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-   -   How much combined sales tax do you pay? (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=880595)

aceplace57 08-18-2019 06:45 AM

How much combined sales tax do you pay?
 
I saw this article and wasn't particularly impressed. Isn't most people's sales tax around 9 to 10%? The poll they did doesn't really mean much.

N Little Rock is 9.5%. 6.5% Ark state sales tax, 2% city, 1% county.
Little Rock is 9% the city gets 1.5%

Generally crossing the bridge into N Little Rock isn't a big deal. The extra .5% on Restaurant bills is negligible. You'd probably want to buy your new 28k car in Little Rock.

We do have a low state income tax rate that offsets the sales tax.

How much combined sales tax do you pay?
https://www.foxbusiness.com/economy/...es-the-highest
Quote:

Chicago ties for the top spot alongside two cities in California, Long Beach and Glendale, according to the Tax Foundation, a Washington-based non-partisan tax research organization.

The three cities each levy a combined state and local sales tax of 10.25 percent on purchases.

aceplace57 08-18-2019 06:53 AM

ElDorado AR is even higher 9.75% state 6.5% county 2%, city 1.25%

Fayetteville, Arkansas is also 9.75%. county 1.25 and city 2%

where you live makes a difference.

galen ubal 08-18-2019 06:54 AM

10%, called GST here. It's the same nationwide in Australia, with no local variation.
Quite handy, that; the price on the shelf will be the final price you pay.

aceplace57 08-18-2019 07:02 AM

Still looking around my state.
Texarkana ties with Chicago but that article doesn't mention our city. Not that record high sales tax is anything to celebrate. ;)

The combined sales tax rate for Texarkana, AR is 10.25%. This is the total of state, county and city sales tax rates. The Arkansas state sales tax rate is currently 6.5%. The Miller County sales tax rate is 1.25%.Texarkana: 2.5%

thelurkinghorror 08-18-2019 07:20 AM

No, sales tax ranges from 0% in a handful of states to 10%+. I think the high mark is California and Tennessee.

RealityChuck 08-18-2019 08:11 AM

New York has a 4% state tax and a 4% local tax. New York City adds an extra 0.5%.

So it's 8-8.5% overall.

jz78817 08-18-2019 08:41 AM

6% in Michigan.

StGermain 08-18-2019 10:52 AM

TN is roughly 9.75%. However, we have no income tax.

StG

racer72 08-18-2019 11:00 AM

I pay 10% in Washington. The rate depends on where you live. I'll drive 8 miles from Auburn to Covington to take advantage of the 8.6% rate there. The tax rate is going to 9.4% in Covington next month, that will likely not make it worth the drive for me.

Eyebrows 0f Doom 08-18-2019 11:05 AM

Here in NYC it’s 8.875%, but clothing/shoes under $110 and non-prepared foods are not taxed.

Northern Piper 08-18-2019 11:09 AM

11%: 5% GST (feds) + 6% PST (province)

Here's a table for all of Canada: Harmonized sales tax calculator GST / PST or HST 2019

Procrustus 08-18-2019 11:18 AM

9%. But zero state income tax.

SmartAleq 08-18-2019 11:21 AM

None. That's Oregon--Washingtonians come here to shop.

psychonaut 08-18-2019 11:37 AM

Sales tax is 20% in Austria. You can also see a nifty bar chart showing the sales tax (VAT) rates in other EU countries, which ranges from 17% to 27%.

RaftPeople 08-18-2019 12:09 PM

I pay 10.5% in Lynnwood Washington.

Fox might be using old data, I think last year we were at 10%.


Edit: They were only looking at major cities, that's why the discrepancy

slash2k 08-18-2019 12:10 PM

The state sales tax in Kansas is 6.5%, but cities, counties, and various special districts can impose additional taxes.

For example, the "Goodland Holiday Inn Express Community Improvement District" is at 11% (state 6.5%, Cheyenne County 2%, Goodland city 0.5%, and 2% for the CID), and there's a convenience store in Chanute that charges 11.5%.

bibliophage 08-18-2019 12:19 PM

Maine has a state sales tax of 5.5% on most goods. There are no taxes on most services, but a handful of services are taxed at 6%. So when you take your car in for servicing, the parts are taxed but the labor is not. There are no county or local sales taxes. Ordinary groceries are not taxed. Meals, whether at a restaurant or from the grocery store, are taxed at 8%. Buying sandwich fixings and make your own sandwiches incurs zero tax. Buying a wrapped ready-made sandwich from the same grocery store incurs an 8% tax. Hotel rooms are taxed at 9%. Car rentals are also taxed, but I'm not sure what the rate is. There was recently a proposal to let towns and cities add an additional 1% meals and hotel tax but it failed.

