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Annie-Xmas 07-24-2009 08:20 AM

Obvious things about a creative work you realize after the millionth time (OPEN SPOILERS POSSIBLE)
 
I have posted about working for a year on an annotated versions of Ira Levin's "Rosemary's Baby," only to look at the cover six months later and realize:

Rosemary's Baby.
Rose-mary's Baby
Mary's Baby:smack:

Yesterday I was walking down the street singing "Yellow Submarine"

Sky of blue and sea of green
In our yellow submarine

when it hit me:

Blue-green-yellow
To make blue green, yellow is added.

Give me some more examples of obvious things you didn't notice till much later.

RealityChuck 07-24-2009 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 11372730)
Rosemary's Baby.
Rose-mary's Baby
Mary's Baby:smack:

Didn't they specifically mention that in the book? I remember it in the movie.

Chronos 07-24-2009 12:29 PM

The Battle of Wits in Princess Bride: Vizzini isn't trying to reason logically about where the poison is. He's gauging the Man in Black's reaction whenever he says it's in one or the other. Whenever he says the poison is in front of the Man in Black, he tenses up, and whenever he says that it's in front of himself, he relaxes. From there, he just had to figure out whether the Man in Black was bluffing or not, something that Vizzini is very good at.

kirk1168 07-24-2009 02:24 PM

Rosie by Jackson Browne, from Running On Empty.
I'd been listening to it for about 5 years before I realized that he was singing about masturbation.:smack:

Nobody 07-24-2009 03:13 PM

I mentioned this in another thread before, but I don't know how many years I heard the song Life in the Fast Lane before I realized that "there were lines on the mirror" was referring to cocaine.

Alan Bird 07-24-2009 04:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kirk1168 (Post 11374045)
Rosie by Jackson Browne, from Running On Empty.
I'd been listening to it for about 5 years before I realized that he was singing about masturbation.:smack:

:eek:

Holy crap! I never knew that and I've been listening to that song for years.

As to the OP, I got nothing right now.

Robot Arm 07-24-2009 04:41 PM

I have seen the Dead Parrot Sketch more than a few times. At some point I noticed that when John Cleese is yelling at Polly to wake up, he opens the door of the cage! I mean, a birdcage isn't exactly soundproof with the door closed, is it? But he hold it right up to his mouth and opens the door, all the better to rouse him from dreams of the fjords. There's something about that action that fits perfectly with the over-exacting nature of the character.

I tend to think that the Pythons greatest gifts were in their writing, but that's one case where the detail of the performance really sells it.

The Second Stone 07-24-2009 10:51 PM

30 Rock is a remake of The Mary Tyler Moore show. It took me two years.

MonkeyMensch 07-24-2009 11:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Second Stone (Post 11375171)
... It took me two years.

Hell, I got that beat! I'm old enough to have seen Have Gun, Will Travel on original broadcasts (barely.) I never knew what the heck the title meant until a couple of weeks ago when a skoshi bit of insomnia had me watching Encore Western at 4 a.m. It's a cookbook! No, no. It's a work sought classified ad! I swear I was so tickled that I finally figured that out.

I used to think that it meant, "If I have a gun, I'll travel; otherwise not." Now I see it's more like, "Have window-washing squeegees, will travel to find work."

Sheesh. A mere 45 years later...

Flip Pancake 07-24-2009 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Second Stone (Post 11375171)
30 Rock is a remake of The Mary Tyler Moore show. It took me two years.

Or maybe The Muppet Show.

BACI 07-25-2009 12:24 AM

For some reason it took years of casual listening before I heard Mick Jagger doing backing vocals on Carly Simon's "You're So Vain". Just never knew it was there before...

commasense 07-25-2009 12:36 AM

I wrote this in a version of this thread two years ago:

Near the end of the Huston/Bogart version of The Maltese Falcon, Gutman is explaining to Spade why Thursby was shot. As he says that Thursby "was quite determinedly loyal to Miss O’Shaughnessy," a look of realization crosses Bogart's face, and he looks at Mary Astor, whose eyes drop guiltily. It was only a couple of years ago, on watching the film for perhaps the 10,000th time, that I caught on to the fact that Spade has only just realized that Brigid had won Thursby's loyalty by sleeping with him.

Very significant in light of how Spade will deal with Brigid just a few minutes later.

commasense 07-25-2009 12:43 AM

(And Robot Arm posted the same point about the Parrot Sketch!)

Recycling is good!

Robot Arm 07-25-2009 12:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by commasense (Post 11375458)
(And Robot Arm posted the same point about the Parrot Sketch!)

I participate on this site with the premise that no one actually reads my posts.

Labdad 07-25-2009 10:40 AM

I listened to, played, and sang "All Along the Watchtower" a bazillion times before I realized the two approaching riders were, in fact, the Joker and the Thief. I thought they were inside the compound with the watchtower where princes kept the view, and it was that place thatthey had to get out of!

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonkeyMensch (Post 11375280)
Hell, I got that beat! I'm old enough to have seen Have Gun, Will Travel on original broadcasts (barely.) I never knew what the heck the title meant until a couple of weeks ago when a skoshi bit of insomnia had me watching Encore Western at 4 a.m. It's a cookbook! No, no. It's a work sought classified ad! I swear I was so tickled that I finally figured that out.

I used to think that it meant, "If I have a gun, I'll travel; otherwise not." Now I see it's more like, "Have window-washing squeegees, will travel to find work."

Sheesh. A mere 45 years later...

Oh, I thought that, too! And I can certainly remember the original broadcasts. Hell, I thought Paladin's first name was "Wire!" (You know - "Wire Paladin - San Francisco")

A couple of decades later, I was looking something up in the dictionary and saw the word "Paladin" near the word I was looking for. I discovered a Paladin was a knight errant under the reign of Charlemagne, who went around righting wrongs.

Shazam! OK - NOW the horsey figure (the knight chess piece) made sense! "Palidan" wasn't the guy's real name - it was just his working name! "A knight without armor in a savage land" - duh! Oh, and his card meant I have a gun and I will travel. Just send me a telegram.

It only took me 20 years to discover this, though!

Not A Tame Lion 07-25-2009 10:53 AM

I've been hearing "Gimme Some Lovin'" for decades now, but it was only a few months ago, hearing it on the radio, when I realized that Steve Winwood was trying to sing like Ray Charles. Should have been obvious, never was.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew 07-25-2009 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Labdad (Post 11376084)
I listened to, played, and sang "All Along the Watchtower" a bazillion times before I realized the two approaching riders were, in fact, the Joker and the Thief. I thought they were inside the compound with the watchtower where princes kept the view, and it was that place thatthey had to get out of!

One theory is that Dylan intentionally set the verses out of order, and the last verse is actually the first. Thus the story begins with the title phrase, and the two riders are seen before they are identified by name.

Nobody 07-25-2009 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Labdad (Post 11376084)
I listened to, played, and sang "All Along the Watchtower" a bazillion times before I realized the two approaching riders were, in fact, the Joker and the Thief. I thought they were inside the compound with the watchtower where princes kept the view, and it was that place thatthey had to get out of!

That's what I always thought. So if it's them on the horses, what does their discussion at the beginning mean then?

Tim R. Mortiss 07-25-2009 02:03 PM

It took me years to realize that "Brown Eyed Girl" was actually about anal sex.

Don Draper 07-25-2009 02:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 11372730)
Rosemary's Baby.
Rose-mary's Baby
Mary's Baby:smack:

Along similar lines, it dawned on me many years after the fact that the main character in E.T: the Extra-Terrestrial is named ElioT.

Also in the Terminator movies, the man who is destined to save mankind from doom (whose father is a mystery to everyone) is John Conner, whose initials would be J.C. - kind of like another well-known savior with an ambiguous paternity...

Yodalicious 07-25-2009 02:36 PM

Not something creative but... I have a habit of trying to figure out what the different letters on the back of cars mean. Only recently did I realize what the A in Audi A4, A6, and A8 stands for. Duh!:smack:

An Gadaí 07-25-2009 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss (Post 11376536)
It took me years to realize that "Brown Eyed Girl" was actually about anal sex.

Maybe you're joking but I thought it was originally called Brown Skinned Girl. How does that work?

MOIDALIZE 07-25-2009 02:53 PM

I used to watch Robocop a whole lot growing up, and I don't think I realized the significance of the old man firing Dick Jones at the end until I had been watching it for a few years. It's obvious in retrospect, but I think I initially thought it was just some kind of smartass 80s movie one-liner, and not the means by which Robocop could override his internal directives.

Elendil's Heir 07-25-2009 04:26 PM

I've liked Bob Dylan's Oscar-winning (from the Wonder Boys soundtrack) song "Things Have Changed" for a long time. But it wasn't until I had it on my iPod, and paid attention to the time index, that I realized he finishes the line "The next sixty seconds could be like an eternity" exactly one minute before the end of the song. I think that's cool.

Exapno Mapcase 07-25-2009 09:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss (Post 11376536)
It took me years to realize that "Brown Eyed Girl" was actually about anal sex.

Maybe we're being whooshed, but there's nothing in the lyrics that remotely suggests this. Young love, yes. Making love, yes. Anal sex? No.

Sometimes brown eyes are just brown eyes.

(And what sexual connotations do you get from CSN's "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes;" Bob Welch's "Ebony Eyes;" Jewel's "Violet Eyes;" or Sugarloaf's "Green-Eyed Lady?")

Hippy Hollow 07-25-2009 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daddypants (Post 11376598)
Not something creative but... I have a habit of trying to figure out what the different letters on the back of cars mean. Only recently did I realize what the A in Audi A4, A6, and A8 stands for. Duh!:smack:

You got me here. Is it "Audi?"

Okay, here's one: my parents have a slew of 45 singles from back in the day. I remember some were James Brown, and occasionally a 45 would have "Part I" of a song on it.

I was listening to a BBC documentary about the history of recorded music, where the commentator remarked that most songs are in the 3-4 minute range because that's as much that would fit on a 45...

And then I was listening to the Jackson 5's "I Am Love Pt 1 & 2" and realized the song was 7 plus minutes long - too long to fit on one side of a 45, hence why there was two parts to it.

I've been puzzling over this for most of my life and just figured it out... I'm 37.

E-Sabbath 07-25-2009 10:31 PM

Actually, there _is_ a connotation in 'Brown Eyed'. Brown Eyed Girl, Brown Eyed Handsome Man?

They're black.

Freudian Slit 07-25-2009 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman (Post 11376563)
Along similar lines, it dawned on me many years after the fact that the main character in E.T: the Extra-Terrestrial is named ElioT.

I had the opposite "revelation." I assumed he was called E.T. because Eliot wanted to name him after himself. Then I found out that aliens are called extra terrestrials.

I also didn't realize that about Rosemary's Baby until painfully too late.

The Tooth 07-26-2009 01:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase (Post 11377515)
Maybe we're being whooshed, but there's nothing in the lyrics that remotely suggests this. Young love, yes. Making love, yes. Anal sex? No.

Sometimes brown eyes are just brown eyes.

