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Old 09-24-2019, 12:39 AM
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PG&E cuts electricity to 24,000 customers


AP story here.

This is happening in America. In a country that likes to flatter itself as "exceptional" and the most advanced, most prosperous country that has ever existed.
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The utility shut down power to areas of Butte, Nevada and Yuba counties in the Sierra Nevada foothills.

The power will remain off until conditions are safer, and PG&E warned that it might expand the precautionary outages on Tuesday to El Dorado, Placer, Sutter, Lake, Napa and Sonoma counties if gusty winds and hot, dry weather continue.

Butte County is where a wildfire blamed on PG&E transmission lines killed 86 people last year and virtually leveled the town of Paradise.

Meanwhile, Southern California Edison warned it might shut off power to 41,000 customers due to forecasts calling for gusty Santa Ana winds.

The cuts could affect Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties.
The power is being shut off because PG&E can't guarantee that their equipment can operate safely. In 2019. In America.

We put people on the moon and brought them home again fifty years ago. We devised, built and operated multi-use spacefaring vehicles 40 years ago.

But somehow, we have electrical distribution systems in operation that can't safely operate in the SW US environment.

I know this isn't the first time PG&E has done this, which makes it even more galling. Wait until they cut the power to Los Angeles; that oughta get people's blood boiling.

How much are PG&E executives paid? And why?
Quote:
Amid Pacific Gas & Electric Co.’s bankruptcy and wildfire safety woes, the utility’s incoming chief executive officer Bill Johnson will receive an annual base salary of $2.5 million for a three-year contract, the company said in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing on Tuesday.

That’s more than twice the base salary of former CEO Geisha Williams.

Johnson — who’s finishing up a six-year stint as president and CEO of the Knoxville, Tenn.-based public utility Tennessee Valley Authority — will also get a one-time transition payment of $3 million on his first day on the job, as well as an annual equity award of about $3.5 million, the filing said.
Cite.

Geisha Williams, by the way, was paid $8,597,220 by PG&E in 2017.

Fix your shit, PG&E. Spend that money where it's needed, not where it's wanted.
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Old 09-24-2019, 05:24 AM
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I'm sure that customers will gladly and quietly pay the higer prices needed to pay for the $30 billion in upgrades that would be needed to make the lines safe.

No--wait--they would scream bloody murder and demand that the government force the companies to keep the same prices.

You get what you pay for.
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Old 09-24-2019, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
I'm sure that customers will gladly and quietly pay the higer prices needed to pay for the $30 billion in upgrades that would be needed to make the lines safe.

No--wait--they would scream bloody murder and demand that the government force the companies to keep the same prices.

You get what you pay for.
Unless I'm missing something, the $30 billion figure appears to refer to potential liabilities for last years' wildfires. Assuming this can't be negotiated down, cost of upgrades would be on top of that.

The compensation package agreed to for the new CEO may or may not be unreasonable, but whatcha gonna do when one is trying to attract top talent to a bankrupt utility with enormous unresolved liabilities? I will agree in advance that accepting a more modest salary with maybe greater back-end performance incentives would be nice, but, well, this ain't Candyland.
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Old 09-24-2019, 06:01 AM
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Con Edison preemptively cut power to 50,000 in Brooklyn, NY during a heat wave mid-July. My block was one of the last to get the power back on, and the heat was so intense that many became ill. We were told afterwards that many more would've lost power if they didn't make our part of Brooklyn their sacrificial lamb.
This was right after a blackout in Manhattan that affected 1/3 of the city - that's still under investigation.

Our infrastructure is crumbling, while politicians just tut-tut, and promise more hearings.
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Old 09-24-2019, 08:06 AM
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Unless I'm missing something, the $30 billion figure appears to refer to potential liabilities for last years' wildfires. Assuming this can't be negotiated down, cost of upgrades would be on top of that.
Yep, and it will take much longer than one year to do the upgrades.

So their choice is to risk another 30 billion with windstorm power outages, a loss of revenue (if the current isn't flowing they aren't making money), and possibly more unwanted deaths or.............

They can incur the wrath of Snowboarder Bo and other social justice warriors.

Having worked in this industry my whole life I can tell you that PG&E is one of the shittiest of the shitty, but they're backed into a corner with no good path to take. Choosing the one which produces fewer crispy bodies might be their best option.

