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  #51  
Old 08-14-2017, 10:31 PM
Nava Nava is offline
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Originally Posted by Knowed Out View Post
I learned that Steven Wright is considered paraprosdokian because of his comedic method of destroying a cliche in midstream.
I just learned that what my friends and family call Navaisms already had a name! But damn, Navaism is easier to spell...

Yep, I do that a lot. Specially in business meetings: once you've punted a business cliche out of the field, people do stay awake waiting to see what else you come up with.
  #52  
Old 08-14-2017, 10:58 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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I learned that stagecoaches were a major technological development.

The old system of traveling by horse and wagon had been around for thousands of years. You have a wagon and a team of horses and you'd hitch your horses to your wagon. Then that team of horses would pull the wagon until you arrived at your destination. Because that one team was making the whole trip, you had to maintain a slow pace so they wouldn't get exhausted.

A team of horses could pull a wagon at a much faster pace but they could only maintain that pace for about twelve miles. So somebody had a bright idea: what if you just switched teams of horses every twelve miles?

Companies designed wagons so that you could change the team of horses in under ten minutes. Then they would build a series of stops along the route every twelve miles, each with teams of horses ready. The coaches would just race between them, stop at each station, quickly change teams, and get back on the route.

Even with the frequent stops, stagecoach travel tripled the speed a passenger could travel.
  #53  
Old 08-14-2017, 11:38 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Since you mentioned 'outback' and capitalized 'Aborigines' I'm going to presume you're talking about Australian Aborigines. Whilst feral cats are indeed a problem especially knocking off native marsupials, I can pretty much guarantee that there are >1 aborigines eating cat-bushmeat.
That's exactly what I was talking about.

The cat was cornered and beaten to death by two women wielding large sticks, and when it was brought back to the camp, a biologist weighed it and examined its internal organs for disease, and its stomach for the contents, before the carcass was skinned and placed on a bonfire.
  #54  
Old 08-15-2017, 05:36 AM
Santelia Santelia is offline
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That some some strange architectural features in my local area are remants of an planned canal project that ran out of money. http://www.dorandsomcanal.org/features.htm
  #55  
Old 08-15-2017, 12:57 PM
Dragwyr Dragwyr is offline
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Don't leave us hanging. Elaborate.
Ok.

We had our annual bonfire at Abbott's Magic Get-Together. Every year someone brings our, "Sacred Scotch that cannot be Scotch" and we have a ritual of vanishing it. It is worth noting that I do not drink, but I will sometimes take a small sip of our Sacred Scotch just to say that I've tasted it. This year we had a guy bring Malort.

I decided to take a small sip. It was absolutely awful. In general I think all alcohol tastes terrible, but this was truly the most vile and disgusting thing I have ever tasted... and everyone else agreed. So next year we will be introducing a new amendment to our "Rules":

"The Sacred Scotch cannot be Scotch... or Malort!"

So there you have it. You have been warned.
  #56  
Old 08-15-2017, 02:26 PM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
I learned that stagecoaches were a major technological development.

The old system of traveling by horse and wagon had been around for thousands of years. You have a wagon and a team of horses and you'd hitch your horses to your wagon. Then that team of horses would pull the wagon until you arrived at your destination. Because that one team was making the whole trip, you had to maintain a slow pace so they wouldn't get exhausted.

A team of horses could pull a wagon at a much faster pace but they could only maintain that pace for about twelve miles. So somebody had a bright idea: what if you just switched teams of horses every twelve miles?

Companies designed wagons so that you could change the team of horses in under ten minutes. Then they would build a series of stops along the route every twelve miles, each with teams of horses ready. The coaches would just race between them, stop at each station, quickly change teams, and get back on the route.

Even with the frequent stops, stagecoach travel tripled the speed a passenger could travel.
Do I take it that that's the reason for the expression stage-coach (which I'd never particularly thought about before) -- the doing of the journey in successive twelve-mile stages?
  #57  
Old 08-16-2017, 05:36 AM
pullin pullin is offline
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I learned this week that a guy wrote a couple of novels about a president named "Trump", who lived at the address of Trump Tower, had a cabinet member named "Pence", and whose election caused riots in the streets. Strangely this Trump was named Baron, not Donald, and the second book was named: "The Last President".