I used to live across the border in New Hampshire, there is no tax on general merchandise. Meals and rooms are taxed at 9%. I think car rentals are also taxed, but I'm not sure.

Before that I lived in West Virginia. Back then the general tax rate was 5% but it applied to everything, even groceries, which shocked me. Until I moved there, I'd never heard of a state that taxed groceries. I gather that since I moved away they have raised the rate to 6% but they now exempt ordinary groceries. They still tax meals.

garygnu 08-18-2019 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SmartAleq (Post 21812270)
None. That's Oregon--Washingtonians come here to shop.

And technically Washingtonians are supposed to self-report those purchases and pay use tax to Washington state.

Also, you should know that Oregonians visiting Washington now have to pay sales tax at the register. They can then apply for a refund from Washington's Department of Revenue. (It was recently changed from when you could avoid paying sales tax to begin with.)

My local rate is 9%

Grim Render 08-18-2019 04:13 PM

Norway here. 0 to 25 %, depending on what you are buying or renting. In general its set up so basic services and entertainment have no or reduced VAT.

No VAT on any form of healthcare, social businesses such as childminding or kindergartens, education, theater, circus and similar, art, finance and property, all turnover below 6000$.

Things like food, transport, cinema tickets etc is half VAT.

Generally, VAT do not act like a tax and we do not call it a tax.

Chisquirrel 08-18-2019 04:16 PM

7.something something locally. Just went up .25% to spend a bunch of money on schools (YAY!) and a new ice arena (dumb).

What Exit? 08-18-2019 04:30 PM

New Jersey (NJ) currently has the silly* tax rate of 6.625%. We have no local sales tax, only state by NJ law. We also have sections of NJ were declared Urban Enterprise Zones. There the tax rate is 3.3125%, this reduction is to help some inner-city areas. It does not apply to luxury items like furs, jewelry, boats and big ticket items like cars.

We don't have sales tax on most food and clothing.



* I only say silly, as I use to calculate the tax in my head and now I can't. In fairness I'm sure this affects almost no one.

california jobcase 08-18-2019 04:31 PM

South Georgia here- 4% state, 4% county. County was 3% 'til last year. The new 1% is a multi-county local option sales tax for roads and the state highway I live on got paved this summer. I also got a turn-in added.

Georgia took sales tax off of prescriptions and food back in the 90s, but they let the counties still apply their local sales taxes. I always thought this was quite the wrong thing to let the counties do.

Topologist 08-18-2019 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RealityChuck (Post 21812093)
New York has a 4% state tax and a 4% local tax. New York City adds an extra 0.5%.

So it's 8-8.5% overall.

In Nassau County, just outside NYC, it's 4% state plus 4.25% county plus 0.375% for the Metropolitan Commuter Transportation District, so 8.625% total.

elfkin477 08-18-2019 04:53 PM

9% on meals and hotel rooms, 0% on everything else.

What Exit? 08-18-2019 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elfkin477 (Post 21812621)
9% on meals and hotel rooms, 0% on everything else.

Is that New Hampshire? You didn't say and I'm going on your location.

Lancia 08-18-2019 05:10 PM

Another 0%-er. Someone pumps my gas for me and I dont have to pay any sales tax on it!

Filbert 08-18-2019 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grim Render (Post 21812575)
Generally, VAT do not act like a tax and we do not call it a tax.

VAT= Value Added Tax, so... yes you kinda do ;)

The English rules on what qualifies for VAT are pretty arcane; take fast food, for example. Sell a takeaway pasty that's hot because it's fresh out of the oven, to someone planning to eat it off the premises and it's not taxed. If they eat it on the premises, VAT applies. Reheat it, or keep it deliberately hot, and it's VAT liable even if eaten outside.

If you visit a UK bakery with tables, that's why the 'eat in' price is different to the 'take away' price for some, but not all items, for anyone who's visited and wondered. It's not the shop charging a fee for you to sit down, it's the VAT.

And yes, if you're wondering, this is damn near impossible to police.

Baker 08-18-2019 05:29 PM

In my city combined taxes are 9.15%

Grim Render 08-18-2019 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Filbert (Post 21812660)
VAT= Value Added Tax, so... yes you kinda do ;)

Actually, we call it "Merverdiavgift (mva)"

It just doesn't act like I as a tax payer and not a business see a tax acting. Not subtracted from my wages, but based on how much I buy, and what I buy. The word "avgift" seem to cover it much better. I am not sure if there is a specific word in english that covers that. Translations sugget it covers "fee, toll, charge, excise or poundage".

