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-   -   Movies/TV Shows/etc moments that seem really dated now... (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=135264)

Little Nemo 06-19-2016 10:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19417795)
Read, dude.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b00e2cd5e8118a

They all actually exist only in that kid's head. The evidence is overwhelming.

TBG's right. In the final scene we saw Tommy's father and grandfather. Tommy had imagined them as characters in his globe but they were also real people in his life. There's no reason to assume the other characters in Tommy's mind weren't also based on real people.

Lumpy 06-20-2016 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokey78 (Post 19216688)
An Officer and a Gentleman
-or maybe not?

OH, and how a big deal it was for couples to live together w/o marriage, the whole premise to Three's a Crowd!

It might not have been a big deal for a lot of people (and in San Francisco no less), but at the time it wasn't implausible that the landlord might be an older person with conservative (pre-1960s) values.

smokey78 06-20-2016 08:33 PM

Will mention the opposite problem: when films/stories depict a certain future year, and then that year comes up and we still haven't seen over the air hoverboards (well not commercially) ala Back to the Future.

The other example I recall was my teacher sheepishly saying, "well the author thought that would happen" I think it was a Ursula Le Guin short story set in 1987 where folks were colonized on the moon.

The Other Waldo Pepper 06-20-2016 09:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokey78 (Post 19420290)
Will mention the opposite problem: when films/stories depict a certain future year, and then that year comes up and we still haven't seen over the air hoverboards (well not commercially) ala Back to the Future.

The other example I recall was my teacher sheepishly saying, "well the author thought that would happen" I think it was a Ursula Le Guin short story set in 1987 where folks were colonized on the moon.

The best example has to be Asimov's story about Everest; sure, he did a bad job of predicting the future when he wrote it -- but by the time it saw print, "I predicted that Mount Everest would never be climbed, five months after it was climbed."

Alfishius 08-06-2016 07:15 PM

...and with all these shows being in that kid's head, I think someone has shown that our own world i.e. the "Real" world..is also in that kid's head. Mind=blown, amirite?

Mean Mr. Mustard 08-06-2016 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19301033)
St. Elsewhere was all in that kid's head...Even the real world is somehow inside that kid's head...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19382822)
Anyway so yeah all these shows were in that kid's head...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19417795)
They all actually exist only in that kid's head...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19535395)
...and with all these shows being in that kid's head...the "Real" world..is also in that kid's head.

Hey Alfishius, just wondering if you think it's all in that kid's head. Please clarify.


mmm

Patch 08-06-2016 10:18 PM

Stumbled across an episode of Adam-12 a few years ago. The main pair of cops had pulled someone over for some offense or other, and the guy was being a jerk. One of the cops took the guy's license, went to his car, spread peanut butter on it, and ate it in front of the guy (licenses were paper then). He then wrote a guy a ticket for driving without a license, stating "Go ahead and challenge it. Tell the judge I spread peanut butter on your license and ate it. He'll think you're nuts."

Yup, because what we want is our officers fabricating tickets then committing perjury in court.

Bryan Ekers 08-06-2016 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patch (Post 19535699)
Stumbled across an episode of Adam-12 a few years ago. The main pair of cops had pulled someone over for some offense or other, and the guy was being a jerk. One of the cops took the guy's license, went to his car, spread peanut butter on it, and ate it in front of the guy (licenses were paper then). He then wrote a guy a ticket for driving without a license, stating "Go ahead and challenge it. Tell the judge I spread peanut butter on your license and ate it. He'll think you're nuts."

Yup, because what we want is our officers fabricating tickets then committing perjury in court.

It's a good thing black people didn't exist on television back then or things coulda got violent.

alphaboi867 08-06-2016 11:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalMeacham (Post 19301976)
...On the other hand, the human drama and interaction is appalling. Captain Breiteis is condescended to, and called "Bright Eyes" *. It's pretty neat that the first human into space is female, but she has to put up with this kind of abuse...

IIRC the only reason she was the 1st human in space was because she was smaller & weighed less than the male astronauts. Also didn't the President promote the male lead at the ender (after she married the couple) because naturally a husband had to outrank his wife (I guess POTUS is a widow or spinster)? :rolleyes:

Dave Hartwick 08-07-2016 12:34 AM

Interesting to read such a long-lived thread.

For me it's not attitudes, prop technology, or prices that date some entertainment so badly as to make me disconcerted (although some items, like Mickey Rooney's performance in Breakfast in Tiffany's make it unwatchable) it's more about passe techniques.

