#51  
Old 08-13-2018, 01:48 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
How is your nighttime vision?

I keep reading of the multifocals causing issues with halos etc. especially at night and that's concerning to me - right now I'm leaning toward a single vision lens; perhaps getting the other eye done as slightly nearsighted when the time comes.

I might consider an accommodating lens (adjusts *somewhat* for nearer vision) though from what I read, those don't work quite as well for people who started out nearsighted.

I see the eye doc tomorrow, in fact, so I'm piling up the questions. I'm hoping to come away with a surgery date scheduled.

Oooh - forgot to ask: if you don't mind spilling, how much did the premium lens cost you out of pocket vs. a plain one?
Night time vision seems fine. But I have not driven yet. I did some star gazing over the weekend looking for the Perseids meteors. Only saw a few. Just don't have the patience.

I think out of pocket costs where about $3300. The lens about 2300 and I opted for some special laser measurement that they do AFTER they take out the cataract and before putting in the new lens. I guess they can fine tune things a bit better that way.

All in all I VERY happy with the outcome.
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  #52  
Old 08-14-2018, 08:58 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Will you have the other eye done soon?
  #53  
Old 08-14-2018, 09:05 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Will you have the other eye done soon?
. My eye doc says he sees a trace of cataract in the other eye. And it's the same kind of fast developing cataract. But he says, it could be 4 months or 4 years. I'm hoping in about a year. Insurance won't cover it if it's just a trace.
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  #54  
Old 08-14-2018, 01:54 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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. My eye doc says he sees a trace of cataract in the other eye. And it's the same kind of fast developing cataract. But he says, it could be 4 months or 4 years. I'm hoping in about a year. Insurance won't cover it if it's just a trace.
From an insurance standpoint, you might be better off getting it done this year (that is, if it's advanced enough) because of deductible / out of pocket issues.

And me: Just got back from the eye doc. No go, right now - my eye pressure has always tended to be on the high side, doc put me on drops 2 months ago - and they made no difference at all. So, a different drop for a month then we'll see. Phooey. I wanted this DONE.

We did discuss lens options. She recommends going with a toric lens (to handle the astigmatism in that eye). She does NOT recommend an "accommodating" lens which supposedly adjusts (a bit) to handle closer up stuff. She pointed out the pros and cons of a multifocal. We discussed monovision - and she urges me to leave the left eye a bit on the nearsignted side (that's the one that's going downhill so fast) and let the right eye remain dominant. I'll have to think about that - there are studies showing equally good results with monovision when the dominant eye is the weaker versus the stronger.

Sigh.
  #55  
Old 08-15-2018, 02:04 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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A couple more comments:

1) doc kept using the word "accommodating" to refer to the multifocals. I finally interrupted her to make sure I was following the terminology right. A bit annoying, as all the websites talk about "multifocal" vs "accommodating".

2) I held off on the new eye drops last night because I'm also dealing with a mild case of swimmer's ear, which requires drops a couple times of day including bedtime. The new eyedrops are also taken at bedtime. I did NOT want to mix those two up

3) Doc said that the learning curve with multifocals can be several months. Are you finding you are adapting quickly?
  #56  
Old 08-15-2018, 03:16 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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A couple more comments:

1) doc kept using the word "accommodating" to refer to the multifocals. I finally interrupted her to make sure I was following the terminology right. A bit annoying, as all the websites talk about "multifocal" vs "accommodating".
I agree. I was confused too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Zappa
3) Doc said that the learning curve with multifocals can be several months. Are you finding you are adapting quickly?
Huh. I did my second follow up with an optometrist today. My new eye with the new IOL is very close to 20/20. Better than my other original equipment eye. Took me a couple of days for things to get that clear. I suspect it was just some inflammation/irritation. Really no learning curve for me. I'm using the Symfony Multi-Focal lens.

The thing is, I can also see up close/read with the new IOL. So, until I get the other eye done, I may end up with a single multi-focal contact lens for it to balance things out. For now, when doing a lot of reading or computer work, I wear readers with one lens knocked out.

Good luck. It's going GREAT for me.
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  #57  
Old 08-16-2018, 08:51 AM
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I agree. I was confused too.

Huh. I did my second follow up with an optometrist today. My new eye with the new IOL is very close to 20/20. Better than my other original equipment eye. Took me a couple of days for things to get that clear. I suspect it was just some inflammation/irritation. Really no learning curve for me. I'm using the Symfony Multi-Focal lens.

The thing is, I can also see up close/read with the new IOL. So, until I get the other eye done, I may end up with a single multi-focal contact lens for it to balance things out. For now, when doing a lot of reading or computer work, I wear readers with one lens knocked out.

Good luck. It's going GREAT for me.
Is yours toric (i.e. correcting astigmatism)? My eye doc was strongly urging me to go for a toric lens because I've got something like 1.5 diopters of astigmatism in that eye.

If I understand what I'm reading online, the toric version of the Symfony seems to have been approved based on Tecnis's existing toric lens + the non-toric Symfony version, or something, and there seems to be less data out there re the toric version of the Symfony. I think I'll leave a message for the eye doc that I'm interested in this one; I don't know what (if any) experience she has with this specific model.

She did say, when discussing torics in general, "I've learned not to sav 'never', because I said "I've never had to reposition a toric" and the following week I had to do it for the first time".

Some of the testing they did the other day was weird. One thing had me looking into a red dot - and with the left eye I could really see hazy red sparkles around the middle. Not so much with the right eye which obviously has much less of a cataract.

Another one involved placing a probe directly on the eyeball, and filling the probe with water (to double check ocular depth, I think). Then she wanted me to turn my head **while the probe was still on the eye** so the water would rain to the side. I yelled "NO, take it off NOW, I don't CARE about getting wet" because I could feel the pressure and I thought that moving while the eyeball was being leaned on by an elephant was a bad idea. Then that gadget wasn't even capturing the readings. Grrrr.
  #58  
Old 08-17-2018, 09:27 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Is yours toric (i.e. correcting astigmatism)? My eye doc was strongly urging me to go for a toric lens because I've got something like 1.5 diopters of astigmatism in that eye.

If I understand what I'm reading online, the toric version of the Symfony seems to have been approved based on Tecnis's existing toric lens + the non-toric Symfony version, or something, and there seems to be less data out there re the toric version of the Symfony. I think I'll leave a message for the eye doc that I'm interested in this one; I don't know what (if any) experience she has with this specific model.

She did say, when discussing torics in general, "I've learned not to sav 'never', because I said "I've never had to reposition a toric" and the following week I had to do it for the first time".