(And what sexual connotations do you get from CSN's "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes;" Bob Welch's "Ebony Eyes;" Jewel's "Violet Eyes;" or Sugarloaf's "Green-Eyed Lady?")

Survivor's "Eye of the Tiger"?

Harvey The Heavy 07-26-2009 02:13 AM

Watching Sanford & Son nowadays I realize that probably 2/3 of the jokes flew right over my head when I watched it as a kid.

Robot Arm 07-26-2009 02:50 AM

Young Frankenstein: In Inspector Kemp's first scene at the town meeting, he breathes on his monocle, polishes it on his jacket, and then puts it on the eye that has an eyepatch on it.

And I think there a later scene where the torch-bearing mob is out looking for the monster and he puts a finger to his mouth to shoosh them that it's his left arm that's wooden. (All the other times it's his right.) I'll have to see it again to confirm that. The eyepatch probably changes sides, too.

Caddyshack: There's a scene where Ty and Lacey are doing Tequila shots. Lacey drinks the tequila, and 30 seconds later (in an unbroken camera shot) she's chewing gum and blows a bubble.

Shagnasty 07-26-2009 03:33 AM

Titanic - Young Rose and Jack fantasized about riding roller coasters in California and riding horseback on the beach. At the very end of the movie, there are shots of her pictures showing her doing those things by herself after she survived the wreck and abandoned her old life.

Recliner 07-26-2009 06:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MOIDALIZE (Post 11376634)
I used to watch Robocop a whole lot growing up, and I don't think I realized the significance of the old man firing Dick Jones at the end until I had been watching it for a few years. It's obvious in retrospect, but I think I initially thought it was just some kind of smartass 80s movie one-liner, and not the means by which Robocop could override his internal directives.

I have a tendancy to point out (as casually as possible) the Fourth Directive when watching the movie with neophytes. Because, yeah, if you miss that, the ending goes from "Woah, the Old Man kicked some ass!" to...yeah, "What? Hoo-hoo, you're fired...and he FIRES his gun!"

I Heart Robocop.

Recliner 07-26-2009 06:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shagnasty (Post 11378230)
Titanic - Young Rose and Jack fantasized about riding roller coasters in California and riding horseback on the beach. At the very end of the movie, there are shots of her pictures showing her doing those things by herself after she survived the wreck and abandoned her old life.

But, dammit, there was room for both of them on that door! Rose, you selfish bitch!

:D

corvidae 07-26-2009 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss (Post 11376536)
It took me years to realize that "Brown Eyed Girl" was actually about anal sex.

Fan of Too Much Coffee Man?

Exapno Mapcase 07-26-2009 09:33 AM

Just thought of one. When I was I kid I spent endless amounts of time trying to figure out how to pronounce the apostrophes in J'onn J'onzz, Manhunter from Mars. Juh-honnn Jun-own-zezzz?

That was back when the audience for comic books was under ten, and they wrote at the right level for them. A Martian! Named J'onn J'onzz! Neat-o!

Stoid 07-26-2009 11:25 PM

Scarecrow wants a brain...yet he's the smartest guy in the group who comes up with all the ideas.
Tinman wants a heart, but he's a sentimental lug.
Cowardly lion wants courage, and he's the toughest SOB there.

Duh.

The Second Stone 07-27-2009 12:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss (Post 11376536)
It took me years to realize that "Brown Eyed Girl" was actually about anal sex.

Damn you. Up until your post this had been one of my favorite songs.

Freudian Slit 07-27-2009 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stoid (Post 11380634)
Scarecrow wants a brain...yet he's the smartest guy in the group who comes up with all the ideas.
Tinman wants a heart, but he's a sentimental lug.
Cowardly lion wants courage, and he's the toughest SOB there.

I remember being really impressed by this the first time I heard it. Especially WRT to the Scarecrow. His great ideas really do stand out when I look back.

Hippy Hollow 07-27-2009 11:57 AM

Another one. I was listening to the Jackson 5's "The Love You Save" - the title, of course, is a takeoff of the safety slogan "The Life You Save May Be Your Own." But I just noticed these lyrics:

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Jackson 5
Isaac said he kissed you
Beneath the apple tree
When Benjy held your hand he felt
E-lec-tri-ci-tee!
When Alexander called you
He said he rang your chimes.
Christopher discovered
Youre way ahead of your times!

So... Isaac (Newton), Benjy (Franklin), Alexander (Graham Bell), and Christopher (Columbus), all referencing their famous "inventions." Clever bit of wordplay, and I've listened to that song all my life...

Little Plastic Ninja 07-27-2009 12:24 PM

The Terry Pratchett book "Guards! Guards!". If you haven't read it, spoilers below...

I realized after about six million reads and listens to the audiobook that the story is a huge circle from the beginning where Sam Vimes lies in the gutter musing on the city:

Quote:

'The city wasa, wasa, wasa, wossname. Thing. Woman. That's what it was. Woman. Roaring, ancient, centuries old. Strung you along, let you fall in thingy, love, then kicked you inna, inna, thingy. Thingy, in your mouth. Tongue. Tonsils. Teeth. That's what it, she, did. She wasa . . . thing, you know, lady dog. Puppy. Hen. Bitch. And then you hated her and, and just when you thought you'd got her, it, out of your whatever, then she opened her great booming rotten heart to you, caught you off bal, bal, bal, thing. Ance. Yeah. Thassit. Never knew where where you stood. Lay. Only one thing you were sure of, you couldn't let her go. Because, because she was yours, all you had, even in her gutters . . .'
He loves the city, as much as it hurts him to. At the end, when he begins to realize he has some feelings beginning for Lady Sybil, the story comes full circle:

Quote:

And then it arose and struck Vimes that, in her own special category, she quite beautiful; this was the category of all the women, in his entire life, who had ever thought he worth smiling at. She couldn't do worse, but then, he couldn't do better. So maybe it balanced out. She wasn't getting any younger but then, who was? And she had style and money and common sense and self-assurance and all the things he didn't, and she had opened her heart, and if you let her she could engulf you; the woman was a city.

And eventually, under siege, you did what Ankh-Morpork had always done - unbar the gates, let the conquerors in and make them your own.
He's fallen in love with someone he has been in love with for years: the fact that Sybil owns a large portion of the city is important to this. She is the city. She is everything he loves about it: proud, strong, noble, and welcoming. It is because of her that he pulls himself out of the gutters and tries to make himself better than what he was -- the worst of the city, drunk and decaying and stinking. Through the city that brought him down, he is uplifted and given the opportunity to reach his potential.

For being something of a silly story about dragons, it's also an amazing book about the redemption of human nature.

Voyager 07-27-2009 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Labdad (Post 11376084)
Oh, I thought that, too! And I can certainly remember the original broadcasts. Hell, I thought Paladin's first name was "Wire!" (You know - "Wire Paladin - San Francisco")

A couple of decades later, I was looking something up in the dictionary and saw the word "Paladin" near the word I was looking for. I discovered a Paladin was a knight errant under the reign of Charlemagne, who went around righting wrongs.

Shazam! OK - NOW the horsey figure (the knight chess piece) made sense! "Palidan" wasn't the guy's real name - it was just his working name! "A knight without armor in a savage land" - duh! Oh, and his card meant I have a gun and I will travel. Just send me a telegram.

It only took me 20 years to discover this, though!

I got the Have Gun part when I saw them originally (right before Gunsmoke on Saturday nights) but I too thought Wire was his first name.

I'm watching them on DVD now, and they are awesome. One of the shows from the first season has the origin of the dance in the Star Trek pilot - in a show written by Roddenberry. In the very first show, he is introduced saying farewell to a woman, with a look that shows that Paladin doesn't love only his horse. :) But I think Paladin is his name, and he got it from the writers assigning a name to match the character.

For my screwup, it took me years of listening to Dylan's Motorpsycho Nighmare to realize it was a takeoff on Psycho - despite very obvious hints such as the title :smack: a mention of Tony Perkins :smack: and the girl's wish for him to take a shower. :smack:

Freudian Slit 07-27-2009 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hippy Hollow (Post 11381892)
Another one. I was listening to the Jackson 5's "The Love You Save" - the title, of course, is a takeoff of the safety slogan "The Life You Save May Be Your Own." But I just noticed these lyrics:


So... Isaac (Newton), Benjy (Franklin), Alexander (Graham Bell), and Christopher (Columbus), all referencing their famous "inventions." Clever bit of wordplay, and I've listened to that song all my life...

That I knew. But I did not know the phrase "The life you save may be your own." Until now. Apparently it's also a Flannery O Connor story.

mbh 07-27-2009 01:55 PM

I have been a fan of the movie Heavy Metal since its debut in 1981.

A couple of months ago, a friend pointed out that "Harry Canyon" is a double-entendre.

:smack: :smack: :smack: :smack:

bup 07-27-2009 02:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stoid (Post 11380634)
Scarecrow wants a brain...yet he's the smartest guy in the group who comes up with all the ideas.
Tinman wants a heart, but he's a sentimental lug.
Cowardly lion wants courage, and he's the toughest SOB there.

Duh.

Oh yeah. Wizard of Oz is just a series of embarrassments for me.

I was probably 13 before I realized the farmhands were the same actors as the traveling companions in Oz.

I was in college I think when I realized Scarecrow was smartest, Tin Man the most loving, and the lion was the bravest.

I was a couple years out of college when I realized the wizard sent them on a quest because he wanted them to die, or at least be taken prisoner by the witch, so they wouldn't be his problem.

Freudian Slit 07-27-2009 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bup (Post 11382579)

I was a couple years out of college when I realized the wizard sent them on a quest because he wanted them to die, or at least be taken prisoner by the witch, so they wouldn't be his problem.

WHAT?!?!

E-Sabbath 07-27-2009 08:12 PM

He was a humbug! He couldn't get her home, of course. So...

Kamino Neko 07-27-2009 08:26 PM

He didn't want them dead, or captured - he was a humbug, not an asshole - he just wanted them to fail (or better yet, give up) and get out of his hair.

Freudian Slit 07-27-2009 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tengu (Post 11383980)
He didn't want them dead, or captured - he was a humbug, not an asshole - he just wanted them to fail (or better yet, give up) and get out of his hair.

It's been a long time. Wow.

Stauderhorse 07-27-2009 10:28 PM

Just now.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears.

Gold-i-locks.

Gold locks = blond hair.

Duh.

BiblioCat 07-27-2009 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bup (Post 11382579)
Oh yeah. Wizard of Oz is just a series of embarrassments for me.

I was probably 13 before I realized the farmhands were the same actors as the traveling companions in Oz.

When I watched WoO as a child, my mother told me that the farmhands were the same guys as the Scarecrow, the Tinman and the Lion, but I didn't believe her till I was about 13 or so. I just didn't see it. Of course, this was back in the Dark Ages, when it was only on once a year, so it's not like I could have stopped the VCR or DVD to make sure. :D

njtt 07-27-2009 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by E-Sabbath (Post 11377730)
Actually, there _is_ a connotation in 'Brown Eyed'. Brown Eyed Girl, Brown Eyed Handsome Man?

They're black.

That might be a connotation in the American south, but hardly in '50s or '60s Belfast.

