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-   -   Obvious things about a creative work you realize after the millionth time (OPEN SPOILERS POSSIBLE) (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=525685)

Helena 07-31-2009 09:23 PM

I was watching Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree and thought, "Huh, Rabbit's hole looks like a real rabbit's hole."

Then I thought, "Rabbit doesn't seem to have any stitches, come to think of it."

And then, "Ohmygosh Rabbit is a real rabbit! And Owl is a real owl!"

I mentioned this to my husband, and he said, "Yes, it's pretty clear if you look at the original illustrations."

I had no clue.

Pigs in Space 07-31-2009 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lakai (Post 11398925)
This is from watching the final episode of season five of Buffy the Vampire Slayer:

SPOILER:
She sacrifices herself to save her sister. She falls into the vortex thingy with her arms spread out wide. And then she gets resurrected in season six.


It took a while before I made the connection.

Also, the entire season is about death. I didn't figure it our until reading it somewhere. Buffy vs. Dracula makes a lot more sense with that in mind. (I did figure out the same about Farscape season 3 on my own, but the first episode is called Season of Death, so that helped.)

Koxinga 07-31-2009 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eyebrows 0f Doom (Post 11397569)
I never knew those were actually words!! I've only heard the song and thought she was just spelling out "F-u-c-k me."

Well, there you go, you just realized something!

panache45 07-31-2009 11:11 PM

I'm surprised nobody's mentioned the arrow in the FedEx logo. I noticed it the first time I saw it (I'm a designer), but some people can't see it even when it's pointed out to them.

Jenaroph 07-31-2009 11:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corkboard (Post 11390248)
So is the "Rose" supposed to equate somehow to "anti", or something, or is it meaningless?

Isn't the rose a medieval symbol of Jesus as well?

Chronos 07-31-2009 11:38 PM

Another one I just remembered: It was some time last year before I realized that the band with John, Paul, George, and Ringo was spelled differently from the insect. Beatles, as in "beat". Before that, I think I just used both spellings interchangeably, and never noticed since spell-check recognizes both.

Helena, good catch on Rabbit and Owl-- I never even suspected. Now that you mention it, though, Gopher must be real, too... All of the real animals don't have their own names, just the names of their species.

DWMarch 08-01-2009 12:02 AM

I don't know how obvious it is to everyone else but in Aliens, it seems very clear to me now that Bishop sold Ripley and co. out. He lies right to her face and no one catches him on it. He tells Ripley and the surviving marines that flight time for the second drop ship will be 40 minutes. Now hold on a minute there Mr. Bishop. That's the express elevator to hell you're talking about. We watched the flight in real time when it was done with a load of squishy marines and a human pilot and from start to finish it took FOUR minutes, not forty. So Bishop had control of that drop ship for a lot longer than he let on. Check his expression when the survivors show up at the landing field early because of Newt's shortcut. "Oops, you're not supposed to be here yet!" So that's how the eggs got on board in Alien 3. Bishop ferried them there. That's probably also why the Queen ripped him in half- she recognized him as the egg thief!

There was also a really good, really subtle one in Angel. In Season 2, Angel is able to get ahold of a special ring that the Senior Partners use to travel between their dimension and Earth. Angel puts the ring on and gets on a different express elevator to Hell, where he is greeted by old Wolfram and Hart buddy Holland Manners. And everything Holland says to him is complete bullshit. It was the best victory they ever scored against Angel and they never get any credit for it.

Basically, Holland tells Angel that there is no way to get to the Senior partners; the home office is on Earth. Angel never notices Holland very smoothly changing the subject. Angel ends up demoralized because he knows he can never defeat the negativity and evil in all human beings so he gives up on trying to get to the Senior Partners! Sure the home office is on Earth. But the Senior Partners aren't! And even after Angel does some dimensional traveling (including to a jail run by the Senior Partners!) he gives up on trying to take them on in their home turf. But he was almost there. There's a visual in the episode that shows the elevator dropping into an open space and then back into the elevator shaft. That ties in with Lindsay bitching at Darla in the next episode about the ring which everyone spent so much time disenchanting. So it's clearly shown in the episode that Angel was well on his way but got distracted by a bullshit story and didn't realize his elevator could be diverted from the outside!

emcee2k 08-01-2009 12:14 AM

I was watching the Seinfeld episode "The Couch" a few days a go and it suddenly occurred to me that the argument between Poppy and Kramer over how to make a pizza was a parody of the abortion debate. I'm not sure how I missed that before.