Some of the testing they did the other day was weird. One thing had me looking into a red dot - and with the left eye I could really see hazy red sparkles around the middle. Not so much with the right eye which obviously has much less of a cataract.

Another one involved placing a probe directly on the eyeball, and filling the probe with water (to double check ocular depth, I think). Then she wanted me to turn my head **while the probe was still on the eye** so the water would rain to the side. I yelled "NO, take it off NOW, I don't CARE about getting wet" because I could feel the pressure and I thought that moving while the eyeball was being leaned on by an elephant was a bad idea. Then that gadget wasn't even capturing the readings. Grrrr.
I don't think mine are toric. I really don't know.

Sorry you are having some difficulties with the tests and measurements. I know exactly which one you are talking about. Pretty weird, and mostly I wondered just how in the hell that worked.

The good news is the surgery is not like that at all. I was sedated, in 'twilight' but I think I remember most of it (the docs where all talking about football). Anyway, it was mostly just a bunch of colored lights. Never felt any pressure or intrusion.
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  #59  
Old 08-18-2018, 08:01 PM
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"Hey! Trees got leaves!" I said to Zyada as we walked out the door after the surgery. I knew that, but it was the first time I'd seen it easily in quite a while.

I had it done (on my one and only working eye) by Dr. Who*, and haven't seen him since - I have no idea what century he's been visiting since. There were no problems on the next-day, next-week, or next-month checkups, and in fact the doc on the monthly was so excited when I read 20/20 that he was almost jumping up and down. (For fear of someone getting hurt, I was very quiet about reading the next line of the chart to myself.)

The only downside is that, like Mama Mapp mentioned above, I lost my microscopic vision. It's no big deal. Seeing past the end of my arm is better than seeing within an inch of my eye.

* In this incarnation he spells his name "Hu" but I didn't call him on it.
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:16 PM
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"Hey! Trees got leaves!" I said to Zyada as we walked out of the surgery. I did know that, but hadn't seen it easily for a while.

I had it done by Dr. Who*. I haven't seen him since, and have no idea which century he's off to. There were no problems on the next-day, next-week, or next-month checkups. In fact, the doc who did the monthly was almost jumping up and down when I read 20/20. (For fear of somebody getting hurt, I was very, very quiet as I read the next line to myself.)

The only downside is that, like Mama Mapp mentioned above, I lost my microscopic vision. No matter - I'd rather see past the end of my arm than see details of something half an inch from my eye.

* In this incarnation he spells it "Hu" but I didn't call him on it.
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  #61  
Old 08-18-2018, 08:39 PM
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Night time vision seems fine. But I have not driven yet. I did some star gazing over the weekend looking for the Perseids meteors. Only saw a few. Just don't have the patience.

I think out of pocket costs where about $3300. The lens about 2300 and I opted for some special laser measurement that they do AFTER they take out the cataract and before putting in the new lens. I guess they can fine tune things a bit better that way.

All in all I VERY happy with the outcome.
I'm glad you are happy with the outcome, but Wow, my friend who had weight loss surgery had a co-pay that was less than half of what you paid for your glasses. And her insurance isn't the greatest.

I'm glad for you that you could afford the glasses. I wonder what someone who couldn't would do? would the Lions Club help out with something like that? I know The Lions Club is a general service organization, but the have a special mission of helping people with visual disabilities that started when Helen Keller approached them about 9 years after they formed, and asked them to be "Knights of the blind." Since then, they've evolved to provide glasses to children, and not just children who otherwise wouldn't be able to see at all, but any child with a prescription, whose parents couldn't afford to fill it.

I also know that sometimes when a Deaf person needed an interpreter, and was stuck for a way to justify it to an interpreting service, and get it paid for-- it somehow didn't fall under community living services, vocational services, medical or legal services, but wasn't something like church, that you would expect the church to pick up the tab for, The Lions Club stepped in. When I interpreted at children's afterschool programs that had educational content, but weren't officially part of the school curriculum, the Lion's Club sometimes picked up the tab.

That just seems like a real jam to be in-- to have a correctable problem, and have insurance that will pay for the medical end, but not for the glasses you need afterwards.

When my mother had her surgery done, she had primary insurance through her former employer, and secondary insurance through Medicare. Her primary insurance paid for the whole surgery, but not the glasses. Medicare paid for the lenses, but not the frames. She had to buy the frames. She picked middle-of-the-road ones, for about $98. She could have gone anywhere from $12 to $300. If she wanted scratch resistance or tinting, or bifocals, she would have had to pay extra, but she didn't want those things.
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Old 08-19-2018, 08:33 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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I'm glad you are happy with the outcome, but Wow, my friend who had weight loss surgery had a co-pay that was less than half of what you paid for your glasses. And her insurance isn't the greatest.

I'm glad for you that you could afford the glasses. I wonder what someone who couldn't would do? would the Lions Club help out with something like that? I know The Lions Club is a general service organization, but the have a special mission of helping people with visual disabilities that started when Helen Keller approached them about 9 years after they formed, and asked them to be "Knights of the blind." Since then, they've evolved to provide glasses to children, and not just children who otherwise wouldn't be able to see at all, but any child with a prescription, whose parents couldn't afford to fill it.

I also know that sometimes when a Deaf person needed an interpreter, and was stuck for a way to justify it to an interpreting service, and get it paid for-- it somehow didn't fall under community living services, vocational services, medical or legal services, but wasn't something like church, that you would expect the church to pick up the tab for, The Lions Club stepped in. When I interpreted at children's afterschool programs that had educational content, but weren't officially part of the school curriculum, the Lion's Club sometimes picked up the tab.

That just seems like a real jam to be in-- to have a correctable problem, and have insurance that will pay for the medical end, but not for the glasses you need afterwards.

When my mother had her surgery done, she had primary insurance through her former employer, and secondary insurance through Medicare. Her primary insurance paid for the whole surgery, but not the glasses. Medicare paid for the lenses, but not the frames. She had to buy the frames. She picked middle-of-the-road ones, for about $98. She could have gone anywhere from $12 to $300. If she wanted scratch resistance or tinting, or bifocals, she would have had to pay extra, but she didn't want those things.
That cost wasn't for glasses. That was for an upgrade to the lens and having them use a special laser to do an extra refining measurement. Insurance would have covered a normal lens and no extra measurement (besides the deductible). With a normal lens, I would still need reading glasses, which wouldn't be that big of a deal. Anyway, I sure as heck wasn't going to skimp, and glad I didn't.

I'm writing this now without reading glasses, something that would have been near impossible a month ago.
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  #63  
Old 08-20-2018, 01:29 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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You know, enipla, your sig ("I don't live in the middle of nowhere, but I can see it from here. ") is unexpectedly funny given the topic! I can't believe I just noticed it . I think you should change it to "I can see it much more clearly from here"!
  #64  
Old 08-28-2018, 11:40 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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....

