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  #51  
Old 11-08-2019, 06:41 PM
Tzigone is offline
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I was in high school, so too young for the group you are asking about. But I recall flare-legged jeans coming in the latter part of the '90s and a friend and I swearing we'd never wear bell bottoms. Soon enough everyone wore flare-legged jeans. It's something we thought of as like the '70s, but really wasn't. Chunky shoes (high heels) were very in, but that was probably more 1998/1999. The flare stayed for a long while (as did the low-rise look, but I think that came later?).
  #52  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:05 PM
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1993 was when I bought my Sportster. Still have it. Harleys were the hottest thing going and most people couldn't walk into a Harley dealership and ride home on a bike. I ordered mine in October and it didn't come in until April '93. Wait times for the big twins were way longer. Used Harleys were selling for top dollar because you didn't have to wait.
Another thing I remember about that time was that guys my age were cutting their hair. I was born in 1957 and most guys my age were still rocking the 80s rock star look until about that time. Younger guys had been doing shorter hair for a while but early 90s was when I noticed my contemporaries suddenly going to highly barbered military style cuts and to the now cliche shaved head/goatee combo. I followed suit and still keep it shaved or super short. Keep in mind I live in the conservative mid-west and fashion trends take longer (or did back then) to hit here.
Music wise, (for me) SRV had brought blues and blues rock back to the forefront and that was largely what I was listening to. That was also when I went through a phase of what was known then as "ambient" music. Most of my music collection was on cassette tape at that time but I was starting to shift to CDs.
  #53  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:17 PM
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I was starting a second career during the mid '90s and the culture of the time, such as it was, made little impression on me.

I didn't get back into rock n' roll until later.
  #54  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
I'll never understand your generations' utter hatred of Disco.
I was never cool--it was all just radio to me. I suspect a synthetic marketing war dreamed up by Megavinyl to make both genres relevant and, thus, stimulate buzz and sales all around. Or maybe it was stoners vs. cokeheads? I'm just glad Punk came along as the neglected red-headed stepchild.
  #55  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:44 PM
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What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?

I turned 20 in 1993. I remember quite a lot, in a nostalgic way.


Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

Yep, mostly in fashion. I think this was in part due to the grunge movement.


Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

For me, it was pretty big. I was cutting my teeth in "desktop publishing" at the time, and voraciously consuming games like Myst that you mentioned. You could walk into a Best Buy, and the computer section had aisles of CD-ROMs for games, but also things like Encarta or recipe, tax or financial software. Macromedia Director was big in developing multi-media content in the industry.

I don't recall many Boomers jumping on board, it seemed mainly the Gen Xers like myself.


Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

I couldn't say, I was young and naive at the time, so I was certainly optimistic about my future.


Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?

I think generally it was. I believe the internet really changed the way information is spread, and allowed ignorance, hate and fear to really proliferate far faster and more effectively than any news outlet you could catch on TV at the time. There was still spin, but not nearly as weaponized as the Trump Administration has made it.


When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

Someone mentioned when Kobain offed himself. I'd say that's close. Rock hasn't seemed to recover since, as pop and rap just really seemed to dominate around the time of Brittany Spears and Christina Aguilera became huge and hasn't let up.

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?


Plenty did, sure. But I'd say the bigger bands were Nirvana, STP, Alice in Chains, Soundgarden, Red Hot Chili Peppers and the like. Rock-Rap seemed to be bigger around the late 90s, like Rage Against the Machine.

My Dad, who was about 45 then, was into Neil Diamond, The Beach Boys, and some MoTown too. Still is.


Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?

Horror.


Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

They were popular for a hot second, but didn't really seem to endure like the bands mentioned above.


Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.

The big revolutions were the PC and the Internet, of course. It opened up the world.

CG was becoming huge in movies, and 1993 introduced the world to Jurassic Park. Blew our minds. No one had ever seen anything like what Spielberg and ILM pulled off with that one.

If you wanted to watch movies at home, On Demand was in its infancy over cable, but really, you had to get your ass over to Blockbuster, roam the aisles for 2-3 flicks you could veg out to at home.

If you missed you favorite shows on TV, and didn't record them on your VCR, you were screwed. You'd have to wait for a re-run, or hope one of your family or friends taped the episode of ER or Friends you'd missed.

Caller ID boxes were a big deal. You could see who's calling! So, of course, screening calls became a thing. Beepers were everywhere.

If you wanted or needed something, you had to go to a store for it. I used to spend a ton of time at bookstores. I miss them.

I remember countless nights arguing with myself to get into the car and head out into the cold to return the movie rentals, or just be lazy and accept the late fee... telling myself I'll drop it off on my way to work in the morning. Only to forget, and argue with myself all over again...
  #56  
Old 11-08-2019, 08:13 PM
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I'll never understand your generations' utter hatred of Disco. I love rock music - The Stones are probably my favorite group of all time and Jumpin' Jack Flash is probably my favorite song of all time - but if I was alive in 1975 or 1976 you can bet your sweet ass I'd be at Studio 54 as much as I could be. My father was born in 1954 as I mentioned. Got himself cracked in the head with a beer bottle for wearing a big "DISCO SUCKS" pin circa 1978.
I wasn't speaking for my whole generation when I said I hated disco. I had several friends who were into it. They dressed in polyester, platform shoes, and wore the coke spoon chains. Then their tastes got better. :-) "Miss You" by the Stones is probably what you're thinking of. Even though they did it disco style, the Stones aren't considered a disco band. They used a lot of styles, including Delta Blues, Soul, R&B, etc.
  #57  
Old 11-08-2019, 08:53 PM
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If you missed you favorite shows on TV, and didn't record them on your VCR, you were screwed. You'd have to wait for a re-run, or hope one of your family or friends taped the episode of ER or Friends you'd missed.
You kids don't know how easy you had it. Back when I was young, you had to be sitting in front of your television when the network decided to broadcast the show you wanted to watch. Or you didn't see it.

