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-   -   When did grilled egg sandwiches become standard in your world (if ever) (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=880043)

Acsenray 08-07-2019 12:20 PM

When did grilled egg sandwiches become standard in your world (if ever)
 
I know McDonald's introduced the Egg McMuffin in the early 1970s, but I don't think I became aware of it as a breakfast option until the late '70s or early 1980s. And for a while after that, it seemed to be a McDonald's-only thing.

It was only a bit after that that McDonald's competitors started introducing grilled egg sandwich-type items for breakfast, like Crossandwiches, etc.

It wasn't until the late 1990s that it seemed to me that egg breakfast sandwiches--defined as cooked egg with cheese and meat (ham, sausage, bacon, etc.) inside bread (English muffins, toast, croissants, etc.) became standard at any cafeteria-style grill, and appeared in some form on almost any breakfast menu.

Does this timeline represent the advent of grilled egg breakfast sandwiches for anyone else? Or did they become a staple much earlier than I experienced?

Bayaker 08-07-2019 12:46 PM

If by grilled you mean fried, then they have been around since forever, although probably not on an English muffin or croissant. My grandmother, born in the nineteenth century, used to make them for me regularly.

The Stafford Cripps 08-07-2019 01:07 PM

Wikipedia says that the Egg McMuffin was based on Eggs Benedict, which has been around since the 19th century.

Fried egg rolls have been around in Britain for who knows how long; you can see a character eating one in the film Quadrophenia in 1979, set 15 years previously.

Acsenray 08-07-2019 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bayaker (Post 21793062)
If by grilled you mean fried

Well, fried or scrambled. But my point was to distinguish it from things like egg salad. The bread and the eggs and other ingredients are usually cooked on a grill, although I guess they don't necessarily have to be.


Quote:

Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps (Post 21793112)
Wikipedia says that the Egg McMuffin was based on Eggs Benedict, which has been around since the 19th century.

Well, Eggs Benedict is clearly not a sandwich, and it's generally served in upper-scale restaurants, not in cafeterias and breakfast stands.

Quote:

Fried egg rolls have been around in Britain for who knows how long; you can see a character eating one in the film Quadrophenia in 1979, set 15 years previously.
I've never encountered that. Is it basically of the form that you would call a sandwich?

The Stafford Cripps 08-07-2019 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acsenray (Post 21793130)
I've never encountered that. Is it basically of the form that you would call a sandwich?

Yes, a roll is pretty much the same as what you put a hamburger in (we often call them hamburger rolls rather than 'buns'). Look up 'bacon roll' and imagine fried egg inside it instead.

Bill Door 08-07-2019 01:44 PM

I know I ate many, many fried egg sandwiches starting in the 1950s. Usually at home. I guess I don't remember ordering them in a diner, but I certainly ordered fried eggs and toast and constructed them on an ad hoc basis.

silenus 08-07-2019 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bayaker (Post 21793062)
If by grilled you mean fried, then they have been around since forever, although probably not on an English muffin or croissant. My grandmother, born in the nineteenth century, used to make them for me regularly.

This, right down to the grandmother. Fried egg sandwiches have been around since there have been eggs and bread.

kenobi 65 08-07-2019 02:34 PM

Another variation, popular in Chicago, is the pepper and egg sandwich. It's particularly a staple here during Lent, for Catholics who are abstaining from meat on Fridays.

I'm not sure how long ago the sandwich was invented, but it's been a thing here at least since the late '80s, when I moved to Chicago, and I suspect it's considerably older than that.

Acsenray 08-07-2019 02:35 PM

I'm surprised, because before Egg McMuffins and its subsequent competitors became common, I had never encountered a breakfast egg sandwich, and certainly not a home made one.

Every home made breakfast I had seen before that had the eggs, toast, and breakfast meats served separately on a plate.

jz78817 08-07-2019 02:37 PM

probably since forever, since the Egg McMuffin (and competitors' versions) have been around longer than me.

however, the best breakfast sandwiches I've had came from the (now closed) greasy spoon next door to the garage I worked at in high school and college. it was just a fried egg (hard), strips of bacon, slice of american cheese, sprinkle of black pepper in two slices of buttered toast. but it was way better than any fast food thing.