I had it done (on my one and only working eye) by Dr. Who*...

* In this incarnation he spells his name "Hu" but I didn't call him on it.
1) Did he use a sonic screwdriver to do the deed?

2) He should go into business with a doc I met yesterday, Dr. Huh (gastro, a friend was having a look-see down there).

"I'd like to leave a message for Doctor Hu"
"Who?"
"Huh?"
"No, Hu"

Hey, if business is going to be looking up, you might as well be able to see it clearly .

Back to topic: enipla, how are things several weeks out? I'm especially curious about your nighttime and driving vision.
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Old 09-05-2018, 08:19 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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How is your nighttime vision?

I keep reading of the multifocals causing issues with halos etc. especially at night and that's concerning to me - right now I'm leaning toward a single vision lens; perhaps getting the other eye done as slightly nearsighted when the time comes.

I might consider an accommodating lens (adjusts *somewhat* for nearer vision) though from what I read, those don't work quite as well for people who started out nearsighted.

I see the eye doc tomorrow, in fact, so I'm piling up the questions. I'm hoping to come away with a surgery date scheduled.

Oooh - forgot to ask: if you don't mind spilling, how much did the premium lens cost you out of pocket vs. a plain one?
Hi all, sorry to have dropped this for a few weeks.

I think I've always had halos, starbursts etc. I've been wearing glasses since I was in 2nd grade.

I did just go back to my regular optometrist to get a contact lens for the eye that DID NOT have the cataract surgery. It's a multi-focal contact. Almost as good as the new eye. I'm doing this to 'balance' the eyes. The eye that has the new IOL (cataract replacement lens) is great. And now, I'm writing this on a net book without any reading glasses at the regular 100% screen zoom level. I don't need reading glasses anymore.

The contact lens is a daily disposable. About a dollar a day.

I can see. And see well enough with my new eye to not need the contact lens in my OEM eye. But for a buck a day for a few months or years (until that lens gets replaced by an IOL. I'm gonna do it.)

Do it would be my advice.
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  #66  
Old 09-09-2018, 04:48 PM
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I see my eye doc next Friday. Here's hoping the change in eye drops has reduced the eye pressure enough that she's comfortable doing the surgery!

She did *not* specifically mention the Symfony but I definitely plan to ask about it. I'm not one who jumps on the newest technology, but this sounds like enough of an improvement over the existing multifocals that it's worth it.

Doc said that they just don't use the "accommodating" lenses at all since they work so poorly.

How are you doing with driving and nighttime vision?

Interesting idea on using the contact lens. I gave up on them 20+ years ago because they never felt all that comfy to me, even the best soft lenses, but maybe they've improved since then...
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Old 09-14-2018, 06:09 PM
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Welp, I saw the doc this morning. Eye pressure is much lower, so the new drops are working well.

At one point she looked at the eye through some gadget and said "Yeah, you have a cataract". I looked affronted and said "really? And you're just NOW telling me this????". We both laughed.

Unfortunately it went downhill from there and I think I need to find a new doctor because I am PISSED.

The tl/dr version is "she couldn't / wouln't take the time to answer questions, and booted me without scheduling anything".

Lens discussion: she does more work with Restor than Symfony (which I specifically asked about because of Enipla's experience). She has done Symfony - and basically said "I'll put in whatever you want me to". I kept asking "Are there reasons why one would be better for me than the other?". The most she would say was that with any "accommodating" IOL (where all the websits say "multifocal") there's a loss in sharpness / contrast, and halos. Fair enough (though she didn't comment on the Symfony having a reputation for less of that). She made the point that if she had it done, she would NOT be able to use a multifocal for that reason. Valid point. I'm not a surgeon, I work with computers, and ultra-sharp vision is not an issue for me.

I tried getting her to say why one type was better or worse than another (not multifocal vs monovision, I've got a good handle on that - but the two brands) and she wouldn't give me an answer.

The exam was worse than usual. I had to be dilated (OK), and then the bright light torture started. Worse than I remember from other visits - looking longer at various places than usual, and she kept snapping at me because I'd jerk my head away in pain. "You can't do that when you're in surgery!". Well duh. But guess what: I'm very sensitive to bright lights -always have been, and this was unusually painful. I reminded her that I'd need to be sedated anyway.

Then she said I might not be a good candidate for multifocals since I had a hard time getting used to progressives. I pointed out that the ones I had issues with were the full on "correct everything" sort, likely because my prescriptions were so different, and I did fine with room distance progressives. It's a valid concern, though.

And when I kept trying to get a feel for what the options were to get the best overall vision, she wouldn't even let me try to explain what I was hoping for = maybe good distance and intermediate, and reading glasses for computer / closeup. I didn't want to have a setting so rigid that I couldn't, say, go to the bathroom at night without finding my glasses.

She wouldn't hear me out and spend another 5 minutes answering questions (she did say "You've had some great questions".... then why not ANSWER the last few!!). She basically said "I want you to get a second opinion. You want better refraction. Here's a guy who does cataracts and Lasik. Go see him. You may have him do the Lasik and the cataract, or have him do the Lasik and me the cataract", When I tried pointing out that I didn't have the budget for Lasik she basically blew me off "might as well get everything just right while you're at it".

And she refused to answer any more questions, just sent me on my way with notes to take to the other doctor.

Whom I called.... and he's in Washington DC and the Maryland suburbs (we're in Virginia), an hour or more drive unless traffic is insanely good (i.e. at 2 AM).... and they can't see me for another month.

I'd hoped to have the surgery DONE by then.

Bear in mind, I've known about the cataract for over a year. I met the criteria for surgery even then but she kept putting it off because at that point, she could get me to 20-20 ( the criteria are: can't get to 20-20, or 2+ diopters part in the two eyes). I lost another diopter in 4 months, and she STILL wouldn't push on with it.

So it's been going on for over a year, I'm losing function (I won't drive unfamiliar roads at night), and I'd hoped to have a surgery date.

So - I'm going to find someone new. I won't go to my husband's ophthalmologist because HE's the one who refused to answer questions about something he saw when my daughter visited him.

I can't ask my internist for a referral because a) she sent my daughter to a neurologist who turned out to not even be board-certified, and b) she's moved out of state anyway.

I guess I'll ask the optometrists's office for some names; they ought to know who's good.

