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Old 06-12-2019, 01:02 AM
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June 12, 1939: Shooting begins on Paramount Pictures' Dr. Cyclops, the first horror film photographed in three-strip Technicolor.

Technicolor envisioned a full-color process as early as 1924 and was actively developing such a process by 1929. By 1931, however, the Great Depression took its toll on the movie industry, which began to cut back on expenses. The production of color films had decreased dramatically by 1932, when Burton Wescott and Joseph A. Ball completed work on a new three-color movie camera. Technicolor could now promise studios a full range of colors, as opposed to the limited red-green spectrum of previous films. The new camera simultaneously exposes three strips of black-and-white film, each of which records a different color of the spectrum. The new process will last until the last Technicolor feature film is produced in 1955.

Technicolor's advantage over most early natural-color processes is that it is a subtractive synthesis rather than an additive one: unlike the additive Kinemacolor and Chronochrome processes, Technicolor prints do not require any special projection equipment. Unlike the additive Dufaycolor process, the projected image is not dimmed by a light-absorbing and obtrusive mosaic color filter layer. Very importantly, compared to competing subtractive systems, Technicolor offers the best balance between high image quality and speed of printing.