And we had two channels.
  #58  
Old 11-08-2019, 09:01 PM
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I was alive in both 1975 AND 1976 and let me tell you I'm grateful I wasn't responsible for dressing myself; I am not to blame for how I looked as a child.

In the mid-90's, I had just graduated university and was making money hand over fist designing wireless ethernet bridges. Technologically, things were like today only less so. Slower, not as ubiquitous, but there. File-sharing was just starting up and the issues concerning piracy were arising.

I didn't listen to Korn and Limp Bizkit, that's for damn sure. I'd given up and what was cool and hip when I knew what time it was by who was playing on the radio. My musical tastes have never been of the times in any case. I was living with a trained musician and trying to learn an instrument myself so I was listening to reggae and Talking Heads and lots of ECM jazz and Al Di Meola and Frank Zappa and on and on. I dig Soundgarden a lot but cringe whenever I hear Nirvana. Likewise the Macarena.

I was seriously into Babylon 5. I still think it's a great tale but as a TV presentation it hasn't aged well at all.

As for the US's political situation, it was truly a nightmare of peace and presperity, and the Republicans were far less slimy than they are today. They might have impeached Clinton over essentially nothing but they wouldn't have put children in concentration camps.
  #59  
Old 11-08-2019, 09:14 PM
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This is when the internet became available to me.
  #60  
Old 11-08-2019, 09:16 PM
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You kids don't know how easy you had it. Back when I was young, you had to be sitting in front of your television when the network decided to broadcast the show you wanted to watch. Or you didn't see it.

And we had two channels.
I may be younger than you (just barely, probably), but I do remember the days of 3 channels, and fighting over who got to watch what when. I think my sisters have their scars.

Ahh, the 80s. Good times.

Last edited by cmyk; 11-08-2019 at 09:20 PM.
  #61  
Old 11-08-2019, 09:30 PM
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Y’know who was far more popular than The Cranberries in 1995? Alanis Morissette.
  #62  
Old 11-08-2019, 09:31 PM
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I knew the Internet was coming by 1990, since I was in library school then. 1993 was the year I moved from East Tennessee to Brooklyn. In 1994 I had a girl friend for the first time since 1986. She dumped me before the year was out, but I met Ms. P the next year. I experienced living in a city where a team won the World Series for the first time (and last, until a little over a week ago). I remember some people who were younger than me being into seventies nostalgia, but having lived through it (I was born in 1964) I wasn't interested. Son number one was conceived, but wouldn't enter the world until the following year. Overall, this is a time that I look back on with great fondness; my life turned around.
  #63  
Old 11-08-2019, 09:36 PM
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Overall, the 90s were pretty great.
  #64  
Old 11-08-2019, 10:34 PM
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I lived in Vegas most of that time. Garbage jobs, horrible girlfriends. I remember crap music, exactly where I was when the radio said Kurt Cobain was dead, getting propositioned by the 'Facts of Life' Girl, and lots of other miserable shit. It sucked, hard.

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Overall, the 90s were pretty great.
But the 80's were better.

Last edited by Gatopescado; 11-08-2019 at 10:37 PM. Reason: speled a word wrong and dont wana look stoopid
  #65  
Old 11-08-2019, 10:39 PM
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I lived in Vegas most of that time. Garbage jobs, horrible girlfriends. I remember crap music, exactly where I was when the radio said Kurt Cobain was dead, getting propositioned by the 'Facts of Life' Girl, and lots of other miserable shit. It sucked, hard.



But the 80's were better.
Eighties? Worst freaking decade of my life. Worst decade for music, even considering that disco happened in the seventies.
  #66  
Old 11-08-2019, 11:31 PM
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Good grief. 1993 was like 15 minutes ago.
It's literally a generation ago. Someone born in 1993 is old enough to be your annoying, know-it-all 26 year-old boss at some tech startup .

Last edited by Tamerlane; 11-08-2019 at 11:31 PM.
  #67  
Old 11-08-2019, 11:56 PM
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Just wondering.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?

Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?

Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?

When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?

Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.
I was in my mid-thirties and teaching high school. I'll answer your questions in order, as best I can.

!) There wasn't anything particularly stand-out about the era. Every era seems stand-out to people later on. At the time, we were finally moving past the Eighties. Bill Clinton was President, and we thought it was about time someone younger took the helm. Technology was changing faster than I could adapt and seemed full of possibilities, but I was not unaware of the drawbacks.

2) The Seventies revival vibe came much later. At the time, it was just lame. I mean, disco? *gag* (I still feel that way.)