Oooh - and when I asked where my doc would do the surgery - thinking "the hospital 2 blocks away from your office", she said "such and such location".... across the street from the hospital where my son was born.... where I had a nightmarishly bad time and 24 years later get the shakes just driving past the place. Ugh.
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Old 09-14-2018, 06:54 PM
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Ach, Mama Zappa. Yes, definitely do find someone else, and best of luck on getting things done fast. I'm feeling sorely indignant on your behalf just reading that.

That aside, this thread is giving me some good ideas of what I ought to bring up when I inevitably (eye doc says it's not a "might" get cataracts, it's definitely a "will", and I'm probably going to get them at a fairly early age) have to have cataract surgery myself. My thanks to y'all.
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  #69  
Old 09-17-2018, 10:15 AM
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Another question (though Enipla seems to have given up on the thread):

I'm severely sensitive to bright lights. As noted, the exam was excruciating. How does that work with the surgery? Are they going to be shining 5-megawatt Klieg lights at me like she was doing the other day?
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Old 09-17-2018, 02:00 PM
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Another question (though Enipla seems to have given up on the thread):

I'm severely sensitive to bright lights. As noted, the exam was excruciating. How does that work with the surgery? Are they going to be shining 5-megawatt Klieg lights at me like she was doing the other day?
I'm still around.

I definitely saw light during the operation, but I didn't find it overly bright. Just kind of dancing lights of different colors. I was sedated but for the most part awake. They called it twilight sedation. It was an IV.

Don't want to cause you more questions, but it seems odd to me that they are suggesting LASIK and cataract surgery. They will be replacing your lens, and at least in my case the Symphony IOL is correcting my vision.

I did have LASIK years and years ago though. The correction used in the IOL is not very much.
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:26 PM
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....
Don't want to cause you more questions, but it seems odd to me that they are suggesting LASIK and cataract surgery. ....
I agree!

And Lasik is something I have never, EVER had an interest in. I was once persuaded to go through an evaluation for it - because I've had such difficulty adapting to full-on progressives (I can deal with room-distance ones, which have less distance correction). I've got wonderful corneas for the purpose. but the concept of **eye surgery**.... for essentially **cosmetic** reasons. Ooooooh no.

I definitely want a second opinion. This doc has been pushing it off for a year - a year ago, the cataract was evident and I met one set of criteria or qualifying for surgery. 4 months later, it was worse - and she STILL didn't want to do it then.

At this point, I honestly get the feeling that she wanted me gone. I don't know why - I'm not an especially difficult patient, I follow instructions etc. Yeah, I had trouble dealing with the intensely bright lights during that part of the exam, but I was not jumping to be annoying, I was jumping because SHE WAS HURTING ME.

If she couldn't be arsed to spend 5 more minutes to answer the last few questions I had, then screw that. She doesn't know it yet, but she is F.I.R.E.D. Fired.

"I'll put in whatever you tell me to".. ?????? Yes, she needs to listen to my needs, but she also needs to guide me as to what would work and what wouldn't. If I want something that would be awful, she needs to tell me. And finding out what I"m hoping to accomplish is kind of critical to that whole process.

The person she is referring me too is actually very well qualified (though their practice's web page has bits about what he and his wife like doing for recreation. WTF? I don't give a rat's ass about that). But no way in hell will I go there if I can find some place in the same area code.

Been doing some more reading. It looks like the ReSTOR (the multifocal lens the current doc uses most often, vs the Symfony) is not strictly a "bifocal" but is more graded. Different tech than the Symfony, but not quite as sharp a transition.

In any case, what I'm thinking now is going for one of the multifocal / gradual lenses (ReStor or Symfony), with what's called "low add". I don't need something that will let me read close up. That's what 2.99 disposable readers are for. I want something where I can drive, see the dashboard (something I can't do well now with distance glasses), maybe brush my teeth without needing glasses (not at the same time as driving.... really.....), and the like.
  #72  
Old 09-19-2018, 01:12 AM
carnut carnut is offline
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Geez, that's passive-aggressive. She doesn't want to do the surgery. You might want to check her ratings and malpractice history. Go get that second opinion.
  #73  
Old 10-11-2018, 11:11 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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My latest: I called my optometrist's office for some names and got two.

One is a few miles away, in an office building i happen to know well (our dermatologist is there; in fact I saw the sign for his office when I was there earlier this week).

The second is the former partner of my soon-to-be ex: Docs A, B and C were in practice together about 1.5 miles from my house. My primary care doc sent me to A. My husband wound up going to B. The practice split up - and C remained at that location. C was the one I went to see 2 days ago.

Advantages: Well, he's very close to home. He does surgery at a very close hospital - same outpatient surgery center I had my wrist surgery at earlier this year. He does laser-assisted surgery - which does not necessarily give better results than traditional, but certainly no worse, and gives the option of doing some astigmatism correction.

I said I thought that a low-add multifocal might be the right choice for me given my past issues with full-on progressives: I can wear "room-distance" progressives that let me read, use the computer, and cook, but not full distance-to-reading ones.
He concurred, especially as I was up-front about saying "I'm not expecting to be completely glasses free. It'd be nice but I have no problem with needing glasses some of the time".

Ideally. I could get by with cheap drugstore readers, but we'll see.

He thinks I might not need a toric lens, if he can get sufficient correction with the laser.

So - he wants to do the preop testing which will help determine the best lens for me (e.g. he may decide a multifocal is not a good idea, or toric is / is not required, whatever). He recommends the Restor Active Focus vs the Symfony simply because the material used has been around a lot longer and he has more experience with it, and knows that it will last well. He doesn't know that the Symfony *won't* last well, of course - but because it's new, he just can't be sure. it's a valid argument (and one the soon-to-be ex did NOT explain).

Posterior opacification is something I'm fairly likely to develop: higher chance than average because a) Type 2 diabetes (though well-controlled), and b) my relative youth (I'm 59). I said "because I have longer for it to develop?" and he said "No, because the way a younger person's healing process goes, it's likelier". Non-issue, of course - gotta have the surgery, and it's quite easily dealt with.

I was very up front about wanting sedation. He said "basically, we use it for everybody". And he assured me that they'd get enough on board to let me tolerate the bright lights. He seemed amused at the idea of doing surgery while chasing me down the hall.

He does suggest doing both eyes, a few weeks apart, in order to get the best effect from the multifocals. That's similar to what the optometrist recommended.

I left a call for the surgical coordinator - gotta call again, as she didn't return my call. I really want this done sooner rather than later, though I have to weigh it against some travel plans that involve a lot of driving, in early November and just after Thanksgiving. Also, this year for financial reasons: we hit our out of pocket very early on so the basic stuff is free, and we've got enough other expenses that we might be able to deduct the extra cost for the premium lens. I guess I might be getting bionic eyes for Christmas.
  #74  
Old 10-20-2018, 02:06 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Sorry to be so late for a return to the thread I started.

