Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-03-2019, 08:35 AM
Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 36,416

How did 1940s people (specifically, men) keep their hats from being blown away?


I wear a hat of some kind most days. The two kinds of hats that I don’t wear are baseball caps and (unless the weather is in Arctic range) ski hats (the cap with a thousand names https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knit_cap) because they’re fucking stupid-looking.

Sometimes I wear a beret but usually I wear a brimmed hat of some kind.

Yesterday I was crossing a broad, busy street (with the light, of course) and it was a bit windy, so I was using one hand to keep my hat on my head. Suddenly there was a gust so strong that it blew my hat away even though I was holding it.

(Luckily a nice driver stopped for me to retrieve it but it was pure luck that it stopped in a place I could get it and no one ran it over).

So do I just have to stick with brimless hats in windy weather or did men in the early 20th century have a trick to keep their hats on their heads? I specify men because I know women used hatpins and stuff to keep their hats on.
__________________
*I'm experimenting with E, em, and es and emself as pronouns that do not indicate any specific gender nor exclude any specific gender.

Last edited by Acsenray; 12-03-2019 at 08:37 AM.
  #2  
Old 12-03-2019, 08:38 AM
Smapti is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 16,427
I wear a wool fedora on cold and rainy days. If it's breezy, I tilt my head down and pinch the crown with one hand. I've owned it for about ten years now and I haven't lost it yet, though I did lose a flimsier trilby to the breeze once.

Last edited by Smapti; 12-03-2019 at 08:38 AM.
  #3  
Old 12-03-2019, 09:53 AM
Ignotus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,356
It愀 from late nineteenth century, but in The Blue Carbuncle Sherlock Holmes notes that a felt hat shows signs of having had a chinstrap attached.
  #4  
Old 12-03-2019, 10:11 AM
CalMeacham's Avatar
CalMeacham is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 44,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignotus View Post
It愀 from late nineteenth century, but in The Blue Carbuncle Sherlock Holmes notes that a felt hat shows signs of having had a chinstrap attached.
Not a chinstrap -- there was a cord at the back that attached to a button on the collar.


Quote:
Sherlock Holmes laughed. "Here is the foresight," said he putting his finger upon the little disc and loop of the hat-securer. "They are never sold upon hats. If this man ordered one, it is a sign of a certain amount of foresight, since he went out of his way to take this precaution against the wind. But since we see that he has broken the elastic and has not troubled to replace it, it is obvious that he has less foresight now than formerly, which is a distinct proof of a weakening nature. On the other hand, he has endeavoured to conceal some of these stains upon the felt by daubing them with ink, which is a sign that he has not entirely lost his self-respect."
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_A...Blue_Carbuncle

Heck, I had one of those on the hat I wore while white-water raftering. Kept my hat on me when I got sucked into a whirlpool.
__________________
The makers of the GoPro have to come out with a model called the "Quid"

Last edited by CalMeacham; 12-03-2019 at 10:13 AM.
  #5  
Old 12-03-2019, 10:15 AM
Exapno Mapcase is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 31,829
Men losing their hats to the wind was a trope in old movies and cartoons, so it must have been common.

Note: I'm not stalking you, Cal. Pure coincidence.
  #6  
Old 12-03-2019, 10:22 AM
Ignotus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Not a chinstrap -- there was a cord at the back that attached to a button on the collar.




https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_A...Blue_Carbuncle

Heck, I had one of those on the hat I wore while white-water raftering. Kept my hat on me when I got sucked into a whirlpool.
Thank you for the correction! I shall notify the editor of the Swedish translation I have!
  #7  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:02 AM
74westy's Avatar
74westy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Regina, SK, Canada
Posts: 2,018
Nothing more foolish than a man chasin' his hat.
-- Tom Reagan
  #8  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:09 AM
CookingWithGas's Avatar
CookingWithGas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Tysons Corner, VA, USA
Posts: 13,501
I guess the phrase, "Hold onto your hat!" is now archaic.
__________________
Making the world a better place one fret at a time.
| | |會 |會 |會 |會 | |:| | |會 |會
  #9  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:19 AM
Just Asking Questions is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 7,596
You think wool caps are "fucking stupid looking", but you admit to wearing a beret?

Hoo-kay.
  #10  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:22 AM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 27,873
Quote:
Originally Posted by 74westy View Post
Nothing more foolish than a man chasin' his hat.
-- Tom Reagan
Quote:
Originally Posted by G.K.Chesterton
there is a current impression that it is unpleasant to have to run after ones hat. Why should it be unpleasant to the well-ordered and pious mind? Not merely because it is running, and running exhausts one. The same people run much faster in games and sports. The same people run much more eagerly after an uninteresting little leather ball than they will after a nice silk hat. There is an idea that it is humiliating to run after ones hat; and when people say it is humiliating they mean that it is comic. It certainly is comic; but man is a very comic creature, and most of the things he does are comiceating, for instance. And the most comic things of all are exactly the things that are most worth doingsuch as making love. A man running after a hat is not half so ridiculous as a man running after a wife.

