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Old 07-03-2019, 07:42 PM
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Snowboarder Bo is offline
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Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
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The AP has a good article about the NHL's Restricted Free Agent status and trading; I learned a bit.
Quote:
Drafting and developing players is what NHL teams attempt to do well as they chase the Stanley Cup, certainly in the salary cap era. And, that is one of the reasons teams are reluctant to extend offer sheets to restricted free agents.

“The way the system is set up with offer sheets, it’s too punitive because of the draft picks you have to give up,” said sports agent Kurt Overhardt, who represents Trouba. “The record has shown it doesn’t make sense for a lot of teams. Montreal took a chance, forcing a notoriously frugal owner to make a decision and he matched. But as long as you have the cap space, you have to match.”
Like, I didn't know this:
Quote:
If Carolina chose not to match the offer for Aho, the Canadiens would have given up a draft pick in the first, second and third rounds. If Montreal offered a little more money on the offer sheet, it risked losing an additional first-round selection. And if the franchise offered Aho an average of at least $10,568,590 over the course of the contract, it would have lost four first-round picks if the Hurricanes refused to pay Aho that much.

Agents of restricted free agents attempt to use the possibility of offer sheets in negotiations. Teams, meanwhile, know offer sheets are extremely uncommon and they seem to have the power in talks. That is true particularly when players don’t have arbitration rights.
I didn't know that draft trades were an intrinsic part of RFA offers, nor that they were so onerous.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 07-03-2019 at 07:45 PM.