Aspidistra 08-01-2009 01:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chronos (Post 11399594)
Another one I just remembered: It was some time last year before I realized that the band with John, Paul, George, and Ringo was spelled differently from the insect. Beatles, as in "beat". Before that, I think I just used both spellings interchangeably, and never noticed since spell-check recognizes both.

Helena, good catch on Rabbit and Owl-- I never even suspected. Now that you mention it, though, Gopher must be real, too... All of the real animals don't have their own names, just the names of their species.

Gopher? What gopher?

TreacherousCretin 08-01-2009 01:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by palindromemordnilap (Post 11397236)
And the words of the prophet were written on the subway walls, and tenant halls...


Isn't it "tenement" halls?


.

TreacherousCretin 08-01-2009 01:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hoopy Frood (Post 11397617)
I've owned a Subaru for almost 4 years now and never caught that reference.

It bothers me that the Pleiades are commonly called "The Seven Sisters" (in the western hemisphere, anyway) but my Subaru's logo has only six stars.

.

TreacherousCretin 08-01-2009 01:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ajdebosco (Post 11398124)
That is dead solid perfect, R A. I recently saw the interview of John Cleese on Inside the Actor's Studio where the discussion rolled around to the question of just what is funny. He maintained that it is comical to see someone going increasingly berserk, but what is really humorous is the reactions of the other characters observing the meltdown.

I had to re-review the dead parrot sketch after reading your post, and my cold beverage came out my nose until I was forced to set it down before wasting more of it. My sides still ache from seeing him try to explain "...was no more....he has ceased to be... he has expired... gone to meet his maker...he's an EX-PARROT!"

An especially delightful performance is on "The Secret Policemens' Other Ball" DVD; Cleese makes Palin crack up, and plays with it a little until they're both losing it.


.

Koxinga 08-01-2009 02:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Helena (Post 11399287)
I was watching Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree and thought, "Huh, Rabbit's hole looks like a real rabbit's hole."

Then I thought, "Rabbit doesn't seem to have any stitches, come to think of it."

And then, "Ohmygosh Rabbit is a real rabbit! And Owl is a real owl!"

I mentioned this to my husband, and he said, "Yes, it's pretty clear if you look at the original illustrations."

I had no clue.

That's sweet, but I hate to break it to you . . .

SPOILER:
None of them are real. They're cartoons.

;)


Derleth 08-01-2009 05:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scifisam2009 (Post 11399266)
He was briefly a modern languages scholar, and he wrote in French because he wanted to be forced to be more succinct.

How does this make sense? No language forces succinctness just like no language forces verbosity.

E-Sabbath 08-01-2009 06:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chronos (Post 11399594)
All of the real animals don't have their own names, just the names of their species.

Doubtful. Kanga and Roo are _probably_ not real animals.

Annie-Xmas 08-01-2009 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman (Post 11387126)
I was just now at the gym on the treadmill, watching a re-run of "Will & Grace" when it suddenly struck me that the names of the two characters (and the series) is an ironic twist:

The character Eric McCormack plays is smart, successful, handsome, but a big pushover. He always knuckles under to Grace and Jack, objecting to their many outrageous demands on him but constantly doing what they want him to do. He's intimidated by his mother, and must often be coaxed into standing up for himself. He has no WILLpower.

The character Debra Messing plays is a sexy, but extremely neurotic red-head, prone to shrill outbursts. She has no qualms about making huge public spectacle of herself on a routine basis. She is severely lacking in social GRACE.

Will & Grace. Or rather "weak-willed & graceless." Heh.

I didn't realize that Will's last name of "Truman" is an indication that he is Grace's "true man" until I read the book about the series. It was orginally suppose to be "Hermann" (her man), but the producers changed it.

ETA: My thread made Threadspotting! WHOO HOO!

KneadToKnow 08-01-2009 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by emcee2k (Post 11399660)
I was watching the Seinfeld episode "The Couch" a few days a go and it suddenly occurred to me that the argument between Poppy and Kramer over how to make a pizza was a parody of the abortion debate. I'm not sure how I missed that before.

