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Old 08-12-2019, 06:10 PM
DrDeth is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 42,233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenman View Post
Go to page two. Hit control F, search for mayor. Click that link in my post.

If you donít read what I have written in the last 24 hours, Iím not going to do the work to repost what Iíve already provided, make a link to what youíve ignored, or physically move your eyeballs for you.
Man, tying a number must be HARD. Psst the answer is 100.


Mayor Sam Liccardo, who led the push to study the policy, said the restriction may possibly be hurting housing production in San Jose. The mayor said heís heard of developers not moving forward with housing projects potentially because of the Ellis Act ordinance.....Liccardo said he knew of at least three housing projects negatively impacted by the law. But the cityís housing director Jacky Morales-Ferrand said that the department canít say whether the projects Liccardo referred to didnít move forward because of the Ellis Act ordinance.

ďEllis is designed to make developers pay,Ē she said. ďBut is this Ellis ordinance designed so itís acting as a barrier? Is it the fundamental reason that development is not going forward is the question.Ē


Note the following words "may" "possibly" "heard of" . Liccardo is a known tool of the developers. Note that the experts disagreed with him.

The Ellis Act Ordinance only applies when a developer plans to demolish rent-controled apartments from the rental market. This ordinance requires 50% of new apartments built on the site of previously rent-controled apartments be subject to the Apartment Rent Ordinance.



Later in that same link "Thousands of new affordable units

On Monday, San Joseís Housing Department announced that it had dedicated $100 million to build 1,144 affordable units. Just a day later at the Feb. 5 City Council meeting, the council made a commitment for additional funding for 249 of those units.

The three developments, located on Page, North 21st and Balbach streets, are the first wave of 11 new affordable housing projects. If all 11 move forward, it will push the city over 20 percent of the way to meeting its goal of building 10,000 new affordable units by 2022. S