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Old 08-29-2019, 08:13 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 18,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
If you buy theater tickets and then decide not to go, do you blame the theater?
And childless people pay the same school tax without even the possibility of direct benefit. So your parents had it good.

The person with the million dollar house the fire department saved is seeing twice the benefit as the person with the $500 K house.
As Budget Player Cadet mentioned, brackets should be based on marginal utility, or pain. Do you object to all people feeling more or less the same pain from their tax burden? If not, taxes on the upper brackets should be a lot higher.
My point wasn't that my parents shouldn't have paid school tax, but that we didn't derive any direct benefit from it- I didn't attend public school. I'm not seeing what your argument is- that somehow I derived some benefit from the money my parents paid to our local school district, that I didn't attend? That doesn't make any sense.

As far as the relative value of communal services, you're trying to have it both ways, by saying that $1 in tax burden to a minimum wage person is more of a burden to them than $1000 is to a person making 15 million a year is to them, and then turning around and saying that if the minimum wage person's home burned down and cost them $60k that it's less of an impact to them than the 15 million income person losing a house worth millions of dollars.

I'd argue that either way, the lower income person bears a heavier burden of tax AND if basic services/law and order were to break down. The rich guy has resources- insurance, cash reserves, other property, and so on- he might lose a $5 million house, but he can go live at the Omni for a few months until he finds another one. That poor person is screwed, even if it's "only" a house worth 80k.

You can't say that the burden is greater in one situation because of the differing relative value of money for the two people, and then turn around and deal in absolute dollar amounts and say that the guy losing more money has more at stake.