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Old 01-27-2020, 01:31 PM
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2020 gaming computer build specs


Epic/Psyonix recently announced that in March they would no longer be supporting MacOS or Linux for Rocket League. This means that in order for me to continue to play, I need to acquire either a console or a PC. I dislike consoles much more than I dislike PCs, so I started researching what I'd need, what I'd want and what I could afford.

This system will do three things: 1) allow me to play Rocket League online, 2) allow me to edit videos and 3) allow me to run Python 3 so I can try and train a bot to play Rocket League.

Here are the system requirements for Rocket League:
Quote:
Rocket League Minimum System Requirements

CPU: 2.4 GHz Dual-core
RAM: 2 GB
HDD: 7 GB available space
GPU: NVIDIA GTX 260 or ATI 4850
OS: Windows 7 or Newer
DirectX: Version 9.0c
Screen Resolution: 720p

Rocket League Recommended System Requirements

CPU: 2.5+ GHz Quad-core
RAM: 4 GB
HDD: 7 GB available space
GPU: NVIDIA GTX 660 or better, ATI 7950 or better
OS: Windows 7 or Newer
DirectX: Version 9.0c
Screen Resolution: 1080p
Here is what I think I can afford and that I'd be happy with (one factor is I don't want to be out-dated in mere months):

ASUS ROG Maximus XI Hero (Wi-Fi) with i7 9700 chipset
Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti
16 or 32 GB RAM (I'll prolly spend the money on 32G; RAM rules)
850w Power Supply
multiple fans
CD/DVD/BR R/W drive
SSD >1 TB
Many USB ports
Audio card (prolly not strictly necessary at this point)

That totals up to about $1800 with a case if I have it built; not sure how much I'd save trying to hook it all up myself vs. how much headache it might be.

How are those specs? I think that should hold me for a couple of years at least, but for the money, I'd prefer it held me for 4 or more years.

I found this $750 build spec that I found online, but I'm not sure about the motherboard or the i5 chipset. I love the price, tho.
Quote:
✔ Intel Core i5-9400F Coffee Lake 6-Core 2.9GHz (4.10 GHz Turbo) CPU Processor | 500G SSD Ė Up to 30x Faster Than Traditional HDD | B365 Motherboard
✔ NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 6GB GDDR5 Video Card | 8GB Gaming Memory DDR4 3000 with Heat Spreader
[and a mere 500w power supply]
I'm thinking about getting a 144mHz monitor too; anyone have any experience with them?

Thanks for your input, folks!
  #2  
Old 01-27-2020, 06:49 PM
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I just did that --


I built the machine you are describing about a year ago for about 500 dollars less. I'd never built a computer before but I stumbled across a video on youtube that showed how easy it really is.

If you have a MicroCenter near you, all the better. They have a build it yourself department and everyone I spoke to at the two different MicroCenters I visited was excellent. Having a person to talk to is not essential, but it can really smooth

Here's the url that got me interested and made me believe I could do it without cursing a blue streak and kicking my cat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7D50mMbxB8o

Design before you build!!! 90% of your happiness hinges on your shopping list. Knowing how much power and speed you want and making sure all the parts you are buying will give you that and are compatible is the single most important element in the process. If you get the shopping list right, the build itself is pretty easy.

Good luck. I really enjoyed it.
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Old 01-27-2020, 06:51 PM
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I just built a computer, for general use but also for gaming. I used a Core i7-9700 CPU and kept my GTX-970 graphics card from my previous computer. As long as you leave some power supply room (which you'll have with that one), you can always upgrade the GPU later, which leads me to the main reason I'm replying...

My last build was in 2009, and it had a Core i7-920, and some relevant graphics card, which I bought another of and connected them in parallel, then bought another one, and then the current one. The CPU was fine all the way through -- maybe I couldn't play with all settings at high, but with medium settings, I was playing pretty current games with zero lag.