Mahaloth 08-18-2019 05:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jz78817 (Post 21812120)
6% in Michigan.

Yep, me too. I wish they'd raise it to 9% to fund schools even more.

Leaffan 08-18-2019 05:56 PM

13% in Ontario: 5% is federal Goods and Service Tax (GST) and 8% is Ontario provincial tax.

Most grocery (food) items are tax-free.

engineer_comp_geek 08-18-2019 06:15 PM

Pennsylvania sales tax is 6%. Allegheny County (Pittsburgh and the surrounding area) has a 1 percent local tax added to that, and Philadelphia has a 2 percent local tax.

Hari Seldon 08-18-2019 06:29 PM

A hair under 15% in Quebec.

kopek 08-18-2019 07:09 PM

I believe
6% state-wide and 1% RAT (regional asset tax) locally.

PoppaSan 08-18-2019 11:45 PM

Wisconsin has 5% plus most counties have another .5% and certain areas have a special 1/10% on top of that for special fees such as professional sports venues. Municipalities cannot charge a local general sales tax. Highest area is 5.6% and the lowest is 5%. Hotels and restaurants are allowed an entertainment (tourist) area add-on. Vehicles are taxed at the rate of the county of residence of the purchaser not of the sellers location. Most prepare at home foods have no sales tax.

I Love Me, Vol. I 08-18-2019 11:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grim Render (Post 21812675)
Actually, we call it "Merverdiavgift (mva)"

It just doesn't act like I as a tax payer and not a business see a tax acting. Not subtracted from my wages, but based on how much I buy, and what I buy. The word "avgift" seem to cover it much better. I am not sure if there is a specific word in english that covers that. Translations sugget it covers "fee, toll, charge, excise or poundage".

I think the English word is "tax". :)

Quote:

Not subtracted from my wages, but based on how much I buy, and what I buy.
Less snarkily, "Merverdiavgift" sounds like a sales tax and not an income tax.

Tastes of Chocolate 08-19-2019 01:19 AM

7%, if you're in the county that got "volunteered" to pay for the new football stadium. But no tax on groceries or clothing.

Grim Render 08-19-2019 05:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by I Love Me, Vol. I (Post 21813119)
I think the English word is "tax". :)



Less snarkily, "Merverdiavgift" sounds like a sales tax and not an income tax.

"Tax" is not among the translations the dictionary gives. Its probably confusing that it got saddled with the inaccurate name in English. If it had been named "Value Added Fee" or "Value Added Charge" from the start it would have been more in line.

psychonaut 08-19-2019 06:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grim Render (Post 21813376)
"Tax" is not among the translations the dictionary gives. Its probably confusing that it got saddled with the inaccurate name in English. If it had been named "Value Added Fee" or "Value Added Charge" from the start it would have been more in line.

Then you need to get a better dictionary. VAT is a tax, plain and simple, and it operates similarly to sales taxes in other jurisdictions. Many of the "quirks" you describe (such as the fact that it is not subtracted from your income, and that certain goods and services are partially or fully exempt) are by no means unusual.

You seem to be arguing that the word "tax" should apply only to income tax and not to other forms of taxation. Perhaps this may be true in Norwegian (at least for a certain Norwegian word you may thinking of), but it's certainly not true in English.

actualliberalnotoneofthose 08-19-2019 06:29 AM

Grew up with 5% in MD. There was no local/county addition. Now pay 7something total in Ohio. Ohio has way too many local taxes that are almost impossible to even know about.

aceplace57 08-19-2019 07:45 AM

Interesting answers. There's a lot of variation between states and in other countries.

State & local government needs money to operate. They will get it either through the income tax, property tax, or sales tax. Maybe all. ;)

I prefer sales tax because I can more easily watch my spending and what I buy. A high state Income tax can be more of a burden.

What Exit? 08-19-2019 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aceplace57 (Post 21813445)
Interesting answers. There's a lot of variation between states and in other countries.

State & local government needs money to operate. They will get it either through the income tax, property tax, or sales tax. Maybe all. ;)

I prefer sales tax because I can more easily watch my spending and what I buy. A high state Income tax can be more of a burden.

Sales tax is often looked at as an unfair tax for the poor. It eats into their money pretty sharply compared to the negligible impact on those in the Upper & upper middle class. Also the reason why many states don't tax unprepared foods and most clothing.

