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Old 07-15-2019, 03:32 PM
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Teach me to swear in other languages. Part 2a: Personal Invective (Male)


Previous thread: Part 1: Interjections

The first thread went a little bit far afield (as is the nature of such things), but I'm still going to try to do this by subject matter. So - what are your favorite things to shout at the driver who just zipped across four lanes of highway traffic, narrowly missing your front bumper, to get to his off-ramp? What do you call the guy who puts his bare foot up on your armrest from behind in coach on an airplane?

I typically stick with, "asshole," although, "dickhead," is fairly common as well. I think there's some subtlety of meaning - to my mind an asshole is more blatantly uncaring and...well, assholish...often self-aware of his assholery. A dickhead is a bit more likely to be merely stupidly obnoxious, and less conscious of their dickheadedness.

I've decided to split this one up into two parts because in my experience there is an entire subset of words devoted to men, and a different subset devoted to women. So, let's try to stick to the foul language you throw toward men in this thread, and deal with the female-directed invectives in the next. Feel free to share the gender-neutral phrases wherever you'd like.
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Old 07-15-2019, 03:41 PM
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In Dutch, “klootzak” would be appropriate, possibly intensified with “vuile”. (Dirty scrotum). Alternately (and there are so, so many alternates): “Godvergeten teringlijer”. Suffer of tuberculosis of whom the Lord has no memory.
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Old 07-15-2019, 08:58 PM
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In Spanish, cabron is one of the worst things you can say to a guy and definitely fighting words. It technically means "male goat" but conveys "cuckold," or someone whose wife screws other men. It has an equivalent weight as "motherfucker" in English.

Idiota and imbecile are common but much stronger than the equivalents in English. In subtitles, I often see "asshole" translated by one of these words.
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Old 07-16-2019, 04:53 AM
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In Spanish, cabron is one of the worst things you can say to a guy and definitely fighting words. It technically means "male goat" but conveys "cuckold," or someone whose wife screws other men. It has an equivalent weight as "motherfucker" in English.
In Spanish from Spain, specifically a man who pimps out his own women. That is, cabrón is not merely a man whose woman is cuckolding him, but one who forces women supposed to be under his care and protection to have sex with other men.

Cabestro refers to a man who behaves like a bull in a china shop, either physically or emotionally. Some people will also use it as an alternative to cabrón; Spanish dislikes repetition to the extent that we'll apologize for using the same root (not even the same word) twice in a single sentence.

There's also mamón (sucker but more agressive), references to one's mother and references to being gay, many of which have become watered-down and obtained gender-flipped versions. 40 years ago, maricón meant "a gay man" and maricona meant "a gay transvestite" (Spain has enough of a tradition of gender-flipped theater characters to be very clear on the concept of "gender flipped clothing doesn't necessarily mean anything about the wearer's sexuality"); nowadays they're more likely to mean "that male asshole who cut me off" and "that female asshole who cut me off" respectively.

Capullo (literally flowerbud) means dickhead, both as an anatomical reference (no me sale del capullo - my dick says no) and as an insult.
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Old 07-16-2019, 10:15 AM
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A long time ago I lived in a large apartment complex. There were a group of Central American immigrants at our end of the complex who had some kind of feud with another group of Central American immigrants in another part of the neighborhood. One night a group from the other end came to our section and smashed the car windshield of one of the guys that lived near us. The victim shouted "CABRON" in anger louder than I have ever heard someone yell anything.

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Old 07-16-2019, 10:19 AM
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In Waali, the strongest insult is probably Bon degre nga i.e. This dirty thing. It seems to be more insulting to refer to the insulltee in the third person like that. There is also nimbiiri yoho i.e. Blank eyes, implying stupidity.