I was itching to replace it when the power supply started failing, so I said, OK, I'll build a new one. But, I probably could have gotten by with the old setup if I had to. The CPU was well below the recommended specs, but that seemed to have very little effect on the game play -- I saw the most dramatic improvements when I upgraded the GPU.

My point is, your build will last a long time, and when it starts to show signs of lagging, just upgrade the GPU. I think the i7-9700 is one of those sweet-spot CPUs, just like the i7-920 was back in 2009, and your GPU is better than mine.

One caveat -- I only have a couple of 1080P monitors, nothing in 4k. Maybe that would have required a new machine earlier.

As far as build yourself vs. having someone build it -- it took me a couple of hours, but I found it fun. Well, except for mounting the fan on the CPU -- how much is the right amount of thermal adhesive??!? Too much or too little are both bad. Stressful moment there. So, if you like that sort of thing, it's easily done in an evening. Lots of Youtube help if you need it. My friend mostly built my previous one with me looking on, so I had that as a guide.

Mine came in at under $1,000, but I already had the GPU and the drives from my old machine (SATA 3 SSDs, which are much, much faster with the new build)

One final note -- the folks at the Tom's Hardware forums are very good about offering advice, and even put together a build list for me, which I mostly followed. The SDMB is great, but those guys are specialists.

ETA: Yes, MicroCenter! I wish I had gone there before I tried to spec out my machine. Tracking down all the incompatibilities can be baffling! Or, maybe Fry's?

Last edited by RitterSport; 01-27-2020 at 06:54 PM.
  #4  
Old 01-27-2020, 06:59 PM
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LittleOtt, the only part of the build that I'm apprehensive about is the BIOS setup and OS installation. It's just been a long time and I'm not sure I remember all the steps. I can prolly figure it out/find it online; I just have to get over the mental hurdle of "I swore I was done with PCs", I guess.

Thanks for the video link. You saved me some time looking for one with that content, eh. And I'll have to check on MicroCenter in Las Vegas.

RitterSport, thanks as well. I'll check out Tom's Hardware.

You know, I couldn't even find CD/DVD/BR drives on Newegg.com? Is that still the best place for computer components?

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-27-2020 at 07:00 PM.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:09 PM
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Here's a list of internal blu ray burners at Newegg:

https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100008607%20600050463

I don't know if you were looking to burn blu rays or just read them. Look under Computer Components and there's a whole section of CD/BD, etc., and you can filter it by external and internal.

Two notes:

1. Make sure your case has a bay for an internal CD-ROM
2. Do you really need one? I have one but accidentally bought a case without a space for it. I happened to have an external CD burner (not blu ray), and I just use that in the rare cases that I need it.

Having an external player leaves the case emptier which keeps it cooler. Plus, fewer cables snaking around, etc.

OK, back to the build -- make sure the power supply is modular -- that way, you only use the cables you need.

I didn't have to do anything to set up the BIOS. For the OS, since I transferred my old drive, that wasn't an issue for me (I did have to get a new license, though). Should be really easy to install a new OS, though.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:27 PM
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Note one was already noted but thank you; it's a good detail to remind people about, IMO.

For note two: with me, there is always the possibility that I will want/need to record a hard copy. And I have a lot of music & film/video that I might use in my own videos that is not available unless I take it directly from one of my CDs or DVDs/BRs (I don't keep everything in my collection on my hard drives).

I'll have to look at an external, tho. If I could also use it with my Macbook that would be an acceptable compromise and with the added benefits you mention might actually be my best deal.

And yeah, my power supply will have plenty of outs.

ETA: Cool, there's at least one external I found at your link to Newegg that will work with Mac and Windows OS… now just have to see if it can be used interchangeably for them or if it has to be one or the other.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-27-2020 at 07:31 PM.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:29 PM
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Yes get an external DVD/CD/whatever. There is no advantage to an internal one, you just have less space and it’ll be constantly drawing power (maybe not much but it’ll be something). Just get an external and plug it in the rare times you need it.