Now a man could, if he felt rightly in the matter, run after his hat with the manliest ardour and the most sacred joy. He might regard himself as a jolly huntsman pursuing a wild animal, for certainly no animal could be wilder. In fact, I am inclined to believe that hat-hunting on windy days will be the sport of the upper classes in the future. There will be a meet of ladies and gentlemen on some high ground on a gusty morning. They will be told that the professional attendants have started a hat in such-and-such a thicket, or whatever be the technical term.
--On Running After One's Hat
  #11  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:24 AM
mbh is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 4,878
Old bit of ranchers' lore about cowboys:

"Never hire a man who rolls his own cigarettes, or wears a straw hat; if he's not trying to roll a cigarette in the wind, he's chasing that d*** straw hat all over creation."
  #12  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:26 AM
Exapno Mapcase is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 31,829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
Nice try, Chesty, but you're making a silk purse out of a sow's ear.
  #13  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:31 AM
Spiderman's Avatar
Spiderman is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: somewhere East of there
Posts: 11,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
ski hats (the cap with a thousand names https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knit_cap) because theyre fucking stupid-looking.

Sometimes I wear a beret


Talk about stupid looking.
  #14  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:38 AM
Dangerosa is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 22,565
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smapti View Post
I wear a wool fedora on cold and rainy days. If it's breezy, I tilt my head down and pinch the crown with one hand. I've owned it for about ten years now and I haven't lost it yet, though I did lose a flimsier trilby to the breeze once.
This. They were also sized way back when and fit pretty tightly - so a light breeze isn't going to take it. I have my Dad's fedora from the early 1960s and its a tight fit on my head.
  #15  
Old 12-03-2019, 11:56 AM
RioRico is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: beyond cell service
Posts: 637
Probably chin- or neck-straps in many situations but then alligator clips were invented; I've used a two-clip hat keeper since forever. Hat may blow off but it doesn't go far. I just jam other hats down tight.

The OP question makes me wonder about earlier times before fairly low fedoras replaced tall top hats. How did Abe Lincoln keep that stovepipe in place?
  #16  
Old 12-03-2019, 12:21 PM
Dinsdale is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 18,967
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
I wear a hat of some kind most days. The two kinds of hats that I dont wear are baseball caps and (unless the weather is in Arctic range) ski hats (the cap with a thousand names https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knit_cap) because theyre fucking stupid-looking.

...
The 2 styles of hats the OP eschews because of appearance impress me as among the 2 most practical styles of hats...

Not sure when it the last time I saw a man wearing a beret. But I CAN categorically state the last time I saw a guy wearing a beret and NOT looking like a doofus! That would be NEVER!

Unless, perhaps, he was in France, wearing a striped shirt, with a mustache, and playing a concertina... Nah, he'd still look like a doofus!
__________________
I used to be disgusted.
Now I try to be amused.
  #17  
Old 12-03-2019, 12:33 PM
ASL v2.0's Avatar
ASL v2.0 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Various
Posts: 619
The peaked cap often worn by military and police (though increasingly only in a formal dress uniform) has a strap that goes across the front, just above the base of the brim. You might think its for use as a chin strap. And maybe, back in the day when such hats were worn as practical header, thats what the strap was used for. But now? Strictly decorative (even though it is often capable of being brought down under the chin).

Anyway, I nearly lost my headgear to many a sudden gust of wind while walking along piers or up the ship's brow (the gangplank, if you will). It was blown off and sent flying more than once, but every time, I managed to catch it before it ended up in the water. Often only just.

[grumbling]Stupid impractical headgear...[/grumbling]
  #18  
Old 12-03-2019, 12:39 PM
enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 14,816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangerosa View Post
This. They were also sized way back when and fit pretty tightly - so a light breeze isn't going to take it. I have my Dad's fedora from the early 1960s and its a tight fit on my head.
Perhaps also that they would also use some sort of hair tonic/oil or whatever. With short hair and some sort of... elixir? I bet you could get a pretty snug fit.
__________________
I don't live in the middle of nowhere, but I can see it from here.
  #19  
Old 12-03-2019, 12:59 PM
Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 36,416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions View Post
You think wool caps are "fucking stupid looking", but you admit to wearing a beret?