3) We still thought there was some dignity to the presidency. If we'd known how badly the whole office was going to go downhill in January, 2017, we'd have been appalled, Republicans and Democrats alike. I'd say in general, we were more secure than we are today. The USSR had collapsed, and the economy, while not great in 1993, grew exponentially. But there were staggering issues. Unspeakable genocide in Rwanda. Global climate change and the extinction of species. Healthcare was a huge concern, belief it or not. Newt Gingrich and his immense ego were Speaker of the House and pushed the BS "Contract with America," the start of the hyper-partisan nastiness today.

4) Multi-media itself was a new thing. I recall a teacher inservice in 1993 where we saw that kids would actually be able to include movie clips in projects--AND they'd be able to submit everything online! And we'd be able to collaborate with teachers across the globe! We were amazed. So cool!

5) No. It only seems optimistic because we know how it turned out. It's true that with the USSR in shambles, we were no longer worried about the Cold War and nuclear annihilation, but we had plenty of other things to worry about.

6) Sure the US was healthier politically. Since we're now so politically unhealthy, 1993-1997 seems positively robust. But keep in mind that Newt Gingrich, with his whacko theories, was big.

7) I don't know when Grunge fell off, precisely. I know that in 1993, most of my students were Nirvana fans. In 1994, Kurt Cobain killed himself, which upset my students but didn't end Grunge. Like most trends, Grunge ended not with a bang but a whimper.

8) Oh, geez. Many of my students did like Korn and Limp Bizkit, as well as Nine Inch Nails, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Smashing Pumpkins, Counting Crows. So were Tupac and the Notorious BIG and a slew of rappers who DIDN'T die, like Dr. Dre. And then there were Boys II Men, Hootie and the Blowfish, Stone Temple Pilots, Blues Traveler, and teen idols like Brandy. It's not like there was only one musical genre. I'd make the distinction at people over 30, not people over 40. And it depended. Genesis was big. So was Mariah Carey. Annie Lenox. Michael Bolton. And a host of others, some of whom I, an over-30, didn't like. I'm not into country so can't help there.

9) Neither. My students taught me the Macarena early in the trend. It was fun, if silly. I didn't hate it.

10) You could answer this one by Googling. I liked The Cranberries. Many of my students liked The Cranberries. Huge? Well, huge internationally. Big domestically.

11) I was teaching and raising two kids. I was moderately Progressive and living in a conservative area. I remember telling my students that whatever their parents shook their heads at then, their kids would laugh at one day. It's proven true.

Honestly, it's hard to characterize an entire era. How would you characterize the 2010's?
  #68  
Old 11-09-2019, 12:57 AM
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I was in high school, so too young for the group you are asking about. But I recall flare-legged jeans coming in the latter part of the '90s and a friend and I swearing we'd never wear bell bottoms. Soon enough everyone wore flare-legged jeans.
I was a teenager too at least until 97, and I remember it differently. We all swore we wouldn't wear bell bottoms, and just a few neo-hippies in my dorm decided to make their own bell bottoms by tearing the bottom seams and sewing in panels of patchwork cloth they got from Joann fabrics. Everyone else wore normal jeans still, though a little less straight-legged and no one was pegging them anymore by 96. Boot cut jeans didn't arrive until the very end of the decade.

Last edited by elfkin477; 11-09-2019 at 01:00 AM.
  #69  
Old 11-09-2019, 01:46 AM
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Eighties? Worst freaking decade of my life.
You didn't do it right.
  #70  
Old 11-09-2019, 02:28 AM
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Multimedia was largely defined for the general public by Microsoft Encarta in 1993 which incorporated an entire encyclopedia with audio and video clips. I don't remember when I got disc (I got my first PC in 1986), but was fascinated by the ability to play (really small, low quality) video from a CD. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encarta

The same year, The 7th Guest with its full motion video scenes broke new ground for many also. For me, the fascination with the graphics and videos was overshadowed by the complexity of the puzzles, so I never got very far into the game and soon gave up on it.

Multimedia was a buzzword, but I would say didn't really take off until the early 2000's with the rise of the internet. Prior to that, CD-ROM capacity was too small, CD read speed too slow (home DVD burners and readers were still years away) and video compression too large to be feasible.

I got on the internet in 1995 initially with with a 33.6K and AOL, Prodigy, Compuserve and whatever free trials were available, until going with local ISP which posted a 56K connection! Videos were limited to 160x240 max and would take hours to download. Shockwave (then Macromedia, later Adobe) was introduced as a multimedia creation tool, but it was a bear to work with and limited in its capabilities. It was used in a large number of multimedia CD releases, but it required installation from the disc if you didn't already have it installed.
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Old 11-09-2019, 02:39 AM
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I am 44 years old and graduated high school in 1993. I was living in northern New England in pretty rural area.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?


I remember watching Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager. Also The Simpsons and South Park(which debuted on August 13, 1997). Of course there was The X-Files(one of the defining shows of the 90s). Other Shows I watched include Beavis and Butthead, Law & Order, and ER.

It wasthe height of the "Trash TV" daytime talk shows: Jerry Springer, Maury Povich, Ricki Lake, Jenny Jones among others. Maury seems to be the only one left doing the format.