Cliffy 07-27-2009 11:01 PM

I hesitate to mention this, because last time we did one of these it came close to derailing the thread. But Kris in Miracle on 34th Street? Just a nice old man with whiskers. He's the beneficiary of a dozen people making more or less self-interested decisions (Macy and Gimbel wanting to look good for their customers; Fred hating his old job and wanting something outrageous to build his resume; Doris needing to prove to Fred that she wasn't a wrinkled up prune; the judge and political boss counting votes, and the post office getting rid of all those dead letters).

It's easier to see in the full-length version, as the broadcast one cuts a few important bits to fit in an extra commercial -- most importantly, the scene where Macy and Gimbel are fighting over who gets to buy Kris the X-Ray machine so they can look good in front of the press.

--Cliffy

PlainJain 07-27-2009 11:18 PM

Miller's Crossing. I had seen this movie about 5 or 6 times and was blown away when a friend told me The Dane was gay.

Don Draper 07-28-2009 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BiblioCat (Post 11384480)
When I watched WoO as a child, my mother told me that the farmhands were the same guys as the Scarecrow, the Tinman and the Lion, but I didn't believe her till I was about 13 or so. I just didn't see it. Of course, this was back in the Dark Ages, when it was only on once a year, so it's not like I could have stopped the VCR or DVD to make sure. :D

Preposterous! They can't be the same people. Anybody with eyes can see that the Scarecrow, Tin Man & Cowardly Lion are in full technicolor, while the mere farmhands are in black & white!

:D


Anyway, one little detail that I'd never noticed before about 'Oz' (until about the umpteen-millionth time I saw it) was the scene in which Dorothy & crew are entering the black woods on their way to kill the Wicked Witch. The Scarecrow is carrying a large mallet, and the Tin Man has a revolver(!) b ut missing his axe. Both weapons mysteriously vanish before the flying monkeys attack. (I couldn't find an appropriate clip on youtube - but if you have the DVD, you can check it out for yourself.)

Also, there is the legendary (and false) UL about the munchkin who hanged himself. (Long story short: It was actually a large bird.) I had seen the 'incriminating' shadow before, and knew the story. But it wasn't until I read Snopes' article debunking the myth that I ever noticed the birds wandering around in the background. And they're all over that set!

RealityChuck 07-28-2009 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cliffy (Post 11384529)
I hesitate to mention this, because last time we did one of these it came close to derailing the thread. But Kris in Miracle on 34th Street? Just a nice old man with whiskers. He's the beneficiary of a dozen people making more or less self-interested decisions (Macy and Gimbel wanting to look good for their customers; Fred hating his old job and wanting something outrageous to build his resume; Doris needing to prove to Fred that she wasn't a wrinkled up prune; the judge and political boss counting votes, and the post office getting rid of all those dead letters).

You're correct, but the final scene makes it clear that he's more than just a nice old man with whiskers. And, for whatever reason, he made all the self-interested decisions happen. You could argue for open-endedness, but the film makes clear that his he's more than just a nice old man.

bup 07-28-2009 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tengu (Post 11383980)
He didn't want them dead, or captured - he was a humbug, not an asshole - he just wanted them to fail (or better yet, give up) and get out of his hair.

He sent them to get the broomstick of the wicked witch! He at least knew he was giving them a mission that was be suicidal if they undertook it, and for no reason.

Strassia 07-28-2009 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman (Post 11385497)
Preposterous! They can't be the same people. Anybody with eyes can see that the Scarecrow, Tin Man & Cowardly Lion are in full technicolor, while the mere farmhands are in black & white!

:D


Anyway, one little detail that I'd never noticed before about 'Oz' (until about the umpteen-millionth time I saw it) was the scene in which Dorothy & crew are entering the black woods on their way to kill the Wicked Witch. The Scarecrow is carrying a large mallet, and the Tin Man has a revolver(!) b ut missing his axe. Both weapons mysteriously vanish before the flying monkeys attack. (I couldn't find an appropriate clip on youtube - but if you have the DVD, you can check it out for yourself.)

Also, there is the legendary (and false) UL about the munchkin who hanged himself. (Long story short: It was actually a large bird.) I had seen the 'incriminating' shadow before, and knew the story. But it wasn't until I read Snopes' article debunking the myth that I ever noticed the birds wandering around in the background. And they're all over that set!

There is a deleted scene where they lose them in the haunted forest.

muldoonthief 07-28-2009 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bup (Post 11385671)
He sent them to get the broomstick of the wicked witch! He at least knew he was giving them a mission that was be suicidal if they undertook it, and for no reason.

Hell, the entire movie from the arrival in Munchkin Land on is just Glinda's convoluted plan to become the only power left in Oz. She could have sent Dorothy home immediately - her excuse of "You had to learn how much you missed home before you could return" is BS. Dorothy was trying to go back to Auntie Em when she got caught by the tornado. Glinda just saw Dorothy as a stooge she could use to expose the Wizard as a fraud, and kill the WWotW, then send her home. You can't tell me Glinda didn't know that the Wizard was just a humbug, or that the WWotW couldn't actually kill Dorothy. By the end of the movie, Glinda was ready to rule Oz with an iron fist. Sure, "only bad witches are ugly", but they can be beautiful too.

Freudian Slit 07-28-2009 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by muldoonthief (Post 11385928)
Hell, the entire movie from the arrival in Munchkin Land on is just Glinda's convoluted plan to become the only power left in Oz. She could have sent Dorothy home immediately - her excuse of "You had to learn how much you missed home before you could return" is BS. Dorothy was trying to go back to Auntie Em when she got caught by the tornado. Glinda just saw Dorothy as a stooge she could use to expose the Wizard as a fraud, and kill the WWotW, then send her home. You can't tell me Glinda didn't know that the Wizard was just a humbug, or that the WWotW couldn't actually kill Dorothy. By the end of the movie, Glinda was ready to rule Oz with an iron fist. Sure, "only bad witches are ugly", but they can be beautiful too.

Along with Madame Morrible and the Wizard, right? ;)

gigi 07-28-2009 12:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 11372730)
I have posted about working for a year on an annotated versions of Ira Levin's "Rosemary's Baby," only to look at the cover six months later and realize:

Rosemary's Baby.
Rose-mary's Baby
Mary's Baby:smack:

I guess I don't see the huge significance of that?? If it's the devil or antichrist, it's not Mary's baby, and "Rosemary's baby" doesn't imply an opposite...??

Rocketeer 07-28-2009 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cliffy (Post 11384529)
I hesitate to mention this, because last time we did one of these it came close to derailing the thread. But Kris in Miracle on 34th Street? Just a nice old man with whiskers. He's the beneficiary of a dozen people making more or less self-interested decisions (Macy and Gimbel wanting to look good for their customers; Fred hating his old job and wanting something outrageous to build his resume; Doris needing to prove to Fred that she wasn't a wrinkled up prune; the judge and political boss counting votes, and the post office getting rid of all those dead letters).

It's easier to see in the full-length version, as the broadcast one cuts a few important bits to fit in an extra commercial -- most importantly, the scene where Macy and Gimbel are fighting over who gets to buy Kris the X-Ray machine so they can look good in front of the press.

--Cliffy

...and you shouldn't have mentioned it, because now I have to rebut you. :D All those things happened because Kris was the real deal. You think all that stuff would have lined up so nicely if Kris was just some potty old dodger from the old-age home? ;)

Cliffy 07-28-2009 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RealityChuck (Post 11385625)
You're correct, but the final scene makes it clear that he's more than just a nice old man with whiskers.

Yes, he's a nice old man who knows how to read the real estate section of the paper. I don't understand why you think it's any sort of coup de grace. The house wasn't free or anything. You think on any given weekend you couldn't find at least one house for sale in the greater metro New York area with a swing in the back?

--Cliffy

commasense 07-28-2009 02:54 PM

A house that looked exactly like the one in the picture that Susan had been wishing for?

Roadfood 07-28-2009 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daddypants (Post 11376598)
Not something creative but... I have a habit of trying to figure out what the different letters on the back of cars mean. Only recently did I realize what the A in Audi A4, A6, and A8 stands for. Duh!:smack:

I've seen the Infiniti car logo for years, but only a few months ago did my feeble brain cells finally grasp that it's a road going off to infinity . . .

WOOKINPANUB 07-28-2009 03:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gigi (Post 11386182)
I guess I don't see the huge significance of that?? If it's the devil or antichrist, it's not Mary's baby, and "Rosemary's baby" doesn't imply an opposite...??

I meant to ask about this when it was mentioned in another thread. I thought the thing was the "rose" part as meaning "Mary's baby arose" but it still doesn't make much sense to me. Please 'splain to my dense self:confused:

Freudian Slit 07-28-2009 03:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WOOKINPANUB (Post 11386803)
I meant to ask about this when it was mentioned in another thread. I thought the thing was the "rose" part as meaning "Mary's baby arose" but it still doesn't make much sense to me. Please 'splain to my dense self:confused:

I just thought she meant that it was a play on Mary. Mary, Rosemary. If there's something more to it, then I'm also dense.

RealityChuck 07-28-2009 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cliffy (Post 11386691)
Yes, he's a nice old man who knows how to read the real estate section of the paper. I don't understand why you think it's any sort of coup de grace. The house wasn't free or anything. You think on any given weekend you couldn't find at least one house for sale in the greater metro New York area with a swing in the back?

Considering the fact that he had no way to get to the house, yes. Kris didn't drive, and he was only available to get there the night after the trial, when there was no one available to drive him (the characters were all with family).

Since he left his cane -- it's too much a coincidence otherwise -- he had to physically be in the house. Kris did not have a car -- it was specifically mentioned he took a train into the city before he moved in with Fred.

Further, Kris wanted to make sure Susan and Doris believed in him. He did not fully get that confirmation until Christmas morning, when Doris said* "I was wrong when I told you that, Susie. You must believe in Mr. Kringle and keep right on doing it. You must have faith in him." His wanted Susan to believe in make believe and miracles; Susan did not until then. If he had gone to the house on Christmas Eve (even though logistically impossible), he would have given her the house without her believing in Santa.

*Her note on Susan's letter was "I believe in you," not "I believe in Santa." Major difference.

Morbo 07-28-2009 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roadfood (Post 11386765)
I've seen the Infiniti car logo for years, but only a few months ago did my feeble brain cells finally grasp that it's a road going off to infinity . . .

I've owned Subarus for years...and only recently found out that "Subaru" is Japanese for Pleiades, hence the logo.

Don Draper 07-28-2009 04:16 PM

I was just now at the gym on the treadmill, watching a re-run of "Will & Grace" when it suddenly struck me that the names of the two characters (and the series) is an ironic twist:

The character Eric McCormack plays is smart, successful, handsome, but a big pushover. He always knuckles under to Grace and Jack, objecting to their many outrageous demands on him but constantly doing what they want him to do. He's intimidated by his mother, and must often be coaxed into standing up for himself. He has no WILLpower.

The character Debra Messing plays is a sexy, but extremely neurotic red-head, prone to shrill outbursts. She has no qualms about making huge public spectacle of herself on a routine basis. She is severely lacking in social GRACE.