They were written in 1893.

Sleep well...
https://archive.org/details/1900orlastpresid00lock

Last edited by pullin; 08-16-2017 at 05:38 AM.
  #58  
Old 08-16-2017, 10:18 AM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Originally Posted by pullin View Post
I learned this week that a guy wrote a couple of novels about a president named "Trump", who lived at the address of Trump Tower, had a cabinet member named "Pence", and whose election caused riots in the streets. Strangely this Trump was named Baron, not Donald, and the second book was named: "The Last President".

They were written in 1893.

Sleep well...
https://archive.org/details/1900orlastpresid00lock
You confuse the matter, sir. There are two books by Ingersoll Lockwood; the first, "Baron Trump's Marvellous Underground Adventure" is a Munchhausen-style adventure fantasy that has little or nothing to do with politics, and "1900, or the Last President" is a rabid little anti-Populist potboiler that can be summed up as "William Jennings Bryant sucks LOL". It does mention a man named Pence - once.
  #59  
Old 08-16-2017, 10:59 AM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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I am a complete idiot: "President" derivation

I watched Seth Meyer's latest salvo against Trump, this one being Donald's response to Charlottesville.

Seth pointed out that "President" derives from "to preside" and that a President who abandons moral leadership is no longer presiding.



I am over 50 and never considered that President basically means One who Presides. I had simply never thought about it.

  #60  
Old 08-16-2017, 11:55 AM
Quimby Quimby is offline
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I learned recently the title font on the Grand Theft Auto games is the same as The Price is Right.
  #61  
Old 08-16-2017, 01:04 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Originally Posted by Sangahyando View Post
Do I take it that that's the reason for the expression stage-coach (which I'd never particularly thought about before) -- the doing of the journey in successive twelve-mile stages?
Originally, the stages were the places set up along the route and the coach was the vehicle that traveled between them. This type of coach was called a stagecoach to distinguish it from traditional coaches. Then people shortened this in common usage and called the vehicle a stage. No doubt there were pedants of that era who were upset when somebody said "I'm taking the stage to Kansas City" and explained that a stage didn't move and it was the coach that would take you someplace.

Personally, I had never really thought about all this. I saw plenty of stagecoaches in movies and TV shows but I just saw them as another type of wagon. I didn't consider that the wagon I saw was just part of a much larger organized system of transportation. I also never thought through the implications of seeing the horses racing along and how they couldn't travel long distances at that pace.
  #62  
Old 08-16-2017, 04:06 PM
moojja moojja is offline
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So... would it be possible to extract enough vitamin C to stave off scurvy from the ship's rats?
I think it would, since humans don't need much vit. C. A slice of lemon squeezed in your water would be enough.

But in a long sea voyager, by the time scurvy becomes a problem, the rats are usually long gone. Already eaten by the crews. It's not even considered to be desperation food, you start to kill and eat them once fresh meat are gone.

Or so say the Great Patrick O'Brian.
  #63  
Old 08-17-2017, 12:18 PM
Max Torque Max Torque is offline
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I watched Seth Meyer's latest salvo against Trump, this one being Donald's response to Charlottesville.

Seth pointed out that "President" derives from "to preside" and that a President who abandons moral leadership is no longer presiding.



I am over 50 and never considered that President basically means One who Presides. I had simply never thought about it.

Similarly, it occurred to me a while back that "penitentiary" is a place for penitent people, or for doing penance. A place you go to atone and feel sorry for what you've done.
  #64  
Old 08-17-2017, 02:08 PM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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I found out today that Stonewall Jackson's sister was an abolitionist and although they had been close in earlier life, when Stonewall joined the confederacy, she never spoke of him again.
  #65  
Old 08-17-2017, 03:10 PM
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Ann Hedonia Ann Hedonia is offline
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I learned about Xalisco heroin dealers. Not first-hand - from this book
https://www.amazon.com/Dreamland-Tru...ords=dreamland

The book is fantastic. I thought I knew a lot about the subject but I learned a lot from the book

Xalisco is a small town in Western Mexico. They grow poppies in the hills and make a semi-processed black tar heroin.