SciFiSam 08-07-2019 04:32 PM

Fried egg sandwiches (or fried egg butties) have been a staple of English breakfast times for as long as anyone can remember. You can eat them at any time but it's most common to have them at breakfast time. Cafes (not cafés, there's a difference) have always sold them. Don't diners do that in the US too?

Fear Itself 08-07-2019 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SciFiSam (Post 21793477)
Fried egg sandwiches (or fried egg butties) have been a staple of English breakfast times for as long as anyone can remember. You can eat them at any time but it's most common to have them at breakfast time. Cafes (not cafés, there's a difference) have always sold them. Don't diners do that in the US too?

They're pretty common now, but many places don't serve them afternoon.

Ukulele Ike 08-07-2019 08:53 PM

New York City has been putting two scrambled eggs on a roll along with bacon (or ham, sausage) and melted cheese for ages. Newbies who move from California’s eyes regularly bug out at this fairly obvious sandwich.

jackdavinci 08-07-2019 09:03 PM

Anecdotally, they do seem to be on slightly more menus in the last decade or so, but they have been a staple item at delis for forever.

aceplace57 08-07-2019 09:13 PM

I grew up eating fried egg sandwiches with yellow mustard. I don't remember ham or bacon as an option.

Archie Goodwin in the Nero Wolfe books occasionally ordered fried egg sandwiches & milk when he didn't go home to eat Wolfe's gormet meals.

McDonald's was astute offering the Egg McMuffin. The ham & cheese makes it so much better

jz78817 08-08-2019 03:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike (Post 21793852)
New York City has been putting two scrambled eggs on a roll along with bacon (or ham, sausage) and melted cheese for ages. Newbies who move from California’s eyes regularly bug out at this fairly obvious sandwich.

TIL Egg McMuffins and Croissanwiches don’t exist in California as far as New Yorkers know.

crowmanyclouds 08-08-2019 03:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike (Post 21793852)
New York City has been putting two scrambled eggs on a roll along with bacon (or ham, sausage) and melted cheese for ages. {...}

Or Taylor ham across the river in Jersey.

CMC fnord!

panache45 08-08-2019 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike (Post 21793852)
New York City has been putting two scrambled eggs on a roll along with bacon (or ham, sausage) and melted cheese for ages. Newbies who move from California’s eyes regularly bug out at this fairly obvious sandwich.

Yes, when I first moved to NYC back in the '60s, I remember getting an "egg on a roll" for breakfast in a nearby deli... with or without ham & cheese.

Alessan 08-08-2019 07:32 AM

Do hard-boiled eggs count? Because a popular Israeli sandwich is called a "Sabich", and it consists of a pita stuffed with hard-boiled eggs, fried eggplants, a cucumber, onion and tomato salad, tahini and mango sauce.

SanVito 08-08-2019 07:56 AM

Fried egg sandwiches have been a 'thing' in the UK for as long as we've had bread and eggs, I suspect. Certainly my Victorian grandmother made them.

Served in all ways - sliced bread, bread rolls, with bacon, with sausage, on their own...

Qadgop the Mercotan 08-08-2019 09:18 AM

I have been enjoying scrambled egg sandwiches since the late 1950's.

Acsenray 08-08-2019 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alessan (Post 21794270)
Do hard-boiled eggs count? Because a popular Israeli sandwich is called a "Sabich", and it consists of a pita stuffed with hard-boiled eggs, fried eggplants, a cucumber, onion and tomato salad, tahini and mango sauce.

No, hard-boiled eggs don’t count. That’s why I specified “grilled egg.”

Skywatcher 08-08-2019 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acsenray (Post 21793130)
Well, fried or scrambled. But my point was to distinguish it from things like egg salad. The bread and the eggs and other ingredients are usually cooked on a grill, although I guess they don't necessarily have to be.

When I see "grilled egg sandwich", I think of a two-slice version of this.

romansperson 08-08-2019 10:39 AM

I make the bodega style of these for dinner sometimes. They've been around since way before the McMuffin.

Skywatcher 08-08-2019 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bayaker (Post 21793062)
My grandmother, born in the nineteenth century, used to make them for me regularly.