Will & Grace. Or rather "weak-willed & graceless." Heh.

Hippy Hollow 07-28-2009 04:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roadfood (Post 11386765)
I've seen the Infiniti car logo for years, but only a few months ago did my feeble brain cells finally grasp that it's a road going off to infinity . . .

I still don't get what Daddypants is talking about re: the A in Audi A4, etc. Can someone explain?!?

commasense 07-28-2009 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Morbo (Post 11386875)
I've owned Subarus for years...and only recently found out that "Subaru" is Japanese for Pleiades, hence the logo.

And "Mitsubishi" is Japanese for "three diamonds," hence its logo.

commasense 07-28-2009 04:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roadfood (Post 11386765)
I've seen the Infiniti car logo for years, but only a few months ago did my feeble brain cells finally grasp that it's a road going off to infinity . . .

It's also a stylized figure-eight infinity symbol. But maybe you got that part.

KneadToKnow 07-28-2009 04:35 PM

I'd like to go ahead and put in a request that the Miracle on 34th Street issue be taken to its own thread where it can get the breathing room it needs.

VarlosZ 07-28-2009 04:37 PM

Not about a work of art, but I'd been reading posts by the SDMB's own Ellis Dee for at least four years before I realized (upon hearing the name spoken) that "Ellis Dee" = LSD.

Freudian Slit 07-28-2009 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VarlosZ (Post 11387213)
Not about a work of art, but I'd been reading posts by the SDMB's own Ellis Dee for at least four years before I realized (upon hearing the name spoken) that "Ellis Dee" = LSD.

I didn't either till just now. Doh.

Roadfood 07-28-2009 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by commasense (Post 11387172)
It's also a stylized figure-eight infinity symbol. But maybe you got that part.

:smack: Um, no, I didn't. Over the years, every now and then when seeing the logo, the thought would flit across my mind as to why a car named "Infiniti" had a stylized "A" in a circle for it's logo . . .

But in defense of my brain cells, I had no trouble spotting the arrow in the Fed Ex logo.

Tim R. Mortiss 07-28-2009 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase (Post 11377515)
Maybe we're being whooshed, but there's nothing in the lyrics that remotely suggests this. Young love, yes. Making love, yes. Anal sex? No.

Oh, c'mon. "Making love in the green grass, behind the stadium with you..." You don't have to be Fellini to get the symbolism. :D

enomaj 07-29-2009 05:49 AM

OK. I knew who General Lee was. I knew what the Confederate flag looked like but....

SPOILER:
I watched most of the Dukes of Hazzard before putting 2 and 2 together.
I

gigi 07-29-2009 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss (Post 11388108)
Oh, c'mon. "Making love in the green grass, behind the stadium with you..." You don't have to be Fellini to get the symbolism. :D

Backfield in motion...?

I've posted this one before, but it took many years of listening and not hearing before I realized Scarborough Fair is about impossible demands:

Tell her to make me a cambric shirt,
Without no seams nor needlework

enomaj 07-29-2009 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by enomaj (Post 11388878)
OK. I knew who General Lee was. I knew what the Confederate flag looked like but....

SPOILER:
I watched most of the Dukes of Hazzard before putting 2 and 2 together.
I

The tv show when i waa a kid.

sandra_nz 07-29-2009 08:55 AM

I only recently realised that the badge for VW was a V on top of a W. I always thought it was just one big W and you were just supposed to look at the 'first half' of it for the V.

corkboard 07-29-2009 09:44 AM

Either I'm really stupid and still don't get the significance of "Rosemary's Baby" and the A in the models of Audis, or it's just always been so clear to me that I don't understand what could be "hidden" about either of them. Can someone spell out the point of both of those entries, in really easy to understand words? Thanks.

The last time (or one of the last times) we did this thread, I pointed out that just that morning I had been sitting behind a Saturn at a stoplight and the lightbulb went off over my head upon realizing that the logo is an image of a portion of the planet Saturn, with the rings around it. Until that point I just saw it as a generically swoopy image.

Koxinga 07-29-2009 09:57 AM

I've never heard or read of anyone making the same realization as I did about Beckett's "Waiting For Godot", which I read in high school. For some reason, Vladimir and Estragon refer to one another as "Didi" and "Gogo". Only a year or two later, after I started taking first-year Mandarin at the university, did I realize that those pet names are actually Mandarin for "litte brother" and "big brother".

Freudian Slit 07-29-2009 09:59 AM

So, am I being whooshed with the Brown Eyed Girl ref, or do people really think it's about anal sex?

Annie-Xmas 07-29-2009 10:06 AM

Anyone besides me think that the intro to Friends was the women first and then the men, not realizing until the millionth time watching it that it's also alsphabetically by last name?

Freudian Slit 07-29-2009 10:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas (Post 11389443)
Anyone besides me think that the intro to Friends was the women first and then the men, not realizing until the millionth time watching it that it's also alsphabetically by last name?

That actually took me a while. I think it sank it when Courtney Cox added the Arquette to her name and was therefore before Jennifer Anniston.

Ellen Cherry 07-29-2009 10:22 AM

To help with the Rosemary's Baby thing ... I think Annie is suggesting that rather than be an opposite to Mary's baby, ie. Jesus, having the mother of the son of the devil being named Rosemary is merely a Mary-like name. This points up the fact that he is, in fact, the son of the Devil not just the freakie looking son of a whacked out housewife.

I think.

And FWIW, I think the allegation that Brown Eyed Girl is about anal sex is latter-day bullshit. It's not like there aren't any actual girls with brown eyes for heavens sake, and that the eyes are an outstanding feature, worthy of writing songs about (see: all the other songs alluding to eyes).

Freudian Slit 07-29-2009 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry (Post 11389503)
And FWIW, I think the allegation that Brown Eyed Girl is about anal sex is latter-day bullshit. It's not like there aren't any actual girls with brown eyes for heavens sake, and that the eyes are an outstanding feature, worthy of writing songs about (see: all the other songs alluding to eyes).

I read that it was originally supposed to be called Brown Skinned Girl, about a black girl. That would make more sense than the anal sex thing, since someone else mentioned that brown eyes often = black, earlier in this thread.

Sauron 07-29-2009 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freudian Slit (Post 11389463)
That actually took me a while. I think it sank it when Courtney Cox added the Arquette to her name and was therefore before Jennifer Anniston.

Why would that matter in the placement of their names?

tdn 07-29-2009 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nobody (Post 11374182)
I mentioned this in another thread before, but I don't know how many years I heard the song Life in the Fast Lane before I realized that "there were lines on the mirror" was referring to cocaine.

Maybe, maybe not.

When I was in college I took a class called Analysis of Song Lyrics. We pulled this one apart. We came up with three (maybe more) explanations for that line:

-Lines of cocaine on a mirror
-Cracks in a rearview mirror after a car crash
-Facial wrinkles

Our conclusion was that it was all three and so packed with meaning. We may have been reading too much into it, though.

Freudian Slit 07-29-2009 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sauron (Post 11389542)
Why would that matter in the placement of their names?

Yeah...it really wouldn't. I have no idea what I was thinking.

wolfman 07-29-2009 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stauderhorse (Post 11384423)
Just now.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears.

Gold-i-locks.

Gold locks = blond hair.

Duh.

It wasn't until We were reading fairy tales in High School German that I understood Cinderella.
"Aschenputtel? Oh like ashy girl because she is dirty from cleaning the fireplace. Too bad they didn't use a clever name like that in English for Cinder......ellla :smack::smack::smack:

Hippy Hollow 07-29-2009 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11389353)
Either I'm really stupid and still don't get the significance of "Rosemary's Baby" and the A in the models of Audis, or it's just always been so clear to me that I don't understand what could be "hidden" about either of them. Can someone spell out the point of both of those entries, in really easy to understand words? Thanks.

Yeah, I've asked twice about the A in Audi A4/6/8. I still don't get it. For anyone who does, could you please explain?

WOOKINPANUB 07-29-2009 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hippy Hollow (Post 11389874)
Yeah, I've asked twice about the A in Audi A4/6/8. I still don't get it. For anyone who does, could you please explain?

Bah. Even after Ellen Cherry so kindly tried to explain, the Rosemary's Baby thing is still not resonating with me.

Freudian Slit 07-29-2009 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WOOKINPANUB (Post 11389898)
Bah. Even after Ellen Cherry so kindly tried to explain, the Rosemary's Baby thing is still not resonating with me.

I think the problem is that it's too simple. Mary's baby was Jesus. Rosemary's baby was the antiChrist. It's just kind of fun that Rosemary has "Mary" in it. Ira Levin liked putting in word games/plays on words in his books...this isn't really a complicated one.

FalconFinder 07-29-2009 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11389353)
<snip>
The last time (or one of the last times) we did this thread, I pointed out that just that morning I had been sitting behind a Saturn at a stoplight and the lightbulb went off over my head upon realizing that the logo is an image of a portion of the planet Saturn, with the rings around it. Until that point I just saw it as a generically swoopy image.

I OWNED my Saturn for more than 5 years before I finally noticed the logo was a portion of the planet! :eek:

Often, during those years, I'd see what I thought was a cool logo, but always wondered why they didn't just use the planet.

Then, one day I was looking at my car and the logo in passing and it struck me.

I must have laughed for 20 minutes when I realized my mistake all that time!

I still see the two line "swoopy" thing more than the planet and I like it fine that way! :D

----

As for the Audi thing, I would assume A=Audi. The numbers would stand for the number of cylinders it has.

corkboard 07-29-2009 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freudian Slit (Post 11389905)
I think the problem is that it's too simple. Mary's baby was Jesus. Rosemary's baby was the antiChrist. It's just kind of fun that Rosemary has "Mary" in it. Ira Levin liked putting in word games/plays on words in his books...this isn't really a complicated one.

So is the "Rose" supposed to equate somehow to "anti", or something, or is it meaningless?

Gadarene 07-29-2009 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Koxinga (Post 11389403)
I've never heard or read of anyone making the same realization as I did about Beckett's "Waiting For Godot", which I read in high school. For some reason, Vladimir and Estragon refer to one another as "Didi" and "Gogo". Only a year or two later, after I started taking first-year Mandarin at the university, did I realize that those pet names are actually Mandarin for "litte brother" and "big brother".

Huh.

Freudian Slit 07-29-2009 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11390248)
So is the "Rose" supposed to equate somehow to "anti", or something, or is it meaningless?

I think it's just meaningless. It just sounds cool because it has a "Mary" in it.

commasense 07-29-2009 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Koxinga (Post 11389403)
I've never heard or read of anyone making the same realization as I did about Beckett's "Waiting For Godot", which I read in high school. For some reason, Vladimir and Estragon refer to one another as "Didi" and "Gogo". Only a year or two later, after I started taking first-year Mandarin at the university, did I realize that those pet names are actually Mandarin for "litte brother" and "big brother".

Is there any reason to think this is anything other than a coincidence? Did Beckett speak or understand Mandarin?

In any case, it's not exactly obvious, as the OP asked.

WOOKINPANUB 07-29-2009 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11390248)
So is the "Rose" supposed to equate somehow to "anti", or something, or is it meaningless?