I only ever get modular power supplies. It’s basically like sliced bread, it makes everything so much easier.

Pretty much everything RitterSport said is spot on.

(Disclosure, I have been doing PC support for 20+ years and have built or modified easily over 100 PCs over the years, either at home or professionally. I always prefer to build my own machines from scratch.)
  #8  
Old 01-27-2020, 07:34 PM
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One reason I picked the Asus motherboard is that it would indeed allow me to upgrade to an i9 chipset in the future, should the need arise.
  #9  
Old 01-27-2020, 08:44 PM
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I just spent the last hour picking thru stuff. I see two different listing for ASUS Maximus Hero XI motherboards and I can't tell if there are major differences in them despite the very different listings, so I went with the one that was a) cheaper and b) explicitly said it had wifi capability.

Here's what I've got in my cart so far; have I missed anything essential? Is there any reason to go with a different component than any of the ones I've picked out?
  • DIYPC DIY-Model C-RGB Black Dual USB3.0 Steel/ Tempered Glass ATX Mid Tower Gaming Computer Case w/ 3xTempered Glass (comes with 3 fans)...
  • Seasonic FOCUS PX-850, 850W 80+ Platinum Full-Modular, Fan Control in Fanless, Silent, and Cooling Mode, 10 Year …
  • CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 64GB (2 x 32GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory Model CMK64GX4M2E3200C16
  • ASUS ROG Maximus XI Hero (Wi-Fi) Z390 Gaming Motherboard LGA1151 (Intel 8th and 9th Gen) ATX DDR4 DP HDMI M.2 USB 3.1 ...
  • Intel Core i9-9900K Coffee Lake 8-Core, 16-Thread, 3.6 GHz (5.0 GHz Turbo) LGA 1151 (300 Series) 95W BX80684I99900K …
  • ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1660 Ti ROG-STRIX-GTX1660TI-A6G-GAMING 6GB 192-Bit GDDR6 PCI Express 3.0 HDCP Ready Video ...
  • XPG SX8100 2TB PCIe NVMe Gen3x4 M.2 2280 Internal Solid State Drive (ASX8100NP-2TT-C)
  • Microsoft Windows 10 Pro - Full Retail Version (USB Flash Drive)
Assuming that's all decent gear, now I have figure out what will actually work with what and what will fit where, I guess.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-27-2020 at 08:46 PM.
  #10  
Old 01-27-2020, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
Yes get an external DVD/CD/whatever. There is no advantage to an internal one, you just have less space and it’ll be constantly drawing power (maybe not much but it’ll be something). Just get an external and plug it in the rare times you need it.

I only ever get modular power supplies. It’s basically like sliced bread, it makes everything so much easier.

Pretty much everything RitterSport said is spot on....
Heh. That's because I followed a lot of your advice in my previous thread on this subject:

https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...d.php?t=883683

Bo, my older thread is not very long if you want to take a quick read-through. I also have a sample build there -- I went with the Noctua CPU cooler -- I can't even tell when my computer is on.

ETA: Just saw your build. You still need a CPU cooler, I think.

ETA 2: Man, that's a sweet setup.

Last edited by RitterSport; 01-27-2020 at 08:48 PM.
  #11  
Old 01-27-2020, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by RitterSport View Post
Heh. That's because I followed a lot of your advice in my previous thread on this subject:

https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...d.php?t=883683

Bo, my older thread is not very long if you want to take a quick read-through. I also have a sample build there -- I went with the Noctua CPU cooler -- I can't even tell when my computer is on.

ETA: Just saw your build. You still need a CPU cooler, I think.

ETA 2: Man, that's a sweet setup.
Thanks; I read straight thru that thread.

ETA: I added a NH-D15 to my cart as well.

