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-   -   Obvious things about a creative work you realize after the millionth time (OPEN SPOILERS POSSIBLE) (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=525685)

Guy Incognito 02-11-2020 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by furryman (Post 21984134)
There's another type of Nickelodeon too. They were simular to player pianos except they were an amalgam of a bunch of different instruments. They had several working models on display at the Lightner Museum. Really neat to watch.

I think these are also known as "orchestreons". There's an old-fashioned soda shop in Columbus, IN that has a few working models:

Zaharakos Ice Cream Parlor - http://www.zaharakos.com/

CalMeacham 02-15-2020 09:51 PM

I saw the Bugs Bunny cartoon Rabbit Hood today. I've seen it a zillion times since I was a kid, but I think that I just sort of accepted many of the details, which I really noticed for the first time today.

The cartoon is set in medieval England (presumably circa the 13th century, when Robin Hood was supposed to be active). Bugs tries to steal one of The King's carrots, which has an alarm attached to it. This draws the attention of the Sheriff of Nottingham, who, instead of a shotgun, menaces Bugs with a bow and arrow.

The Sheriff wears tights, a puffy set of pantaloons and a collar ruff. Not really appropriate for the period, but believable for later England. What I have tuned out all these years was that he wore a vest more suited to the Old West, complete with a five-pointed star, a set of cowboy boots, a cowboy hat (also with a star), and a handlebar moustache more suited to the 1880s than the 1280s.
I guess that's because he's the Sheriff of Nottingham. The Old West Sheriff of Nottingham.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbit...e:RabbHood.jpg

Slow Moving Vehicle 02-28-2020 11:28 PM

As my sig suggests, I'm fond of Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett's Good Omens; I've read it probably a dozen times over the last 25 years.

One scene in the novel features a flying saucer landing in Oxfordshire, disgorging three aliens, two of whom stop a car to talk to the driver. The third one, which is described as looking "like a pepperpot", rolls down the ramp and falls over, beeping frantically.

Longtime Whovian that I am, I immediately recognized it a Dalek. TvTropes listed it as a Shout Out, and further noted that it was a twofer. I never though thought about the fact that Daleks don't beep - their iconic vocalization is "EX-TER-MIN-ATE!"

Only today, after literal decades, did I realize that there is another, even more iconic robotic lifeform that's shaped like a pepper shaker, and communicates in beeps. I can't believe it's taken me twenty-five years to recognize R2D2. SMDumbassH. :smack:

This is as close as I've ever come to literally meeting the conditions of the OP.

Blue Blistering Barnacle 03-16-2020 08:29 AM

Just watched “Bladerunner: Final Cut” with my son last night.

When Roy dies, he releases a dove, which of course symbolizes death (departing soul).

I only now just realized that this represents a strong (unambiguous) signal from film creators that they believe replicants HAVE souls. (Yes, I know it’s all pretty strongly messaged in other ways, but I’d always felt you could debate whether they really have souls or simply act like that. That goes for humans, too.)

Or maybe that’s just Deckard’s view...

Blue Blistering Barnacle 03-16-2020 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle (Post 22192757)
Just watched “Bladerunner: Final Cut” with my son last night.

When Roy dies, he releases a dove, which of course symbolizes death (departing soul).

I only now just realized that this represents a strong (unambiguous) signal from film creators that they believe replicants HAVE souls. (Yes, I know it’s all pretty strongly messaged in other ways, but I’d always felt you could debate whether they really have souls or simply act like that. That goes for humans, too.)

Or maybe that’s just Deckard’s view...



Screw it, I take that back- Roy decides to carry a dove around for whatever reason, and of course he releases it as he dies, leaving Deckard (and audience) to interpret that as his soul departing.

Alessan 03-16-2020 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle (Post 22192800)
Screw it, I take that back- Roy decides to carry a dove around for whatever reason, and of course he releases it as he dies, leaving Deckard (and audience) to interpret that as his soul departing.

The dove also represents the Holy Spirit, and if you add fact that he drove a nail through his palm earlier in the scene, that pretty much implies that Roy is (or sees himself as) some sort of Christ figure.

commasense 03-16-2020 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alessan (Post 22192895)
The dove also represents the Holy Spirit, and if you add fact that he drove a nail through his palm earlier in the scene, that pretty much implies that Roy is (or sees himself as) some sort of Christ figure.

Well, that's an idea that never occurred to me. Thanks for suggesting it.

Pleonast 03-16-2020 10:10 AM

I finally noticed that George Harrison’s My Sweet Lord has the Hare Krishna mantra in the backup vocals. It’s not subtle or anything, I just never noticed it before.