Young men from this town come to the US and set up small, direct to retail businesses. Each business has an owner/manager, a dispatcher and several drivers. The drivers are the point of contact with the customers and they work on salary for 3-6 month "contracts". The drivers work unarmed and don't carry any more product than they can swallow - the heroin is packaged in single doses in uninflated ballons. If they get caught, they just get deported which is not really a big deal since they would go home ( for a while at least) at the end of their contract.

They set up in mid-major cities like Boise, SLC, Columbus and Charlotte and avoid locales with gang-related drug operations. They are racist and only sell to white people.

They develop contacts in the addict communities and hand out free samples with a phone number. If someone calls they dispatch a drive to meet them at a prearranged location, usually a parking lot although they will go to the homes of established customers.

They even call their customers and conduct surveys "Was the delivery on time?" - "Was the driver courteous?" Was the product high quality?" If they havent heard from a regular customer in a while they'll call them and offer freebies.

I've always wondered HOW all the painkiller addicts found a heroin source. It's not the whole answer but it's part of the puzzle.

Last edited by Ann Hedonia; 08-17-2017 at 03:13 PM.
  #66  
Old 08-17-2017, 04:47 PM
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I learned today what "doxxing" means.
  #67  
Old 08-17-2017, 08:49 PM
Spice Weasel Spice Weasel is offline
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I learned today what "doxxing" means.
lol
  #68  
Old 08-17-2017, 09:25 PM
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Sahirrnee Sahirrnee is offline
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That George Washington and Kamehameha the First are both enshrined as kami in a Shinto Shrine in Hawaii.

http://www.greenshinto.com/wp/2013/0...aii-revisited/
  #69  
Old 08-18-2017, 12:03 AM
Ulfreida Ulfreida is offline
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In the Brothers Grimm fable, The Goose Girl, in which the evil chambermaid takes over the role of the princess, forces the princess to tend geese, and marries the prince, the princess has a faithful horse named Falada, and when the chambermaid-princess has the horse killed, the goose girl manages to have Falada's head hung in an archway, where it continues to talk to her, and is instrumental in her ultimate victory over the chambermaid. I knew all that part, but what I didn't know is that Falada, a name which I loved as a child and saved to be given to my own special horse someday (that didn't happen), means "spoken" in Portuguese and Asturian, a related western Iberian language. Past participle of falar.

This made my day.
  #70  
Old 08-18-2017, 12:13 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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And in Galego as well, spoken and co-official in Galicia, the part of Spain that's just north of Portugal.

The Asturian language is called Bable; the dialect of Spanish spoken in Asturias is called Asturiano (academic Spanish) or Asturiaņu (dialectal version). Asturias is in the middle of Spain's northern coast and was one of the starting points for the Reconquista; it is a one-province region which combines some highly industrial and highly technical cities with tiny villages where each house has one cow because they don't have room for more than one; the heir-apparent to the throne of Spain gets three titles of Prince and is usually called Prince of Asturias (Princess in the current edition).

There, more things about Asturias than you ever wanted to know

Last edited by Nava; 08-18-2017 at 12:16 AM.
  #71  
Old 08-18-2017, 12:26 PM
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I learned that California Condors are actually vultures, they were renamed "condors" to escape the deleterious vulture label so people would like them and help save them from extinction.

And it worked.
  #72  
Old 08-18-2017, 12:38 PM
Jennshark Jennshark is offline
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And I finally realized that the root meaning of "Alpine" is "of the Alps." It's evolved into general usage to indicate certain altitudes/flora ecologies, but its origin is Alp-ish.

Recently I learned something that challenges the received wisdom from my family of deer hunters that herds are always made up of a stag who presides over a family of females and fawns (boys get kicked out of the herd early). The last two weeks a lovely deer herd has been visiting the field behind our house at dusk; all seven of them are bucks -- two of them are even 12-points! The youngest still has velveted antlers.
  #73  
Old 08-18-2017, 04:34 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Guinea pigs can jump. Saw one on Twitter jump a fence as high as its head.
  #74  
Old 08-18-2017, 08:29 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is online now
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Originally Posted by Jennshark View Post
I learned that California Condors are actually vultures, they were renamed "condors" to escape the deleterious vulture label so people would like them and help save them from extinction.