Also Kevin Smith released his first movie Clerks in 1994 and Quentin Tarantino releases his first movie Reservoir Dogs in 1992. There were the "cool" directors of the period.

Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when? I don't remember this at all. Granted I lived out in the country in rural New Hampshire so we really didn't follow all the latest trends and fads.

How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?

I'd say the 9/11 attacks has made the general feeling today a lot more scared and apprehensive. People seem more cautious than were before.

Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers? I can't say I noticed anything in regards to this.

Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

I'd say YES. With the collapse of Communism and the rise of the Internet the 90s made everyone fairly optimistic about the future.

Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
I remember the Clinton years and The Republican Revolution in 1994 in which they took over The House and Senate. There was plenty of vitriol back then too. There were right-wing militia groups screaming about how the Clintons were going to confiscate all fire-arms and the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 was commited by a former militia member. I am not sure if it is actually worse today but the use of the Internet and Social media by extremists has definitely made it seem that way.

When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off? Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to? Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

I'd say grunge fell off in 1994 when Kurt Cobain died and Pearl Jam fought against TicketMaster. It is also when I stopped watching MTV and following popular music closely. As for the bands you mentioned I never really listened to them at all.

Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
I found the song annoying then and now.

Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.

The thing I remember most was the beginnings of the modern Internet and the Dot.com bubble. Amazon and Yahoo! was started in 1994. eBay in 1995. Google in 1998. geoCities was a popular place for creating personal web pages. It was a fun place to be.

Also I was big fan of pro wrestling(WWF and WCW) during this period but I won't go into much detail about that.
  #72  
Old 11-09-2019, 02:43 AM
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This is before the timeline in the OP, but I got my first cell phone 1989. It was a Panasonic and cost $799. Service was ~$70-80/month with NO free minutes. That was charged at $0.90/minute. That same year, I started working for the City and County and was on call to the Mayor's office. At first they gave me a pager, but when they learned that I was responding to the page with my personal phone, they gave me a Motorola Dynatac Classic II?, about 1/2 as thick as the Zack Morris phone. This was State of the Art, same as what the Mayor had! The bill was paid by the City and County, but now I had no excuse for not answering. Fortunately, I was on call only during regular work hours.
  #73  
Old 11-09-2019, 04:32 AM
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What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
Boring. Music, especially. I was delving into the back catalogue of famous singers/bands for the good stuff : Bowie in particular, and to a lesser extent Elton John and Billy Joel but also New Wave / Cold Wave / Gothic / Industrial acts from 10-15 years earlier. Also discovering the golden age of Jazz (1945-1975) and, without admitting it, starting to make my way back towards Classical Music.

The only new acts that got some of my attention at the time were Björk, Radiohead, Portishead and The Cardigans.

Quote:
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
In general, no, I don't think so.

Quote:
How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
Not an American. But in Europe, the general vibe was optimistic thanks to the incredibly easy end of the Cold War and the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Quote:
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
I first heard of the Internet and cell phones while living in London in late 1994. Clearly a turning point for me as far as techonology is concerned though it would be 4-5 more years before I adopted them myself. At the time, I remember cell phones being used mainly by important business people with a hectic life and poseurs who pretended to be important business people with a hectic life. The Internet was a hit with people of my age, but few of us had PCs at the time and connection speed was appaling. Still, the appeal was clear and we were quick to respond to it.

Quote:
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
Yes, pretty much compared to the 80s and definitely compared to now.

Quote:
Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
See above.

Quote:
When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
It was starting to grow seriously stale by early 1993.

Quote:
Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
Some metalheads embraced nu-metal, others, like me, didn't.

Quote:
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
Céline Dion was huge. 70s stars who were still around way past their heydays. Some current harmless hits.

Quote:
Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Neither. It was annoying at the time, but only because it was everywhere and inescapable. Nowadays, I don't mind hearing it a couple of times a year but I sure don't go out of my way to listen to it. It reminds me of a good time in my life, but that's not directly related to the song itself.

Quote:
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
Huge would be an exaggeration but they sure were big, along with a dozen other British bands at the time.
__________________
Mais je porte accroché au plus haut des entrailles
À la place où la foudre a frappé trop souvent
Un cœur où chaque mot a laissé son entaille
Et d’où ma vie s’égoutte au moindre mouvement

Last edited by Les Espaces Du Sommeil; 11-09-2019 at 04:35 AM.
  #74  
Old 11-09-2019, 05:31 AM
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HEY! I'll have you know that my (about 20 years younger than me) doctor says I'm officially a young woman. Pft.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
That I was BUUUUSSSYYYYYY. 1993, finished 5th year of university, sent applications to multiple grad schools in the US, started my Project (undergrad thesis)... 1994 got accepted, finished Project, moved to US, started grad-student life. April of 1997, I found out that my grad advisor had been purposefully sabotaging my career and those of other foreign students, thinking that since we were foreigners and he was American he could do that with impunity. I napalm'd his career: his most important article still is and will forever remain the one which bears my name. Got my "masters without thesis" (that is, my PhD dropout degree), got a job. I had no time and no money but damn was I BUSY!