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Old 07-16-2019, 11:06 AM
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Italian: testa di cazzo (dickhead), testa di minchia (same, Sicilian version but popular in the whole country), coglione (ball, this one implies stupidity rather than malice), figlio di putana (son of a whore).
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Old 07-16-2019, 11:11 AM
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In Spanish, cabron is one of the worst things you can say to a guy and definitely fighting words. It technically means "male goat" but conveys "cuckold," or someone whose wife screws other men. It has an equivalent weight as "motherfucker" in English.
In Italian this would be "cornuto" (to be "horned"). It doesn't imply pimping, but does imply that your being cheated on by your wife. Quite a grave insult, do not use in Naples.
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Old 07-16-2019, 11:38 AM
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German invectives for a bad driver (aka everybody else but me): Arschloch (asshole), Wichser (wanker) or Pisser (no translation needed).
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Old 07-16-2019, 12:21 PM
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In Dutch, “klootzak” would be appropriate, possibly intensified with “vuile”. (Dirty scrotum). Alternately (and there are so, so many alternates): “Godvergeten teringlijer”. Suffer of tuberculosis of whom the Lord has no memory.
I like "klootzak." Lots of sharp consonants - the word even looks angry.
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Capullo (literally flowerbud) means dickhead, both as an anatomical reference (no me sale del capullo - my dick says no) and as an insult.
Is this Spanish Spanish only? I know a lot of words (both uncouth and otherwise) have different meanings depending on which Spanish-speaking country the speaker is from. I like the word, but I'm wondering if it will be understood as, "dickhead," here in Miami. :-)
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German invectives for a bad driver (aka everybody else but me): Arschloch (asshole), Wichser (wanker) or Pisser (no translation needed).
I like, "wichser." I never know if, "Arschloch," was actually useful in German or one of those things I picked up that maybe nobody ever uses in practice. Thanks for the validation.
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Old 07-16-2019, 12:32 PM
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In French, the typical insult is 'connard' or 'pauvre con' meaning moron, but stronger. That would be a start.

If you want to escalate things go to 'trou du cul' or 'fils de pute', repectively asshole and son of a bitch.

'(Nique) ta mère' (fuck) your mother is always a hit, too especially with the younger generation.
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Old 07-16-2019, 12:54 PM
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I like, "wichser." I never know if, "Arschloch," was actually useful in German or one of those things I picked up that maybe nobody ever uses in practice. Thanks for the validation.
What were those "other things" you picked up? Maybe I can confirm them, there are still others I may haven't thought about, and many regional ones.
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Old 07-16-2019, 02:24 PM
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Oh, forgot an important Italian one : stronzo.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:33 PM
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Norwegian: You devil - "Jævel", or you ballsack/testicle - "kødd".

The latter word has the same origin as cod in "codpiece", is also the origin of the Swedish for "pillow", and is also our word for "dicking around", "joking", "messing with".
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Old 07-17-2019, 02:31 AM
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Oh, forgot an important Italian one : stronzo.
And I forgot an important French one : 'enculé' - literally someone who takes it up the ass. It could theoretically be used for both sexes but is usually reserved for guys. It hasn't quite lost its initial sexual connotation but is now mainly a general-purpose insult, like 'connard'.
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Old 07-17-2019, 04:37 AM
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Is this Spanish Spanish only? I know a lot of words (both uncouth and otherwise) have different meanings depending on which Spanish-speaking country the speaker is from. I like the word, but I'm wondering if it will be understood as, "dickhead," here in Miami. :-)
The tone would be understood; the word, not sure. Have you ever played Civ5? The bunched-up-fingers gesture the Latin American guy does when initiating conversations always throws me off; it is common in both Spanish and Portuguese speakers, sure, but you would use it under very different circumstances. Depending on what is being said, it means "you're a dickhead (and an asshole, and your mother is so ugly a satyr wouldn't fuck her in daylight", "I'm such an imbecile (why didn't I think of this sooner)" or "we're such morons (why didn't we think of this sooner)".

Another group in Spanish is related to animals: donkey/ass/stupid = burro, borrico, pollino; pig/dirty/sleazy = cerdo, puerco, cochino, marrano, guarro... (it's one of the nouns that has the highest number of synonyms, and most of them include the kind of strong phonemes we favor in our insults). I remember one of my bosses saying "I will not say I dislike him, but I certainly do consider him an animal porcino" (he got an ovation).
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Old 07-17-2019, 02:55 PM
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What were those "other things" you picked up? Maybe I can confirm them, there are still others I may haven't thought about, and many regional ones.
Arschgeige. Hosenscheisser. Sau Preusse, Du ehlender! (To denote displeasure with someone not from Swabia, Bavaria or Austria). Zigenficker. Arschgeburt.

