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Old 04-07-2014, 08:35 AM
yellowjacketcoder is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 3,088
I'll start with the obligatory "I'm not a teacher, but"... the but in my case being that my family is about half teachers (two cousins, two aunts, an uncle and my grandfather).

I think part of the issue is that teachers end up with at least 3 bosses. The administrators, the parents, and politicians on the school board. They also only have so much control over their end product - whether the students or the parents are involved will make a bigger different than almost anything the teacher can do. So, in that sense, it's a bit different from being a regular office drone, where you usually have only one boss, and while someone else can affect the quality of your work, nobody is actively trying to NOT get the work done.

That being said, there are good teachers and bad teachers, like in every profession. I had a couple of friends that went into teaching. One of them went in because she liked music and wanted to be a band director. Our entire peer group though this was a bad idea because she was very quiet and shy and there was no way she'd be able to control a class on hormone-laden teenagers. We were right - she lasted one semester and then drifted among a half-dozen jobs before settling on something totally unrelated to her teaching career.

The other is a sweet girl, but has the ability to be tough as nails and in your face as need be when the situation calls for it. Sure, she complains about her students, but she's been doing it for 6 years now and is handling it just fine.

As far as different jobs - both the uncle and grandfather were retired military when they went into teaching. They said that handling the kids was no different than handling a bunch of rowdy privates - generally you got them to do their work, occasionally you used your command voice, but the same no-nonsense attitude from a previous job was fine. The problem for both was the administration, which was more concerned with metrics than with the students actually learning. The cousins both left teaching for something else (real estate and accounting), and have never looked back.