It's a pizza the minute you put-a you hands in-a the dough!

Electric Warrior 08-01-2009 10:06 AM

This thread made me realize what the title of the Wolfmother song The Joker and the Thief refers to. :smack:

Lust4Life 08-01-2009 10:20 AM

I always thought that Born in the U.S.A. was a celebration of being American until one day I actually listened to the words and realised that it was about a Special Forces veteran who was left on the scrap heap after he had finished his time.

SciFiSam 08-01-2009 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derleth (Post 11399898)
How does this make sense? No language forces succinctness just like no language forces verbosity.

Writing in a foreign language, where your vocabulary is much smaller (even if you're fluent), forces you to be more economic with your words. It's not a feature of French, but of it being a second language to him.

Baal Houtham 08-01-2009 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eleanorigby (Post 11398686)
WHAT fell off? Augh--this thread is frustrating.

His penis.

Lyrics:
Mother told me, yes she told me
I'd meet girls like you
She also told me stay away
You'll never know what you'll catch

Just the other day I heard
Of a soldier's falling off
Some Indonesian junk
That's going 'round
(...)

Father says, "Your mother's right,
she's really up on things"
"Before we married, Mommy served
in the WACS in the Philippines"

Siam Sam 08-01-2009 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lust4Life (Post 11400206)
I always thought that Born in the U.S.A. was a celebration of being American until one day I actually listened to the words and realised that it was about a Special Forces veteran who was left on the scrap heap after he had finished his time.

Ronald Reagan made the same mistake while president. I recall him publicly praising Bruce Springsteen for his message of hope with that song. Springsteen was reportedly mighty perplexed.

eleanorigby 08-01-2009 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baal Houtham (Post 11400337)
His penis.



Oh.





Note to self: Google lyrics prior to posting...

And here's something else (not part of a creative work) and you all can have a good laugh at my expense. Until I was in my 30s, I never knew why a freight train would haul 2-3 engines around with all those box and coal cars. They seem awfully heavy to drag. (and in my defense, I'll say it's hard to know if more than one diesel engine is functioning as they roll by). I mean, it's not like it kept me up at night or anything, but I finally asked my husband this (we were stopped waiting for a very long train). When he stopped holding his sides, he informed me that the "extra" engines provided power. Well, go figure...

jefahrbach 08-01-2009 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eyebrows 0f Doom (Post 11397557)
"Sirius" is also the name of the Dog Star. Then of course there's Remus Lupin. (Remus as in Romulus &, and Lupin as in lupine.) That is one thing that really annoyed me about those books. All her names were way too obvious & cutesy like that. Plus Lupin wasn't born a werewolf, was he? He was attacked by one. Pretty lucky he already had that name then. :rolleyes:

I agree. It was just too obvious that all she did was look at Latin translations of words and at mythology to name characters, places, and spells. It often disappointed me how easily decipherable they were.

I mean: Sirius ("Dog Star") Black can turn into a black dog, Sibyll (the Sibyls were prophets of mythology) Trelawney is a divination teacher and sometimes prophet herself, Gregory Goyle (as in "gargoyle") was also an ugly, monstrous protector, the Malfoys (Latin "maleficus" means "evil-doer") are an all around bad family, Gilderoy Lockhart ("gilded" as in covered in thin gold foil) hides a rotten inside with a handsome exterior, and Remus (from Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome who were suckled by a wolf as children) Lupin ("Lupus" is Latin for "wolf") is *shock* a werewolf. (Which I agree, he was lucky to be named that since years later he gets bitten by a werewolf and becomes one himself. One could say he should have seen it coming.)

The different houses don't need much thought either: Gryffindor's symbol is a lion but a "griffin" is a mythological creature half eagle and half lion, Ravenclaw's eagle symbol is self explanatory with the bird references ("raven", "claw"), Hufflepuff with its badger I always took to be the sound of that badger foraging ("huff" "puff" sound of breath in the dirt), and Slytherin only makes sense to be a "slithering" snake.