And I got to work in the US and in Germany (researchers' exchange, the Germans sent a German and the Americans sent a Spaniard), met a bunch of nice people, some not so nice and some extremely stupid people... was a founding member of a couple of student clubs, had a lot of first dates which felt completely surreal (seriously, any dude who sincerely believes that "a woman must always make less than her husband" simply sholdn't ask engineers who are in grad school to go on dates ), became a Wench of a Renfair-style group, and generally proved that you can have a damn good time while having no time and no money

Quote:
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
A what de what? There was a mild attempt at bringing bellbottoms back during 2001, but that's after your period.

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How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
I don't even know what is that question supposed to mean.

Quote:
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
I don't know about your Boomers, but this 1968 vintage was born at the peak of the Spanish Population Boom (our postwar hunger didn't end until the mid-1960s, so no postwar population boom) and I still remember Brother Librarian so excited, telling me that CAS was now available, not only as books or as CDs, but directly through the phone! There was this new system that let computers call other computers and you could use it to consult the latest CAS, without waiting for the next year's editions; this would have been in 1993 IIRC.

And I remember my first rlogin (to Harvard) and my first sight of a webpage. The browser was Mozilla and the page included a picture of a molecule along with its topographic matrix. Mind you, the servers my colleagues and I used in our research had less power than my current cellphone, but hey.

Quote:
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
Your question sounds as if you think it was an inordinately optimistic period. To me it looks as if THIS is an inordinately pessimistic period. We're being sold fear and hate, because fear and hate mean more money for the people who give more of a shit about money than about any human other than the one whose company they can't avoid.

Quote:
Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Well, for starters Trump wasn't president, so yeah.

Quote:
When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
I don't know, I managed to skip all that.

Quote:
Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
The only one of those that I know I'd be able to recognize some of their songs is Limp Bizkit. I know I've seen references to Korn, but their songs and my ears just don't mesh. I can tell you that I discovered Red Hot Chili Peppers in a free concert fronted by Marilyn Manson (who I still can't stand, but my friends really liked his work; good workmanship in the concert).

But then, I was in my mid-late 20s and made a lot of fun of my "independent"-listening friends when they discovered Shania Twain over one year after I did. I listened to multiple local radio stations including the country one (WKIS); they didn't.

Quote:
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
Which people? I didn't hear the same things in Calle Ocho and at the university...

Quote:
Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
I'm from Spain and female. Don't get me started.

Quote:
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
Apparently, but I mainly know them because oldies' stations like to have that chick wail ZOOOOOOM BIIIIIIII!
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  #75  
Old 11-09-2019, 08:26 AM
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I had stopped listening to top 40 radio by 1993. The 90's music passed me by.

I primarily remember the change in computers. Purchasing Sound Blaster kits from Best Buy. It included a CD ROM drive, sound card, and software. I updated a bunch of 486 PC's for friends and customers.

I got my first ATI TV Tuner/ video capture board and got very interested in video editing.

My boss made me carry a beeper.

Star Trek TNG, DS9, Jag, Hercules, and Xena were my favorite TV shows.

Last edited by aceplace57; 11-09-2019 at 08:31 AM.
  #76  
Old 11-09-2019, 09:20 AM
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More on the Multimedia Revolution
  #77  
Old 11-09-2019, 09:23 AM
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Also, regarding the relatively primitive computers of that era...this was a video game sex symbol in 1996. (SFW picture )
  #78  
Old 11-09-2019, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Tamerlane View Post
It's literally a generation ago. Someone born in 1993 is old enough to be your annoying, know-it-all 26 year-old boss at some tech startup .
As long as he stays off my lawn.

I was 45 in 1993.
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  #79  
Old 11-09-2019, 09:59 AM
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Missed the edit window.

The general public may have been aware of the coming Multimedia Revolution, but it would still be years off before it would come to most homes.

I worked for a company that had a small crew working on creating a custom multimedia CD for a realtor that was never completed. Macromedia (later Adobe) Shockwave was capable of mixing text, graphics, video and audio together, but it required installation on the user's PC. It would have been a snap to use Shockwave, but the customer required that no additional software be required for playback of the CD. Other obstacles were slow CD reader speed (the disc had to be able to run on a 1x reader) and many people didn't even have a sound card. There were multimedia games like The 7th Guest available, but that was bought and played by people who were willing to buy the expensive faster CD drives and compatible sound card.

Broadband wouldn't become common until the early mid 2000's or later, so must websites were designed to the viewable by 56K max modems. Also, webspace, because of high hard drive prices was expensive. I have all the elements of my first website and it's a whopping 1.37MB! hosted on the 5MB space allotted by my ISP in 1996. I later moved and redid the site at Geocities which offered free webspace, I think 20 or 25MB. This was a whopping 13.1MB which was mostly taken up by video clips up to 2MB each!

I got cable broadband in 1999, but my 10Mb/s down, 2Mbs, but this was faster than what most servers were able to feed to me.
  #80  
Old 11-09-2019, 10:03 AM
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Not much re culture or current events. In '92 I bought a house in the mountains (my first that I still live in and now own). And I got a great job that I still have.

There was no TV reception at my house, I counted on VCHS tapes that my brother recorded for me (yes, I have seen every episode of Seinfeld, and can almost quote entire shows).

