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Old 06-11-2019, 01:33 AM
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The U.S. was a leader in the metricization of currency for its own sake! The original American standard was that a silver dollar had the average weight of worn-down Spanish pieces of eight reales, so the base unit was a reale, called a "bit" in the States, and worth 12 cents. However no one-bit coin was ever minted: the first coin minted by the U.S. Treasury was the silver half-disme; it took 2 half-dismes to make a bit. No wonder that when pries are quoted in bits, it's almost always an even number of bits.

The silver half-disme was a short-lived coin. Nickel mines wanted in on the action and named the replacement for the half-disme after themselves.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Decimal inches are common in electronics.
Traditionally, IC pin spacing was in .1 or .05 inch increments.
Back in the Triassic Era, most of the ICs I worked with had two rows of 8 pins each with 0.1 inch spacing. However IIRC, IBM's MST-2 IC's had four rows of 4 pins (arranged in a square) with ⅛ inch spacing. IBM did everything differently from The.Rest.of.the.World. Allegedly this was to make it harder for IBM technicians and engineers to find work at other companies.

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Thais are lovers, not fighters and have an ecumenical system for quoting the dimensions of wooden boards. Thickness is given in inches, width in centimeters, length in sok (the Traditional Thai measure).