But especially the spells are like a slap in the face to one's intelligence. They all are merely the Latin translation of what the spell's effect is: "Lumos" means "light" and causes a light to appear, "Nox" means "darkness" and extinguishes that light, "Crucio" means "to torture" and is a curse that causes extreme pain, "Imperio" means "to command" and is a curse which puts someone under another's control, "Accio" means "to summon" and is a summoning charm, "Expelliarmus" means "to expel" (expello) "weapon" (arma), and so on and so forth.

I liked the books, but there really wasn't much mystery to all of this even the first time I read them. I hope that with this extensive response to the Harry Potter thread on this post, this one can be laid to rest, unlike the Audi, Rosemary's Baby, and "Brown-Eyed Girl" threads.;) If anyone is more interested, I recommend looking at "The Magical Worlds of Harry Potter" by David Colbert.

Derleth 08-01-2009 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scifisam2009 (Post 11400252)
Writing in a foreign language, where your vocabulary is much smaller (even if you're fluent), forces you to be more economic with your words. It's not a feature of French, but of it being a second language to him.

OK, this makes sense.

PeskiPiksi 08-01-2009 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefahrbach (Post 11401486)
...Gregory Goyle (as in "gargoyle") was also an ugly, monstrous protector...

Oh, this reminded me.

Crabbe and Goyle=Grab and Coil. Very snakelike.

Malleus, Incus, Stapes! 08-01-2009 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefahrbach (Post 11401486)
But especially the spells are like a slap in the face to one's intelligence. They all are merely the Latin translation of what the spell's effect is: "Lumos" means "light" and causes a light to appear, "Nox" means "darkness" and extinguishes that light, "Crucio" means "to torture" and is a curse that causes extreme pain, "Imperio" means "to command" and is a curse which puts someone under another's control, "Accio" means "to summon" and is a summoning charm, "Expelliarmus" means "to expel" (expello) "weapon" (arma), and so on and so forth.

One of them's sorta from the Aramaic. "Abra kadabra" supposedly derives from the Aramaic a'bara k'davra, "I will create as I speak". As it turns out, the imfamous killing curse, "avada kadvara", means, "I will destroy as I speak".

Siam Sam 08-01-2009 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Malleus, Incus, Stapes! (Post 11401542)
One of them's sorta from the Aramaic. "Abra kadabra" supposedly derives from the Aramaic a'bara k'davra, "I will create as I speak". As it turns out, the imfamous killing curse, "avada kadvara", means, "I will destroy as I speak".

Maybe it's a nod to Shiva, who is both destroyer and creator.

Koxinga 08-01-2009 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Siam Sam (Post 11401623)
Maybe it's a nod to Shiva, who is both destroyer and creator.

I thought Vishnu was creator and Shiva was destroyer. (And Brahma is protector)

Of course, this being Hinduism, maybe we're both right. Or neither of us. Or both.

Siam Sam 08-01-2009 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Koxinga (Post 11401707)
I thought Vishnu was creator and Shiva was destroyer. (And Brahma is protector)

Of course, this being Hinduism, maybe we're both right. Or neither of us. Or both.

I suppose that's strictly true. But I've seen a lot of references in the past to Shiva as both creator and destroyer.

Mahaloth 08-01-2009 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sandra_nz (Post 11389214)
I only recently realised that the badge for VW was a V on top of a W. I always thought it was just one big W and you were just supposed to look at the 'first half' of it for the V.

Wow! :smack:

Quote:

Originally Posted by wolfman (Post 11389741)
It wasn't until We were reading fairy tales in High School German that I understood Cinderella.
"Aschenputtel? Oh like ashy girl because she is dirty from cleaning the fireplace. Too bad they didn't use a clever name like that in English for Cinder......ellla :smack::smack::smack:

Like....cinders? :smack::smack:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chronos (Post 11399594)
Another one I just remembered: It was some time last year before I realized that the band with John, Paul, George, and Ringo was spelled differently from the insect. Beatles, as in "beat". Before that, I think I just used both spellings interchangeably, and never noticed since spell-check recognizes both.

Yeah, took me until I heard the Beatles talk about how they thought it up to realize the spelling difference.

