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Old 05-17-2019, 06:06 PM
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How far did I see?


A few weeks ago I was driving around with someone and we ended up somewhere I had heard of before but never been to--an open-air chapel built on the edge of a cliff on the top of a mountain in Greenville, SC. There were a few other people visiting at the time and one of them commented that they could probably see a hundred miles from there. It makes me wonder just how far the most distant peak visible actually is. Maybe five miles? Ten? Photo mine, video not.
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Old 05-17-2019, 07:17 PM
yabob is online now
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
A few weeks ago I was driving around with someone and we ended up somewhere I had heard of before but never been to--an open-air chapel built on the edge of a cliff on the top of a mountain in Greenville, SC. There were a few other people visiting at the time and one of them commented that they could probably see a hundred miles from there. It makes me wonder just how far the most distant peak visible actually is. Maybe five miles? Ten? Photo mine, video not.
Go to heywhatsthat.com- you can entire a location, and a height above the ground, and get a labeled panorama plus a map of what peaks are visible from that point.
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Last edited by yabob; 05-17-2019 at 07:18 PM.
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Old 05-17-2019, 08:02 PM
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That place is 2907 feet above sea level... which via multiple online Line-of-sight (LOS) calculators is about 60 miles. This is assuming flat terrain, and as itís in the mountains itíll be less versus a cliff of that elevation over the ocean.
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Old Yesterday, 02:28 AM
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That place is 2907 feet above sea level... which via multiple online Line-of-sight (LOS) calculators is about 60 miles. This is assuming flat terrain, and as itís in the mountains itíll be less versus a cliff of that elevation over the ocean.
No, if you think about it, in an area with dispersed mountains it will be further, since the tops of distant mountains will be above the theoretical horizon. I've seen a 3000ft mountain from sea level 80 miles away, when it was clear.

Having said that, in the OP's picture it looks too hazy to see much more than 30-40 miles. And it's harder to pick out distant features when you're looking from high to low than the other way around.
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Old Yesterday, 03:06 AM
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I've seen a 3000ft mountain from sea level 80 miles away, when it was clear.
Or rather, slightly above sea level.
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Old Yesterday, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
A few weeks ago I was driving around with someone and we ended up somewhere I had heard of before but never been to--an open-air chapel built on the edge of a cliff on the top of a mountain in Greenville, SC. There were a few other people visiting at the time and one of them commented that they could probably see a hundred miles from there. It makes me wonder just how far the most distant peak visible actually is. Maybe five miles? Ten? Photo mine, video not.
Here in Portland Oregon, Mt. Hood and Mt. St. Helens are fixtures that are only not visible when it is overcast (which is much of the time). Both are roughly 50 miles away from downtown Portland.

On a clear day, Mt. Rainer can be seen behind Mt. St. Helens. Mt. Rainer is about 100 miles away. This picture was taken in the hills above downtown Portland.
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Old Yesterday, 02:48 PM
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The white mountains in the background behind the city are about 100 miles away. They are the Kaikouras in the South Island of New Zealand taken from a mountain bike trail north of Wellington.


https://photos.app.goo.gl/ZiazWMHzmgdXcfEd7
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Old Yesterday, 11:10 PM
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Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps View Post
No, if you think about it, in an area with dispersed mountains it will be further, since the tops of distant mountains will be above the theoretical horizon. I've seen a 3000ft mountain from sea level 80 miles away, when it was clear.

Having said that, in the OP's picture it looks too hazy to see much more than 30-40 miles. And it's harder to pick out distant features when you're looking from high to low than the other way around.
Doh! Didn't think of that... Assuming two 3000' peaks it's 154 miles, could possibly pull that off in the winter when humidity is lowest.
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Old Today, 03:56 AM
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Doh! Didn't think of that... Assuming two 3000' peaks it's 154 miles, could possibly pull that off in the winter when humidity is lowest.
In Britain, the longest theoretical line of sight is 144 miles, between Snowdon (3560ft) in north Wales and Merrick (2766ft) in south Scotland. It's mostly over water and I don't think anyone's ever actually seen or photographed one from the other.
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Old Today, 04:57 AM
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Mt. Fuji at 3,770 m theoretically can be seen at from 300 km away.
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