I do for sure recall that people where getting much more uptight about shit. In the '80s it was no big deal to fire up some MJ in a park as long as you where at least a little bit discrete about it. Grab a case of beer and throw up a volleyball net and have fun with a dozen friends. Sure you can still do that. But dam near everything seems to need some sort of permit now.

Camping involved a tent a cooler and a way to start a fire. Follow your nose and pick a place. That started to change in the 90's. Too many people just started to fuck things up and just didn't do it right. Zero respect. They started leaving trash around and couldn't seem to make a safe fire. Or figure out how to put it out before they left. A lot of jeep trails have since just been shut down.
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  #81  
Old 11-09-2019, 12:35 PM
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One difference I failed to mention in my earlier post is how everything is more open now thanks to the widespread use of camera phones and social media.

For instance, videos of police brutality are spread across social media and become national news. Granted the video of Rodney King's beating by the LAPD became national news in 1991 but that in part was because, at the time, actual video of such instances were rare. Nowadays such videos are regularly occurence and people have started to become de-sensitized to the violence.

And it's not just police brutality. Videos of hate crimes and rallies, kids being bullied in school, people having public outburst are spread all over the internet. Stuff that 20 to 40 years would be only covered by local news(if even at all) is now spread online nationally even globally.

So it is hard for me to say the political discourse is worse today than back then because what I have written above has changed the whole landscape. Everything is more open. Every one can express their opinions online through social media and it makes extremists seem more prominent than they actually are.

Last edited by dorvann; 11-09-2019 at 12:37 PM.
  #82  
Old 11-09-2019, 01:08 PM
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Macarena? Annoying then, annoying now. Along with The Hustle, fun the first few times you hear/see it, then quickly becomes annoying.

BTW, I was in my 30's in the 90's.

Last edited by lingyi; 11-09-2019 at 01:10 PM.
  #83  
Old 11-09-2019, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
Macarena? Annoying then, annoying now. Along with The Hustle, fun the first few times you hear/see it, then quickly becomes annoying.

BTW, I was in my 30's in the 90's.
Don't forget Do the Bartman or The Humpty Dance. And the Y.M.C.A. and the Safety Dance.

Of course you could always just STAND in the place where you live.
  #84  
Old 11-09-2019, 07:38 PM
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[QUOTE=Kennedy1960;21960937]Just wondering.

I'm 54.


What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?

There was this feeling that we had reached the "end of history": The Cold War was over and the "War on terror" had not begun. It was a hopeful time.



Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

Not really.



How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?

It was more optimistic, I would say.



Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

You mean the internet? Yes, it was exciting to see the beginnings of the World Wide Web. It opened up a whole new world. America Online was fun and completely new. Plus, Seinfeld was "Must See TV".



Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

I think so.



Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?

Yes! There was obviously competition between Democrats and Republicans. There was an impeachment over Clinton's trivial lie about sexual relations, and Newt Gingrich's "Contract With America" was launched following the Republican takeover of the House in 1994. But there was more civility and more chance that the parties could compromise and work together.



When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

When Kurt Cobain killed himself.



Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

I suppose some did. I was 30 and listened to R.E.M., Tori Amos, Happy Rhodes. It was a great time musically.



Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?

It was kind of a joke to me.


Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

Not to me.
  #85  
Old 11-11-2019, 07:37 AM
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I was a teenager so a bit younger than your target demographic. I recall the 70s nostalgia being more of a teenage girl thing, at least at my school. This may have been due to the influence of one of the "cool" younger teachers who was born around 1971 and used to rock bell bottoms and 70s shirts. Some of the girls in my class tended to follow the style and started listening to the Grease soundtrack a lot (nostalgia on nostalgia for kids who weren't even born at the time to be nostalgic about it!). One girl I know had a mood ring, inspired by My Girl.

Flannel was still a big thing around 95 to 97 but not really in a grungy way. It was in a bright, colorful clean-cut kind of way - refer JTT in his prime. Speaking of - the 90s middle part. If you wanted girls to like you, you had to be able to pull it off.

Multimedia to me basically meant CD-ROMs, like Encarta (basically Wikipedia on a CD-ROM with actual reliable encyclopedia-level content) and Cinemania (an interactive movie guide that basically collated the various movie guides that were put out every year in book format by reviewers like Roger Ebert, Leonard Maltin and Pauline Kael). It wasn't really much of a thing until the late 90s and most kids I knew didn't necessarily have a computer at home. The internet was expensive, crazy slow and primitive by today's standards. It was mostly blindingly colorful fan pages with little Under Construction icons with the bulldozer and if you were super cool, a counter that would tally how many people visited your page. And forget kids with cell phones! Most kids' parents didn't even have one until the late 90s. I didn't get my Nokia 1610 until I went off to college.

I've been really feeling the 90s nostalgia the last few years with all that's gone on in the world this century. It felt like the last optimistic era in American history before 9/11, the GFC, smartphone zombies and Trump.
  #86  
Old 11-11-2019, 09:09 AM
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What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?

I was born in 1972, so this would have been around my sophomore year in college through me being a few years into my career with a technology consulting firm in Boston. So shows and films like Friends, Singles, Reality Bites and so on were largely targeted at and ostensibly about my demographic (Gen X).


Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

Not so much, although class rock acts like Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd and so on were popular.


How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?