Quote:

Originally Posted by silenus (Post 21793183)
This, right down to the grandmother.

Similar with my dad, who was mistaken for my grandfather at times. Fried egg and ketchup on white toast and a mug of hot tea.

krondys 08-08-2019 10:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skywatcher (Post 21794618)
When I see "grilled egg sandwich", I think of a two-slice version of this.

In my house, those are called elephant eyes, not toad-in-the-hole.

AHunter3 08-08-2019 11:00 AM

I grew up with my folks cooking them for us on camping trips: fried egg on an English muffin with some bacon and cheddar on top.

But when I first experienced them as ubiquitously available and standard fare? New York City, 1984. Long lines of people at deli counters ordering them and receiving them in short order. On rolls, not English muffins, by the way.

Annie-Xmas 08-08-2019 11:05 AM

I'm pretty sure that McDonald's was the first fast food chain to offer breakfast foods, starting in 1972 with the Egg McMuffin (and Big Breakfast and Pancakes & Sausage). Totally revolutionized the concepts of "fast food." and "breakfast food."

Acsenray 08-08-2019 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 21794695)
I'm pretty sure that McDonald's was the first fast food chain to offer breakfast foods, starting in 1972 with the Egg McMuffin (and Big Breakfast and Pancakes & Sausage). Totally revolutionized the concepts of "fast food." and "breakfast food."

That’s what it was in my experience. The idea of a fried or scrambled egg in a sandwich for breakfast started with McDonald's and didn’t become ubiquitous until the 1990s.

But it seems that a lot of folks were eating these kinds of breakfast sandwiches at home, long before then.

Annie-Xmas 08-08-2019 11:35 AM

Yes, at home and in delis. But McDonald's started the fast food breakfast concept. Especially good for vegetarians, who can tell them to "hold the meat." (Say it with a straight face and watch the counter person try not to react.)

SciFiSam 08-08-2019 12:06 PM

Maybe they started it in the US, but I promise you cafes had been selling fried egg sandwiches (sometimes for takeaway) for a very long time before that in the UK.

Annie-Xmas 08-08-2019 12:15 PM

The point I'm trying to make is Mickey D's started the fast food breakfast concept. Before the Egg McMuffin, fast food places were only opened for lunch and dinner. No breakfast food.

Yes, there were food places that offered breakfast, but no fast food places.

SciFiSam 08-08-2019 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 21794866)
The point I'm trying to make is Mickey D's started the fast food breakfast concept. Before the Egg McMuffin, fast food places were only opened for lunch and dinner. No breakfast food.

Yes, there were food places that offered breakfast, but no fast food places.

I'm not sure how delis and cafes selling fried egg sandwiches at breakfast doesn't count as fast food.

Annie-Xmas 08-08-2019 12:19 PM

*SIGH* Fast Food franchise breakfast concept.

SciFiSam 08-08-2019 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 21794879)
*SIGH* Fast Food franchise breakfast concept.

Sure, if you want to get that specific. But you said they revolutionised the idea of breakfast food.

beowulff 08-08-2019 12:31 PM

I just wanted to say “thanks.”
I made myself two grilled egg sandwiches for breakfast this morning, because of this thread.

Ukulele Ike 08-08-2019 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SciFiSam (Post 21794840)
Maybe they started it in the US, but I promise you cafes had been selling fried egg sandwiches (sometimes for takeaway) for a very long time before that in the UK.

See the first scene in Withnail and I (1986). Will put you off fried egg sandwiches FOREVER.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4ScgpaZBpTU

jasg 08-08-2019 11:05 PM

I bought an egg ring and steam cooked eggs for homemade egg muffins for years. Added cheese, bacon, ham or sausage.

Have given then up for egg quesadillas. A stirred egg, fried in a 9 inch pan, the slid onto a large corn or flour tortilla, covered in shredded cheese in an oiled pan. Add a strip of bacon, sliced jalapeńos or both and fold. Cook and flip until each side is crisp.

Velocity 08-08-2019 11:07 PM

Don't know why but this thread has given me a stronger food craving than any other Cafe thread before.