Last edited by BubbaDog; 09-24-2019 at 08:08 AM.
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Old 09-24-2019, 09:38 AM
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Our infrastructure is crumbling, while politicians just tut-tut, and promise more hearings.
This is the problem: too many looters. Our country is being looted and left to rot. Too many politicians and too many businesspeople are acting without a care for the society they live in. "I've got mine; fuck 'em" is not going to help our society.

Anyone who uses the term "social justice warrior" in earnest is, IMO, likely a selfish jackass who doesn't understand the issues, doesn't understand the consequences and doesn't deserve a whole lot of consideration.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 09-24-2019 at 09:39 AM.
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:02 AM
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This ......
Anyone who uses the term "social justice warrior" in earnest is, IMO, likely a selfish jackass who doesn't understand the issues, doesn't understand the consequences and doesn't deserve a whole lot of consideration.
So help me out here Bo. What should they do at this point? Keep the power on, risk another firestorm? Wave a magic wand and make a billion dollar upgrade happen overnight? Spank the CEO who was hired to guide them out of this mess?

Depending on the terrain just building a standard quality transmission line can cost $1,000,000 per mile. And it takes a long time. Restructuring the lines isn't going to be much cheaper.

Or they could aggressively cut back any trees near their equipment. That's a popular option in California.

Please, please give this jackass the full benefit of your wisdom.

Last edited by BubbaDog; 09-24-2019 at 10:03 AM.
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:07 AM
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The compensation package agreed to for the new CEO may or may not be unreasonable, but whatcha gonna do when one is trying to attract top talent to a bankrupt utility with enormous unresolved liabilities? I will agree in advance that accepting a more modest salary with maybe greater back-end performance incentives would be nice, but, well, this ain't Candyland.
I have issue with the term 'top talent'. Wasn't the last guy in the job also 'top talent'? And the guy before him? He\She was 'top talent' too, right? And yet, here we are.

'Top talent' comes in, reaps rewards, and leaves without taking any responsibility. Then off to another company that needs 'top talent'. Unless he\she actually commits a crime. And even then.....

I get the feeling we could get a bear cub in the woods, dress it up in a suit, make it the CEO, pay it in fish and berries, and we would be pretty much in the position we're in now.

Seriously, as long as it had the same staff as the last CEO, how bad could the bear cub do??
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:07 AM
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In San Jose, PG&E has been sending out notices for months about prepping for possible power interruptions due to emergency conditions. Guess it's the new normal for the company that recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:12 AM
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Or they could aggressively cut back any trees near their equipment. That's a popular option in California.
Maybe if they used a giant hedge trimmer.
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:23 AM
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I find, speaking for myself, that I am considerably more irritated at PG&E given their apparent habit of neglecting to do the work they are hired to do, waiting until something catastrophic happens, declaring bankruptcy, failing to fix issues or set out a plan to address them, and then announce they're just gonna shut things down.

How many do overs does this group get?
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:25 AM
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Maybe if they used a giant hedge trimmer.
Gotta get me one of those.
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:27 AM
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You guys do realize that for the most part, electrical utilities are regulated monopolies under the thumb of the various state governments, right? This ins't a case of public officials allowing the infrastructure to decay; at worst, it's lax regulatory oversight.

And on top of it, this isn't due to shit equipment or infrastructure; it's a pre-emptive attempt to limit the wildfire risk- apparently the combination of hot, dry winds, drought conditions in that part of California, and power lines blown down by the wind is, well, like a spark in a tinder box. It's what caused the Camp fire last year, as a matter of fact.

To cap it off, PG&E is the LAST of the southern California electrical utilities to do this sort of thing- Southern California Edison started in 2017, and San Diego Gas & Electric started in 2013. And not in your rant, is the fact that 45,000 Southern California Edison customers have been warned that their power may be shut off too.

So before you get your righteous panties in a wad, this sure sounds a lot more like a prudent thing to do, than a consequence of poor or deferred maintenance or investment in better equipment. And I just get the impression that power networks are somewhat inherently fragile. Just this past June, a 15 minute severe thunderstorm and accompanying hail wiped out power to 800,000 Dallas area residents (myself among them) for a minimum of 9 hours, and in some cases, several days. It's just the way the things are- sometimes Mother Nature gets the best of them, despite our best efforts.