Little Nemo 03-16-2020 11:05 AM

Stan Lee played a mailman who delivered a package to "Tony Stank" in Captain America: Civil War. It's a funny line but I just realized it's also a callback to Lee's cameos in the first two Iron Man movies, where Stark mistook Lee (playing himself) for Hugh Hefner and Larry King.

Blue Blistering Barnacle 03-20-2020 02:07 PM

I was talking to my kids last night about vaccines. I was mentioning the possibility of building viral antigens into vaccinia (the virus used to prevent smallpox). This devolved into a discussion of Jenner, smallpox, and cowpox; and how “vaccinate” used to mean “inoculate with vaccinia (cowpox)”, which ultimately got “nouned” to vaccine for any generic preventative inoculation.

As I was saying it, I realized that the “vac” in vaccine stands for “cow”.

Then I heard it all again on Science Friday this afternoon!

CalMeacham 03-20-2020 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle (Post 22200767)
I was talking to my kids last night about vaccines. I was mentioning the possibility of building viral antigens into vaccinia (the virus used to prevent smallpox). This devolved into a discussion of Jenner, smallpox, and cowpox; and how “vaccinate” used to mean “inoculate with vaccinia (cowpox)”, which ultimately got “nouned” to vaccine for any generic preventative inoculation.

As I was saying it, I realized that the “vac” in vaccine stands for “cow”.

Then I heard it all again on Science Friday this afternoon!

Many years ago I similarly had an epiphany when I realized that they called cowboys "Buckaroos" because the word is an Anglicized corruption of the Spanish word vaceros ("cattle herder").

Roderick Femm 03-20-2020 08:27 PM

This has probably been mentioned in this thread before, but I just noticed it so that makes it repeatable.

At the end of the intro song to Two and a Half Men, Jake (Angus Jones) morphs from the kid he was at the beginning to whatever he looks like this season. I'm not sure when I first noticed it, but lately I've realized watching reruns that it must have been going on all along, but it wasn't very noticeable when he was still young.

jerez 03-21-2020 02:47 AM

Quote:

...the word is an Anglicized corruption of the Spanish word vaceros
Vaquero, with q.

Quote:

At the end of the intro song to Two and a Half Men, Jake (Angus Jones) morphs from the kid he was at the beginning to whatever he looks like this season. I'm not sure when I first noticed it, but lately I've realized watching reruns that it must have been going on all along, but it wasn't very noticeable when he was still young.
I was surprised by that, too. I stopped watching shortly after Sheen was fired, and some time later I noticed the kid was much bigger. A wild guess: Maybe not all the seasons were sold in the same syndication package, or maybe Angus Jones wasn’t featured as much during a season or two. I recall seeing that his character had returned from military service but I don’t remember any episodes that led up to that or showed him or the others during his service. Or maybe he just grew up very quickly.

Robot Arm 03-21-2020 08:24 AM

At the end of Caddyshack, the grudge match between Judge Smails and Al Czervik is tied as they're playing the final hole. Smails sinks his putt, and it's Danny's turn. Ty tells him that if he misses it, they lose. Doesn't that mean that if he sinks it, the match will be tied? If Danny makes the putt, either the wager is a tie or they keep playing. I'm not an expert on golf, but is there any scoring system in which one putt can change a loss to a win?

But then something happens. Al says "double-or-nothing he makes it," and the judge agrees. Now the wager really does depend on this one putt. Smails went from a situation where he had nothing to lose to one where he could lose the whole bet. What an idiot!

Blue Blistering Barnacle 03-21-2020 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalMeacham (Post 22201254)
Many years ago I similarly had an epiphany when I realized that they called cowboys "Buckaroos" because the word is an Anglicized corruption of the Spanish word vaceros ("cattle herder").


Huh!

Cows will rule after we are gone.

Dendarii Dame 03-21-2020 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle (Post 22201908)
Huh!

Cows will rule after we are gone.

The "milk" will inherit the Earth. Or the " 'Moo' "k will inherit the Earth.

Blue Blistering Barnacle 03-24-2020 05:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dendarii Dame (Post 22201934)
The "milk" will inherit the Earth. Or the " 'Moo' "k will inherit the Earth.


“Blessed are the cheese makers”

CalMeacham 03-24-2020 07:26 PM

[QUOTE=jerez;22201677]Vaquero, with q.



I knew that, but for some reason, my hands typed it with a "c". Probably because of the stuff about "vaccine"

Little Nemo 03-24-2020 07:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle (Post 22201908)
Huh!