Inner Stickler 08-01-2009 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefahrbach (Post 11401486)

But especially the spells are like a slap in the face to one's intelligence. They all are merely the Latin translation of what the spell's effect is: "Lumos" means "light" and causes a light to appear, "Nox" means "darkness" and extinguishes that light, "Crucio" means "to torture" and is a curse that causes extreme pain, "Imperio" means "to command" and is a curse which puts someone under another's control, "Accio" means "to summon" and is a summoning charm, "Expelliarmus" means "to expel" (expello) "weapon" (arma), and so on and so forth.

Some of them are grecian in origin like episkey and anapneo which translate as roughly, I repair and I breathe. Others are more esoteric like alohomora. I always thought avada kedavra was a take-off of abracadabra. Rowling's way of taking a familiar and cliched part of fantasy and turning it upside down.

FourDeer 08-02-2009 04:07 AM

Nobody: Your wife is correct about “Bones” < “Sawbones”; that’s straight from Roddenberry. And no, I can’t give a proper cite; it’s just something I remember from a TV Guide interview from a hundred years ago or so.

Eleanorigby: In your defense, the “Diagon Alley” thing works better in a British accent. Yanks say “die-YAG-gunnully”; Brits say, approximately, “DIE-a-GONN-elly”. If you had grown up saying DIE-a-GONN-elly instead of die-YAG-gunnully, I am sure you would have gotten Diagon Alley right away.

(Unless you are, in fact, British. In which case, oopsie!)

Panache45: Someone DID mention the FedEx arrow. Roadfood, post # 78, page 2, about halfway down.

FourDeer 08-02-2009 04:39 AM

This is slightly off OP topic; my apologies. My further apologies for continuing the subthread after Jefahrbach suggested ending it.

For the record, I love the Potter books. But one thing seriously bugged me, still bugs me; related to Eyebrows of Doom’s and Jefahrbach’s gripes: She was frequently, I don’t know how to put this, careless or disrespectful or uninsightful or something, about the nature of magic itself. For example, in battles, she treats wands as though they were ray-guns: people shoot spells at one another, and if their aim -- their physical aim -- is off, the spells miss! Well, to my mind, any spell worth casting ought to be “smart”, at least; surely the aiming device is not the hand, or even the wand, but the intent in the mind of the spell-caster. How could that miss? This is exacerbated in the movies; but it’s there in the books as well.

Along the same lines, in Halfblood Prince, Harry begins to recite aloud a dangerous curse whose meaning he does not know -- and it works! So if the magic lies in the words themselves, then anybody, including a Muggle, could pick up a spellbook and go to town. But a major premise of the series is that only these special people have magical power, and they have to go to special schools for years to learn how to deploy it, and it requires intense mental focus. She isn’t consistent about this; e.g., the teleportation lessons illustrate what seems to me to be a more plausible magic-acquisition process.

But, to return to something a little closer to the OP, a counterbalancing delight, for me, is that some, though not all, of her monstrous or magical menaces are shrewd descriptions of mental and emotional ailments. The most obvious one, of course, is that the Dementors/Azkaban = depression; but there are several others. I made a list once; can’t find it; will return with it if I do.

But, yeah, the Latin is simplistic.

Horatio Hellpop 08-02-2009 07:34 AM

Paul Simon's "My Little Town": I always thought it was an American "Penny Lane," wistfully longing for a more innocent time. I heard this song on the radio a few times in high school in the 70s and promptly forgot it. I happened upon the lyrics again recently and he fuckin' HATED that place! Oh well.

The Stafford Cripps 08-02-2009 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FourDeer (Post 11402154)
Eleanorigby: In your defense, the “Diagon Alley” thing works better in a British accent. Yanks say “die-YAG-gunnully”; Brits say, approximately, “DIE-a-GONN-elly”.

Not as far as I'm aware - I've never heard anybody from Britain pronounce "diagonally" without the stress on the 1st a.

Ellen Cherry 08-02-2009 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aspidistra (Post 11399747)
Gopher? What gopher?

He whistles when he talks ... remember now? He tries to get rabbit unstuck when he gets stuck in his hole.

Chronos 08-02-2009 10:41 AM

Quote:

It bothers me that the Pleiades are commonly called "The Seven Sisters" (in the western hemisphere, anyway) but my Subaru's logo has only six stars.
It bothers me that they're called the "Seven Sisters", too, but that's the Europeans' fault, not the car company's. The seventh-brightest and eighth-brightest stars in the Pleiades are just about the same brightness, so if your eye or telescope is sharp enough to pick up seven stars, it'll also be sharp enough to pick up eight. So depending on how good your vision is, they should either be the "Six Sisters" or the "Eight Sisters".