The big one for me is the psychedelic montage. I was reminded of it recently when Cracked made some jokes about the Nixon campaign ad "Convention". The film adaptation of "Flowers for Algernon" (Charly) had a notable one. Obviously, 2001 had a famous one at the end.

I think Kubrick liked the psychedelic montage-- and was good at them-- and they don't stand out so much in his work, and thus don't date them. I suspect that the ones that I dislike (and I really didn't like the one in Charly, a film I otherwise didn't mind) are imitations of Kubrick.

Bryan Ekers 08-07-2016 01:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Hartwick (Post 19535852)
I think Kubrick liked the psychedelic montage-- and was good at them-- and they don't stand out so much in his work, and thus don't date them. I suspect that the ones that I dislike (and I really didn't like the one in Charly, a film I otherwise didn't mind) are imitations of Kubrick.

That montage in Charly was just awful, but I have a particular dislike for the "running from yourself" dream sequence here, with distractingly bad double-exposure photography that must have seemed primitive even in 1968.


But of course Cliff Roberston got the Academy Award - he didn't go full retard.

Ranger Jeff 08-07-2016 01:55 AM

I've been watching The Monkees season 1 lately. Vox Super Beatle amps? A Gretsch bass guitar? Come on!

NDP 08-07-2016 03:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers (Post 19535892)
That montage in Charly was just awful, but I have a particular dislike for the "running from yourself" dream sequence here, with distractingly bad double-exposure photography that must have seemed primitive even in 1968.


But of course Cliff Roberston got the Academy Award - he didn't go full retard.

Beating out Peter O' Toole for A Lion in Winter who should've gotten it.

Dave Hartwick 08-07-2016 05:49 AM

I had no idea Robertson got an Oscar for that. Here's a link to the montage scene, which shows off his performance. Sure, the double exposure sequence is also bad, but holy crap.

Speaking of the Monkees, I think I remember that their show had a lot of this sort of thing as well.

Lumpy 08-07-2016 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokey78 (Post 19420290)
Will mention the opposite problem: when films/stories depict a certain future year, and then that year comes up and we still haven't seen over the air hoverboards (well not commercially) ala Back to the Future.

The other example I recall was my teacher sheepishly saying, "well the author thought that would happen" I think it was a Ursula Le Guin short story set in 1987 where folks were colonized on the moon.

Anything done in the 1960s was hyper-optimistic where spaceflight is concerned. At the time people took the early space launches as the equivalent of Kitty Hawk, and presumed that spaceflight would advance as fast as technological development would allow. In fact they'd have been disbelieving if you told them that there'd be an interregnum where we'd putter about in low orbit for fifty years before even considering doing as much as returning to the moon.

Bryan Ekers 08-08-2016 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lumpy (Post 19537282)
Anything done in the 1960s was hyper-optimistic where spaceflight is concerned. At the time people took the early space launches as the equivalent of Kitty Hawk, and presumed that spaceflight would advance as fast as technological development would allow. In fact they'd have been disbelieving if you told them that there'd be an interregnum where we'd putter about in low orbit for fifty years before even considering doing as much as returning to the moon.

Heh, reminds me of a comment by an aerospace engineer who'd been involved in Apollo along the lines of "If you'd told me in 1970 where we'd be in 1995, I'd've asked 'was there a major war?' "

MsJinx 08-08-2016 01:22 AM

Drunk driving was sometimes treated humorously in old shows. A car on a spewing fire hydrant was always good for a few laughs.

Eclipse Chaser 08-08-2016 03:08 PM

Back on topic, Hawaii Five-O is a gold mine for dated material. I always enjoyed the scene where one of McGarrett's underlings was tailing a bad guy. When asked for an update he replied, in all seriousness: "He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.[/QUOTE]

Even way back then, it infuriated me the way whenever there was a pretty girl from the mainland in the plot, the guys would immediately switch to the Hawaiian language in front of her and start making personal comments about her.

terentii 08-08-2016 03:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eclipse Chaser (Post 19538861)
Back on topic, Hawaii Five-O is a gold mine for dated material. I always enjoyed the scene where one of McGarrett's underlings was tailing a bad guy. When asked for an update he replied, in all seriousness: "He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.

My favorite line was when McGarrett asked Chin Ho how much a bunch of figures came to: "I don't know. I don't have my abacus with me."