And it worked.
Oh, this probably explains why whenever I see a picture of one I first think it's a vulture and get surprised it's really a condor...
  #75  
Old 08-18-2017, 08:59 PM
Lucas Jackson Lucas Jackson is offline
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That in the Momas & the Popas song California Dreamin' they sing, "... and I pretend to pray" instead of "... and I began to pray".
  #76  
Old 08-19-2017, 12:24 AM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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That in the Momas & the Popas song California Dreamin' they sing, "... and I pretend to pray" instead of "... and I began to pray".
That's interesting. We sang it in chorus when I was a teenager, and I distinctly remember the word being "began".

I didn't know until today that this classic Chicago song was called "Questions 67 & 68".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qupeVLtXWLY
  #77  
Old 08-19-2017, 06:31 AM
pullin pullin is offline
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You confuse the matter, sir. There are two books by Ingersoll Lockwood; the first, "Baron Trump's Marvellous Underground Adventure" is a Munchhausen-style adventure fantasy that has little or nothing to do with politics, and "1900, or the Last President" is a rabid little anti-Populist potboiler that can be summed up as "William Jennings Bryant sucks LOL". It does mention a man named Pence - once.
What a relief. I can quite\ searching the books for words like "stock market" or "crash".
  #78  
Old 08-21-2017, 10:48 AM
Annoying Buzz Annoying Buzz is offline
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I learned two things recently that I could have gone quite happily without knowing.

1. Necrosis in Japanese is "necrosis", at least for the two doctors I spoke to.
2. Even when my life is being threatened by a violent nutcase, I will look at naked breasts.

These two pieces of information were not related.
  #79  
Old 08-21-2017, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Lucas Jackson View Post
That in the Momas & the Popas song California Dreamin' they sing, "... and I pretend to pray" instead of "... and I began to pray".
I didn't realize this until I read this post (and corroborated it with online listing of the lyrics).
  #80  
Old 08-21-2017, 02:11 PM
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mistymage mistymage is offline
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Recently I learned something that challenges the received wisdom from my family of deer hunters that herds are always made up of a stag who presides over a family of females and fawns (boys get kicked out of the herd early). The last two weeks a lovely deer herd has been visiting the field behind our house at dusk; all seven of them are bucks -- two of them are even 12-points! The youngest still has velveted antlers.
That's called a bachelor herd: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor_herd
  #81  
Old 08-21-2017, 02:51 PM
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That's called a bachelor herd: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor_herd
That sounds like a great slang term for a Singles Bar.
  #82  
Old 08-21-2017, 03:03 PM
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Telperion Telperion is online now
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Yesterday I learned that it's a lot harder to get detergent out of a washing machine than it is to pour it in. It wouldn't start because apparently the water sensor was broken or something.
  #83  
Old 08-24-2017, 08:55 AM
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I just learned there's a Las Vegas, New Mexico. It predates that other one in Nevada by about 70 years.

Also, 1 in 5 Koreans have the surname "Kim." For most of Korean history only the aristocracy had surnames, and they adopted surnames that suggested their families originated in China. Around the 10th century commoners began to take surnames, and they emulated their social betters by taking their "noble" names, which at the time were dominated by "Kim" and "Park." Later "Choi" and "Lee" became prominent.
  #84  
Old 08-31-2017, 03:39 AM
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I recently learned why, a few years ago, issues of Popular Mechanics mysteriously began appearing in my mailbox. Now, I suppose it shouldn't have been all that hard to work out that a snafu involving my similarly named father's subscription was the reason. I had always assumed that someone had bought me a gift subscription, albeit someone who doesn't really know me that well, because nothing about my behavior especially suggests that Popular Mechanics would be the mag for me.
  #85  
Old 08-31-2017, 05:18 AM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is online now
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Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
I just learned there's a Las Vegas, New Mexico. It predates that other one in Nevada by about 70 years.

Also, 1 in 5 Koreans have the surname "Kim." For most of Korean history only the aristocracy had surnames, and they adopted surnames that suggested their families originated in China. Around the 10th century commoners began to take surnames, and they emulated their social betters by taking their "noble" names, which at the time were dominated by "Kim" and "Park." Later "Choi" and "Lee" became prominent.
But did you know that this used to be quite the problem in finding a suitable marriage mate?
  #86  
Old 08-31-2017, 05:58 AM
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You can buy an electric kettle for $20, but I've never seen the need for one.

