19612753)
I'd like to see all my favorite Harry Hausen films with the animation upgraded with blur motion.

Harryhausen was well aware of the "strobing" effect his animation had, and thought it was an acceptable part of the experience. I wouldn't like to see it blurred out, either.

For what it's worth, people have been blurring away the animation strobing well before there was "full" CGI. In the 1920s animator Ladisls Starevich moved his model during film exposure. Animator Jim Danforth used a movement mechanism to move wings and such on his animation models so that they would photograph as a blur*. In the 1980s Phil Tippett at Industrial Light and Magic came up with his own version -- "Go Motion" -- that was used in several films, like Dragonslayer. Since the early 1990s it's been easier to simply use CGI to cause blurring.





*The Wikipedia article on Go-Motion claims that Danforth used a petroleum-jelly method to create the blur, but contemporary sources said that he actually moved the winds during exposure.

CalMeacham 02-15-2019 09:13 AM

There have been cases of people updating the effects in some old movies. Long before George Lucas released his "special edition" of the original Star Wars movies, people were re-shooting the special effects scenes for the 1950 movie Rocketsjip X-M ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocketship_X-M )

Personally, I wouldn't have a problem with them re-doing the effects from the Hunt for Red October, which I thought looked hopelessly cartoony when the film was first released, and which look terrible now. I similarly wouldn't mind if they redid the CGI for The Last Starfighter, an excellent film overall. but whose CGI wasn't quite up to the task set for it.

KneadToKnow 02-15-2019 09:30 AM

EDIT: erroneous post.

Darren Garrison 02-15-2019 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalMeacham (Post 21489648)
There have been cases of people updating the effects in some old movies. Long before George Lucas released his "special edition" of the original Star Wars movies, people were re-shooting the special effects scenes for the 1950 movie Rocketsjip X-M ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocketship_X-M )

Personally, I wouldn't have a problem with them re-doing the effects from the Hunt for Red October, which I thought looked hopelessly cartoony when the film was first released, and which look terrible now. I similarly wouldn't mind if they redid the CGI for The Last Starfighter, an excellent film overall. but whose CGI wasn't quite up to the task set for it.


I forget--did ny of the SW special editions update the original "hologram" of the Death Star that had the gunhole* centered on the equator?





*technical term

Just Asking Questions 02-15-2019 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AHunter3 (Post 2449579)
Fashion is different. In 2011, audiences will rent old DVDs from the turn of the century and laugh their heads off to see guys wearing shorts and cutoff jeans and swim trunks where the legs go nearly down to their knees. No one would be caught dead in anything so old-fashioned in 2011, except maybe Grandpa. And don't even get me started on those baggy-ass jeans!

And in 2019 grown men will be wearing "shorts" that go below their knees. And not be embarrassed.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 19304184)
It was a punchline back then because the idea that a young woman would have a tattoo seemed crazy back in 1975.

Sigh. I miss those days.

Alfishius 04-24-2019 11:27 PM

I dont mess with tatted chicks.

nightshadea 04-25-2019 03:50 AM

here's a scene that wouldn't happen in a show today

Ok in murder she wrote for the first 4 or so seasons a running story was her nephew couldn't keep a job or girlfriend well he finally found both but they broke up for 5 minutes when they were engaged because one reason was "she hated being a career woman all she wanted to do was stay home have kids and make cookies " and he was all "well what's wrong with the old ways yadda yadda ya "

If someone said that in a series on a major series today twitter would burn for days .....

caligulathegod 04-25-2019 05:35 AM

Something you never see anymore. Crime drama where the detective/police sticks his finger in a pool of blood to gauge how long it had been there.

CalMeacham 04-25-2019 08:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darren Garrison (Post 21490003)
I forget--did ny of the SW special editions update the original "hologram" of the Death Star that had the gunhole* centered on the equator?





*technical term

As far as I can tell, they haven't tampered with the "holograms" in either Star Wars (A New Hope) or Return of the Jedi in any of the re-edited and "updated" editions.

BrotherCadfael 04-25-2019 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 21166277)
Heroin isn't a brand name...(neither is granola).

Heroin was answered above. Now, about Granola...
Quote:

Originally Posted by Wikipedia
The names Granula and Granola were registered trademarks in the late 19th century United States for foods consisting of whole grain products crumbled and then baked until crisp, in contrast to the, at that time (about 1900), contemporary invention, muesli, which is traditionally neither baked nor sweetened. The name is now a trademark only in Australia and New Zealand, but is still more commonly referred to as muesli there.[1] The trademark is owned by the Australian Health & Nutrition Association Ltd.'s Sanitarium Health Food Company in Australia[2] and Australasian Conference Association Limited in New Zealand.