Nava 08-09-2019 12:08 AM

For me, never; in Spain we do get the occasional sandwich which has a fried egg or some chopped-up hard-boiled egg as one of its ingredients but they're multi-ingredient and not stuff you'd make at home. It's either some sort of "burger with fried egg in case you didn't have enough cholesterol" (often called Obelix; this bar offers it as "to share between four people", link in Spanish) or some variation on a club sandwich.

My "host mother" in Ireland (1983) couldn't cook worth shite; the lunches she could provide were hard-boiled egg sandwiches. That's white bread, cut-up boiled egg, white bread. Most of my classmates had host mothers with better cooking skills; the majority also got sandwiches but at least there was more than one thing in between the two slices of white bread and the contents varied from day to day.

panache45 08-09-2019 01:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by krondys (Post 21794682)
In my house, those are called elephant eyes, not toad-in-the-hole.

We called them, for some obscure reason, "Rocky Mountains" or "Rockies". And you had to flip them over and fry the other side as well, timing them perfectly to avoid overcooking the egg.

Quote:

Originally Posted by AHunter3 (Post 21794686)
But when I first experienced them as ubiquitously available and standard fare? New York City, 1984. Long lines of people at deli counters ordering them and receiving them in short order. On rolls, not English muffins, by the way.

Make that 1964 for me.

The Stafford Cripps 08-09-2019 03:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike (Post 21795782)
See the first scene in Withnail and I (1986). Will put you off fried egg sandwiches FOREVER.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4ScgpaZBpTU

I could have mentioned that as well as Quadrophenia. I saw Quadrophenia and Withnail and I in a cinema double bill once - I was looking for things they had in common, and one of them was a scene with someone eating a sandwich with very gooey yoke in a caff. That's why I remembered it for my post above. To correct myself, I think it might actually have been bread rather than a roll in Quadrophenia as well, but it still fits the OP's requirements.

As it happens, this is how I like my egg sandwiches.

RobDog 08-09-2019 03:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike (Post 21795782)
See the first scene in Withnail and I (1986). Will put you off fried egg sandwiches FOREVER.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4ScgpaZBpTU

Great username and post combo for the following reason.

That type of egg sandwich was popular in the WWI trenches. Supposedly, the runny yolk caused the troops to hold the sandwich in one outstretched hand while they brushed the yolk / crumbs off their uniform with the other, making them look like they were playing an invisible stringed instrument. Hence they became known as an "egg banjo".

nightshadea 08-09-2019 04:41 AM

Actually the biscuit sandwiches McD's made in th mid 80s and bk's crossandwiches were more o f a revelation as grandma had been making faux egg mc muffins years before McD's did ... she seen them in a texas truck stop shed been to a few times and figured out how to make them herself ...

rowrrbazzle 08-09-2019 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 21794695)
I'm pretty sure that McDonald's was the first fast food chain to offer breakfast foods, starting in 1972 with the Egg McMuffin (and Big Breakfast and Pancakes & Sausage).

FWIW, this site says Jack in the Box produced the first breakfast sandwich in 1969, but it doesn't say specifically it was the Breakfast Jack. I can't say I definitely ate them at that time, but I think I did.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acsenray (Post 21793009)
It wasn't until the late 1990s that it seemed to me that egg breakfast sandwiches--defined as cooked egg with cheese and meat (ham, sausage, bacon, etc.) inside bread (English muffins, toast, croissants, etc.) became standard at any cafeteria-style grill, and appeared in some form on almost any breakfast menu.

Does this timeline represent the advent of grilled egg breakfast sandwiches for anyone else? Or did they become a staple much earlier than I experienced?

I had the Breakfast Jack many times in the late 80s, and possibly earlier.

rowrrbazzle 08-09-2019 11:37 PM

Forgot the link.

https://www.franchisechatter.com/201...d-by-calories/

JohnT 08-10-2019 12:16 AM

I have been putting eggs between two pieces of buttered toast since I was a child.

TheMightyAtlas 08-11-2019 07:00 AM

The cafeteria at my father’s workplace in Karachi Pakistan was offering a toasted egg sandwich (egg over hard in toasted bread) in 1955/57 for the equivalent of 11 US cents. With cheese 13 cents. Cheese was a pretty exotic food in Pakistan in the 1950s. As was tuna fish and mayonnaise, another offering at the same cafeteria.


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