EATA: Thanks! I hope it will all fit in that case (it's a steal at just $56) and that the RAM is QVL, etc. Gotta research all that now.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-27-2020 at 09:11 PM.
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Old 01-27-2020, 09:27 PM
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I got a pretty good build for about $500, including a 2k 27" monitor. I had to accede to some used parts and last gen processor, motherboard, RAM and vid card. It's an i5 processor, older Asus mobo, Nvidia 1060 GTX 6GB GPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, 650W power supply, an 1GB SD drive and the case. I have since added a regular 2TB hard drive to store games. I love it, but not as future-proof as what you're describing. Dude, seriously, if you're about to plop down almost 2k for a build you can get a KILLER system for that kind of coin.
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Old 01-27-2020, 11:12 PM
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Is what I have spec'd in post #9 not a killer system? What would you change and why?

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-27-2020 at 11:14 PM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:07 AM
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Your build in #9 is fine. Strong build. Probably the first thing in it that you'll upgrade is the GPU just because the rest of it is high end stuff and the GPU is mid-tier (but not bad!) and GPUs get outdated quicker than CPUs. But, aside from the GPU, I don't know what else you'd ratchet up for a "killer" system and you don't need twin RTX 2080Ti's to play Rocket League. The only thing I'd consider adding is a traditional high capacity HDD for storing stuff like pictures, music, etc to save room on the SSD for your games. But that can be added at any time so no need to worry about it now.

Make sure to overclock your CPU since you're paying for the privilege with that K chip. The BIOS (well, UEFI these days) will make it super easy, just selecting from presets or clicking a performance mode toggle. Gone are the days of tediously adjusting voltages by hand trying to find a stable balance. Likewise, make sure you activate XMP for your memory so it runs as fast as possible.
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Old 01-28-2020, 01:34 PM
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As far as I could tell, Jophiel, yeah, that's the best card I can get without getting into hardware that is just waaaaaay more than what I need. And I don't mind spending a couple/few hundred in a couple/few years to upgrade a graphics card; they're easy enough to just pop in.

Can you elaborate on why I'd need a HDD? I'll have 2 TB of SSD storage. The only music and video would be Rocket League footage and background music for videos. I won't be recording and mixing my own music on this machine and it won't be my day-to-day-browse-the-internet computer. And there won't be other games, unless they put the kibosh on Rocket League.

Thanks for advice on overclocking and the XMP memory. I have never overclocked a CPU before, so that'll be interesting. I admit I am not sure what XMP memory is; I'll have to look that up. ETA: Ah, Extreme Memory Profile. Okay; cool. It's right in the BIOS too. Excellent! Thanks!

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-28-2020 at 01:39 PM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 02:15 PM
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I was assuming that you would be using the system for more standard computer stuff and playing other games on it (many modern games eat up drive space in a hurry).

Honestly, if you're serious about only playing Rocket League, you have twice as much computer (at least) than you need. Rocket League is a fairly "old" game and you could max out your performance with a much lower spec'd system -- it's not as though Rocket League is suddenly going to jump in system requirements.

I'm not going to tell you not to buy this system if you want to buy it but, for a pure "Rocket League performance" (and light game video editing) standpoint, you could probably get the same experience from the "Moderate Build" recommendation on any hardware site.
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Old 01-28-2020, 02:28 PM
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Well, there's also the video editing and the bot training.

And I'm trying to make sure I have a system that will run for years with no problems.

I'm a Mac guy. This purchase is prompted by the publisher removing support for MacOS and Linux. At the moment, I do everything on Mac, including all my work stuff (Vectorworks, etc.). So right now, the only thing I plan on doing on the PC is playing Rocket League, training my bot and putting together videos for YouTube.

