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Old 08-21-2019, 09:08 PM
DrDeth is online now
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Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 42,749
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenman View Post
..

But when Nobel Prize winning economists like Krugman and the architect of the Swedish welfare system, Gunnar Myrdal, tell people it is foolish to think that rent control is good economic policy, people should listen. ....
Ok, then cite them. Cute where they said, exactly, that those two Nobel laureates said "rent control leads to housing shortages".

Simply saying they did is the argument from authority.

Citing their exact words is not.

I'll wait.

Now, i want their words, in context. Not somebody else quoting them. Their words on their papers.

Yes, they love to quote "Rent control has in certain Western countries constituted, maybe, the worst example of poor planning by governments lacking courage and vision. However, the certain western nation he was talking about was Sweden, not the USA . So, in context.




https://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleade...ard-that-right

Oh, and instead of a off the cuff out of context comment I leave you with a actual paper:
https://scholarship.law.cornell.edu/...&context=cjlpp

With middle-class neighborhoods disappearing and society becoming increasingly stratified by social class, 266 now, more than ever, it is
important to adopt policies that encourage mixed-income living arrangements, particularly those that deconcentrate the poor. Rent control
should be used as one part of a larger strategy to revitalize decaying
neighborhoods, disperse the poor, and promote higher homeownership
rates in inner cities. By enlisting the spirited and underutilized determination of potential homeowners, along with their stabilizing and positively socializing presence, blighted communities may be transformed
into healthy and stable places to live. The proposed rent control schemeseeks to weave the marginalized poor into the mainstream fabric of society and prevent unhealthy neighborhood conditions from producing the
costly "concentration effects" that benefit no one.