Quote:

Doubtful. Kanga and Roo are _probably_ not real animals.
Well, no, but there's not an animal called a "roo", or a "kanga".

TreacherousCretin 08-02-2009 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chronos (Post 11402536)
It bothers me that they're called the "Seven Sisters", too, but that's the Europeans' fault, not the car company's. The seventh-brightest and eighth-brightest stars in the Pleiades are just about the same brightness, so if your eye or telescope is sharp enough to pick up seven stars, it'll also be sharp enough to pick up eight. So depending on how good your vision is, they should either be the "Six Sisters" or the "Eight Sisters".


You've provided the clarification I was hoping for. 10-Q veddy much!


.

E-Sabbath 08-02-2009 03:33 PM

True. (Gopher is a Disney creation, by the way.) And you're right, all the animals except Rabbit and Owl are toys, and named after 'real' toys.

Lamia 08-02-2009 04:44 PM

The Wizard of Oz has already been mentioned, but I think I'm the first with this particular point. A year or so ago I was watching the movie for the first time since I was a kid, and it struck me that the Cowardly Lion was gay. I mean, from a modern perspective all these "friends of Dorothy" seem kinda gay (three singing, dancing, single men who like Judy Garland? Say no more!), but it was surprising to realize that the Cowardly Lion was actually intended to be a big ol' early Hollywood homosexual.

First off, the Cowardly Lion comes out and says he was "born to be a sissy" in "If I Only Had the Nerve", although I'll admit that this term doesn't necessarily indicate homosexuality. But he also refers to himself as "a dandy lion" in the same song, which seems irrelevant unless we take this as code for "homosexual" (and thus stereotypically weak and effeminate).

Once in the Emerald City, the Tin Man and Scarecrow receive utilitarian repairs. At the same time, Dorothy and the Cowardly Lion get almost identical makeovers, including a perm and pretty hair ribbon. When they go to meet the Great and Powerful Oz, the Cowardly Lion even makes some comment about having had a permanent.

In the "King of the Forest" song, the Cowardly Lion once again displays an interest in fashion and a surprisingly specific knowledge of different fabrics. In a modern film if there were a male character insisting he wanted satin, not chintz, I think it would be clear he was intended to be a flaming queen.

Speaking of which, the same verse of the song refers to queens: "If I were King of the Forest! Not queen, not duke, not prince." If the Cowardly Lion is simply making it clear that he's talking about being a real king and not lesser nobility, why begin with a term referring to female royalty? As with "dandy lion", this makes little sense unless "queen" is intended as code for "effete homosexual" and the lion is talking about what he'd be like if he butched up and were a "king" instead of a "queen".

Finally, he lisps and tends to make limp-wristed gestures. Case closed.

SciFiSam 08-02-2009 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FourDeer (Post 11402154)
Nobody: Your wife is correct about “Bones” < “Sawbones”; that’s straight from Roddenberry. And no, I can’t give a proper cite; it’s just something I remember from a TV Guide interview from a hundred years ago or so.

Eleanorigby: In your defense, the “Diagon Alley” thing works better in a British accent. Yanks say “die-YAG-gunnully”; Brits say, approximately, “DIE-a-GONN-elly”. If you had grown up saying DIE-a-GONN-elly instead of die-YAG-gunnully, I am sure you would have gotten Diagon Alley right away.

(Unless you are, in fact, British. In which case, oopsie!)

Panache45: Someone DID mention the FedEx arrow. Roadfood, post # 78, page 2, about halfway down.

That is not how British people pronounce diagonally. Where did you get that idea?

kittenblue 08-02-2009 06:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefahrbach (Post 11401486)
I agree. It was just too obvious that all she did was look at Latin translations of words and at mythology to name characters, places, and spells. It often disappointed me how easily decipherable they were.

I liked the books, but there really wasn't much mystery to all of this even the first time I read them. I hope that with this extensive response to the Harry Potter thread on this post, this one can be laid to rest, unlike the Audi, Rosemary's Baby, and "Brown-Eyed Girl" threads.;) If anyone is more interested, I recommend looking at "The Magical Worlds of Harry Potter" by David Colbert.

