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-   -   Did the day after scare you? (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=881615)

squeegee 09-07-2019 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dewey Finn (Post 21847046)
For whatever reason, I never saw Threads or The Day After, but we did see another movie with a similar subject called Special Bulletin. It was presented as if it was live news reports from the scene of a hostage-taking in Charleston, South Carolina by a group with a home-made nuclear bomb.

Ooh, I remember that one and IIRC it was pretty good!

Siam Sam 09-08-2019 03:25 AM

No. It was laughable.

JKellyMap 09-08-2019 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DorkVader (Post 21847331)
This, and Special Report or whatever it was called, the one that was broadcastas though it was a live event (iirc even the commercials were part of the show) were really cool at the time, the whole family watched together. They only thing my parents were worried about was if I would get bored part way through.

The one movie that really affected me was the japanese anime, I can't think of the name, about a boy dealing with the death of his little brother. He carried him to where he thought he would get help but he was already dead. I want to say it was written by and based on the experience of a man who actually did survive the bombing of Hiroshima. My recall of specific details is fuzzy but the overall theme and story was very saddening for me.

Grave of the Fireflies (1988). I rented it about a year ago, based on Roger Ebertís praise. It is indeed brutal and also lovely in its way.

DorkVader 09-08-2019 11:26 AM

That's the name, thanks.

Yes, brutal and lovely is an excellent way to describe it.

El_Kabong 09-08-2019 11:52 AM

I found The Day After fairly disturbing, but many years earlier, as an eight-year-old, I had had the living shit scared out of me by the Cuban Missile Crisis, so that may have blunted the impact somewhat.

I'll add another nod to Special Bulletin. That was very well done, as I recall.

Lastly, film rather TV but the somewhat obscure Miracle Mile, with Anthony Edwards, really messed me up.

Guest-starring: Id! 09-08-2019 01:30 PM

I found TDA basically depressing, with two scenes I remember: John Lithgow seeing some missiles in the sky and saying "Those are minutemen missiles", and a frazzled housewife in denial, insisting on finishing making the bed while the husband yanks her away to go for cover.
Never seen Threads nor WTWB but might after what I've read here.

Damnation Alley was kinda fun.:)

SmartAleq 09-08-2019 02:44 PM

It occurs to me that a double feature of Grave of the Fireflies and When the Wind Blows is likely the most suicide inducing movie night imaginable.

monstro 09-08-2019 03:00 PM

I didn't see the "The Day After" when it first aired. It was on my mind for awhile after I saw it as an adult. But it didn't scare me.

But I do remember watching the movie "Testament" as a kid. It aired on PBS and starred Jane Alexander, who played a mother struggling to keep it all together after a nuclear explosion kills everyone and their mama in a painfully slow way. Now, that movie did scare me. It seemed so realistic.

But I watched it recently and I actually think "The Day After" was more realistic. Like, in "Testament", people drop like flies after the event, but no one really exhibits any illness or signs leading up to their death. But you see all of that in "The Day After".

Gray Ghost 09-08-2019 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by monstro (Post 21848122)
...But I do remember watching the movie "Testament" as a kid. It aired on PBS and starred Jane Alexander, who played a mother struggling to keep it all together after a nuclear explosion kills everyone and their mama in a painfully slow way. Now, that movie did scare me. It seemed so realistic.

But I watched it recently and I actually think "The Day After" was more realistic. Like, in "Testament", people drop like flies after the event, but no one really exhibits any illness or signs leading up to their death. But you see all of that in "The Day After".

Combine the death scenes of the firefighters from "Chernobyl" with the rest of Testament. Then consider that anything beyond palliative care is likely not going to be available. Acute secondary radiation sickness is about as bad a way to go that there is. Also consider that the cells lining the GI tract are some of the most susceptible to ionizing radiation. Most sufferers are going to die from shitting themselves to death, or systemic sepsis from an initial GI infection, long before they melt into their hospital beds like that one poor bastard.

Just a nightmarish death for the victim and her caregivers.

OTOH, acute radiation sickness is largely a creature of WarDay +30 and shorter, as short half-life, intensely radioactive isotopes largely decay away. Unless you live very near the ground burst. Radiation induced cancer, OTOH....

bizerta 09-08-2019 05:22 PM

It's all true. It just hasn't happened yet. Evolution created the small pox virus at some point in the past. Sooner or later the same conditions will exits and it will be re-evolve. Or maybe some whacko at the CDC will screw up while playing with the virus being stored in Atlanta(?).

Fail-Safe, or the black-comedy version, Dr.Strangelove will probably not happen in my lifetime, but don't-cha think it's probable to occur sometime in the next 83,000 years.

Nuclear war and the inevitable return of small pox certainly would solve the problem of over crowding.

nelliebly 09-08-2019 06:41 PM

The Day After was grim but not terrifying. I was afraid of nuclear holocaust my entire childhood, the result of nuns telling us Chicago would be a primary target and that we should pray The Bomb hit while we were sleeping, as well as all those duck-and-cover drills. By the 1980s, the drills were long gone, but most of us carried that fear around with us, albeit on a back burner.

Then Jonathan Schell's superb 1982 nonfiction book, The Fate of the Earth came out and not only frightened a lot of people (IT was a bestseller and had been featured in The New Yorker) but got us talking about the unthinkable. I highly recommend it.

Oddly enough, I was scared by the last scene in Dr. Strangelove, but that was probably because I was 10 and still clinging to the hope that the Grown-Ups In Charge were sane and knew what they were doing. Quaint notion, eh?


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