Here's a cite:

https://www.latimes.com/california/s...-power-outages
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:32 AM
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Con Edison preemptively cut power to 50,000 in Brooklyn, NY during a heat wave mid-July. My block was one of the last to get the power back on, and the heat was so intense that many became ill. We were told afterwards that many more would've lost power if they didn't make our part of Brooklyn their sacrificial lamb.
This was right after a blackout in Manhattan that affected 1/3 of the city - that's still under investigation.
Rolling blackouts or brownouts are a standard power management strategy; they happen occasionally around here (Texas) as well, when it's unusually hot (> 108 or so) or unusually cold for a protracted period in the southern part of the state (where heaters aren't often necessary, and people have electrical heating)

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/...er-heat-looms/
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:33 AM
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Wait, go back. The former CEO mentioned earlier ... some loving mother named their child Geisha?!?
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:56 AM
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And on top of it, this isn't due to shit equipment or infrastructure; it's a pre-emptive attempt to limit the wildfire risk- apparently the combination of hot, dry winds, drought conditions in that part of California, and power lines blown down by the wind is, well, like a spark in a tinder box. It's what caused the Camp fire last year, as a matter of fact.
I think most of us are OK with this part.

I think the issue is with the utility crying poverty while paying stuffed suits multi-million dollar salaries and signing bonuses.
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:58 AM
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I'd much rather be inconvenienced temporarily than have 10s of thousands of homes burn. This is high fire season in CA and PG&E has been going up and down the state telling people they have the program in place that will shut off power if the weather conditions warrant it. Seems prudent to me.
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Old 09-24-2019, 11:47 AM
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What a fucking stupid thread. You understand that the problem is that downed power lines can cause fires, right? However many men we put on the moon and whatever year it is, we're not going to be able to snap our fingers and cancel out the potential effects of high winds. You might as well rail about construction companies that can't build hurricane-proof roofs In 2019 In The Country That Put A Man On The Moon.
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:14 PM
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Buried power lines seldom have these issues. But that requires more upfront capital.
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:17 PM
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I get the feeling we could get a bear cub in the woods, dress it up in a suit, make it the CEO, pay it in fish and berries, and we would be pretty much in the position we're in now.

Seriously, as long as it had the same staff as the last CEO, how bad could the bear cub do??
I think that may be overstating the case slightly.

I think that there are a couple of thousand middle management types in the company who could take over and do a good job though.

You're absolutely right about how ridiculous the cult of the "CEO" is though.
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:27 PM
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What a fucking stupid thread. You understand that the problem is that downed power lines can cause fires, right? However many men we put on the moon and whatever year it is, we're not going to be able to snap our fingers and cancel out the potential effects of high winds. You might as well rail about construction companies that can't build hurricane-proof roofs In 2019 In The Country That Put A Man On The Moon.
This was, almost certainly, the right call to make in the circumstance. But let's not let PG&E off the hook for getting itself into these circumstances in the first place. They've spent a decade or more cheaping out on maintaining and upgrading their equipment in favor of bigger profits. They're in this position due to their own mismanagement.
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:31 PM
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Perhaps. But I don't see any evidence that there is some other transmission method that avoids these issues (other than burying power lines, which creates a whole new set of problems).
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:53 PM
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Perhaps. But I don't see any evidence that there is some other transmission method that avoids these issues (other than burying power lines, which creates a whole new set of problems).
It's true that even a properly maintained, state of the art power system is still going to be subject to these sorts of events, and PG&E might have had to do this shutdown even if they'd done everything right in the last ten years.

But that's kind of a moot point, because they didn't do everything (anything?) right in the last ten years, and they have a poorly maintained, outdated power system that breaks catastrophically way too often. I'm way past giving them any sort of benefit of the doubt when it comes to this shit.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:13 PM
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Maybe if they used a giant hedge trimmer.
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Gotta get me one of those.
My first thought as well. And my backyard is just the size of a postage stamp (a really, really large postage stamp, but you get the idea). Still, my hedges got out of control due to lax upkeep. Wonder if there is one that can do the tops?
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:28 PM
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I inherited a butt-load of PG&E stock, and unloaded it just before they burnt down half of Oakland (or wherever that was, don't recall). I check on stock prices for grins, and smile quietly to myself every time I see this shit plummet.

After the Camp Fire, I just felt bad. But, damn! Glad I liquidated that stuff.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:31 PM
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Perhaps. But I don't see any evidence that there is some other transmission method that avoids these issues (other than burying power lines, which creates a whole new set of problems).
Tesla had wireless power figured out at the end of the 19th century after all.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Wireless_System
Why aren’t we doing that?

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Old 09-24-2019, 08:07 PM
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Not surprising that those who support PG&E live thousands of miles away from California. The San Bruno explosion was the first hint. They got lots of money approved to check out gas pipelines, and stuffed it all into profits. So they had no idea of what lines were where, overpressurized some, and boom. People dead.