Sigh. You do realize the books are written for children, right? I know they've been around a while, and maybe you grew up with them, but they were not written for Latin scholars. And remember, she was a beginning author when she wrote the first one...total amateur. And magic doesn't exist, so each author can make up their own rules on how it works.

Okay...rant over. I'm really enjoying this thread. But it has convinced me of one thing...the way some people can misinterpret something when they hear it wrong, and never question their firmly-held belief. h, and that my mother was right...rock and rollers mumble too much, and no one can understand what they are saying.

Carry on.....

EricJSmith 08-02-2009 06:45 PM

1. "Pulling my leg" - Biblical story of Isaac and Esau. They were twins. Esau was born first, and Isaac immediately followed holding onto Esau's leg as they were exiting the womb. Esau, being the firstborn, was awarded the birthright, until Isaac tricked him out of it.

2. In the film "Raising Arizona". H.I., or "Hi", a professional convict, and Edwina, a booking cop, meet everytime Hi is booked for a crime. It is Edwina's job to take his mug shot. The routine is that she first takes a picture of him straight on, and then a profile shot; with a flash bulb flash, and Edwina saying "Turn to the right".

Hi and Edwina fall in love, and on their wedding day, as they are standing side by side, the wedding photographer takes their picture with a flash bulb going off. Hi then automatically turns to the right. No attention is drawn to it, Hi just naturally does it.

mbh 08-02-2009 09:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry (Post 11402513)
He whistles when he talks ... remember now? He tries to get rabbit unstuck when he gets stuck in his hole.

That sounds like the beaver in Lady and the Tramp. Or are whistling rodents a recurrent leitmotif in Disney?

Malleus, Incus, Stapes! 08-02-2009 09:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EricJSmith (Post 11403741)
1. "Pulling my leg" - Biblical story of Isaac and Esau. They were twins. Esau was born first, and Isaac immediately followed holding onto Esau's leg as they were exiting the womb. Esau, being the firstborn, was awarded the birthright, until Isaac tricked him out of it.

Isaac was Esau's dad. Jacob was the twin brother.

Are you saying that "pulling one's leg" comes from the Bible story?

shantih 08-02-2009 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by E-Sabbath (Post 11403234)
True. (Gopher is a Disney creation, by the way.) And you're right, all the animals except Rabbit and Owl are toys, and named after 'real' toys.

Ooo! Ooo! I can pull out one of my bits of trivia here: Gopher says several times in the cartoon that he's 'not in the book,' meaning not in the phone book, but it's a sly nod to the fact that he was created specially for the cartoon.

Chronos 08-02-2009 10:27 PM

Quote:

But he also refers to himself as "a dandy lion" in the same song, which seems irrelevant unless we take this as code for "homosexual" (and thus stereotypically weak and effeminate).
Even if there were no such thing as homosexuality, a dandelion is still a kind of flower, and flowers are the sort of thing that are associated with not being fierce. Unless you can come up with any examples of the Lion being actually, you know, attracted to other males, I don't think there's really a strong case for him being gay.

TheseGoToEleven 08-02-2009 11:22 PM

Sometimes it takes one to know one...
 
I'm don't lean that way personally (not that there's anything wrong with that), but way back around 1980 when I lived in San Francisco for a couple of years, I went with some gay friends to a showing of the Wizard of Oz at the Castro Theater, deep in the heart of a very openly gay part of town. Yes, Judy Garland was undoubtedly the main atraction, but as the Cowardly Lion sang his first song, the line "I'm just a Dandy Lion" practically got a standing ovation. That audience all sure thought they knew exactly what the references were about! That, plus the the consistency of the portrayal as pointed out by Lamia, leads me to agree.

FourDeer 08-03-2009 12:17 AM

Scifisam2009 and G. Odoreida both objected to my attempted explanation for why Eleanorigby didn’t get the Diagon Alley joke. Where, they ask, did I get that notion of a British version of “diagonally”?

From a televised interview with J.K. Rowling, actually; that is (VERY approximately) how she pronounced it, I thought. I assumed it was typical; perhaps she was just using that emphasis to make the joke work.


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