Yes and no on the meaningless, I think. I'm probably the last person who should be addressing this, but I'm now understanding it to aknowledge that we're all aware of the famous "Mary's baby", aka The Lord, and that this is a Mary of a different kind with an equally formidable bun in her oven. It kind of makes more sense of you say it as "Rose Mary" with the emphasis on "Rose". It refers to and also differentiates her from the original Mary.

And now that I have wasted everyone's time by belaboring this, I would like to conclude with the explanation that not being Christian, I never think of Christ, on thoses rare occasions that I ponder him at all, as "The Son of Mary" so Mr. Levin's little play on words was lost on my poor, dense soul.

I shall shut up now :smack:

Nobody 07-29-2009 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tdn (Post 11389670)
Maybe, maybe not.

When I was in college I took a class called Analysis of Song Lyrics. We pulled this one apart. We came up with three (maybe more) explanations for that line:

-Lines of cocaine on a mirror
-Cracks in a rearview mirror after a car crash
-Facial wrinkles

Our conclusion was that it was all three and so packed with meaning. We may have been reading too much into it, though.

Well, after mentioning lines on the mirror it goes "There were lines on her face" which I assume would be the wrinkles. And if you remember, how did you guys come up with cracks from a car crash?

rowrrbazzle 07-29-2009 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cliffy (Post 11384529)
It's easier to see in the full-length version, as the broadcast one cuts a few important bits to fit in an extra commercial -- most importantly, the scene where Macy and Gimbel are fighting over who gets to buy Kris the X-Ray machine so they can look good in front of the press.

From http://www.script-o-rama.com/movie_s...et-script.html which purports to be the film dialogue (reformatting and minor corrections by me). It matches my memory, though, and has been in the movie every time I've seen it.
Quote:

MACY: Just a minute. I have something I'd like to give our friend here. This is a little something to show my appreciation for all you've done.

KRIS: Thank you, Mr. Macy. Ooh! That's very kind of you. I didn't think you were that generous.

GIMBEL(?) That's a bit of money. What are you going to do with it?

KRIS: Well, I have a friend. A doctor. He's been very kind to me. He needs an x-ray machine.

MACY: I don't think that's going to be enough.

GIMBEL: I'll make up the difference.

MACY: Buy it through the store. Get [?]% discount.

GIMBEL: I can get it for cost.

[The three look at each other, then laugh.]
I'm not disputing your point. I'm only asking what evidence for your point was cut from that part of the movie.

Sauron 07-29-2009 03:29 PM

I remember this scene, too, rowrrbazzle ... there were photographers in the scene, taking pictures.

I always wondered why Macy's would be selling x-ray machines.

bup 07-29-2009 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sauron (Post 11390845)
I remember this scene, too, rowrrbazzle ... there were photographers in the scene, taking pictures.

I always wondered why Macy's would be selling x-ray machines.

I don't think they sold them - they used to use them in shoe-selling departments. Yes, really. So the store would have a way to buy them as equipment.

tdn 07-29-2009 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nobody (Post 11390636)
And if you remember, how did you guys come up with cracks from a car crash?

Keep in mind that this was like 27 years ago, so my memory isn't exactly fresh.

But I think it was life in the fast lane, you're driving really fast, so you could crash and break a mirror.

I think.

Clothahump 07-29-2009 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robot Arm (Post 11378190)
Young Frankenstein: In Inspector Kemp's first scene at the town meeting, he breathes on his monocle, polishes it on his jacket, and then puts it on the eye that has an eyepatch on it.

And I think there a later scene where the torch-bearing mob is out looking for the monster and he puts a finger to his mouth to shoosh them that it's his left arm that's wooden. (All the other times it's his right.) I'll have to see it again to confirm that. The eyepatch probably changes sides, too.

Igor's hump does.


Sorry....Eye-gore.

Nobody 07-29-2009 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tdn (Post 11390932)
Keep in mind that this was like 27 years ago, so my memory isn't exactly fresh.

But I think it was life in the fast lane, you're driving really fast, so you could crash and break a mirror.

I think.

I see what you're getting at. I'm still sticking to cocaine*, but I see what you're getting at.


I'm talking about interpreting the song lyrics, of course :D

TBG 07-29-2009 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hippy Hollow (Post 11389874)
Yeah, I've asked twice about the A in Audi A4/6/8. I still don't get it. For anyone who does, could you please explain?

The A stands for Audi. At least that's all I can figure.

Koxinga 07-29-2009 08:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by commasense (Post 11390410)
Is there any reason to think this is anything other than a coincidence? Did Beckett speak or understand Mandarin?

In any case, it's not exactly obvious, as the OP asked.

It was obvious to me, looking back after a single semester of first-year Chinese.

Two characters who exhibit an older brother-younger brother relationship, calling each other the exact terms used in Chinese to describe such a relationship, gives me an inkling that Beckett may have picked up a dictionary or asked a Chinese friend about those words at some point in writing the play.

apollonia 07-29-2009 08:25 PM

I had just assumed they were nicknames rising out of Vladimir--Didi, and Estragon--Gogo. At least, that was the party line when I studied the play in a British Literature class. And I hated it anyway, so my memory is probably not sparkling.

digs 07-30-2009 12:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FalconFinder (Post 11389952)
I OWNED my Saturn for more than 5 years before I finally noticed the logo was a portion of the planet! :eek:

John Byrne, in the intro to his revamping of the Superman comics, told how for the longest time he saw Supey's chest shield as two fishy shapes swimming past each other... and then finally "reversed" the perception and saw... the letter S!

This is the guy who at the time was, if not THE Supes artist, was at the least drawing a LOT of Our Favorite Kryptonian Exchange Student.

He went on to explain that even though the S shield makes sense now, he still draws Superman's logo as two fishy shapes swimming past each other... wow.

bink 07-30-2009 01:46 AM

In XTC's Senses Working Overtime, he says "all the world is football-shaped". It took me a long time to realize he's English and meant a sphere!

statsman1982 07-30-2009 02:53 AM

I have two.

The first is the jingle at the end of Kay Jewelers ads--"Every kiss begins with Kay." I never realized until this past Christmas that they were trying to make a play on words: The letter "K" is spelled "kay" phonetically.

Also, the Neighborhood Watch eye. I didn't realize it was an eye with the pupil off center, you know, as when someone is "WATCHING". :) until I was a teenager. I always saw it as a spinner of some sort, the pupil being the axis on which the spinner spun.

Aspidistra 07-30-2009 03:17 AM

When I was a kid, I devoured the Narnia books multiple times in a row.

In The voyage of the Dawn Treader there's a section from Eustace's diary where Lucy gives him some of her scant water ration explaining "girls don't get as thirsty as boys.". To which his response is that he always thought as much and that this sort of thing "ought to be more generally known".

So it was about 3 or 4 years of me mentally shouting at the book "Yes We Do you silly bint!" before I realised - duh - she was lying to make him feel better, and he was so clueless that it was a completely wasted effort, since he was selfish enough to have taken it even if he DID realise she was as thirsty as him

Telperion 07-30-2009 03:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBG (Post 11391683)
The A stands for Audi. At least that's all I can figure.

Aluminium, I think. The A-line was introduced when they replaced the steel platform with an all-aluminium space frame, which was reportedly the first implementation of one in a mass-market car.

corkboard 07-30-2009 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Telperion (Post 11392770)
Aluminium, I think. The A-line was introduced when they replaced the steel platform with an all-aluminium space frame, which was reportedly the first implementation of one in a mass-market car.

I really hope it's this, because if the Audi A6 is supposed to mean "Audi Audi 6", I'd have to direct a major rolleyes their way. And they'd be quaking in their boots, yo.

Arien 07-30-2009 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roadfood (Post 11387556)
:smack: Um, no, I didn't. Over the years, every now and then when seeing the logo, the thought would flit across my mind as to why a car named "Infiniti" had a stylized "A" in a circle for it's logo . . .

But in defense of my brain cells, I had no trouble spotting the arrow in the Fed Ex logo.

Wikipedia says the Infiniti logo is a stylized representation of Mt. Fuji.

Telperion 07-30-2009 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11392928)
I really hope it's this, because if the Audi A6 is supposed to mean "Audi Audi 6", I'd have to direct a major rolleyes their way. And they'd be quaking in their boots, yo.

I'm pretty sure. While I haven't been able to find a definite cite for it so far (I guess they must relish the mystery of it.), I did find out yesterday that the A2 concept model was given the internal designation Al2 for utilizing the second iteration of the aluminium frame.

digs 07-30-2009 03:33 PM

Can I just point out that it'd be nice if people here explained what they mean with their cryptic "answers" (that are really just questions), before they hit "Post and Take Off For Points Unknown"?

How much of this thread has been taken up with "What did you mean by Audi A2?" No reply. "I wonder what they meant by Audi A2?";"Here's what I think they meant by Audi A2."; "I figured out the Audi A2!" "No, I know what they reeeeeally meant!"

I mean, how rude would it be if I walked up to you at a party and said "I know where Amelia Earhart is! Just wait right here for a minute..." and then ran away. Wouldn't you get a little impatient after a day or two? Especially if those two days were full of other people coming up and guessing at what I would've said if I'd stuck around? Or giving their pet Amelia Theories*.

So PLEASE, don't just say "I finally figured out what 'a movie star, the professor and Mary Anne...' really means!" without telling us.

* Feel free to substitute Fermat's Last Theorem, The Kessel Run, The GOP's 9/11 Plot, or Obama's French Birth Certificate, depending on your Geek Quotient and IQ.

rowrrbazzle 07-30-2009 03:44 PM

Sometime in the past year I realized something about "West Side Story". The notes for the word "Maria" in the song of that name, C-F#-G, are the same notes as on the phrase "Who knows?" in "Something's Coming" with the last two notes in a lower octave. In addition, the opening 3 notes of the musical, G-C-F#, are the same, just starting on the G instead of the C.

I thought this should've been noticed before, so I Googled a bit before posting this, and it had. I also found the original concept of the musical was for a Jewish girl and a Catholic Italian-American boy, with the anti-Semitism of the Catholics as a source of conflict. They eventually rejected this because the subject had already been explored in "Abie's Irish Rose" and similar productions.

I also came across this page, which contains a letter that reports Bernstein claimed the whole musical was based around the G-C-F# notes. The letter also claims that those notes are a remnant of the Jewish/Catholic concept because that's one of the soundings of the shofar on Jewish New Year! I did find one shofar rendition on YouTube that was closer to C-F#-G.

From the letter: "The overture is vivid tone-painting of terrifying Jew-baiting, for example, subjecting this shofar theme to being mocked and chased by the other instruments."

MrSquishy 07-30-2009 04:50 PM

I think you might have missed the first word in the thread title.

That's ironic, isn't it?

Koxinga 07-30-2009 05:18 PM

Maybe someone can start a thread on unique epiphanies we've had on works of art. I've had no such ephiphany except didi/gogo, which noone else seems to believe, so I'm afraid I won't be starting it. And I'm lazy.

Baal Houtham 07-30-2009 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bink (Post 11392672)
In XTC's Senses Working Overtime, he says "all the world is football-shaped". It took me a long time to realize he's English and meant a sphere!