Just Asking Questions 08-08-2016 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patch (Post 19535699)
Stumbled across an episode of Adam-12 a few years ago. The main pair of cops had pulled someone over for some offense or other, and the guy was being a jerk. One of the cops took the guy's license, went to his car, spread peanut butter on it, and ate it in front of the guy (licenses were paper then). He then wrote a guy a ticket for driving without a license, stating "Go ahead and challenge it. Tell the judge I spread peanut butter on your license and ate it. He'll think you're nuts."

Yup, because what we want is our officers fabricating tickets then committing perjury in court.

I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!

I've seen all the episodes recently, not only is that not there, it doesn't even fit the tone of the show. Jack Webb would never show characters doing crap like that. Let alone, them carrying a jar of peanut butter around just for jerk-assed tricks like that.

Stephe96 08-08-2016 04:26 PM

In the 1990's movie Beautiful Girls, one of the characters is showing his friends around the restaurant he just opened. He says something like, "We've got a full bar, lots of seating, we've got apps.."
"Apps?"
"Appetizers."
"Oh."

Funny to think that 20 years ago, 'apps' had to be explained as 'appetizers,' when today it would mean something else entirely.

JackieLikesVariety 08-08-2016 06:28 PM

Quote:

I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!
+1

Jim's Son 08-08-2016 07:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terentii (Post 19539020)
My favorite line was when McGarrett asked Chin Ho how much a bunch of figures came to: "I don't know. I don't have my abacus with me."

Used to work with a guy whose wife was from Okinawa (and she was always reluctant to say she was Japanese). He swore his wife was better with an abacus than he was with a calculator..and he was a pretty sharp guy.

The Other Waldo Pepper 08-08-2016 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions (Post 19539037)
I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!

I've seen all the episodes recently, not only is that not there, it doesn't even fit the tone of the show. Jack Webb would never show characters doing crap like that. Let alone, them carrying a jar of peanut butter around just for jerk-assed tricks like that.

I betcha it was POLICE STORY.

Morbo 08-08-2016 07:44 PM

One scene in The Parallax View is pretty shocking these days. Warren Beatty is following someone who gets on a plane, so he climbs a fence, sneaks onto the runway and onto the plane.

After they have taken off, the stewardess approaches him, writes down the fake name he gives her into a legal pad, asks him if he's flying Round Trip, and then says something like "That'll be $73."

Patch 08-08-2016 11:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions (Post 19539037)
I don't know what you watched, but it wasn't Adam-12!

I've seen all the episodes recently, not only is that not there, it doesn't even fit the tone of the show. Jack Webb would never show characters doing crap like that. Let alone, them carrying a jar of peanut butter around just for jerk-assed tricks like that.

I don't remember enough of the old cop shows to take a guess, but it was around the same era. I tried searching on YouTube for the scene, and the police cars in the show looked familiar so I figured it was that one.

Patch 08-08-2016 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper (Post 19539552)
I betcha it was POLICE STORY.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

Found a post on another forum where someone mentioned it It was Police Story. The actor Don Meredith did it.

yesanything 08-09-2016 12:18 AM

Sheldrake tossing a tip to the boy.
 
In the apartment when Fred McMurray finishes getting his shoes shined he flips the colored shoe shine boy (actually a man) a tip!

terentii 08-09-2016 02:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yesanything (Post 19540047)
In the apartment when Fred McMurray finishes getting his shoes shined he flips the colored shoe shine boy (actually a man) a tip!

Okay ... he tips the guy who shines his shoes (and also happens to be black). So? :dubious:

What was he supposed to do? Pat him on the head? Toss him a slice of watermelon? :confused:

When I was in fifth or sixth grade, I used to go with my dad to get our shoes shined at a place downtown. The guy who did it was black, and we always tipped him, even though I'm sure he was paid to be there anyway. It was his job, fer chrissakes!

I've never heard of anyone who provides a service (and is good at it) not being pleased when someone gives him (or her) a gratuity.

terentii 08-09-2016 02:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim's Son (Post 19539497)
Used to work with a guy whose wife was from Okinawa (and she was always reluctant to say she was Japanese). He swore his wife was better with an abacus than he was with a calculator..and he was a pretty sharp guy.

Not surprising. I've worked with abacuses too (until recently, they were ubiquitous in Russia), and I know they're really fast!