I do have an excuse. My Wife and I left on a 4600 mile road trip on September 24th. We are back. Been a bit busy. No way I could have done the trip with out my new eyes.

Mama Zappa, I had the option of going go a place close, only 20 miles from home, or 'far', 100 miles from home. My optometrist recommended the place farther away. Mostly because they would do a final laser eye measurement when they got my cataract out and then choose the proper lens. Understand that 100 miles is nothing for my wife and I. So, I chose what my optometrist suggested.

I was also told about Posterior opacification Seems like no big deal.

My results have been nothing less than miraculous. I just gave all of my reading glasses to the library (I had 12 pair scattered around [home, work and car-I keep finding them in the oddest places]). Don't need them any more.

I've watched my brother in law go through Retinitis pigmentosa for 20 years now. He is for all practical purposes now completely blind. My mother has Macular degeneration. It's a difficult time for her. I thought it best to prevent such difficulties for myself and loved ones.

Mama Zappa, try to consider yourself lucky. I'm 57, a little younger than you, and have had my site restored to that a 10 year old. Surgery is scary, I know, but this is really quite simple and the most common surgery in the USA.

I only had the cataract in one eye. And to balance things out, I wear a multi-focal contact in the other. Works great. I'll oddly be glad to get a cataract in the eye that I wear a contact in so I can get a IOL put in that so I don't have to mess with a contact lens. That's how easy it was.

Surgery recap - Wife drove me to clinic. Was put on a gurney in pre-op. Had to take shoes and shirt off and wear a gown on top. They put lots of diffent drops in my eye to dialate and numb. Had to wait about an hour, and couldn't read anything. Really, that boredom was the worst part. Had an IV put in. They called it twilight sedation. So I was never really out. Light show in eye, but not bright that I would consider. Then I was wheeled out to rest a bit (maybe 30 minutes). Wife got me and we went to the Cheesecake Factory before the drive home. Don't order the cheese stuffed burger. Sounds better than it is. Roasted artichoke heart appetizer though, is great.

The patch over the eye was bothersome to sleep with for a few days. Oh and I had to put Rx drops in the eye for 10 days.

Had to do a follow up check up with my local optometrist the next day. I just drove myself. Then two more to get the proper contact lens for the eye that did not have the surgery.

Best of luck. Try not to get too wound up about it. I've had worse splinters then that surgery. Absolutely zero pain of any type. Consider it a few days away from normal that you can take it easy, only to return to a better life.
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  #75  
Old 10-24-2018, 03:09 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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...
I do have an excuse. My Wife and I left on a 4600 mile road trip on September 24th. We are back. Been a bit busy. No way I could have done the trip with out my new eyes....

I've watched my brother in law go through Retinitis pigmentosa for 20 years now. He is for all practical purposes now completely blind. My mother has Macular degeneration. It's a difficult time for her. I thought it best to prevent such difficulties for myself and loved ones....
Trip: nice!!! We did an 8,000 mile trip when we were a bit (30+ years) younger and it was one of the best things we've ever done. I want to do it again (except this time, hotel or RV, not camping or friends' couches).

What does your cataract have to do with the RP or MD? Just referencing vision loss, or does fixing a cataract reduce the risks of those?

I'm actually "looking forward" to having it done. I mean, surgery is no fun but being able to see would be nice.

I don't think I'd be considered legally blind in the bad eye - 20:200 or worse **with glasses**.... but I have to hold my phone about 4 inches away to see it clearly with that one eye, and computer distance is just a big colorful blur. And I've noticed actual double vision in that eye, at least some of the time. It's time to get it fixed.

I had the pre-op measurements done today. Much faster than at the other opthalmologist - I was in and out in less than an hour. They measured my cornea curviture on 3 different machines - evidently they gave similar-enough results that they were satisfied. I imagine if they got different results from the different machines they'd have to redo everything to figure out what was going on.

I see the doc in a week, at which point we'll make decisions and hopefully schedule the work. I'm leaning toward the laser-assisted version, as the incisions are more precise and they can do the limbic relaxing incisions to hopefully sort out the astigmatism, though of course I'll have to discuss that with the doctor.

The tech asked if I had any questions for her and I did have a few. One was "can I drive while adjusting to the first lens". I have a "CANNOT MISS" trip in late November - family business, and I need to be able to drive. If that would be an issue, I couldn't schedule anything until December. She thought it would be no issue, since I'd still have the un-operated eye at that point. I asked about pupil size, as that's an indicator of possible problems with the multifocals. She said mine were "average". I asked if my right eye would even qualify for surgery for insurance purposes, and her opinion was that there was enough scattering that it would.

Oh yeah: distance: We're in a major-enough metropolitan area that fortunately there are many, many choices that don't require driving 100 miles!! I cancelled the consult with the guy that would have required a 20+ mile drive - both because I was pissed at the whole scenario, and because I know what traffic is like getting to that area, and it ain't pretty. Mine will actually be at the same place where I had my wrist surgery back in March - i.e. practically walking distance.

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 10-24-2018 at 03:11 AM.
  #76  
Old 10-24-2018, 10:48 AM
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Nice time for this thread to resurface. Optometrist made me an appointment yesterday with an eye surgeon to have a cataract removed; he’s sending me to the doctor who removed his cataract – she does only cataract surgery, so I guess she’s good. Appointment for first visit is next week but it will probably be two or three months before the actual surgery.

The trigger for going now was that I managed to let my driver’s license expire and now have to take the test and I know I can’t pass the eye test.

I’ve gotten pretty used to a soft, blurry world but it bugs me to have had to give up driving at night. Hoping for an improvement there, mostly. Even on familiar roads I can’t read the street signs and often miss turns, even missing my own driveway at night.
  #77  
Old 10-24-2018, 10:56 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Trip: nice!!! We did an 8,000 mile trip when we were a bit (30+ years) younger and it was one of the best things we've ever done. I want to do it again (except this time, hotel or RV, not camping or friends' couches).
Have also decided that camping is a been there done that thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Zappa
What does your cataract have to do with the RP or MD? Just referencing vision loss, or does fixing a cataract reduce the risks of those?
Just a reference. No idea if there is a relation. Good luck, it was very simple for me, I hope you have the same experience.
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  #78  
Old 10-24-2018, 10:59 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Iíve gotten pretty used to a soft, blurry world but it bugs me to have had to give up driving at night. Hoping for an improvement there, mostly. Even on familiar roads I canít read the street signs and often miss turns, even missing my own driveway at night.
Driving and work did it for me. I'm a programmer and was starting to struggle with computer screens. And I got to where I was uncomfortable driving somewhere I was not familiar with. And I had one good eye.