Hey!

TBG 07-30-2009 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by statsman1982 (Post 11392730)
The first is the jingle at the end of Kay Jewelers ads--"Every kiss begins with Kay." I never realized until this past Christmas that they were trying to make a play on words: The letter "K" is spelled "kay" phonetically.

Once I realized that, I could no longer hear those commercials without rewriting it in my head, every time it's sung, as "The word kiss begins with K"

eleanorigby 07-30-2009 07:35 PM

This is really embarrassing...


But it took me several rereads of the first Harry Potter book to realize that Diagon Alley was a play on diagonally.... <hangs head in shame>


I also (this has nothing to do with art, but could arguably be more important to day to day life) only recently realized that all the Tupperware I inherited from my sister have coordinating numerals on them. I used to just curse and try 3-4 lids, but then I noticed that the #2 bowl has a #2 lid....


And I have a graduate degree! :eek:

Re West Side Story: we had to "analyze" it for 8th grade music class (it and Carmen; not at the same time). My music teacher brought up the repetition of notes and themes and keys etc. It's been too long for me to remember much, but at the time we all thought, "cool" for about 5 minutes. (we were 13). This is the first I've heard of anti-Semite conspiracy.

eleanorigby 07-30-2009 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11390248)
So is the "Rose" supposed to equate somehow to "anti", or something, or is it meaningless?

Here's my WAG: Rose, as in he rose (came back or decided to visit us sinners or whatever). Mary's baby rose. But it's not Mary's baby (Jesus), he's the anti-Christ. That's all I got.

Cliffy 07-30-2009 07:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RealityChuck (Post 11386873)
Considering the fact that he had no way to get to the house, yes. Kris didn't drive, and he was only available to get there the night after the trial, when there was no one available to drive him (the characters were all with family).

I think you're demanding rather more precise measurements from the screenwriters than are reasonable. But anyway, they had cabs in 1947.

Quote:

Originally Posted by rowrrbazzle (Post 11390655)
I'm not disputing your point. I'm only asking what evidence for your point was cut from that part of the movie.

I'm pretty sure at least part of that scene is cut in the syndicated version. I might be wrong. Definitely the first part of the scene where the guy from Chico and the Man discovers Susie's letter addressed to Kris at the courthouse gets cut.

More recently, I haven't been seeing it on broadcast at all; it shows up on TCM, and they of course show the whole thing. But a few years ago, the syndicated version was the most common one to see.

Anyway, that's about all I have to say on the subject.

--Cliffy

KneadToKnow 07-30-2009 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eleanorigby (Post 11395307)
This is really embarrassing...


But it took me several rereads of the first Harry Potter book to realize that Diagon Alley was a play on diagonally.... <hangs head in shame>

You are not alone.

Have you figured out Nocturne Alley yet?

PeskiPiksi 07-30-2009 09:49 PM

Pssst...it's Knockturn Alley.

And also Grimmauld Place.

And Hagrid, Dumbledore, and Sirius all have "color" names. (Rubeus=red, Albus=white, Black=um, black.) It has something to do with alchemy, but don't ask me what.

PastAllReason 07-30-2009 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PeskiPiksi (Post 11395646)
Pssst...it's Knockturn Alley.

Well, geez, I never got "nocturnally" before now. Thanks! Adding one more about Harry Potter, I DID get that the mirror Erised was Desire written backwards, or more exactly, I guess, how it would appear written in a mirror.

KneadToKnow 07-30-2009 10:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PeskiPiksi (Post 11395646)
Pssst...it's Knockturn Alley.

I knew that didn't look right. I blame the Braves blowing their 3-2 lead in the 8th for my distraction.

digs 07-30-2009 11:07 PM

THIS is what I'm on about! [/python] Don't just say "And also Grimmauld Place, wink, wink!" without explaining. I had to take time out from my hectic doing-nothing evening to google it. Most sites made no reference to a pun... did you mean Grim Old Place?

DWMarch 07-31-2009 03:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss (Post 11376536)
It took me years to realize that "Brown Eyed Girl" was actually about anal sex.

No no, it's "Hurts So Good" that's about anal. Sometimes love don't feel like it should.

Apologies to all who will now never be able to hear that song without thinking of anal sex.

mshar253 07-31-2009 07:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digs (Post 11395899)
THIS is what I'm on about! [/python] Don't just say "And also Grimmauld Place, wink, wink!" without explaining. I had to take time out from my hectic doing-nothing evening to google it. Most sites made no reference to a pun... did you mean Grim Old Place?

I googled, saw nothing, then said it to myself about five times. I'm sure he meant "Grim Old Place."

MOIDALIZE 07-31-2009 07:17 AM

So Rosebud was his sled. Ohhhhhhhhhh, I get it.

And I can't believe it took me so long to figure out what was in the briefcase in Pulp Fiction. It was so obvious!

JohnT 07-31-2009 08:18 AM

Last Friday, my wife realized that the song Rapture, by Blondie, was called that because of the rap in the second half of the song.

gigi 07-31-2009 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MOIDALIZE (Post 11396481)
So Rosebud was his sled. Ohhhhhhhhhh, I get it.

And I can't believe it took me so long to figure out what was in the briefcase in Pulp Fiction. It was so obvious!

:p
Will you be telling us what Bill Murray whispered to Scarlett Johannson?

E-Sabbath 07-31-2009 09:19 AM

What was in the briefcase in Pulp Fiction? The same thing that was in the trunk in Repo Men, geez.

RealityChuck 07-31-2009 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cliffy (Post 11395365)
I think you're demanding rather more precise measurements from the screenwriters than are reasonable. But anyway, they had cabs in 1947.

Not measurements -- plot logic.

In any case the argument that Kris is Santa is simple: the theme of the movie is clearly and simply that we must believe in things even when there's no evidence to back them up. Consider:

Quote:

Fred Gailey: Look Doris, someday you're going to find that your way of facing this realistic world just doesn't work. And when you do, don't overlook those lovely intangibles. You'll discover those are the only things that are worthwhile.
-------------------------------
Doris: Faith is believing when common sense tells you not to. Don't you see? It's not just Kris that's on trial, it's everything he stands for. It's kindness and joy and love and all the other intangibles.
-------------------------------
Doris: Would you please tell her that you're not really Santa Claus, that actually is no such person?
Kris Kringle: Well, I hate to disagree with you, but not only IS there such a person, but here I am to prove it.
_________________________
Susan: I believe... I believe... It's silly, but I believe.
---------------------------------------
Doris Walker: I was wrong when I told you that, Susie. You must believe in Mr. Kringle and keep right on doing it. You must have faith in him.
If, as you assert, Kris isn't Santa, then the movie is denying its own message.

Even more telling is this line:

Quote:

Susan Walker (referring to the house): If you're really Santa Claus, you can get it for me. And if you can't, you're only a nice man with a white beard like mother says.
Since Kris does get it for her -- or, at least, leads them to the house and has visited it, in the terms of the movie, he's really Santa Claus.

Insisting that he's not Santa is like being Doris in the beginning of the film. Or worse, it's being Sawyer (the one person who never accepts Kris is Santa). If you want to be Sawyer, that's your decision, but since he's shown to be a neurotic, vindictive, and small-minded little man -- and pretty much the only villain of the movie -- that's clearly not what the movie is intending.

If you were right, then Sawyer would be the hero. He's not, and thus you're wrong.

commasense 07-31-2009 09:41 AM

And to add one more thing to RealityChuck's excellent summary, I'll just say that it's perfectly possible to be an atheist, rationalist, and skeptic who doesn't take anything on faith, and yet believe that the 1947 Miracle on 34th Street is a charming and delightful minor classic of cinema.

eleanorigby 07-31-2009 09:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PastAllReason (Post 11395752)
Well, geez, I never got "nocturnally" before now. Thanks! Adding one more about Harry Potter, I DID get that the mirror Erised was Desire written backwards, or more exactly, I guess, how it would appear written in a mirror.

Yep-I got Knockturn Alley (which makes the Diagon all the more inexplicable--I kept thinking [when I thought of it at all] as some play on dragon or diamond). Knockturn is also a double pun--doesn't it also mean something to do with seances or carnival "fun" houses?


The THOUGHT of Hagrid being anywhere close to anything to do with alchemy makes me shudder. Why give him the name of Rubeus?


Slytherin is a play on slithering snakes. No clue where she got Hufflepuff, though. It sounds more like that thing Ginny buys at her brother's shop and names Arnold, rather than a distinguished house of the premier wizarding school...

TubaDiva 07-31-2009 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman (Post 11385497)
Preposterous! They can't be the same people. Anybody with eyes can see that the Scarecrow, Tin Man & Cowardly Lion are in full technicolor, while the mere farmhands are in black & white!

:D


Anyway, one little detail that I'd never noticed before about 'Oz' (until about the umpteen-millionth time I saw it) was the scene in which Dorothy & crew are entering the black woods on their way to kill the Wicked Witch. The Scarecrow is carrying a large mallet, and the Tin Man has a revolver(!) b ut missing his axe. Both weapons mysteriously vanish before the flying monkeys attack. (I couldn't find an appropriate clip on youtube - but if you have the DVD, you can check it out for yourself.)

Also, there is the legendary (and false) UL about the munchkin who hanged himself. (Long story short: It was actually a large bird.) I had seen the 'incriminating' shadow before, and knew the story. But it wasn't until I read Snopes' article debunking the myth that I ever noticed the birds wandering around in the background. And they're all over that set!

You don't have to go to strangers to get the straight dope:

Can a Munchkin be seen committing suicide in The Wizard of Oz?

:)

KneadToKnow 07-31-2009 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gigi (Post 11396620)
:p
Will you be telling us what Bill Murray whispered to Scarlett Johannson?

He was whispering the same thing I sometimes whisper in my girlfriend's ear:
Quote:

Everybody who can see me thinks I'm whispering something naughty in your ear right now.
Makes her giggle in the most deliciously naughty way.

Crawlspace 07-31-2009 10:11 AM

Two from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory:

- The ride on the Hsaw Aknow (Wonka Wash) occurs right before they go into the TV room. The TV room is a clean room. The ride is used to ensure that whomever goes into the room is clean.

- Almost everything in Wonka's office is split in half lengthwise. When he gets angry at Grandpa Joe, he starts reading him the contract, "The undersigned waives all rights and privileges here in contained et cetera et cetra." Looking closely, the contract is split in half length wise. The et cetera's are just place holders for the missing half.

TubaDiva 07-31-2009 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11390248)
So is the "Rose" supposed to equate somehow to "anti", or something, or is it meaningless?

In the Catholic faith, Mary, Mother of God, is often referred to as the Lady of the Rose, or Lady of the Roses.

(Those early years of parochial school finally pay off. Many years later.)

Ellen Cherry 07-31-2009 10:33 AM

:confused: I think you're thinking of St. Therese of Lisieux.

Larry Mudd 07-31-2009 10:50 AM

How heavily Star Wars was cribbed from The Wizard of Oz.