I don't think that was quite what Chin's line was intended to convey, though. ;)

John Bredin 08-09-2016 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terentii (Post 19540238)
Okay ... he tips the guy who shines his shoes (and also happens to be black). So? :dubious:

What was he supposed to do? Pat him on the head? Toss him a slice of watermelon? :confused:

Hand it to him. :smack: I think the operative word in yesanything's post is "flipped." Sheldrake flipped or tossed the shoeshine man his tip rather than handing it to him.

terentii 08-09-2016 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Bredin (Post 19540983)
Hand it to him. :smack: I think the operative word in yesanything's post is "flipped." Sheldrake flipped or tossed the shoeshine man his tip rather than handing it to him.

So? He caught it, didn't he? :dubious:

This is a sign of disrespect? :confused:

John Bredin 08-09-2016 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terentii (Post 19541049)
So? He caught it, didn't he? :dubious:

This is a sign of disrespect? :confused:

I'd argue so; why exactly won't Sheldrake let his hand near the shoeshine man's hand? :confused:

Even if it's not disrespectful, it's definitely dated, which is the topic of this thread.:smack: When was the last time you saw someone (a) tip a server of any kind with only a coin, and (b) do so by throwing it at them? :p

terentii 08-09-2016 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Bredin (Post 19541149)
When was the last time you saw someone (a) tip a server of any kind with only a coin, and (b) do so by throwing it at them? :p

To tell the truth, I've never really given the matter much thought.

Back in 1960, though, a 50 cent piece was worth at least $2.50 in today's money, so tipping with a coin wasn't exactly cheap.

That Don Guy 08-09-2016 02:25 PM

The first one that came to mind was the ending - in fact, pretty much the entire premise - of the Peanuts special Charlie Brown's All-Stars, where Charlie Brown decides not to accept sponsorship for his team into a "better" league because...
SPOILER:
No Girls (or dogs) Allowed - which was a firm (as in, "Your choice: don't let any girls into your league, or don't bother sending a team to the tournament that leads to the Little League World Series") regulation in Little League until 1974

Derleth 08-09-2016 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Morbo (Post 19539605)
One scene in The Parallax View is pretty shocking these days. Warren Beatty is following someone who gets on a plane, so he climbs a fence, sneaks onto the runway and onto the plane.

After they have taken off, the stewardess approaches him, writes down the fake name he gives her into a legal pad, asks him if he's flying Round Trip, and then says something like "That'll be $73."

Speaking of Bell-Bottom Paranoia, pretty much anything to do with the phone system in Three Days of the Condor is just wonderfully dated. Really, anything where it takes time to trace a call and someone can defeat a trace by hanging up really fast is indicative of either ancient technology or ancient minds, with the latter being more in evidence these days than the former.

Speaking of, there's some interesting and historical information about payphone phreaking in the 1995 cinematic classic Hackers, when Razor and Blade teach you how to trick payphones into thinking you've deposited money by recording the sounds played in the handset when you deposit coins and playing them back into the mouthpiece later. Aside from the fact payphones in and of themselves are indicative of a previous epoch, that specific trick was likely all but obsolete by the time the film came out, and is certainly useless today.

Don Draper 08-09-2016 05:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derleth (Post 19541724)
Speaking of Bell-Bottom Paranoia, pretty much anything to do with the phone system in Three Days of the Condor is just wonderfully dated. Really, anything where it takes time to trace a call and someone can defeat a trace by hanging up really fast is indicative of either ancient technology or ancient minds, with the latter being more in evidence these days than the former.

Speaking of, there's some interesting and historical information about payphone phreaking in the 1995 cinematic classic Hackers, when Razor and Blade teach you how to trick payphones into thinking you've deposited money by recording the sounds played in the handset when you deposit coins and playing them back into the mouthpiece later. Aside from the fact payphones in and of themselves are indicative of a previous epoch, that specific trick was likely all but obsolete by the time the film came out, and is certainly useless today.

There's actually an interesting scene in the original version of Black Christmas where they show how they traced calls, albeit with very dated equipment.

And once I thought about that, I began to think about how dated the premise of the original BC was -- the main heroine is pregnant, but adamant that she wants to have an abortion. She even breaks up with her boyfriend because he wants her to keep it and for the two of them to get married. You would NEVER see that plot-line in a movie today, especially with the main character with whom the audience are meant to identify with and root for.

Alfishius 08-10-2016 06:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Draper (Post 19541871)
There's actually an interesting scene in the original version of Black Christmas where they show how they traced calls, albeit with very dated equipment.