Also, I come into work early in the morning. Twisty dark mountain roads. Luckily, I got it done before it was dark in the morning. I wouldn't have been able to do it. No way, know how, and I've been driving the same road for 26 years.

Good luck to you too. It will really change your life.
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  #79  
Old 10-25-2018, 11:54 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Nice time for this thread to resurface. Optometrist made me an appointment yesterday with an eye surgeon to have a cataract removed; he’s sending me to the doctor who removed his cataract – she does only cataract surgery, so I guess she’s good. Appointment for first visit is next week but it will probably be two or three months before the actual surgery.

The trigger for going now was that I managed to let my driver’s license expire and now have to take the test and I know I can’t pass the eye test.

I’ve gotten pretty used to a soft, blurry world but it bugs me to have had to give up driving at night. Hoping for an improvement there, mostly. Even on familiar roads I can’t read the street signs and often miss turns, even missing my own driveway at night.
Good luck!!

I see the eye tnext Tuesday. Hoping to have it scheduled some time before Thanksgiving.

Re the license: Slightly off-topic, but be prepared to have to jump through extra hoops re proving your identity when you do go to renew. A friend had missed her renewal date and had to provide extra documentation including proof of naturalization.... which the DMV declined!!! Apparently there was some kind of screwup with a USCIS database and she wasn't listed. It took a call to her Congressman to get it straightened out. She'd never been asked to produce such documentation before, with any of her renewals - but apparently they raise the bar if the old one has expired. Part of that is that new licenses in our state are RealID-compliant now.

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 10-25-2018 at 11:56 AM.
  #80  
Old 10-30-2018, 11:47 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Bumpdate: I saw the doc this morning. Evidently I'm a good candidate for a multifocal based on the various measurements they did, including something called angle alpha (well, if you google it, you'll get the Greek letter instead).

My astigmatism is outside the range where the limbal relaxing incisions would be helpful - I'm at 1.5 diopters in that eye, and the results are not great much over .5 or .75 diopters, so the results would be unpredictable. So, toric it is.

The right eye won't need a toric - it's only got about .5 diopters and they'll zap that while they're playing laser tag with my right eyeball.

He's booked up for a bit - so I won't get either done before Thanksgiving. In fact, the left will be done in early December, and the right will be done in early January. Oh well. The main issue there is financial: we've hit our out of pocket limit this year, and we'll be able to itemize medical deductions, so the extra lens expense would be deductible - dunno if we'll be able to do so next year.

They gave me choices of several different surgery slots on the first available date. For the one in December, I opted for the "oh gawd, you have got to be kidding me" early slot. For the one in January, I opted for the "you are out of your effin' MIND" early slot (arrival time at 6:45 and 6:00 AM, respectively). My logic being: while OR-delaying emergencies are less likely with this sort of thing, might as well get 'er done and over with.

I'm seeing a new (to me) primary care doctor tomorrow - already scheduled. The timing is good - I'll need medical clearance before the eye surgery. Interestingly, they're stricter than when I had wrist surgery at the same facility - no pre-op labs or anything required for that.

I asked "what if I sneeze or get hiccups during?". Doc laughed, said he'd only been sneezed on 3 times, but in any case, I should try to give them a second or two notice if I could.

I think the doc appreciated that I'm not expecting perfection out of all this - I'm perfectly happy to wear reading glasses (drugstore or prescription). I'm sure a lot of people go in with insanely high expectations.

Annoyingly, they want to repeat the measurements I had done last week. Not a big deal - it took about 40 minutes total; it's just a slightly longer drive to get to the office where they do that (the surgery center, and the office I went to today, are 1.5 miles from home).
  #81  
Old 11-02-2018, 05:52 PM
carnut carnut is offline
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snip.

He's booked up for a bit - so I won't get either done before Thanksgiving. In fact, the left will be done in early December, and the right will be done in early January. Oh well. The main issue there is financial: we've hit our out of pocket limit this year, and we'll be able to itemize medical deductions, so the extra lens expense would be deductible - dunno if we'll be able to do so next year.
Get this checked out with the insurance company. A few years ago, I had a procedure approved in December that was postponed to January due to an emergency the doc had to deal with. It still came out of the previous year's budget for OOP because that's when it was approved for. I admit, it may have been a mistake and it could be something that is handled differently by each state, but it's worth checking out.
  #82  
Old 11-03-2018, 11:23 AM
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Looks like I’m having my surgery sooner than expected. Doctor had a cancellation and scheduled me for the last week of November and the first week of December for the other eye. That works well for already having met deductibles since I had a skin graft for skin cancer earlier this year.

She phoned in prescriptions for three kinds of eye drops to use before the surgery. She also gave me a sheet to take to the pharmacy listing two or three alternatives for each in case my insurance didn’t cover one. They ended up costing me $140 but would have been over $700 without the insurance … for three tiny little bottles of eye drops.

The thing that really bugs me is that I have to have a physical by a doctor of my choosing before the surgery. My last physical was my Army separation physical in 1967. I must not be the only one who doesn’t like this because she had a hand-out sheet that explains this requirement “is the law and we cannot change it.” Damn insurance company lawyers in cahoots with government bureaucrats taking away my personal freedom to live or die as I choose (for my own good… BAH.)

On the ride home from the eye surgeon appointment (my brother drove) my eyes were dilated. While stopped at a red light I counted the number of lights I was seeing surrounding the “real” light; I saw 17. I guess it really is time to get this done.
  #83  
Old 11-04-2018, 09:51 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Get this checked out with the insurance company. A few years ago, I had a procedure approved in December that was postponed to January due to an emergency the doc had to deal with. It still came out of the previous year's budget for OOP because that's when it was approved for. I admit, it may have been a mistake and it could be something that is handled differently by each state, but it's worth checking out.
I doubt it would apply here - since we're talking two different procedures. It'll just get me through the 2019 deductible that much faster! I will let the surgical coordinator know that if they have a cancellation in December, let me know!!

Turble, I doubt it's the law that you have to have a pre-op physical - but it's many doctors' policy. For my wrist surgery, they didn't require anything (except in my case an EKG because of the type 2 diabetes). I had to scramble for that EKG, too - the whole thing happened on a Thursday, I was scheduled for the following Tuesday, my primary care office was closed that Friday due to a nasty windstorm that knocked power out.

I don't think it's a bad idea, either - if you've got underlying health issues, any surgery is riskier. And of course the doctors and hospitals are protecting themselves as well. Imagine starting a "minor" surgery and finding out you had some condition that made that particular surgery especially risky.