Yeah, trimming trees near power lines is a big job. Which they had money for. But it inflates the bonuses of the execs if the money isn't spent.
After the fires they can afford to spring for ads every five minutes on local stations on how first responders just love PG&E. Yeah, they create interesting disasters. Or how to escape from fires PG&E starts. It's not like it builds business - maybe they can use some of that budget to trim more trees.
Sure turning off power is better than another fire starting (but I don't live in the affected areas) but I get the impression that there is a PG&E attitude of "diss us for burning down your town? No power for you."
The Utilities commission was in their pocket, but all in all it is capitalism at its best.
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Old 09-24-2019, 08:25 PM
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Friends of mine works for LADWP. This is due to risk of mountain fires when the winds actually come. So the upcoming service cuts is so we don't have another fire like last year where Trump gets to make fun of us and tell us to rake better.
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Old 09-24-2019, 08:44 PM
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It's true that even a properly maintained, state of the art power system is still going to be subject to these sorts of events, and PG&E might have had to do this shutdown even if they'd done everything right in the last ten years.
So, beinbg out there in sunny California, they must be wishing for lots of individual homeowners spending their own upfront capital to put solar panels on their roofs, and connect those up ro the grid. That would provide lots of small, distributed 'generating plants' scattered throughout the system to add power. Especially power added on hot, dry sunny afternoons -- peak time for electricity use.

So P G & E must have been pushing that a lot, right? Ha!

Just like all the profit-draining "investor owned" utilities, they were fighting tooth & nail against customer-provided renewable power. Adding every kind of bureaucratic obstacle and dragging their feet every time they could. And counting on their bought-and-paid-for friends on the regulatory commission or in local building inspectors to interfere whenever they could. Let 'em burn.
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Old 09-24-2019, 08:57 PM
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Exactly! They got regulations in place that restrict homeowners from installing more panels than they needed to cover their regular usage. So if your roof would handle enough panels to provide double your power, you can't install that many.

PG&E sucks.
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Old 09-24-2019, 09:05 PM
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It's true that even a properly maintained, state of the art power system is still going to be subject to these sorts of events, and PG&E might have had to do this shutdown even if they'd done everything right in the last ten years.
So, beinbg out there in sunny California, they must be wishing for lots of individual homeowners spending their own upfront capital to put solar panels on their roofs, and connect those up ro the grid. That would provide lots of small, distributed 'generating plants' scattered throughout the system to add power. Especially power added on hot, dry sunny afternoons -- peak time for electricity use.

So P G & E must have been pushing that a lot, right? Ha!

Just like all the profit-draining "investor owned" utilities, they were fighting tooth & nail against customer-provided renewable power. Adding every kind of bureaucratic obstacle and dragging their feet every time they could. And counting on their bought-and-paid-for friends on the regulatory commission or in local building inspectors to interfere whenever they could. Let 'em burn.
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Old 09-24-2019, 10:35 PM
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Exactly! They got regulations in place that restrict homeowners from installing more panels than they needed to cover their regular usage. So if your roof would handle enough panels to provide double your power, you can't install that many.

PG&E sucks.
Odd trivia - if you have solar in CA and you are normally connected to the grid, if power goes out you will still lose power. When power is out, utilities require a cutoff so you can't feed power back into the grid. It makes sense since utility workers going to work on lines wouldn't want solar generated power to be live in those transmission lines.f

Now, if you have a backup generator, or batteries, you're fine. You'll have to have a cutoff switch so you don't feed back into the grid though.
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Old 09-24-2019, 11:19 PM
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PG&E is shit -- I was out there when their gas line obliterated several families in San Marino around dinner time.

But strangely, I'm somewhat sympathetic toward them in the wake of last year's catastrophic fires. I mean, atmospheric conditions are to blame for the fires more than anything. I don't see how bankrupting them with floods of lawsuits helps anyone, particularly when the source of the problem are probably the very people wanting a piece of their ass financially, driving their big gas guzzling SUVs all over Nor-Cal.
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Old 09-25-2019, 05:25 AM
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Odd trivia - if you have solar in CA and you are normally connected to the grid, if power goes out you will still lose power. When power is out, utilities require a cutoff so you can't feed power back into the grid. It makes sense since utility workers going to work on lines wouldn't want solar generated power to be live in those transmission lines.f
That was neither odd nor trivial.
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Old 09-25-2019, 05:32 AM
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I get the feeling we could get a bear cub in the woods, dress it up in a suit, make it the CEO, pay it in fish and berries, and we would be pretty much in the position we're in now.