Eventually, I noticed that the "knock over the guards, take their uniforms, and march into the prison" gag was played almost identically... and then all of the other parallels became obvious. :smack:

jackdavinci 07-31-2009 10:59 AM

Not something I realized but something I was told - in Young Frankenstein the reason a horse neighs everytime Frau Blucah's name is said is because Blucah means "glue" in German.

palindromemordnilap 07-31-2009 11:18 AM

1) As a kid I had a joke book with this riddle:

How do you get down from an elephant?
You don't, you get down from a duck.

For decades I thought it was very dry humor along the lines of "Don't do something difficult, do something easy" -- and they used a duck because it's a funny word.

2) For 10 years I worked at a building where one of the other cars had the vanity plate XANITAX, and I always wondered if it referred to a tax accountant, or pharmaceutical sales, or what? When I finally got it, I felt particularly stupid because

SPOILER:
My sister's name is Anita.

Siam Sam 07-31-2009 11:23 AM

For the longest time, I could not understand the lyrics to Givin' the Dog a Bone, by AC/DC. Sounded mostly like a bunch of screaming and grunting. It wasn't until one day when I read the lyrics that I saw it was about getting a blowjob from a girl.

BiblioCat 07-31-2009 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by palindromemordnilap (Post 11397174)
1) As a kid I had a joke book with this riddle:

How do you get down from an elephant?
You don't, you get down from a duck.

For decades I thought it was very dry humor along the lines of "Don't do something difficult, do something easy" -- and they used a duck because it's a funny word.

I didn't get that joke for an embarassingly long time. I just never made the connection as a kid. Fast-forward to high school - a group of us were goofing around, telling stupid jokes. Someone told that one, I looked down at my down vest, and it suddenly hit me. Ooooooooh, I get it! :smack:

palindromemordnilap 07-31-2009 11:33 AM

On the Rush song "Spirit of Radio," there is a couplet at the end, set apart from the rest of the song. I always knew these two lines were a take-off of "The Sound of Silence"* lines:

And the words of the prophet were written on the subway walls, and tenant halls/
whispered in the sound of silence" (a previous line had used the word "echoed")

So I get partial credit for making that conenction. But the first 1,000 times or so I heard the Rush song I heard the lyrics as:

"For the words of the profits were written on the stadium wall, and concert hall/
And echoes with the sound of salesmen."

It wasn't until I heard a Rush tribute band sing the song live that I discovered the word was "studio", not "stadium". Which in the context of the song makes more sense.

And yes, I got that Rush changed "prophets" to "profits".

*Also known as "Sounds of Silence" but I prefer the singular version and apparently either is correct.

palindromemordnilap 07-31-2009 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BiblioCat (Post 11397209)
I didn't get that joke for an embarassingly long time. I just never made the connection as a kid. Fast-forward to high school - a group of us were goofing around, telling stupid jokes. Someone told that one, I looked down at my down vest, and it suddenly hit me. Ooooooooh, I get it! :smack:

High school? You beat me by about 15 years.

Nom_de_Plume 07-31-2009 11:46 AM

I guess I was pretty young when Cheap Trick first came out with Surrender. I remember hearing the line "Just the other day I heard of a Soldier's falling off.." and wondering what the Soldier fell off of.
Then recently I heard the song on Jack FM and "Of course, THAT'S what fell off!"
:smack:

Chronos 07-31-2009 12:08 PM

Quoth rowrrbazzle:
Quote:

Sometime in the past year I realized something about "West Side Story". The notes for the word "Maria" in the song of that name, C-F#-G, are the same notes as on the phrase "Who knows?" in "Something's Coming" with the last two notes in a lower octave. In addition, the opening 3 notes of the musical, G-C-F#, are the same, just starting on the G instead of the C.
Along a similar vein, in Man of La Mancha, Aldonza's song (I was born in a ditch to a mother who left me there...) is basically the same tune as Don Quixote's song (I am I, Don Quixote, the Lord of La Mancha...), but much more musically ornate. It's a sort of musical commentary on the fact that Aldonza is living in the real world, with all of its detail, while Don Quixote is living in an overly-simplistic fantasy world.

JohnT 07-31-2009 12:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by palindromemordnilap (Post 11397174)
1) As a kid I had a joke book with this riddle:

How do you get down from an elephant?
You don't, you get down from a duck.

The riddle that haunted, yes, haunted me for years was:

"If April showers bring May flowers, what do May flowers bring?"

Answer? Pilgrims!

I think I figured this one out about 10 years after I heard it. :(

Histrion 07-31-2009 12:24 PM

I was in college - I don't remember what year, or what class I was sitting in, or what - when suddenly I looked up and said, possibly aloud:

"Oh my God. 'Fargo North, Decoder!' "

KneadToKnow 07-31-2009 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdavinci (Post 11397100)
Not something I realized but something I was told - in Young Frankenstein the reason a horse neighs everytime Frau Blucah's name is said is because Blucah means "glue" in German.

Don't believe everything you hear

RitterSport 07-31-2009 12:52 PM

Took me 15 or 20 years to figure out that "My Aim is True" in Elvis Costello's Alison has a double meaning. (1. my intentions are pure, 2. I have good aim, so you can count on me to put out the big light. I always thought it was "my intentions are pure", but upon realizing the double meaning, I mentioned it to my dad who always thought it was the other one -- interesting different approaches to world, I guess)

Ellen Cherry 07-31-2009 12:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Histrion (Post 11397415)
I was in college - I don't remember what year, or what class I was sitting in, or what - when suddenly I looked up and said, possibly aloud:

"Oh my God. 'Fargo North, Decoder!' "

Um, what?

Siam Sam 07-31-2009 12:56 PM

Not sure if it's been mentioned in this thread yet, but there was recently an entire thread started by someone who just got the Britney Spears song, "If You Seek Amy."

Eyebrows 0f Doom 07-31-2009 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PeskiPiksi (Post 11395646)
And Hagrid, Dumbledore, and Sirius all have "color" names. (Rubeus=red, Albus=white, Black=um, black.) It has something to do with alchemy, but don't ask me what.

"Sirius" is also the name of the Dog Star. Then of course there's Remus Lupin. (Remus as in Romulus &, and Lupin as in lupine.) That is one thing that really annoyed me about those books. All her names were way too obvious & cutesy like that. Plus Lupin wasn't born a werewolf, was he? He was attacked by one. Pretty lucky he already had that name then. :rolleyes:

Eyebrows 0f Doom 07-31-2009 01:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Siam Sam (Post 11397553)
Not sure if it's been mentioned in this thread yet, but there was recently an entire thread started by someone who just got the Britney Spears song, "If You Seek Amy."

I never knew those were actually words!! I've only heard the song and thought she was just spelling out "F-u-c-k me."

MOIDALIZE 07-31-2009 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry (Post 11397548)
Um, what?

Just let this one go. Don't think about it, you'll just get pissed.

Hoopy Frood 07-31-2009 01:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eyebrows 0f Doom (Post 11397557)
"Sirius" is also the name of the Dog Star. Then of course there's Remus Lupin. (Remus as in Romulus &, and Lupin as in lupine.) That is one thing that really annoyed me about those books. All her names were way too obvious & cutesy like that. Plus Lupin wasn't born a werewolf, was he? He was attacked by one. Pretty lucky he already had that name then. :rolleyes:

I still think she spent too much time listening to the Musical of "The Secret Garden" in her past which is why she came up with the whole Lily's eyes thing. Every time I read a reference to Harry having Lily's green eyes the song "Lily's Eyes" would earworm it's way into my head. (Lily's eyes were apparently hazel in the musical.)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Morbo (Post 11386875)
I've owned Subarus for years...and only recently found out that "Subaru" is Japanese for Pleiades, hence the logo.

I've owned a Subaru for almost 4 years now and never caught that reference. Thanks.

Quote:

Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman (Post 11376563)
Also in the Terminator movies, the man who is destined to save mankind from doom (whose father is a mystery to everyone) is John Conner, whose initials would be J.C. - kind of like another well-known savior with an ambiguous paternity...

This seems to be a fairly common trope. In the Deus Ex games, J.C. Denton is the intended savior of mankind.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nobody (Post 11376321)
That's what I always thought. So if it's them on the horses, what does their discussion at the beginning mean then?

The way I understand it is that these two are on a mission to upset the status quo and the castle is meant to be their first target.

Hoopy Frood 07-31-2009 01:13 PM

And I forgot to add my sudden realization.

I had seen Men In Black many times. I even own it, but it wasn't until my sixth or seventh viewing that I realized that K was the kid in the truck who took the wrong turn. And the flowers that he brought were for his girlfriend who he was going to propose to that night. I always thought K was one of the original MiB at that meeting.

Siam Sam 07-31-2009 01:18 PM

Thought of another one. In Texas, we had Aggie jokes. An Aggie is a student at Texas A&M University, a pretty darned good school, up there with the best in the country, but for some reason a culture of jokes has grown up with the basic theme of how dumb the students are. For most of them, you could probably substitute "Polish" for "Aggie," and it would work the same, regarding Polish jokes, which I think were common elsewhere back when I was younger.

This one joke went: "Did you hear about the Aggie who couldn't spell? He spent $25 to spend the night in a warehouse." I was just a kid and didn't get it. I even asked my father about it, and he pretended he didn't know. (I'm convinced he was pretending; he didn't like to talk about stuff like that.)

Histrion 07-31-2009 01:18 PM

Sorry, my bad... Reference to an American children's show of the 70s.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry (Post 11397548)
Um, what?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ele...ing_characters

Zsofia 07-31-2009 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnT (Post 11397402)
The riddle that haunted, yes, haunted me for years was:

"If April showers bring May flowers, what do May flowers bring?"

Answer? Pilgrims!

I think I figured this one out about 10 years after I heard it. :(

What's a metaphor?

For cows, silly!

Histrion 07-31-2009 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zsofia (Post 11397671)
What's a metaphor?

For cows, silly!

OK, that one took me a minute. I had to put my inner voice in a very Southern place.

Satchmo 07-31-2009 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawlspace (Post 11396926)
- Almost everything in Wonka's office is split in half lengthwise. When he gets angry at Grandpa Joe, he starts reading him the contract, "The undersigned waives all rights and privileges here in contained et cetera et cetra." Looking closely, the contract is split in half length wise. The et cetera's are just place holders for the missing half.

I remember seeing that the first time in the theater and thinking, "Ah, Mr. Wonka's recently divorced."

Histrion 07-31-2009 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by palindromemordnilap (Post 11397174)
2) For 10 years I worked at a building where one of the other cars had the vanity plate XANITAX, and I always wondered if it referred to a tax accountant, or pharmaceutical sales, or what? When I finally got it, I felt particularly stupid because

SPOILER:
My sister's name is Anita.

I don't think that's obvious at all. AFAIK, using X's as a graphical element to mark off the beginning and end of a word (or to separate words) has only become common in the past few years, and a license place wouldn't be the usual context for that.

Even if the X's represent "kisses," it still doesn't jump out at ya.

gigi 07-31-2009 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Histrion (Post 11397687)
OK, that one took me a minute. I had to put my inner voice in a very Southern place.

:o I had to google it.

Nobody 07-31-2009 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hoopy Frood (Post 11397617)
The way I understand it is that these two are on a mission to upset the status quo and the castle is meant to be their first target.