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 11-04-2018 at 09:53 PM.
  #84  
Old 11-04-2018, 10:27 PM
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Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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My wife goes in Tuesday for her left eye, with the right one being done a month later. She's been semi-freaked out about it, even going so far as to tell me what to do if she somehow doesn't survive the experience. I keep trying to reassure her.
  #85  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:02 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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My wife goes in Tuesday for her left eye, with the right one being done a month later. She's been semi-freaked out about it, even going so far as to tell me what to do if she somehow doesn't survive the experience. I keep trying to reassure her.
Would that have been this week (2 days ago)? How did it go?

I had a second measurement visit today - doc wanted to repeat one of them, because apparently my eyelashes were in the way of the image. They called back after he'd reviewed the results, and I'm good to go for the multifical.

I was surprised at having to start eyedrops 3 days before surgery (triple-whammy - an NSAID, steroid, and antibiotic) - and also that I'll need to stop the pressure-reducing drops a week beforehand. The triple-whammy eyedrops evidently aren't available at a pharmacy: I had to pay 50 bucks for them at the visit. I could have insisted on the 3 different drops, as I've hit my out of pocket for my insurance. It was pretty annoying, all in all.

The kit they gave me (that has the eyedrops and an eye shield that I'm supposed to bring with me) *also* has dilating drops - I'm supposed to administer them myself an hour beforehand. Bizarre. I guess that lets them get right to it more quickly without waiting for ones done there to take effect.

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 11-09-2018 at 12:05 AM.
  #86  
Old 11-28-2018, 05:48 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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The Big Day is a week from tomorrow, and while I'm nervous, I'm also VERY eager to get this done.

I have had to do a lot of driving this past week. From the DC area to Vermont, then a "day trip" from Vermont to New Hampshire.

Due to my poor night vision, and short daylight hours, I had to break up the drive into 2 days; in fact I had to stop much earlier than planned the first day, as heavy fog forced me to travel at a snail's pace. So I barely made it into the hotel in Vermont before sundown the second day.

And yesterday I had to take my daughter to an appointment at Dartmouth in NH. It's a bit over an hour drive.... but her appointment was late in the afternoon. And it had snowed that day, quite heavily. No way in HELL was I attempting that return trip on snowy, winding, unfamiliar roads, at night.
  #87  
Old 11-28-2018, 11:01 PM
carnut carnut is offline
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A friend just had hers done, two weeks apart and is very pleased with the results. I'm working on getting a dental implant right now, but know I must face the cataract surgery within the next year or two. I'm really beginning to hate night driving and I used to love it.
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:05 PM
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Good luck MZ!
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Old 11-29-2018, 09:52 AM
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My first cataract surgery is in a few hours -- second one in two weeks. My current earworm in now alternating between I can see clearly now and The man who never returned.

See you if I get back.
  #90  
Old 11-29-2018, 10:40 AM
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Would that have been this week (2 days ago)? How did it go?

I had a second measurement visit today - doc wanted to repeat one of them, because apparently my eyelashes were in the way of the image. They called back after he'd reviewed the results, and I'm good to go for the multifical.

I was surprised at having to start eyedrops 3 days before surgery (triple-whammy - an NSAID, steroid, and antibiotic) - and also that I'll need to stop the pressure-reducing drops a week beforehand. The triple-whammy eyedrops evidently aren't available at a pharmacy: I had to pay 50 bucks for them at the visit. I could have insisted on the 3 different drops, as I've hit my out of pocket for my insurance. It was pretty annoying, all in all.

The kit they gave me (that has the eyedrops and an eye shield that I'm supposed to bring with me) *also* has dilating drops - I'm supposed to administer them myself an hour beforehand. Bizarre. I guess that lets them get right to it more quickly without waiting for ones done there to take effect.
Sorry, didn't see this until now. It all went just fine, and she's now had the second eye done. The only problem with the first one is that her vision was so bad that she had to keep one eye covered for the three weeks between surgeries so as not to get disoriented. She'd watch TV through the repaired eye and read through the other one. She also used audio books for entertainment. Now that both are fixed, she doesn't need glasses at all other than for reading.
  #91  
Old 11-29-2018, 04:55 PM
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I can see clearly now -- kinda -- out of one eye.

Those who said there's nothing to it were right. The anticipation is the only bad part; the surgery itself was a snap, over before I knew it.
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Old 12-02-2018, 08:03 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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ChefGuy: glad to hear all went well for your wife. Interesting about the two eyes being that different that she had to be one-eyed for a few weeks. I have trouble walking while wearing my driving glasses: they are single-distance, set for distance only, and a very big difference between the two eyes. I left them on by mistake once when I hopped out of the car to go into a store - and wound up taking them off and doing my shopping with no glasses at all.

Turble: glad you're enjoying the results of the first one.

I'm in the countdown phase to my surgery. I've already quit using the pressure-reducing eyedrops - a prostaglandin analogue; there's a possible, though unproven so far, correlation between those and a complication called cystoid macular edema when they're used around the time of cataract surgery.

Tomorrow I start the triple-whammy eyedrops (steroid, antibiotic, and an NSAID) that I'm to use 3x/day beforehand and then for several weeks afterward.
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Old 12-04-2018, 09:22 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Well here are a couple of pre-op annoyances.

The paperwork confirming the surgery date said "must have medical clearance by 11/30 or we might cancel". I saw my doc in late October and got the bloodwork done a few days later.

So I called them one day last week and left a message asking "have you gotten it???".

They called yesterday and told me they had to bump me from 7:45 to 7:00. Oh well. My poor husband will be exhausted (he flies in from Ohio tomorrow night) but the sooner it's done, the better - and the second eye will be that early anyway.

When I was on the phone, I asked "have you gotten the paperwork" and she said that if they hadn't, the surgical coordinator would have called me already. So I assumed it was ok.

This morning, they called me about the fee for the extra lens and would I like to pay it over the phone. I said I'd stop by the office, as I needed time to dig out the right credit card. AND, they said "by the way, we haven't gotten your medical clearance yet". ARGH!!!

So I called the primary care doc's office. They had it - they just hadn't bothered to fax it. ::::shriek::::

And I got a couple calls from the surgery center. One, to go over all the medical history stuff.... the other, to discuss the payment I needed to make.

Now, I'm supposed to pay the doctor about 2600 for the premium (multifocal and toric) lens, and the surgery center about 800 for the laser.

But the surgery center is asking for 500 dollars to cover the cost of the toric lens.

So I don't know what the hell is going on. Why are *two* places trying to bill me for the premium lens. Does the surgery center think I'm just getting toric? Did the doctor's office write it up wrong? Is it a cash grab by the surgery center??? Am I going to wake up with the wrong damn lens???? Or is it just an extra fee nobody thought I needed to know about until the last minute?