Seriously, as long as it had the same staff as the last CEO, how bad could the bear cub do??
But where would we find 2.5 million dollars worth of fish and berries? Oh wait, Whole Foods...
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Old 09-25-2019, 06:07 AM
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Odd trivia - if you have solar in CA and you are normally connected to the grid, if power goes out you will still lose power. When power is out, utilities require a cutoff so you can't feed power back into the grid. It makes sense since utility workers going to work on lines wouldn't want solar generated power to be live in those transmission lines.f

Now, if you have a backup generator, or batteries, you're fine. You'll have to have a cutoff switch so you don't feed back into the grid though.
I'm surprised that solar panels aren't installed with a transfer switch, the same as a home generator. Or does the ability to sell power back to the utility make that hard/impossible?
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Old 09-25-2019, 06:07 AM
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Odd trivia - if you have solar in CA and you are normally connected to the grid, if power goes out you will still lose power. When power is out, utilities require a cutoff so you can't feed power back into the grid. It makes sense since utility workers going to work on lines wouldn't want solar generated power to be live in those transmission lines.f

Now, if you have a backup generator, or batteries, you're fine. You'll have to have a cutoff switch so you don't feed back into the grid though.
Why can't you install a backfeed breaker with a solar installation? Is there some technical reason?
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Old 09-25-2019, 06:49 AM
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Your favorite kind of monopoly, a government protected one. (also the only kind that persists)

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Old 09-25-2019, 07:32 AM
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Why can't you install a backfeed breaker with a solar installation? Is there some technical reason?
I'm not sure actually. But I had a discussion with the installer about it and they said it was a requirement that it was done that way. Perhaps if you tinker it can be done, but the way it works in most setups is homes with solar typically always pull from the grid, and all generation goes back to the grid, and then the energy generated is netted against the energy used. Your house doesn't get powered directly from the panels.

Last edited by Bone; 09-25-2019 at 07:33 AM.
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Old 09-25-2019, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by WillFarnaby View Post
Your favorite kind of monopoly, a government protected one. (also the only kind that persists)
Actually my power is coming from a third party, through PG&E lines, and is mostly renewable. For less. I can be 100% renewable if I wanted to pay a bit more.
Only the government could force PG&E to do this.

Or do you want multiple power lines coming into each house? Ever heard of a natural monopoly?
  #41  
Old 09-25-2019, 04:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
Actually my power is coming from a third party, through PG&E lines, and is mostly renewable. For less. I can be 100% renewable if I wanted to pay a bit more.
Only the government could force PG&E to do this.

Or do you want multiple power lines coming into each house? Ever heard of a natural monopoly?
https://mises.org/library/myth-natural-monopoly-0
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Old 09-25-2019, 06:17 PM
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Most solar panels simply generate DC electrical current. Then you need an inverter to change it to AC, and transform it to 120 volts. Not too difficult.

But you also need it to be at 60 cycles/second (Hz), AND to be synchronized with the 50 Hz of the grid*. That takes lot more complex (expensive) circuitry to do, apparently. So most solar panels don't have that -- they just sync up with the grid, so if the grid is down, they can't generte at 60Hz at all -- they just shut down.

* This is true of all electrical sources on the grid. Every time they start up a new generator in the line of them at Boulder Dam, or at coal-fired electric plant, or wherever, the operators have to 'lock sync' it with the 60 Hz of the grid. This can take some work on their part.

Last edited by Tim@T-Bonham.net; 09-25-2019 at 06:19 PM.
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Old 09-25-2019, 10:44 PM
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I'm not sure actually. But I had a discussion with the installer about it and they said it was a requirement that it was done that way. Perhaps if you tinker it can be done, but the way it works in most setups is homes with solar typically always pull from the grid, and all generation goes back to the grid, and then the energy generated is netted against the energy used. Your house doesn't get powered directly from the panels.
Regulations are moving now towards a preference for on-site storage for home solar instead of net-metering. (As opposed to utility-scale solar farms which output directly to the grid.) Those battery systems do require an automated transfer switch to protect the grid.
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Old 09-25-2019, 10:48 PM
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Originally Posted by friedo View Post
Regulations are moving now towards a preference for on-site storage for home solar instead of net-metering. (As opposed to utility-scale solar farms which output directly to the grid.) Those battery systems do require an automated transfer switch to protect the grid.
I'm not sure if CA regulations are moving that way, but I am familiar with on site storage. I do it
  #45  
Old 10-03-2019, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
This is the problem: too many looters. Our country is being looted and left to rot. Too many politicians and too many businesspeople are acting without a care for the society they live in. "I've got mine; fuck 'em" is not going to help our society.