This time period is mostly pre-internet bubble, unless you were specifically in that industry. There was no Fox News, so you didn't have 24 hour broadcasting of conservative propaganda.

I think there was a general feeling that, with the end of the Cold War, we were in a transitional period. Changes in ideas about employment, family, etc. A lot of Gen-X felt very directionless or unsure about what we would transition to or out place in that. A lot of the pulp culture of the time reflected a sense of apprehension, ambivalence or ennui.



Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

Not with Boomers. More Gen X. It really was a huge an exciting time. Prior to 1995, most of us never used email (even though it was available at school). No one had cell phones. Unless you were a comp-sci guy or hobbyist, most people were not included to fuck around with a modem to connect to bulletin boards or whatever.

To meet people out somewhere, we had to make PLANS ahead of time. Everyone couldn't just go out and randomly cherry pick where they wanted to go based on whose texts or media postings looked the most enticing.

Even driving directions, you had to carry around a map and written directions.

When I graduated college in 1995, we were sending paper resumes with cover letters through the mail and 90% of the time, received a written response back.

Prior to Napster, we traded in mix tapes/CDs or actually had to buy music.

Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

It became optimistic around 1995 when Gen-X discovered we had an alternative to working at some stuffy, boring company we hated, eating shit for 30 years, hoping to move up the corporate ladder. There were awesome jobs in tech, lots of them and no sense yet of the potential downsides.


Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?

It was "healthier" in that without 24 hour news coverage besides CNN or social media, you didn't have the constant political debates about every fucking thing or the ideological echo chambers. Every local thing didn't turn into some damn national debate.


When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

"Grunge" died with Kurt Cobain around 93 IIRC. From then it became more radio-friendly "post grunge", which then entered a steady decline in favor of pop and hip hop.


Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?

Yes, there were douche bags in the mid 90s too.

There was a brief wave of "nu metal" or "rap rock" around the mid to late 90s. This was a more aggressive and perhaps less introspective form of heavy alternative rock that blended elements of grunge, rap/hip hop and industrial music.


What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

Can't say. Jazz maybe? Shit they listened to in the 60s?


Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?

I recall it being played in every Jersey Shore bar and night club the summer of 96.


Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

Their big commercially successful albums were released in 1993 and 1995 IIRC. But they were part of the "alt rock" movement of the time, which included a diverse variety of commercially successful acts.
  #87  
Old 11-11-2019, 12:00 PM
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Just wondering.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
Getting away from the USA-centric trend. Many Hong Kong movies had themes that related directly or indrectly to the uncertainty of what would happen after the 1997 handover of Hong Kong to Mainland China. Especially topical with the current protests in Hong Kong.
  #88  
Old 11-11-2019, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Just wondering.



What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?



Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?



How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?



Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?



Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?



Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?



When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?



Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?

What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?



Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?



Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?



Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.

I was a High School age teen then, slightly younger than you are asking for, but I think I can provide some good perspective on the era:

There was a big rapid change in style and mood at that time. If you take a look at shows like “Saved by the Bell” and “Beverly hills 90210” that was basically the early 90’s vibe. Very preppy, name brand, dressy pants, fancy leather belts (sometimes even multiple belts) bright colored shirts, lots of jewelry and accessories, big hair, etc. Jeans, virtually all pants really, had to be tight rolled at the ankle. Grunge music and style was like a giant clap back to all of that and it hit fast and hard. Even kids who didn’t want go full-rebel shifted styles to baggier clothes, flannels, suddenly a sloppy appearance became acceptable.

No 70’s revival that I recall. The 70’s seemed impossible dorky to us.

General feeling in the US seemed a bit more hopeful than today. Economy kept expanding (especially tech) and the feeling was that if you did good work you’d get rewarded, there wasn’t a general feeling that rich corporations are out to screw over their workers.

Not sure what you mean by multimedia revolution exactly, it all kinda happened gradually from my perspective. The internet of the 90’s was not based on social media, it was basically a collection of company websites and some people had personal blogs. Lots of email and email forwards. We shared music over Napster with MP3’s.

Yeah I’d say it was pretty optimistic. Tech seemed to be changing at a mile at a minute and there were good jobs for everyone who had any kind of tech skills. Late 90’s there was a lot of concern and focus on y2k and that created even more tech jobs.

I think we were healthier politically. A lot of the same disagreements were around back then, but the focus was on the issues and policies. Now the two sides don’t even see the facts the same way and there is way more propaganda and conspiracy theory.

Not sure when grunge fell off, because I went to college and it was less grungy there. I think it was just kinda absorbed by normal styles. Clothes stayed generally baggier throughout most of the 90’s even when it wasn’t a specific grunge look.

No idea what older people in the 90’s listened to, but I was into all those punk-alt-rock groups you named for sure.

Macarena was awful.

Cranberries weren’t huge, they were beloved by a select group that was into alt-music but not the heavy stuff. I was a big fan.
  #89  
Old 11-12-2019, 01:25 PM
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Hmmm...

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?

I was in my early 30's and my son was just starting kindergarten and I was tired of being a broke grad student and the job market was finally picking up again and so I went back to work. I was one of those who did really well under Clinton

Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
Don't remember anything like that; was never really into fads

How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
I was thrilled with the election of Clinton and it did feel more optimistic; I don't remember anything real antagonism toward Bush I (in fact I liked him, just felt we could do economically better under Clinton); things didn't seem so...extreme. Considering we had the bombings of the World Trade Center and Oklahoma City - we were angry but not panicked, there weren't people pushing things like "the Patriot Act" or we weren't listening to them. It still felt like we were moving forwards as a group.

Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
I do remember people whining about having to switch their music collections to CDs

Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
More optimistic than now. College was more affordable, there seemed to be more opportunities, people actually got raises and promotions.

Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Yes. It was only the start of the crazy that was the right wing - Contract with America, etc.

When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
I was never into the whole grunge thing - I listened to a lot of R&B (Whitney, Boyz II Men, Mary J. Blige, Mariah Carey, Madonna, Will Smith) - a pop girl all the way

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
Not the ones I knew.

What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
Depends. Oldies or the same stuff I listened too. My friends weren't into grunge or rock or alt rock.

Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Just a dance - no biggie, but I like fun dances. Didn't kill anybody.

Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
Frankly, I couldn't name a single Cranberries song.
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  #90  
Old 11-12-2019, 03:01 PM
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Short bio: 20-something in Seattle, WA at the time. Single with no kids.

---Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

None.

---Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

It was huge for the young...email, internet, napster, cd burning, gaming. The Boomers were barely managing to fwd:fwd:fwd:fwd: jokes to their friends assuming they even had an internet account. Monetary and technical hurdles were still high.

----Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

There was an optimism among the left/liberal end that the Clinton era was finally bringing some achievable progressive ideologies and economics into mainstream. However, the conservative/reactionary backlash was very strong.

----When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

'97-ish when grunge's star was fading, and I saw more electronic/trip-hop-fusion getting the attention, based on concert and festival buzz.

---Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

No. They were pretty much seen universally as riding the coattails of others, popular with teen/tweens searching for their own rebellion banner to fly. "Nu-metal" was a gimmick. Above-40 were Springsteen and Jimmy Buffet fans, plus Dave Mathews and Blues Traveler types.

----Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

They were part of a wave of female-fronted alternative music. Popular yes, but not distinctly huge.
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  #91  
Old 11-13-2019, 04:57 PM
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Windows 95 came out in 1995. After about 95, people could use computers without having to learn how to use computers. Before that, either you were a person who had learned, or you weren't.

It was a gradual thing -- there was Mac and Windows 3 before that, and the iPhone came much later -- but 1995 is around where I would place the watershed moment. And that meant that computers were everywhere in the media.

This was also a golden era for magazines. Everything that is on the internet now was in magazines then. Advertising in the magazines supported editorial content in the magazines, which put magazines in vast racks in retail outlets. Although the internet had arrived and was coming, even in 2000 most of the content wasn't there. Magazines had been popular for a very long time, but they got a late boost by the shift of cigarette advertising revenue from TV. Great thick computer magazines were the central medium for content distribution.

Smoking was still common, but in 1995 it was common for offices to be non-smoking. There was an obvious demographic shift by 2000, where upper class men didn't smoke and lower class women did -- so in a office, it was the women who went out to smoke -- (in 1980 it was the opposite), (Psartly as a result of the shift of advertising revenue from tv to womens magazines
  #92  
Old 11-13-2019, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Just wondering.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
Very much so. I was in the Canadian military until eight years ago so my whole working life was divided into three to five year discrete chunks, each of which are very easy for me to remember
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
For me, only insofar as "That 70s Show" was on sometime around then. Otherwise I don't recall any 70s stuff happening.
How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
I'm Canadian so I can't really answer that.
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
I'm a boomer and I'll say for me - not really. Cell phones at that point were just very portable phones, not the computing devices they are now. And the internet was just getting rolling in the early '90s (for non-computer people anyway)
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
For me as a military guy at the time - incredibly so; if I think back to that decade I can still feel it. The cold war was over, the falling of the Berlin Wall was still fresh in my mind. Towards the end of the '90s I was posted to Canadian Forces Base Borden and I was living in the officer's quarters for a year and there was a program in which former Warsaw Pact officers were there to learn English. I spent many evenings in the TV room and in the mess with officers from Ukraine (I remember one describing the economic "shock therapy" that Ukraine was apparently undergoing; another from the Czech air force (he was a MiG 21 pilot) and infantry officers from Estonia and Lithuania, and all of their buddies. I had an absolute blast at the time and when my wife was able to move up from our previous location we had a few of them over for supper.

It was extremely optimistic and exciting.
Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
From an outsider point of view - definitely.
When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
At the time I never really thought of it as grunge or post-grunge. I've always been a hard-rock and metal lover so most of it just seemed like more great stuff. I just remember in '99/2000 time frame it went from the local rock station to an alt rock station and then eventually to the classic rock stations.
Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
I was in my 30s and I didn't really listen to those bands. I did, however, love Alice in Chains (and I still do), Collective Soul, Stone Temple Pilot, some Nirvana, and of course Sabbath, Judas Priest, Iron Maiden etc
Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
I just can't handle "gimmick" songs, so horror.
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
I believe so, but to me, more in the later 90s.
Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.
For me, as I mentioned above, very optimistic and exciting. It was also, from a personal point of view, a great period of change for me as I got married in '91 and I was changing career streams in the military in the late '90s.
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