If I need hot (but not boiling) water I use the microwave. I don't like to boil it, and try to have something in the cup to prevent any explosions.
If I need boiling water I use the stove top.

I don't use boiling water for tea, hot chocolate, ramen, etc. I prefer merely hot water and the microwave is fine for that.
Please, God, don't open this wound again.
  #87  
Old 08-31-2017, 08:34 AM
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I learned recently that Osama bin Laden chose that particular date for the attack on the World Trade Center because he hated Porsches.
That's weird. I thought he chose 119 because it's the emergency fire number in Afghanistan.
  #88  
Old 09-01-2017, 12:25 AM
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
I didn't realize this until I read this post (and corroborated it with online listing of the lyrics).
Stopped into a church
I passed along the way
Got down on my knees
And I pretend to pray

?? Why the change in tense? I'm sticking with "began" if only because it's grammatical. And it doesn't make a lot of sense as "pretend". I guess the 60s were a crazy time.
  #89  
Old 09-01-2017, 01:47 AM
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Beckdawrek Beckdawrek is offline
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I recently learned the noise my Yorkie makes is not a snort or a snore..but a reverse burp! Hmm!
  #90  
Old 09-01-2017, 09:23 AM
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I learned that California Condors are actually vultures, they were renamed "condors" to escape the deleterious vulture label so people would like them and help save them from extinction.

And it worked.

Actually, the word "condor" comes from a native Peruvian language - Quechua - 'kuntur' which was used to describe the Andean Condor. When European naturalists arrived in the 1700s, they classified the Andean Condor and the California Condor in the same genus, Vultur. In the mid-1800s, the common name of the California Condor became more frequently used than the earlier 'California Vulture,' or 'Royal Vulture.'

While it's possible this shift in terminology is due to the rarity and an attempt to protect the bird, it's classification and similarities with the Andean Condor may be enough to explain the name change - this is only 60 years after the birds were described. Conservation efforts to protect the California Condor were not common at the time, but by 70 years later in the 1920s it would be recognized that the population was less than 100 birds. By 1987 it would be extinct in the wild and only revived through a breeding program in captivity. It may be that the timing of the name change is too early to explain by using conservation motives.


Quote:
Originally Posted by wikipedia on California Condor
The California condor was described by English naturalist George Shaw in 1797 as Vultur californianus. It was originally classified in the same genus as the Andean condor (V. gryphus), but, due to the Andean condor's slightly different markings, slightly longer wings, and tendency to kill small animals to eat,[6] the California condor has now been placed in its own monotypic genus. The generic name Gymnogyps is derived from the Greek gymnos/γυμνος "naked" or "bare", and gyps/γυψ "vulture",[7] while the specific name californianus comes from its location in California. The word condor itself is derived from the Quechua word kuntur.[8]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_condor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snyder and Snyder in "Introduction to the California Condor"
The scientific name of the California Condor, Gymnogyps californianus, literally means naked vulture of California, referring to the general absence of feathers on the bird's head and neck and to its primary recent range in California and Baja California. The bird's present common name, California Condor, did not appear in early writings on the species and became widespread only in the mid-nineteenth century. Prior to that time the species was most usually referred to as the California Vulture, the Royal Vulture, or simply the Vulture. "Condor" came into general use largely because of similarities of the species to the Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) of South America.
https://books.google.com/books?id=Ca...ame%22&f=false

Last edited by wevets; 09-01-2017 at 09:25 AM. Reason: Oops - spelling error
  #91  
Old 09-02-2017, 05:13 PM
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I got a text today that mentioned "water bears" (Tardigrades). I'd never heard of these, so Googled. Absolutely fascinating indestructible little creatures that probably everyone knows about except me.
Can't imagine how they escaped my attention for so long.

Tardigrades.
  #92  
Old 09-02-2017, 07:23 PM
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I got a text today that mentioned "water bears" (Tardigrades). I'd never heard of these, so Googled. Absolutely fascinating indestructible little creatures that probably everyone knows about except me.
Can't imagine how they escaped my attention for so long.