Cows will rule after we are gone.

I believe they're after the birds and before the slugs. cite

Exapno Mapcase 03-24-2020 10:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 22193081)
Stan Lee played a mailman who delivered a package to "Tony Stank" in Captain America: Civil War. It's a funny line but I just realized it's also a callback to Lee's cameos in the first two Iron Man movies, where Stark mistook Lee (playing himself) for Hugh Hefner and Larry King.

It's also an homage to the newspaper comic strip created by Stan and drawn by Dan DeCarlo called Willie Lumpkin that ran from December 1959 to May 6, 1961. Stan and Jack Kirby introduced another Willie Lumpkin character as the Fantastic Four's mailman in 1963.

Stan also acted as the character in the 2005 Fantastic Four movie.

Little Nemo 03-25-2020 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase (Post 22209083)
It's also an homage to the newspaper comic strip created by Stan and drawn by Dan DeCarlo called Willie Lumpkin that ran from December 1959 to May 6, 1961. Stan and Jack Kirby introduced another Willie Lumpkin character as the Fantastic Four's mailman in 1963.

Stan also acted as the character in the 2005 Fantastic Four movie.

I understood it was a Willie Lumpkin reference. But I had missed the significance of Stan Lee's character getting Tony Stark's name wrong after Tony Stark had gotten his name wrong in the past.

In case anyone is wondering, I watched a YouTube video of all of Lee's MCU scenes and seeing them together was when I made the connection.

Exapno Mapcase 03-25-2020 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 22211009)
I understood it was a Willie Lumpkin reference. But I had missed the significance of Stan Lee's character getting Tony Stark's name wrong after Tony Stark had gotten his name wrong in the past.

In case anyone is wondering, I watched a YouTube video of all of Lee's MCU scenes and seeing them together was when I made the connection.

Yeah, I was just adding on to what you said for those who didn't grow up on the comics.

terentii 03-26-2020 07:49 PM

In the Columbo episode "Forgotten Lady," strains of "Walking My Baby Back Home," from the movie Janet Leigh uses to establish her alibi, are woven into the background incidental music. I think this has to be unique in the series; I don't know of another instance where something besides the studio music composed for the show was heard.

(The episode where Johnny Cash was the murderer might be an exception, but I don't think that one is ever shown anymore. I certainly haven't seen it in decades.)

Enola Straight 03-27-2020 12:02 PM

The Amityville Horror.

Unlike other spooky/satanic scary movies of the 70s which were at times forgetable, like The Devil's Rain or The Hearse, there is ONE aspect of this film which makes it enduring...

https://bloody-disgusting.com/wp-con...Amityville.jpg




























The fucking House
HAS EYES!!!

Telemark 03-27-2020 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Enola Straight (Post 22214277)
The fucking House
HAS EYES!!!

It was kind of obvious from the original movie poster. How did you miss that? The sequel made it even more clear.

Peter Morris 03-27-2020 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Enola Straight (Post 22214277)
The Amityville Horror.
...
The fucking House HAS EYES!!!

I'd say more than that, theside of the house looks like a human skull.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Telemark (Post 22214369)
How did you miss that?

How did you miss the point of the whole thread?

Telemark 03-27-2020 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter Morris (Post 22214471)
How did you miss the point of the whole thread?

It's one thing if it was subtle, but the advertising campaign emphasized it! Of course, we can all miss obvious things, I get that. :)

Blue Blistering Barnacle 03-30-2020 07:17 PM

I was working from home today, using a desktop and a laptop at the same time, very non-ergonomic. I was stretching out to the laptop doing one handed copy and pastes, and I suddenly realized *why* paste is CTRL-v.

Remove text is CTRL-x: check
Copy is CTRL-c: check
Paste is CTRL-v: what the heck? Oh, yeah (::dope smack::) “x” is next to “c” is next to “v”

Little Nemo 03-30-2020 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle (Post 22220610)
I was working from home today, using a desktop and a laptop at the same time, very non-ergonomic. I was stretching out to the laptop doing one handed copy and pastes, and I suddenly realized *why* paste is CTRL-v.

Remove text is CTRL-x: check
Copy is CTRL-c: check
Paste is CTRL-v: what the heck? Oh, yeah (::dope smack::) “x” is next to “c” is next to “v”

It's poor design. They shouldn't have put active keys next to each other and made it easy to hit the wrong key by mistake. (I've done it. I've copied a section of text with CTRL-C and then inserted it where I wanted with CTRL-V - only, oops, I hit CTRL-C a second time by mistake instead of CTRL-V. I just lost the section of text I had copied. Or I wanted to copy a section of text with CTRL-C but erased it by accidentally hitting CTRL-X.) They should have put neutral keys between the active keys to separate them.

