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Old 07-22-2019, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iiandyiiii View Post
As far as I can tell, there's still no actual evidence (aside from a maybe-exists, maybe-it-doesn't supposed social media post about nieces/nephews that may or may not have been made by the person in question) that she married her brother. And if I understand immigration law at the time correctly, there would have been no immigration motive -- her brother would have had the same ability to immigrate as her husband.

Sounds a lot like birtherism to me -- bullshit evidence, tons of innuendo from internet nutbars, and (unfortunately) significant numbers of Americans who latch on because they're eager for any reason, even bullshit ones, to cast aspersions on dark-skinned people who reach high office.
Dad had an affair. They're only half siblings. If so, I assume that, that would negate the immigration advantage.

You would also need to look at the timelines. Plausibly, Elmi isn't the most organized person in the world, decides at the last minute that he'll come to try living with the rest of the family while going to college in the US and, at the point he makes the announcement, the amount of time it will take for approval is insufficient. The marriage route might be the only pathway to get him over in time for school, without having to wait a year or two. And maybe Elmi isn't real sold on the whole America thing to begin with (he does ultimately decided to go back to the UK, after all) so he's going to go to a university in the UK if the visa thing can't be figured out in time, rather than work at McD's for a year or two waiting for things to be figured out.

Most likely it would have been a longer process, after all. Whatever caused the family to be split up would have to be explained and the family connection established. You're fighting both a perjury accusation from previous disclosures of your family size and having to establish a new legal record that goes against previous ones, which isn't the favorite thing of a bureaucracy. What's on paper is always more believable than the actual person's word.