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Old 07-17-2019, 03:38 PM
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Arschgeige. Hosenscheisser. Sau Preusse, Du ehlender! (To denote displeasure with someone not from Swabia, Bavaria or Austria). Zigenficker. Arschgeburt.
All valid . Though a Bavarian worth his salt would call me "Saupreiss, elendiger!" (I like "Arschgeburt", wouldn't say I've ever heard it in the wild)
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Old 07-17-2019, 04:37 PM
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40 years ago, maricón meant "a gay man" ...
I remember learning this from a Spanish-speaking classmate a good 35 years ago. Seemed to be thrown around casually and with frequency.
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Old 07-18-2019, 07:55 AM
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Another group in Spanish is related to animals: [snip]... pig/dirty/sleazy = cerdo, puerco, cochino, marrano, guarro... (it's one of the nouns that has the highest number of synonyms, and most of them include the kind of strong phonemes we favor in our insults). I remember one of my bosses saying "I will not say I dislike him, but I certainly do consider him an animal porcino" (he got an ovation).
I seem to recall having read that in the times after the reconquest of all of Spain from the Moors: there was a considerable issue about Jews (all of whom had faced the choice between conversion to Catholicism, and expulsion from Spain) who had stayed; and on the face of it, converted -- but whose "conversion" was suspected of having been about expediency, not conviction, and they were suspected of still secretly performing Judaic religious observances in secret. (This was, IIRC, an issue with which the Inquisition was majorly preoccupied.) I seem, again, to recall that these folk were especially referred to as "marranos".
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Old 07-18-2019, 08:25 AM
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I remember learning this from a Spanish-speaking classmate a good 35 years ago. Seemed to be thrown around casually and with frequency.
More nowadays, having become deprecated. But in general Spaniards are recognizable by the amount of bad language. I was waiting in line at an American university's cafeteria once and greeted the two guys in front of me with "hi! I'm from Pamplona, in grad school here. Where are you guys from?" "Uh... from Spain…" "I'd figured that from the amount of hostias and copones, dear, I meant the specifics." (They'd been peppering their conversation with "hosts" and "chalices": definitely not from Cuba!)

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I seem to recall having read that in the times after the reconquest of all of Spain from the Moors: there was a considerable issue about Jews (all of whom had faced the choice between conversion to Catholicism, and expulsion from Spain) who had stayed; and on the face of it, converted -- but whose "conversion" was suspected of having been about expediency, not conviction, and they were suspected of still secretly performing Judaic religious observances in secret. (This was, IIRC, an issue with which the Inquisition was majorly preoccupied.) I seem, again, to recall that these folk were especially referred to as "marranos".
Yes. Nowadays since the majority of people only worry about the religious practices of others when it impinges upon them directly (whether it is in the form of interfaith marriages or of noisy holidays), the meaning is very much not the one that comes to mind. Most people will not even have vague memories of having learned this meaning; the exception is those of us who really like either history, language, or both.
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Old 07-18-2019, 12:47 PM
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Arschgeige...
I just love this. Ass violin, really ?
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Old 07-18-2019, 03:19 PM
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Yes really. You might enjoy the Dutch “kloothommel”. Scrotum bumblebee.
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Old 07-19-2019, 02:26 AM
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More nowadays, having become deprecated. But in general Spaniards are recognizable by the amount of bad language. I was waiting in line at an American university's cafeteria once and greeted the two guys in front of me with "hi! I'm from Pamplona, in grad school here. Where are you guys from?" "Uh... from Spain…" "I'd figured that from the amount of hostias and copones, dear, I meant the specifics." (They'd been peppering their conversation with "hosts" and "chalices": definitely not from Cuba!)
My goodness -- so Spaniards do this, too? I'd heard of it as a speciality of Quebecois bad language; had no idea that same applied to Spain.
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Old 07-19-2019, 03:19 AM
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The amount of usage applies to Spain (the words are used by people from other Spanish-speaking countries too, but not so casually) and, while the Quebecois are famous for their tabernacles, I've had some French coworkers whose speech dropped hôtes all over the factory floor. "Using religious elements as bad words" is common through cultures - what do you think "godamnit" or "damn" are?

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Old 07-19-2019, 05:12 AM
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And I forgot an important French one : 'enculé' - literally someone who takes it up the ass. It could theoretically be used for both sexes but is usually reserved for guys. It hasn't quite lost its initial sexual connotation but is now mainly a general-purpose insult, like 'connard'.

Of note, depending on where exactly in France you are, "enculé" can also be used as a generic interjection, semi-positive adjective or as a punctuation mark equivalent to a full stop .