Hoo-kay.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiderman View Post


Talk about stupid looking.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
The 2 styles of hats the OP eschews because of appearance impress me as among the 2 most practical styles of hats...

Not sure when it the last time I saw a man wearing a beret. But I CAN categorically state the last time I saw a guy wearing a beret and NOT looking like a doofus! That would be NEVER!

Unless, perhaps, he was in France, wearing a striped shirt, with a mustache, and playing a concertina... Nah, he'd still look like a doofus!
Yep, I look fantastic in a beret, and like a doofus in a baseball cap or ski hat. That's life. And that's aesthetics. De gustibus non disputandum est.
__________________
*I'm experimenting with E, em, and es and emself as pronouns that do not indicate any specific gender nor exclude any specific gender.
  #20  
Old 12-03-2019, 02:41 PM
panache45's Avatar
panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 49,601
I have the best solution: I never buy a winter coat unless it has a hood.
  #21  
Old 12-03-2019, 03:36 PM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 85,750
[Moderating]

Let's doff all the discussion about which sorts of hats look stupid, fucking or otherwise.
  #22  
Old 12-03-2019, 03:39 PM
minor7flat5's Avatar
minor7flat5 is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Trenton, NJ
Posts: 5,010
I just pull my fedora on as tight as I can get it. If it's too windy for that then I have to travel one-handed, with the other holding my hat in place--kind of like how old-timey ladies had to walk around one-handed, with the other fully occupied in lifting their long skirts above the filth in the city streets.
  #23  
Old 12-03-2019, 03:44 PM
KneadToKnow is offline
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 26,687
My Tilley hat has a wind cord. I used it when I was in Egypt, because if the wind took it from me, there wasn't anything to stop it until it got to Morocco.

N.B.: My particular model is no longer available, apparently, but the wind cord is still part of several models, from what I can see.
  #24  
Old 12-03-2019, 06:08 PM
Senegoid is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny California
Posts: 14,939
I am aware that some observant Jews, who wear a yarmulke (skullcap) at all times, may use a bobby pin or similar to hold it in place.

I have engaged in outdoor recreational activities lately that often entail getting hats blown off in gusts of wind. Hats with chinstraps were widely used. Also, hats with a flap in the back to keep the sun off the back of the next.

In direct answer to OP's question, my suggestion would be to go with the hats with chinstraps.

Vlad the Impaler had his useful techniques too, but I don't think OP would like that.
__________________
=========================================
  #25  
Old Yesterday, 01:11 AM
steepone is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 44
I can't recall where I read it or what the time frame was but I remember reading a story once where young boys earned pocket money chasing down hats on windy days
  #26  
Old Yesterday, 07:20 AM
Hari Seldon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Trantor
Posts: 13,220
I wear a ski cap for at least 6 months of the year. It keeps my head warm and cannot blow away. If you don't like how it looks, that's your problem.

My father wore a fedora very tight and I imagine he held on tight when necessary. What I was never able to understand was why his ears didn't freeze since he never wore ear muffs. He said he got used to the cold and it rarely got that cold in Philly, hardly ever below 10 F. But still....
  #27  
Old Yesterday, 07:37 AM
Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 36,416
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
My Tilley hat has a wind cord. I used it when I was in Egypt, because if the wind took it from me, there wasn't anything to stop it until it got to Morocco.

N.B.: My particular model is no longer available, apparently, but the wind cord is still part of several models, from what I can see.
I have a Tilley hat. Its a fine hat. but Im not going to wear it with my suit to work. Maybe on days that I dress casually.
__________________
*I'm experimenting with E, em, and es and emself as pronouns that do not indicate any specific gender nor exclude any specific gender.
  #28  
Old Yesterday, 08:15 AM
enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 14,816
Where my Wife and I have gone horseback riding, you must have a chin strap for your hat. If it blows off, it can spook the horses.
__________________
I don't live in the middle of nowhere, but I can see it from here.
  #29  
Old Yesterday, 10:33 AM
DesertDog is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Mesa, Ariz.
Posts: 5,897
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Not a chinstrap -- there was a cord at the back that attached to a button on the collar.
A few years ago I had a batch of custom fezzes made by these folks for use at Burning Man, known for its occasional high winds. I specified some way of attaching a lanyard, just in case, and they came up with a small, sturdy loop at the back on the inside just short of showing.

I hadn't considered that the city of Fez, where they were presumably thought up, also has a desert climate with a lot of wind. While I've not gone out with it during really windy periods -- this causes what's called a 'whiteout' where you want to hunker down in place anyway -- but I have been hit by gusts I'd estimate at 30mph with no signs of the hat being lost. The lanyard loop had proved entirely superfluous.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:19 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017