Peter Morris 03-30-2020 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 22220790)
(I've done it. I've copied a section of text with CTRL-C and then inserted it where I wanted with CTRL-V - only, oops, I hit CTRL-C a second time by mistake instead of CTRL-V. I just lost the section of text I had copied.

But that can be rectified with CTRL-Z.

rowrrbazzle 03-31-2020 12:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle (Post 22220610)
I was working from home today, using a desktop and a laptop at the same time, very non-ergonomic. I was stretching out to the laptop doing one handed copy and pastes, and I suddenly realized *why* paste is CTRL-v.

Remove text is CTRL-x: check
Copy is CTRL-c: check
Paste is CTRL-v: what the heck? Oh, yeah (::dope smack::) “x” is next to “c” is next to “v”

The "v" looks like a caret ^ that's been inverted like so ˇ, both used in proofreading to indicate insertions. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caret#Proofreading_mark

Elendil's Heir 03-31-2020 03:09 PM

Just saw the Tom Hanks desert-island movie Cast Away for, I think, the third time, and finally noticed, in an early panning shot of the rooms of his character Chuck's house, that he'd won several awards as a yachtsman. Made it clearer why he was able to later build and capably sail his raft to escape the island.

Little Nemo 03-31-2020 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter Morris (Post 22220930)
But that can be rectified with CTRL-Z.

I stand by what I said. CTRL-Z,C,B,M would have been better than CTRL-Z,X,C,V.

Yorkshire Pudding 03-31-2020 05:45 PM

In our house, when somebody is embarrassingly slow on the uptake, the phrase used when admitting it/being riduculed for it is "Oh, like the boots!" which references the time - about 18 months after first seeing it - that I realised the sitcom 'Doc Martin' isn't solely called that because it's about a doctor called Martin.

Y'know...? "Doc Martin"? Doc Martens...like the boots?

commasense 04-01-2020 09:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 22222281)
I stand by what I said. CTRL-Z,C,B,M would have been better than CTRL-Z,X,C,V.

Sorry to disagree, but I do all those functions with my left hand alone, and although I have pretty large hands, CTRL-M is not comfortable. Although I very occasionally mis-key CTRL-V (usually as CTRL-B, which bolds in most programs) CTRL-M would simply be unworkable. And as Peter Morris pointed out, if you hit the wrong key, CTRL-Z fixes it instantly.

Enola Straight 04-02-2020 08:04 PM

In the DC Cinematic Universe...

The Wayne Enterprises logo
https://t6.rbxcdn.com/4333e2ab08b7a14b469e8ff8ab3addd2

look at it...upside-down.

SPOILER:
It is a mausoleum for two...Dr. Thomas and Martha Wayne!
https://www.salemstones.com/wp-conte...ronze-door.jpg

DPRK 04-09-2020 05:43 AM

Star Trek
 
I must not be a great sailor, or else I was dazzled by the sci-fi, because I always quickly assumed the "warp drive" referred to bending and twisting space (it does, of course), before thinking about, you know, warping a ship.

CalMeacham 04-09-2020 02:07 PM

Okay, this isn't "obvious", but there isn't any other thread appropriate to put this in.

In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, in the scene where Indy and his father have gone to Berlin to rescue the GRail diary, there's a scene where the Nazis are having a book burning bonfire, and Indy inadvertently tuns into Adolph Hitler.

Playing in the background was a march that I recognized as what I was always told was the Hohenzollern March, but which is evidently properly called the Hohenfriedberger March*, the composition of which is credited to Frederick II (the Great), although apparently no one really believes this. It's named after the Prussian victory at the Battle of Hohenfriedberger in 1745. (And the tune was apparently inspired by an even earlier march, the Pappenheimer March)

In any event, the version in the movie had parts added onto it, and I wondered if this was a part I was unaware of, or if some other march segued into the Hohenfriedberger. It turns out that the march played in the movie was actually the Königgrätz March , written by Johann Gottfried Piefke to celebrate (what else?) the Prussian victory at the Battle of Königgrätz in 1866, the decisive battle of the Austro-Prussian War. Piefke deliberately included the Hohenfriedberger March in his own composition, so I wasn't completely wrong (aside from the name).