Thank you for answering my question from three pages ago.

I'm Googling around to try and find the meaning of the song, and not only is it hard to find, but on SongMeanings.net there are a million different interpretations.


OK, I have another one, although, like some others around here, I had to be told about it. I was talking to my wife about reading the movie spoiler for the recent star trek movie and the conversation about how Dr. McCoy got his nick name of bones* and she thought it was stupid. When I said that they never gave an explanation of his nick name in the original series she said that doctors use to be called sawbones and she figured that bones was just a shortening of that. I had never heard the term sawbones before to refer to a doctor, which is why I never got his nickname.

*After a divorce he said the only thing he had left to his name were his bones

Eyebrows 0f Doom 07-31-2009 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hoopy Frood (Post 11397617)
I still think she spent too much time listening to the Musical of "The Secret Garden" in her past which is why she came up with the whole Lily's eyes thing. Every time I read a reference to Harry having Lily's green eyes the song "Lily's Eyes" would earworm it's way into my head. (Lily's eyes were apparently hazel in the musical.)

Ha! Same here! Every time I would read that in the book I would picture Alan Rickman trying to sing that song. :D

SandyHook 07-31-2009 02:12 PM

It wasn't until just a couple of years ago (I'm 62) while hearing The Who's "Momma's Got A Squeezebox," for the 10,000th time that the light came on for me. "Hey, this isn't about a real musical instrument at all."

Partial lyrics below for those as slow as myself, though there can't be many.



'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

Well the kids don't eat
And the dog can't sleep
There's no escape from the music
In the whole damn street

'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out

Eyebrows 0f Doom 07-31-2009 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zsofia (Post 11397671)
What's a metaphor?

For cows, silly!

:confused: Please explain.

palindromemordnilap 07-31-2009 02:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnT (Post 11396585)
Last Friday, my wife realized that the song Rapture, by Blondie, was called that because of the rap in the second half of the song.

Rap...sure.

RitterSport 07-31-2009 02:34 PM

What's a meadow for?

On edit: That's for Eyebrows

palindromemordnilap 07-31-2009 02:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eyebrows 0f Doom (Post 11397918)
:confused: Please explain.

"Metaphor" sounds a little like "meadow for" so the spoken question sounds like "What's a meadow for?" Cows used to be kept in meadows, before [insert rant against modern agribusiness here].

Eyebrows 0f Doom 07-31-2009 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RitterSport (Post 11397996)
What's a meadow for?

On edit: That's for Eyebrows

Ahhh, thanks. I don't pronounce meadow like meta so that never occurred to me. I thought maybe a meta was some kind of milking tool. :smack: :D

ajdebosco 07-31-2009 02:58 PM

It's only a flesh wound......
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Robot Arm (Post 11374317)
I have seen the Dead Parrot Sketch more than a few times. At some point I noticed that when John Cleese is yelling at Polly to wake up, he opens the door of the cage! I mean, a birdcage isn't exactly soundproof with the door closed, is it? But he hold it right up to his mouth and opens the door, all the better to rouse him from dreams of the fjords. There's something about that action that fits perfectly with the over-exacting nature of the character.

I tend to think that the Pythons greatest gifts were in their writing, but that's one case where the detail of the performance really sells it.


That is dead solid perfect, R A. I recently saw the interview of John Cleese on Inside the Actor's Studio where the discussion rolled around to the question of just what is funny. He maintained that it is comical to see someone going increasingly berserk, but what is really humorous is the reactions of the other characters observing the meltdown.

I had to re-review the dead parrot sketch after reading your post, and my cold beverage came out my nose until I was forced to set it down before wasting more of it. My sides still ache from seeing him try to explain "...was no more....he has ceased to be... he has expired... gone to meet his maker...he's an EX-PARROT!"

Baby Driver 07-31-2009 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nobody (Post 11374182)
I mentioned this in another thread before, but I don't know how many years I heard the song Life in the Fast Lane before I realized that "there were lines on the mirror" was referring to cocaine.

There were a couple.

Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody":

"Mama, just killed a man
Put a gun against his head
Pulled my trigger now he's dead"

For a long while I didn't get that there was a comma after mama. I always visualized the singer's mama being some hard-knock woman busting into a trailer with a revolver.


Simon and Garfunkel's "The Boxer":
"But I got no offers
Just a come on from the whores on 7th avenue
I do declare, there were times when I was so lonesome
I took some comfort there"

I was about eleven when I first heard the song and I thought "whores" was "horse". I pictured this young man sleeping in the stables among the horses :eek:

bup 07-31-2009 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eleanorigby (Post 11395307)
But it took me several rereads of the first Harry Potter book to realize that Diagon Alley was a play on diagonally.

:o

Nobody 07-31-2009 03:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baby Driver (Post 11398142)
Simon and Garfunkel's "The Boxer":
"But I got no offers
Just a come on from the whores on 7th avenue
I do declare, there were times when I was so lonesome
I took some comfort there"

I was about eleven when I first heard the song and I thought "whores" was "horse". I pictured this young man sleeping in the stables among the horses :eek:

Wow, my hearing must be screwed up.
I could never make out the lyrics between "But I got no offers," and "on 7th avenue," and actually, I thought they were saying something about 5th avenue.

So now that part make sense. Thanks.

ajdebosco 07-31-2009 03:12 PM

Oh yeah, I also remember seeing a blurb about the 4th century Greek jokebook (Philogelos: the laugh addict) that contained a variation of the sketch, but it was a slave rather than a Norwegian parrot.

ajdebosco 07-31-2009 03:28 PM

Great thread, and I'm a little off on this but ..

a couple of say aloud pranks that some people haven't heard:

I am sofa king
we Todd Head

and a pink phone message note

7/31/09 4:25 p.m.

(312) 555-1624

please return call

Oliver Klozehoff

Malleus, Incus, Stapes! 07-31-2009 05:33 PM

I tend to miss basic plot elements until the tenth reading or so, never mind hidden meanings and such.

F'r instance, Terry Pratchett's Small Gods. I'm reading it for aproximately the one billionth time, and it occurs to me that deserts are a reoccuring theme here. There's the deserts that prophets are associated with, the deserts around the citadel, the desert in the afterlife, the desert that Vorbis sneaks his troops across, the desert that Brutha crosses with Om and Vorbis... No, this hadn't occured to me before. :smack:

Thinking some more on Pratchett's oeuvre, I realized that Thief Of Time was a meditation on the meaning of humanity, along with its cons and pros. You know, because just about every character short of Jason struggles with that very issue over the course of the book?

And The Last Continent, in addition to being about Asutralia, is about sex. Not just the bit with the God of Evolution- the whole UU wizards subplot is about Mrs. Whitlow, and the effect she has on them.

Some day I will discover some other stunningly obvious theme while rereading my Discworld collection, and I will be sure give myself a :smack:.

eleanorigby 07-31-2009 05:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nom_de_Plume (Post 11397291)
I guess I was pretty young when Cheap Trick first came out with Surrender. I remember hearing the line "Just the other day I heard of a Soldier's falling off.." and wondering what the Soldier fell off of.
Then recently I heard the song on Jack FM and "Of course, THAT'S what fell off!"
:smack:

WHAT fell off? Augh--this thread is frustrating.

Chronos 07-31-2009 06:30 PM

Quote:

Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody":

"Mama, just killed a man
Put a gun against his head
Pulled my trigger now he's dead"

For a long while I didn't get that there was a comma after mama. I always visualized the singer's mama being some hard-knock woman busting into a trailer with a revolver.
I always hear a very unaccented "I" before "killed a man". So it's "Mama, I killed a man". It might be a dialectical difference that I heard it and you didn't.

Lakai 07-31-2009 07:14 PM

This is from watching the final episode of season five of Buffy the Vampire Slayer:

SPOILER:
She sacrifices herself to save her sister. She falls into the vortex thingy with her arms spread out wide. And then she gets resurrected in season six.


It took a while before I made the connection.

Zsofia 07-31-2009 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Histrion (Post 11397687)
OK, that one took me a minute. I had to put my inner voice in a very Southern place.

The funny thing is, it's my ex-teacher mother from Pittsburgh who loves that one and told it to me a lot as a child, not my Georgia born dad.

Siam Sam 07-31-2009 07:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baby Driver (Post 11398142)
Simon and Garfunkel's "The Boxer":
"But I got no offers
Just a come on from the whores on 7th avenue
I do declare, there were times when I was so lonesome
I took some comfort there"

I was about eleven when I first heard the song and I thought "whores" was "horse". I pictured this young man sleeping in the stables among the horses :eek:

What, you mean like this guy?

Linty Fresh 07-31-2009 08:15 PM

I've got two.

The first is from The Usual Suspects. I used to complain that the Kobayashi character made no sense. He had a European face, a Japanese name and a Pakistani accent. Finally, someone explained to me that:

SPOILER:
In all likelihood, Kobayashi either never existed or was completely different from how he was portrayed in the movie. Remember that what we were seeing was merely Kint/Soze's bullshit story. Oh, we saw someone at the end who looked like Kobayashi, but how could we know who he really was. He could have been just another driver.


Another one was from Dodgeball. In a Vegas motel, Patches O'Houlihan tells Peter LaFleur that he has a couple of call girls in his hotel room, if LaFleur cared to join him. When LaFleur turns down the offer, Patches goes "Suit yourself, queer!" and wheels away. It took me a few times watching the movie before I realized that there probably weren't any prostitutes in Patches's room, and LaFleur was right not to join him.

Idlewild 07-31-2009 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SandyHook (Post 11397903)
It wasn't until just a couple of years ago (I'm 62) while hearing The Who's "Momma's Got A Squeezebox," for the 10,000th time that the light came on for me. "Hey, this isn't about a real musical instrument at all."

Partial lyrics below for those as slow as myself, though there can't be many.



'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

Well the kids don't eat
And the dog can't sleep
There's no escape from the music
In the whole damn street

'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out

Is it just me, or does that sound filthy?!

Linty Fresh 07-31-2009 08:23 PM

Thought of another one.
 
In the opening sequence to Watchmen, we see a bunch of stylized scenes establishing the heroes' characters. Among them is a scene of a bomber with Sally Jupiter's portrait on the side. It was our third time watching that scene before my wife realized that the bomber was returning from dropping the A-bomb on Japan.

SciFiSam 07-31-2009 08:58 PM

It was only after I noticed the lack of eyebrows in the Girl With a Pearl Earring that I realised that was the source of her ambiguous expression (eyebrows show a surprising amount of expression), and then noticed exactly the same on the notorious Mona Lisa.

SciFiSam 07-31-2009 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by commasense (Post 11390410)
Is there any reason to think this is anything other than a coincidence? Did Beckett speak or understand Mandarin?

In any case, it's not exactly obvious, as the OP asked.

He was briefly a modern languages scholar, and he wrote in French because he wanted to be forced to be more succinct. Odds are he thought about his character names extremely carefully, and would have either chosen those nicknames because of what they meant, or would at least have become aware of the meanings shortly after they were chosen.

Of course, they're also a pun on 'did he go.'


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