But hey, I'm open to changing things up. I'd love to have the same experience but for less money. I'm not sure how to research and evaluate that gear tho; no one posts articles online about "The best 4 year old technology you can buy today" and such. How do I know what I'm buying isn't just gonna be garbage in 18 months?
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Old 01-28-2020, 02:43 PM
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I personally would build with AMD 3xxx processors right now, but the intel choice isn't a bad one or anything.
Power supply is good quality but overkill, even a 600W supply probably has a good amount of excess capacity with your current build listed. The only way you need that much power is if you are going to run more than one video card (and who does that today unless you are bitcoin mining).

Edit: I see in a separate comment that you added a CPU cooler so I removed the recommendation to add one.

Last edited by jacobsta811; 01-28-2020 at 02:45 PM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 02:51 PM
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I added a NH-D15 CPU cooler in post #11.

I can bump the power supply down to a 650w. What are the advantages of having a smaller power supply, besides saving me $40?
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Old 01-28-2020, 03:34 PM
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I added a NH-D15 CPU cooler in post #11.

I can bump the power supply down to a 650w. What are the advantages of having a smaller power supply, besides saving me $40?
Smaller power supplies are generally cooler, smaller (as in taking up less space in your case), and quieter, but thatís no absolute. (You can buy big power supplies with features to make them quieter, like special bearings on the fans for example.) Personally, I donít like spending more money than I need, even if itís only a 5% price drop from the total cost, if Iím not benefiting from the extra money. But thatís just me. It all depends on what your priorities are, everyone has different preferences.
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Old 01-28-2020, 04:31 PM
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In my business, having more power available is almost always a good thing, so I figured I'd get a slightly larger power supply than needed, in case a later audio card or something required more power.

I see now that the mobo itself supports 5.1 sound, so I doubt I'd even need an audio card; I've been recording, mixing and mastering for more than a decade on a machine without one. If, as jacobsta says, it is extremely unlikely to be the case where i am adding things that need that much power (and indeed, I can foresee no circumstance that would necessitate a 2nd powerful video card, for example), then I'm happy to benefit and learn from y'all's expertise and switch it out to a more appropriate one. I'm sure the 650w version will be awesome, and hey, it saves me $40.

ETA: So tell me why I'm a fool for paying $524 for the i9 9900K as opposed to $389 for the i7 9700K. I'm thinking that a $150 investment in future viability for the machine sounds like a good idea; is that wrong?

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-28-2020 at 04:34 PM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 04:50 PM
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I was assuming that you would be using the system for more standard computer stuff and playing other games on it (many modern games eat up drive space in a hurry).
Man, ain't that the truth. The latest Modern Warfare COD game for PC is over 180GB. HUGE game.
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Old 01-28-2020, 05:54 PM
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I discovered that you have to check and make sure the RAM is compatible with the mobo, of course. Took me a while to find the chart online but it turns out the RAM I had picked out won't work. The Corsair 64GB that will work is slightly cheaper (saved $30) and runs for .2v less power, so there's that.

Also, this one is 8x8 and the incompatible one was 2x32. A lot of what I'm reading says that having many smaller RAM modules is faster and more efficient than fewer larger ones. Is that correct? Or is correct but so insignificant that it only matters for benchmarking purposes?

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 01-28-2020 at 05:56 PM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 06:27 PM
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Also, this one is 8x8 and the incompatible one was 2x32. A lot of what I'm reading says that having many smaller RAM modules is faster and more efficient than fewer larger ones. Is that correct? Or is correct but so insignificant that it only matters for benchmarking purposes?
Faster, no. More efficient, yes. But marginally. RAM can get warm and smaller chips will be a bit cooler and draw less power. But in a desktop machine neither of those things will matter much. In that environment itís like a cup of water in a swimming pool. So yes, pretty insignificant.

Hereís a little discussion on Tomís Hardware (I too am a fan of them and use them as a resource personally and professionally).
https://forums.tomshardware.com/thre...-less.3305234/
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Old 01-28-2020, 06:32 PM
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Right on; thanks for that. Pretty brief discussion but it seems to have covered everything well enough for a layman.