I never would have known this, but I picked up a CD of Herbert von Karajan and the Berlin Philharmonik playing a selection of marches (all European, and mostly German, for that matter. Not a Sousa in the bunch), and it included both the Hohenfriedburger and the Königgrätz Marches.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Der_Hohenfriedberger
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%B...%A4tzer_Marsch

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgEoDT7ODXI



*The Hohenzollern March is actually a very different composition by Gustav Mahler, composed in 1880

Little Nemo 04-13-2020 11:38 PM

Not directly linked to a creative work but I've seen every episode of The West Wing and a bunch of movies and TV shows without realizing this.

I was just watching a YouTube video about the White House and I learned the Oval Office is not in the main building, the Executive Residence, which is where I always thought it was. It's out in the West Wing and it's been there since 1909.

Irishman 04-14-2020 02:02 PM

[Smack]

Horatio Hellpop 04-14-2020 10:16 PM

Lex Luthor is the NIETZCHEAN Supereman!

Irishman 04-15-2020 12:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 22247970)
I was just watching a YouTube video about the White House and I learned the Oval Office is not in the main building, the Executive Residence, which is where I always thought it was. It's out in the West Wing and it's been there since 1909.

So where was it before 1909?

Elendil's Heir 04-15-2020 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 22247970)
Not directly linked to a creative work but I've seen every episode of The West Wing and a bunch of movies and TV shows without realizing this.

I was just watching a YouTube video about the White House and I learned the Oval Office is not in the main building, the Executive Residence, which is where I always thought it was. It's out in the West Wing and it's been there since 1909.

True. There is a Yellow Oval Room in the residence, however: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_Oval_Room

furryman 04-15-2020 01:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Horatio Hellpop (Post 22249989)
Lex Luthor is the NIETZCHEAN Supereman!

Probably a fairly obvious compliant, but it occurred to me that if Lex devoted his intellect and money to solving the world's problems he'd be a bigger hero than Superman.

digs 04-15-2020 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding (Post 22222473)
In our house, when somebody is embarrassingly slow on the uptake, the phrase used when admitting it/being riduculed for it is "Oh, like the boots!" which references the time - about 18 months after first seeing it - that I realised the sitcom 'Doc Martin' isn't solely called that because it's about a doctor called Martin.

Y'know...? "Doc Martin"? Doc Martens...like the boots?

I've noticed the similarity, but so? Why would they name the doctor after a pair of boots?

Kamino Neko 04-15-2020 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by furryman (Post 22251164)
Probably a fairly obvious compliant, but it occurred to me that if Lex devoted his intellect and money to solving the world's problems he'd be a bigger hero than Superman.

Been brought up a lot in various Superman media. At least once by Lex, who justified not doing so by claiming that he had to take down the Alien, or humanity would always be dependent.

Mahaloth 04-15-2020 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Nemo (Post 22247970)

I was just watching a YouTube video about the White House and I learned the Oval Office is not in the main building, the Executive Residence, which is where I always thought it was. It's out in the West Wing and it's been there since 1909.

I think this shot of the White House gives a better feeling for what it is like.

CalMeacham 04-15-2020 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Horatio Hellpop (Post 22249989)
Lex Luthor is the NIETZCHEAN Supereman!

Not that far off. When Siegel and Schuster started playing with ideas for Superman they toyed with the idea of an evil Superman. And they created a character called the Ultra Humanite (in case Nietzche wanted to sue them for copyright infringement from beyond the grave, I guess).

They ultimately turned out a good Superman, but gave him Luthor as an antagonist. In his first appearance Luthor looked kind of like Tom Edison, with hair and all. I guess that made sense -- he was an Evil Inventor. He had bald minions, though. They soon realized that the Bald Minion look worked better on Luthor himself.

Yorkshire Pudding 04-15-2020 02:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digs (Post 22251203)
I've noticed the similarity, but so? Why would they name the doctor after a pair of boots?

I think "Doc Marten" is such a known thing that they must have meant it. It doesn't have to be about boots, or be named after boots per se: they could have written a sitcom about a Doctor called Martin, then have the name hit them and think it too perfect to waste.

Like...if there was a thing about a gigolo named Ford, it would be called Ford Escort, regardless of its being nothing to do with the car.

At the very least, even if it was pure coincidence, the fact that I didn't notice it AT ALL is embarrassing. I'm a copywriter for crying out loud.

WildaBeast 04-15-2020 03:03 PM

Along the same lines as the Doc Martin thing, it took me literally decades to notice the word play in title of the movie Sister Act. I always took it as a literal description of the movie's premise: woman pretends to be a nun. It never dawned on me that a sister act is a musical group made up of women who are sisters, such as The Andrews Sisters.


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