Also there are endless, subtle variations one can apply to the baseword "con". You could establish an entire typology of all cons : A "petit con" is an impertinent or cheeky person, and depending on your intonation can be spoken in spite or in praise/enjoyment of said p'tite connerie. A "sale con" is a particularly vicious brand of asshole. A "gros con" for his part is pig ignorant, often prone to violence (even moreso a "gros con de base") and likely racist/misogynist ; whereas a "grand con" is more aloof or airheaded but not necessarily malevolent. A "gentil con" is naive or idealistic but harmless or even cute ; a "con-con" is equally harmless, keeps doing or saying dumb stuff but at least he means well (down South the "con-con" morphs into a "couillon", which I assume is derived from the Italian coglione). A "vieux con" will never ever change his mind, will tell you the same anecdote a dozen times and presumably votes hard right while a "jeune con" will know better soon enough, just you wait. A "pauvre con" is just pitiful, useless all around ; whereas "Ducon" or "Ducon-Lajoie" can apply to just about anybody - or even simply be a slightly pejorative moniker applied to someone whose name you do not know. If "Dupont" is "John Doe", "Ducon" is "Joe Six-Pack" or "that guy" more or less.

And then there's the friendly "haha, t'es trop con !" when someone you like makes you laugh with a clever joke.


Another useful one is "bâtard" - literally it means, well, a bastard in the geneallogic sense ; but more generally denotes some low-down type of underhanded or back-stabby bastard - he's specifically distinct from the various types of "cons" in that he can be very smart. The hallmark of the "bâtard" is that he means ill to you or your friends and achieves it in unfair or cowardly ways. There again, a typology applies : a "sale bâtard" isn't quite a "gros bâtard" isn't exactly a "petit bâtard". You can be a "sale petit bâtard" but no one has ever heard of a "vieux gros bâtard". It's all very specific . French profanity is nothing if not surgically precise.



A "branleur" is a wanker, with the same general lazy/shiftless connotation as the British idiom.



As for the OP's specific requests, "trou du cul" or "trou de cul" means asshole, "tête de bite" would be dickhead (although I'm not sure the content of the words match exactly, if you follow my meaning) but neither is very commonly used any more.
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Old 07-19-2019, 05:20 AM
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If you want to escalate things go to 'trou du cul' or 'fils de pute', repectively asshole and son of a bitch.

Be very, very careful with that last one however. It's one of them false friends - in English (particularly American English) sumbitch is a mild one, to the point of not even being insulting any more. "Fils de pute" however ? Them's strong fighting words.
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Old 07-19-2019, 06:43 AM
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The amount of usage applies to Spain (the words are used by people from other Spanish-speaking countries too, but not so casually) and, while the Quebecois are famous for their tabernacles, I've had some French coworkers whose speech dropped hôtes all over the factory floor. "Using religious elements as bad words" is common through cultures - what do you think "godamnit" or "damn" are?
Swearing in the form of blasphemy is of course a well-known phenomenon. However I, being from a highly-predominantly-Protestant country, had long never come across this particularly Catholic variant which involves the assorted "gear" for celebrating Mass. (It seems not to occur on our neighbouring, mostly Catholic, island of Ireland -- though maybe Irish Dopers will chime in, informing me that I'm wrong there.)

I first became aware of of this particular bad-language mode, in reading Harry Turtledove's "Southern Victory" or "TL191" alternative-history series, an element of which is set in Quebec -- historically (including, in real history) an ardently Catholic region. On my thus reading of the phenomenon, it struck me as a marvellously weird and imaginative swearing-of-the-blasphemous-kind variant.
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Old 07-19-2019, 09:24 AM
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Mexican Spanish - pendejo and variants

¡Pendejo! - Asshole!

Qué pendejo eres. - What a heartless motherfucker you are.
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Old 07-19-2019, 12:07 PM
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Another good French one is 'Beauf" It's a contraction of beau frère (brother in law) but connotes a vulgar, unsophisticated person.
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Old 07-19-2019, 12:12 PM
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Mexican Spanish - pendejo and variants

¡Pendejo! - Asshole!

Qué pendejo eres. - What a heartless motherfucker you are.
To make it even stronger, add the adjective 'pinche' (fucking), liberally used in Mexican Spanish
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Old 07-19-2019, 04:10 PM
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Another good French one is 'Beauf" It's a contraction of beau frère (brother in law) but connotes a vulgar, unsophisticated person.

Ah, yes, good one - but I wouldn't really call it an invective per se. You can absolutely describe a third person as "c'est un gros beauf" to someone, but for some reason it's not used at people. Possibly because, well, what's the point of even talking to a beauf' ?
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