I'm gonna go ahead and be happier with my new RAM than I was with the old, non-compatible RAM.

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Old 01-29-2020, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
ETA: So tell me why I'm a fool for paying $524 for the i9 9900K as opposed to $389 for the i7 9700K. I'm thinking that a $150 investment in future viability for the machine sounds like a good idea; is that wrong?
It is way overkill for that one game, I think. The i9 9900K is pretty much the best CPU you can buy for gaming (and video editing) unless you go to workstation chips. But unless you are doing multiple layers of 4K video for professional-level editing, it's more than you need. Maybe the AMD 3600x or 3700x or an i7 would do it for you.

I don't know much about computer building and parts but it seems to me you're not going to be able to upgrade any higher from the 9900K (except 9900KS at $980) without getting a new mobo. Maybe start with an i7 (or Ryzen 3600x, say) and see if that holds you for a while. Those would seem a more appropriate match for your GTX 1660 GPU.

I'm actually in the process of building a video editing rig myself. I'm especially having problems choosing a case and PSU. I'd love advice on my build but right now I can't get all my info so Ill just go with this post for now.




RE: storage: if you are video editing you might want to have more than one SSD or SDD+HDD. Your best (or only) SDD would hold your OS and programs and in your case (with only one drive) also you video editing media. It's usually better to have at least two SSD drives for serious editing so you can put audio and video on different drives.

Then you might choose a bigger 7200 RPM HDD for archive and backup purposes.

Last edited by I Love Me, Vol. I; 01-29-2020 at 05:50 AM.
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Old 01-29-2020, 06:21 AM
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are video card prices normal now? For a while they were high due to bitcoin people buying a lot of them
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Old 01-29-2020, 08:02 AM
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I built the machine you are describing about a year ago for about 500 dollars less. I'd never built a computer before but I stumbled across a video on youtube that showed how easy it really is.
I've been building boxes since I was 15 or so. It's just LEGO , and everything is designed more or less foolproof (although of course, a dedicated idiot can force things).

That being said, I'm now a lot older than 15 and my lazyness has grown exponentially. I think when I replace my last LEGO project, I'll just get it ready-made. The thought of spending another weekend backuping, partitioning, installing windows, going apeshit because I forgot to backup something very important and getting depressed because I lost 20 year old chat logs with a girl I've never seen is too much right now.
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:14 AM
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are video card prices normal now? For a while they were high due to bitcoin people buying a lot of them
Around the beginning of 2018 the prices of video cards had ballooned due to bitcoin mining. By mid 2018 the prices had slid as manufacturers upped the supply and by the end of 2018 things were pretty much back to normal. Hereís an article from December 2018 showing charts of GPU prices that peaked in early 2018:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/13747...-hardware-drop
Another article from that time:

https://cointelegraph.com/news/popul...since-february
So yes, GPUs have been back to normal for about a year. (Late 2018 was also when I finally upgraded my video card after waiting a good year and a half for prices to normalize.)
  #30  
Old 01-29-2020, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Bijou Drains View Post
are video card prices normal now? For a while they were high due to bitcoin people buying a lot of them
Yeah, they stabilized a good while ago now although they never really returned to the same price per tier. But that's AMD/Nvidia taking advantage, not scarcity. I believe the real crypto mining is done with ASICs these days, not consumer GPUs.

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Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
ETA: So tell me why I'm a fool for paying $524 for the i9 9900K as opposed to $389 for the i7 9700K. I'm thinking that a $150 investment in future viability for the machine sounds like a good idea; is that wrong?
Here's a review of the two benchmarking them on applications like Blender, Cinebench and Handbrake. While the 9900k outperforms the 9700k, sometimes with numbers impressive on the surface (18% faster!), in real life that might mean your video processing taking an extra couple of minutes. It's up to you to decide how often you'll be using that stuff and if $150 is worth being done a few minutes earlier or if you'll likely be off doing other things while the video processes anyway.