Ellis Dee 04-25-2019 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AHunter3 (Post 2449579)
Fashion is different. In 2011, audiences will rent old DVDs from the turn of the century and laugh their heads off to see guys wearing shorts and cutoff jeans and swim trunks where the legs go nearly down to their knees. No one would be caught dead in anything so old-fashioned in 2011, except maybe Grandpa. And don't even get me started on those baggy-ass jeans!

With the benefit of hindsight, I don't see a huge difference in 2000s fashion compared to 2010s fashion.

I think of the 2000s as the low-rise jeans faze, and then the 2010s as the tragedy of the pixie cut combined with skinny jeans, but generally speaking, when watching a movie from 2004 or 2017, the general aesthetic and fashions seem pretty similar.

By contrast, anything from the 90s screams "90s!!!", anything from the 80s screams "80s!", and so on. (70s? Oh yes. 60s? So much. 50s? Almost too much...)

20 years ago, in 1999, I would have said the opposite about 1984 vs 1997: Such a completely different world in terms of aesthetic and fashion that it's immediately obvious which year you're watching.

ftg 04-25-2019 01:44 PM

Our one-episode-a-night sitcom is Mork & Mindy. Almost done with season 3. (It's going to take some determination to continue with season 4.)

Lots of "Oh, I guess things were different back then." moments.

E.g., Mork has a job at a daycare. One of the kids has an eating disorder which is used for laughs including multiple ones said to the kid. Um, really?

Robin Williams goes on several tears using various voices. Including ethnic ones like Indian, Black, and Hispanic. I don't think that'd go over well now.

And the most absurd one: Mindy had been going to college as a journalism major. After graduation she actually gets a job that uses her degree. Heavens to Betsy!

mplo 04-26-2019 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ivylass (Post 2452413)
Well, I guess my nominations got eaten.

West Side Story. The idea of clean shaven gang members grand jeteing their way down the streets of Manhattan and then agreeing to a fist fight instead of guns...how quaint.

War Games The huge floppy disks, the monotone computer screen...the phone handset modem...also very quaint.

I never saw "War Games", but I disagree with you about the idea of the 1961 film version of "West Side Story" being dated. This is a great, golden oldie-but-keeper of a classic movie-musical that is very relevant, even today, plus it's my all time favorite film, hands down.

There's an upcoming re-boot of the film "West Side Story" by Steven Spielberg that I plan to boycott when it hits the movie theaters sometime next year, because re-makes of older classic films generally come out awful, and absolutely nothing beats the original. If I'm a bit of an old-fashioned stick-in-the-mud due to my opinion, so be it.

Gyrate 04-29-2019 05:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mplo (Post 21610750)
There's an upcoming re-boot of the film "West Side Story" by Steven Spielberg that I plan to boycott when it hits the movie theaters sometime next year, because re-makes of older classic films generally come out awful, and absolutely nothing beats the original. If I'm a bit of an old-fashioned stick-in-the-mud due to my opinion, so be it.

Jesus, why would they do this? The "Cool" scene is absolute perfection (it was also absolute hell for the dancers, but the end result is insanely good). STOP SHITTING ON THE CLASSICS, HOLLYWOOD.

Just Asking Questions 04-29-2019 10:22 AM

You want to update West Side Story? Then you need drug trafficking and automatic weapons, drive by shootings, police helicopters hovering with searchlights all night.

Please leave me my nostalgia, thank you.

Darren Garrison 04-29-2019 01:05 PM

Updated West Side Story:



Cop: Why the hell are you dancing in the streets, are you on bath salts? And wipe off that brown makeup, you're white, you racist assholes!

Dewey Finn 04-29-2019 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions (Post 21614790)
You want to update West Side Story? Then you need drug trafficking and automatic weapons, drive by shootings, police helicopters hovering with searchlights all night.

Please leave me my nostalgia, thank you.

I believe I read that the remake of West Side Story is set in the same time as the original (late 1950s, I think).

Urbanredneck 04-29-2019 05:09 PM

Notice how in those "future" movie, you dont have half the people always staring at their phones.

Gilligan's Island will always be funny.

Asuka 04-29-2019 05:30 PM

Pretty much everything written during the 2000s Bush adminstration about how the "mainstream news media" and the Government were colluding and how you shouldn't trust CNN or MSNBC.

There was some awful Rosario Dawson movie made during that time about how CNN was basically run by the government.

The Other Waldo Pepper 04-29-2019 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dewey Finn (Post 21615128)
I believe I read that the remake of West Side Story is set in the same time as the original (late 1950s, I think).

What, not 1500s Verona?

Peter Morris 04-29-2019 09:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper (Post 21615890)
What, not 1500s Verona?

What, not ancient Babylon?


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