NJ has a fairly high but graduated income tax and among the highest property taxes in the US. For this we do get top 5 schools in country while dealing with the densest population level of any state. We're currently rated #2 for schools.

Chefguy 08-19-2019 10:30 AM

As mentioned, no state sales tax in Oregon, nor city sales tax in Portland, where I live. In Alaska, sales tax varied by city, but there was none in Anchorage where I lived. Most places make up for absence of it with fees and property taxes. Property owners bear the brunt of supporting city government here.

DCnDC 08-19-2019 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by actualliberalnotoneofthose (Post 21813391)
Grew up with 5% in MD. There was no local/county addition.

It's 6% now, since 2008. Still no local.

Balthisar 08-19-2019 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mahaloth (Post 21812677)
Yep, me too. I wish they'd raise it to 9% to fund schools even more.

Yeah, that doesn't work. We've got $10 million extra from sales taxes? Great, let's move $10 million from income taxes over to this pot of money. And while I don't care if something is regressive or not, a lot of people do care about the regressive nature of sales taxes, and it's usually the same audience that says "more money for schools" as says "but let's not impose regressive taxes on the poor!"

robby 08-19-2019 11:53 AM

State sales tax in Connecticut is 6.35%. There are no municipal or county sales taxes in Connecticut (nor county government, for that matter).

However, we do have a state income tax as well as property taxes (on real estate and vehicles).

When you buy a car, you pay sales tax on the vehicle purchase, and annual property taxes based on the value of the car as long as you own it.

doreen 08-19-2019 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aceplace57 (Post 21812016)

Generally crossing the bridge into N Little Rock isn't a big deal. The extra .5% on Restaurant bills is negligible. You'd probably want to buy your new 28k car in Little Rock.

Unless Arkansas is very different from the places I am familiar with, you pay sales taxes based on where the car is registered or the goods are delivered, not where the seller is located.* If I buy a car in NYS , and register it with a NYC address, I will pay the NYC rate no matter where in the state the seller is located. If I buy furniture in Long Island or NJ to be delivered to NYC, I will owe sales taxes at the NYC rate ( If I buy from a chain like Raymour and Flanigan with locations in NYC , they will directly charge me the NYC rate, if I buy from a business with no NYC locations, I am still supposed to pay the difference with my tax return)** . If as a non-resident of NJ, I buy a car in NJ, I am exempt from NJ sales tax, but will have to pay the NYC rate when I register it.




* Of course, if I'm buying something that I carry out of the store, the place where the goods were delivered to me is the seller's location and there's no telling whether I brought them back to NYC,
** And I know people who have been caught for non-payment because they bought something expensive in NJ ( I think it was a piano) didn't pay NJ sales taxes because it was delivered to NYC and then also didn't pay the NYC sales tax.

kayaker 08-19-2019 12:15 PM

I pay Pennsylvania's 6% sales tax. I live outside of the Allegheny County 1% additional tax. I was looking at cars a few years ago and realized I'd strayed into Allegheny County. I steered away from that dealership.

Additionally, Allegheny County has an alcoholic drink tax. I avoid drinking in Allegheny County on principle.

doreen 08-19-2019 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kayaker (Post 21813931)
I pay Pennsylvania's 6% sales tax. I live outside of the Allegheny County 1% additional tax. I was looking at cars a few years ago and realized I'd strayed into Allegheny County. I steered away from that dealership.

According this fact sheet , you didn't have to.

Quote:

Pennsylvania sales tax is 6% of the purchase price or the current market value of the vehicle (7% for
residents of Allegheny County and 8% for City of Philadelphia residents).

Chefguy 08-19-2019 02:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Balthisar (Post 21813788)
Yeah, that doesn't work. We've got $10 million extra from sales taxes? Great, let's move $10 million from income taxes over to this pot of money. And while I don't care if something is regressive or not, a lot of people do care about the regressive nature of sales taxes, and it's usually the same audience that says "more money for schools" as says "but let's not impose regressive taxes on the poor!"

Whenever I'm not feeling abused enough, I bring this up to my spouse, who then unloads on me about the regressive nature of sales taxes. While I agree with that, I'm also tired of my property taxes being jacked up on my over-inflated property "value". Hipsters seem to have discovered the joy of breeding, without any regard for the impact on the school systems, yet they bitch incessantly about how schools are overcrowded and underfunded. :rolleyes: This city can't afford to fix potholes or schools or much else, so instead of funding it through taxation, have started shutting down public facilities like recreation centers and public pools. Makes me crazy.


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