Tardigrades.
I learned about those things from the Cat in the Hat cartoon when my daughter was about 2 years old!
  #93  
Old 09-02-2017, 08:36 PM
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http://www.mainestatemuseum.org/exhi...d/the_history/


I learned about this ,I saw it on Chronicle a few days ago.
  #94  
Old 09-08-2017, 03:58 PM
Spice Weasel Spice Weasel is offline
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I got a text today that mentioned "water bears" (Tardigrades). I'd never heard of these, so Googled. Absolutely fascinating indestructible little creatures that probably everyone knows about except me.
Can't imagine how they escaped my attention for so long.

Tardigrades.
I adore tardigrades (before they were cool.)

I have a friend who does biologically accurate marine art. He has a piece called "life in a drop of pond water" which features a tardigrade, and which I have framed in my bathroom. He also wrote an illustrated children's book for his son about a tardigrade who wears a little backpack and explorer's cap.
  #95  
Old 09-10-2017, 06:22 AM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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I learned yesterday of the existence -- in British English anyway -- of the word "widdy", meaning a hangman's rope. It's somewhat old-fashioned, and colloquial-ish; but it's allowed in Scrabble.
  #96  
Old 09-10-2017, 03:59 PM
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EddyTeddyFreddy EddyTeddyFreddy is offline
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I just learned about vinegaroons thanks to a reference in a SD BBQ Pit post. Rather cool member of the arachnid family.
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  #97  
Old 09-10-2017, 04:54 PM
Mangosteen Mangosteen is offline
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Listening to music one enjoys releases dopamine into your blood steam.

It makes sense, but I just hadn't thought of it in that way before.

However, one can "overdose" on a particular song. When Cream put out Sunshine of your Love, it was a huge hit and I really enjoyed listening to it, but I heard it the other day and it didn't feel like I got even a small drop of dopamine.

The best is when one hasn't heard a certain song that you really enjoyed in the past and suddenly it comes on. It seems to release an extraordinary amount of dopamine. The latest case for me was not hearing Hold Me Now, the 1984 hit by the Thompson Twins for years. Gave me a good rush.
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  #98  
Old 09-10-2017, 09:57 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
What's insidious is that vitamin C apparently deteriorates rapidly, so taking on board a supply of vitamin C isn't as easy as you'd think. Why it is that it survives in line juice and sauerkraut, but deteriorated to a useless byproduct in other cases (and, for that matter, how we keep the vitamin C from deteriorating in bottles of modern supplements) I admit I do not know. But early attempts to prevent scurvy by bringing on board foods that should have prevented it , but which didn't, must have been a severe test of the Scientific Method.
Vitamin C didn't survive in Lime Juice. The British continued to have problems with scrurvy until they started using steam ships (which required frequent port stops to refuel).

"Lime" was a language misunderstanding: it was a word which was used to describe what we would call a lemon. "Acid" was just ignorance: at the time, scientists didn't understand that there was a difference between ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and acetic acid (vinegar). The lime cordial provided to the sailors was prepared by ??? boiling ??? the limes, which destroyed the vitamin C.
  #99  
Old 09-10-2017, 10:08 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Originally Posted by stillownedbysetters View Post
Mea culpa.

When the urgeoning American Mafia took a hit as a result of Prohibition, the KKK took advantage of their influence with the booming southern moonshining industry to make inroads on the mafia's weakened alcohol distribution networks. According to the documentary, the KKK had their fingers in a number of vice-related industries. When the KKK began dabbling in such industries, they structured their organization based on that of the Sicilian mafia.

I had no idea that the KKK had any agenda other than the suppression of blacks before viewing this show.

Hope that is clearer.
The Irish IRA in the '70s too. We used to get Irish youth here in Aus on working visas. One of the reasons for comeing to Aus on a working visa was because you'd come to the attention of the security services, and wanted to go somewhere else with less heat. Another reason was because you'd been dealing dope without being a member of the IRA, and wanted to go somewhere with less heat...
  #100  
Old 09-10-2017, 10:27 PM
Xema Xema is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spice Weasel View Post
... Humans, orcas, and blue finned whales.
Blue whales and fin whales are well known. What is a blue finned whale?
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