If this isn't cleared up by tomorrow noon, I may have to call the whole thing off .
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Old 12-05-2018, 12:42 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Panic partly abated. The doc's office called back and verified that I'm to get the multifocal toric lens. The person I spoke to wasn't sure if it was the "low add" version - "It's whatever you discussed with the doctor". She had called the hospital to make sure they double-checked.

Someone from the hospital called and verified the lens: apparently the description just said "toric", so the call I got yesterday was as if I were just getting a toric lens (500 vs 790), but the part number does indeed refer to the low-add one - he looked it up while on the phone with me.

I'm surprised the lens portion of the cost is relatively low; I'm paying about 3400 out of pocket total, and 2600 of that is for the doctor; I'm surprised there's that much extra cost (maybe for the extra screenings or something).

I forgot to ask this morning whether they had gotten the paperwork from my primary care doctor. I need to call back at 1:00 to check - because otherwise I need to drive to the primary care doc and get it myself.
  #95  
Old 12-06-2018, 05:35 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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All's set. About to use my first dilating drop, then heading out.
  #96  
Old 12-07-2018, 08:24 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Aaaand, back!

The trip over was festive in a weird way: because the dilating drops were kicking in, all the traffic lights (red and green) appeared as huge bursts of what looked like fireworks.

They had trouble getting the IV started. As the nurse was failing her second attempt with my left hand I told her flat out "you are done with that hand". I've learned not to let them rummage around too long - they'll happily to so. They always inject a numbing medication beforehand which does fuck-all to stop the sting.

Luckily the third attempt, in the right hand, was successful or I'd have told her to find someone else.

They gave me more dilating drops - phenylephrine and something else, as well as numbing drops. The doc actually used something to **mark my eyeball** - which the numbing drop did nothing to stop

Step 1 was the laser. I had to lie on a gurney with a head brace. And NO DRUGS which is just baffling as hell. Next time, I'll have to ask WTF. It was very uncomfortable until they brought a pillow to put under my knees. They held my eye open and stuck this suctiony cylinder on top and poured water (sterile saline, probably) into it - which was consistent with what I'd seen. The pressure was very uncomfortable. I was tense as a board during that whole process. It was, as advertised, very fast. I could hear the doctor and a tech talking about "It's going GREAT!" to each other - I wouldn't have been surprised to learn they'd high-fived each other. At one point, someone said (to me) "10 more seconds" and you'd better believe I counted down! This all was festive too... lots of red sparkly lights while aiming the thing, then when it went to work, green.

Then I had to move to another gurney. Maybe that's why "no drugs" but it still seems bizarre. I'll have to ask the doctor why - and maybe demand the happy juice before the laser part.

They let me have my iPod on, in one ear, which probably helped relax me (as I was in the recovery area, "Blinded By The Light" started up .

They started the happy juice (Versed and Fenanyl) and went at it. The meds made me not care - and also gave my interesting "dreams" about what I was seeing. Then it was done. They gave me a dose of something called Diamox to help reduce eye pressure - it can be elevated after such surgery.

I went back just after 7 AM; I was walking out right at 8. They wouldn't let me walk out with my husband - made him go fetch the car then walked me down to wait at the door until he arrived - which was very quick... that normally-crowded parking lot is empty as hell at 6 AM. Home, a snack, put on the eye shield, and snoozed for 4 hours or so. At one point, I woke up a little, looked through the "new" eye, saw nothing but bright white haze, and thought vaguely "Must be because it's still dilated" (No, it was because I had the tape right over the middle of the shielf!). The vision was actually a little hazy, but that's cleared up. Some food, my eye drops, and some more sleep - and I watched TV without glasses!

I had my followup visit today. Eye pressure (which had been high before, hence the drops) was good. That might be a long-term improvement but we'll see. I'm scheduled for the right eye in 4 weeks, though if they have a cancellation it might be sooner. I had someone there pop the lens out of my driving glasses and a spare pair of reading glasses... only, I brought in the spare driving glasses instead - so I can't see the computer terribly well right now!

Supposedly my near visiion will work, when all is settled down, at roughly arm's length. It hasn't yet - I'm squinting right now to type this.

So, current status: distance vision good. Near vision sucks. But I can read, mostly using my right eye - the computer seems to be just beyond where the right eye works though I can see better with the right than the left. I saw some definite round sparkles around the night light in the bathroom last night, if I opened my left eye wide enough; the dilation has largely faded now and I *think* that's gone now but won't know until tonight.

The dilation is almost gone - last night I looked like I'd had a traumatic brain injury, the pupil was so huge. I'm officially cleared to drive - will probably attempt it in a parking lot over the weekend.
  #97  
Old 12-08-2018, 10:25 AM
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Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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My wife had her final post-op on Wednesday for the second eye. She ordered progressives at Costco because she doesn't want to screw around with OTC reading glasses, which are never really right. Turns out that with the minor corrective upper part, she will end up with 20/15 in both eyes instead of 20/20. Amazing.
  #98  
Old 12-11-2018, 05:18 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
My wife had her final post-op on Wednesday for the second eye. She ordered progressives at Costco because she doesn't want to screw around with OTC reading glasses, which are never really right. Turns out that with the minor corrective upper part, she will end up with 20/15 in both eyes instead of 20/20. Amazing.
Nice!

I may well get prescription glasses as well - but it'd be nice to get by with drugstore readers in a pinch.
  #99  
Old 12-11-2018, 07:31 PM
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Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Nice!

I may well get prescription glasses as well - but it'd be nice to get by with drugstore readers in a pinch.
I can legally drive with one eye at 20/25 and the other at 20/20 (the threshold is 20/40), but it's just much clearer to wear the corrective lens for the poor street signs in this city.
  #100  
Old 12-12-2018, 10:05 AM
Turble Turble is offline
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Had my ‘day after the surgery’ check on my second eye yesterday. Doc gave me a pair of reading glasses but they turned out to be much stronger than I actually need (250+) so I went to the drug store and bought a pair at 125+. I got the multi-focus kind so I can use them for the computer, too. I don’t really seem to need any magnification, just the focal distance.

Surgeon told me to make an appointment with the optician in about two weeks to see if any further correction might be beneficial. I can’t imagine seeing even better than I do now. My right eye is still a tiny bit blurry but the first one is now crystal clear two weeks after the surgery.

I’ve been messing with people who ask about my vision now. I’ll point to a tree or something very far in the distance and say “You see that sparrow in that tree over there … the one with the bent tail feather?” Always gets a good groan.
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