Anyone who uses the term "social justice warrior" in earnest is, IMO, likely a selfish jackass who doesn't understand the issues, doesn't understand the consequences and doesn't deserve a whole lot of consideration.
This. These utilities have legal monopolies over large areas. They make big profits, and funnel tons of money to their "top guys" in pay, benefits, and lavish offices.

When it's hot or cold they want to jack up the rates. When the Saudis fuck us again, they want to jack up the rates. When they have a big conservation campaign and we fall for it, they cry about lost revenue and jack up the rates.

it's theft on a grand scale.

Last edited by SteveG1; 10-03-2019 at 12:35 PM.
  #46  
Old 10-03-2019, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Sunny Daze View Post
I find, speaking for myself, that I am considerably more irritated at PG&E given their apparent habit of neglecting to do the work they are hired to do, waiting until something catastrophic happens, declaring bankruptcy, failing to fix issues or set out a plan to address them, and then announce they're just gonna shut things down.

How many do overs does this group get?
… and this.
  #47  
Old 10-03-2019, 12:43 PM
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Odd trivia - if you have solar in CA and you are normally connected to the grid, if power goes out you will still lose power. When power is out, utilities require a cutoff so you can't feed power back into the grid. It makes sense since utility workers going to work on lines wouldn't want solar generated power to be live in those transmission lines.f

Now, if you have a backup generator, or batteries, you're fine. You'll have to have a cutoff switch so you don't feed back into the grid though.
That no-power always seemed stupid to me.. All you would have to do is wire in a current sensing unit and relay, just like you have in emergency lighting boxes. OR a switch.

When the power goes down, you disconnect from the utility and hook up to your own batteries and charging system. When the power comes back up, you toggle back onto the grid.

But the way solar is promoted and very poorly "explained" out here in Cali, it always sounded too much like "if it's too good to be true, then it probably is"
Buyer beware.
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Old 10-03-2019, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by SteveG1 View Post
That no-power always seemed stupid to me.. All you would have to do is wire in a current sensing unit and relay, just like you have in emergency lighting boxes. OR a switch.

When the power goes down, you disconnect from the utility and hook up to your own batteries and charging system. When the power comes back up, you toggle back onto the grid.
Such switches are readily available -- anybody who installs an emergency generator at their home or farm will have one installed by their electrician. They can be either manual cutovers, or automated ones. (But this requires that your solar system produce 120V, 60Hz AC current on its own. Most simple (cheap) solar systems don't.)
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Old 10-06-2019, 05:23 PM
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In Los Angeles too? IIRC LADWP exclusively serves the city, plus mich of the Owens Valley.

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  #50  
Old 10-09-2019, 09:30 AM
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Well, the thread title says 24,000 but now it could be in the millions


https://apnews.com/a1816e7e270945979dfb0e0d65fb9722
Quote:
12:00 a.m.

Millions of people in northern and central California are facing days without power as Pacific Gas & Electric creates the largest preventive blackout in state history.

The utility says it will start to shut down power at midnight Wednesday to customers to reduce the chance of fierce winds knocking trees into power lines or downing equipment and sparking wildfires.

People preparing for the outages emptied shelves of bottled water and batteries, and there were lines at gas pumps.

PG&E planned to shut off power to 800,000 home and businesses in 34 counties through Thursday. But the utility warned it could take up to five days to restore power because the lines must be inspected to make sure they’re safe.
Quote:
To the south, Southern California Edison said more than 106,000 of its customers in parts of eight counties could face power cuts as early as Thursday as Santa Ana winds loomed.
a few hours later:
Quote:
6:30 a.m.

Pacific Gas and Electric has shut off power to more than half a million customers in Northern California in the biggest planned shut off in the state’s history.

The utility said Wednesday it will gradually turn off electricity to nearly 800,000 customers to prevent its equipment from starting wildfires during hot, windy weather.

It says a second group of about 234,000 customers will lose power starting at noon.

The utility says it’s considering turning off power to another 42,000 customers in areas it serves near Southern California. It says it will determine a time and the specific locations later Wednesday.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 10-09-2019 at 09:32 AM.
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