I don't think the 9900k will really "futureproof" past the 9700k since they're pretty similar. More likely, we'll hit a point where you need to upgrade your chipset and motherboard to take advantage of a new RAM (DDR5, DDR6, etc) or USB4.0 or some other new technology and both the 9900 and 9700 will be equally obsolete by those metrics. Or you stick with them and they both continue to work pretty much the same for the next seven years.
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:27 AM
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The i7 Might be a bit of overkill - you can get an i5 9600kf for around 200 (without cooler) and overclock it with a decent cooler. I ran an i5 2500k for 8 years this way - I overclocked to 4.5 from the base 3.3 on a bigger aluminum air system - it ran me another $40 for that, I think.

I only just upgraded that CPU this month with a ryzen 3600 - I decided not to overclock this time and I still got a decent performance boost that way. I run more serious games than you at 4k, and the new cpu only hits 50-60% in those games now. Should be a good bit of room with any modern chip you get as long as it's not the lowest specs of their production line.
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Old 01-29-2020, 10:18 AM
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It is way overkill for that one game, I think. The i9 9900K is pretty much the best CPU you can buy for gaming (and video editing) unless you go to workstation chips. But unless you are doing multiple layers of 4K video for professional-level editing, it's more than you need. Maybe the AMD 3600x or 3700x or an i7 would do it for you.
I'd look at the AMD Ryzen series of chips; AMD seems to be playing to win with this generation of chips, unlike the FX-xxxx series.

The Ryzen chips are comparably fast, and for a LOT less cash. For example, the 3rd gen Ryzen 5 3600X is priced right around $200, but is comparable performance-wise with the Intel i7-9700k, which is priced around $400.
  #33  
Old 01-29-2020, 11:58 AM
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...I can bump the power supply down to a 650w. What are the advantages of having a smaller power supply, besides saving me $40?
Biggest advantage is that the efficiency curve for power supplies is not even - at a low percentage of usage they are less efficient. So if you overspec too much, you actually use slightly more power at the outlet because you don't get into the highest efficiency part of the curve. That only applies if they are similar efficiency - an 400w silver might use more power than a 850W platinum even at 250W.
The cost savings in the initial purchase matters more than the minor power savings though.
Edit and the only parts of your system that draw significant power are the Video Card and CPU - everything else is all but a rounding error well under 100 watts total probably.

Last edited by jacobsta811; 01-29-2020 at 12:00 PM.
  #34  
Old 01-29-2020, 05:02 PM
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Around the beginning of 2018 the prices of video cards had ballooned due to bitcoin mining.
It really wasn't Bitcoin that was the problem. At that point Bitcoin had pretty much moved entirely to ASICs rigs, because they were cheaper and faster for mining than video cards were (even at MSRP).

It was Ethereum mining that mostly drove the inflation. At the time, the best way to mine Ethereum was using video cards, particularly ones with AMD GPUs, which was why AMD-based cards saw a bigger price jump than NVIDIA ones, but because those two manufacturers are pretty much it for GPUs, the market overall saw a huge upswing in prices where at it's peak some cards were going for four times MSRP from retailers.

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Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
I discovered that you have to check and make sure the RAM is compatible with the mobo, of course. Took me a while to find the chart online but it turns out the RAM I had picked out won't work.
Last time we built a rig (c. spring 2018), the manufacturer of our RAM had a compatibility listing for various motherboards and our motherboard manufacturer had a listing for various compatible RAM. At least one of these methods should give you the information you need without having to search everywhere (and hope the third-party information is accurate).

You can typically go right to the website of the motherboard and/or RAM manufacturer and get the info.

Bear in mind, though, that just because it doesn't list it as compatible doesn't mean it's necessarily not compatible. Our RAM manufacturer did not list it as being compatible with the motherboard, but our motherboard manufacturer listed the RAM as compatible, and we've had no problems.

However, if neither lists it, I'd just look for a different set.
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