And once I thought about that, I began to think about how dated the premise of the original BC was -- the main heroine is pregnant, but adamant that she wants to have an abortion. She even breaks up with her boyfriend because he wants her to keep it and for the two of them to get married. You would NEVER see that plot-line in a movie today, especially with the main character with whom the audience are meant to identify with and root for.

I was a camp counsellor for years. Young people today are very anti-abortion which is surprising.

BrotherCadfael 08-10-2016 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim's Son (Post 19539497)
Used to work with a guy whose wife was from Okinawa (and she was always reluctant to say she was Japanese). He swore his wife was better with an abacus than he was with a calculator..and he was a pretty sharp guy.

When I was in college, I needed a good calculator, so my dad bought me one. We set up some test problems, and I worked them with the calculator and he with his slide rule. He beat me to the answers every time. He was GOOD with that thing!

Lumpy 08-10-2016 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19542931)
I was a camp counsellor for years. Young people today are very anti-abortion which is surprising.

Selective effect- the people born today are the children of people who didn't abort them? :p

akrako1 08-12-2016 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff (Post 19535924)
I've been watching The Monkees season 1 lately. Vox Super Beatle amps? A Gretsch bass guitar? Come on!

Not sure if this is an attempt at a Whoosh... but you realize that vintage gear like this has only gotten more desirable over the years? Most of yer favorite 'modern' musicians seek out vintage gear.

foolsguinea 08-12-2016 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19382822)
Anyway so yeah all these shows were in that kid's head. Crazy stuff.

St. Elsewhere, maybe. But probably not the shows it crossed over with. Fictional characters can exist in more than one continuity. Some characters, like Jenny Everywhere and Mikhail Gorbachev, basically have the super-power to actually exist in any continuity you can think of. (Well, I think Gorby is usually only used in settings that include Russia at the end of the Cold War, but he does exist in many fictional universes, including ours.)

Happy Birthday, Jenny!

Alfishius 09-02-2016 10:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foolsguinea (Post 19550426)
St. Elsewhere, maybe. But probably not the shows it crossed over with. Fictional characters can exist in more than one continuity. Some characters, like Jenny Everywhere and Mikhail Gorbachev, basically have the super-power to actually exist in any continuity you can think of. (Well, I think Gorby is usually only used in settings that include Russia at the end of the Cold War, but he does exist in many fictional universes, including ours.)

Interesting!

But still...if a fictional character exists only in one person's mind, and yet someone meets that fictional character...then they must also be in that person's mind, no?

digs 09-03-2016 09:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19602299)
Interesting!

But still...if a fictional character exists only in one person's mind, and yet someone meets that fictional character...then they must also be in that person's mind, no?

Dude, let it go.

But, wait, if you're obsessed ... I'm not sure you could do that if you were just a character in some kid's head...

monstro 09-03-2016 09:58 PM

I'm starting to think maybe he is the kid.

Lumpy 09-04-2016 11:30 AM

Any television or movie western from before the Sergio Leone era that depicted astonishingly clean and well-dressed cowboys.

TBG 09-04-2016 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfishius (Post 19417795)
Read, dude.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b00e2cd5e8118a

They all actually exist only in that kid's head. The evidence is overwhelming.

Dracula has appeared in my head. Guess that means there's not any Dracula fiction in the real world, just what's in my head, right? :rolleyes:

Harvey The Heavy 09-05-2016 08:53 AM

I really don't understand all the debate over the Tommy Westphall Universe. It's quite simple: He fantasized about characters he saw on TV. The connections happened in his head, that's all. He was watching the same unconnected shows that we do and just tied them all together in his head.

I also don't believe that the entirety of St. Elsewhere was a fantasy of Tommy's. St. Elsewhere was probably a real hospital that he had been to (where else would you get a snow globe like that one?), and his fantasies were a mix of real people and TV characters.

akrako1 09-07-2016 12:59 PM

Almost any early CGI, especially on TV. Babylon 5 is a great example. Wonderful stories, but oh-so-terrible graphics by today's standards. While watching, you feel like you're playing a late 90's video game. Even today's browser-run games have better graphics. Unfortunately, there's probably too many CGI shots to redo if it were to get the Star Trek TOS treatment where they recreate all of the exterior shots. Probably not enough profit to be made from doing it.. I hope eventually the current level of eye-tricking CGI will get cheap enough to make it workable.. Or the network will just opt to do the upteenth reboot intead...

Lumpy 09-07-2016 09:00 PM

I'd like to see all my favorite Harry Hausen films with the animation upgraded with blur motion.


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