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Old 07-11-2019, 07:00 PM
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Alternate double slit experiment explanation.


A quite uninformed supposition. But possible?

What if the double slit experiment is indicating a sort of step level of interactions of particles and such? For instance.

A photon travels through a slit. If it goes very close to the center, it does not deviate much. But if it goes through a little closer to one edge, it encounters forces related to the material of that slit edge. I do not know what forces they might be. But the edge is composed of matter. Might there be forces that deflect the particle? Could the forces be in packets of force? Steps of force? So if the particle interacts fully within that area of force, it is deflected a fairly discrete amount. Maybe as you get closer to the matter of the slit, the strength of the packets/steps increases? So there would be a banding effect. The particles going through the slit being deflected in somewhat discrete steps. So there would be some piling up of collisions with the detector at those discrete steps of deflection. Looking like waves.

I imagine some effect of the mass of the material of the slit. Gravitation???

Quantum mechanics. The name indicates quanta of things. Discrete in effect? Or nearly.

I have tried to get more detailed information of slit experiments. But have not had success in finding a middle level of explanation that I can decode. They are very low level, or way over my head. Have experiments been done to specifically see effects of the materials used? Could more or less dense materials cause different band patterns?
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:04 PM
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Read Richard Feynman’s classic book on QED.
https://www.amazon.com/QED-Strange-T.../dp/0691024170

Accessible and covers exactly what you want.
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:17 PM
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Would the path of the particles be deflected, if opposite charges were put on the sides of the slits? If so. Would the interference bands be distorted as well?
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:03 PM
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So how does putting a second slit next to the first one change the pattern so much? If each particle only goes through one slit, and doesn't know about the other slit, then the two-slit pattern should look like a pair of one-slit patterns stacked on top of each other. But it actually looks completely different.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
So how does putting a second slit next to the first one change the pattern so much? If each particle only goes through one slit, and doesn't know about the other slit, then the two-slit pattern should look like a pair of one-slit patterns stacked on top of each other. But it actually looks completely different.
Another question I had. So there are photons emitted at the same time? Each going through a different slit. But close enough in time to interfere?

I am not sure, but I think I read that a single slit can exhibit some banding?
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Kedikat View Post
Another question I had. So there are photons emitted at the same time? Each going through a different slit. But close enough in time to interfere?
You can get an interference pattern even if the photons are emitted so infrequently that there will be only one photon anywhere near a slit at any time.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:39 PM
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Last edited by Kedikat; 07-11-2019 at 08:40 PM. Reason: other person answered.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:45 PM
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You can get an interference pattern even if the photons are emitted so infrequently that there will be only one photon anywhere near a slit at any time.
Can one photon, going through one slit, produce a band effect that looks like a wave entering both slits? Or does the wave looking effect have to be built up over time, of many hits of photons?

Last edited by Kedikat; 07-11-2019 at 08:47 PM.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:50 PM
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Can one photon, going through one slit, produce a band effect that looks like a wave entering both slits?
No - one photon shows up in only one specific place (rather like a particle), but if you send one photon a day through the double slits, after a few hundred days, you'll see the interference pattern develop.
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Old 07-11-2019, 09:07 PM
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No - one photon shows up in only one specific place (rather like a particle), but if you send one photon a day through the double slits, after a few hundred days, you'll see the interference pattern develop.
Really? That is a great tidbit of information I have not come across. But I think that reinforces that it is not a wave effect. How can yesterdays photon, determine todays photon behavior, so it appears as if it is interfering or reinforcing in a wave like manner?
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Old 07-11-2019, 09:12 PM
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Really? That is a great tidbit of information I have not come across. But I think that reinforces that it is not a wave effect. How can yesterdays photon, determine todays photon behavior, so it appears as if it is interfering or reinforcing in a wave like manner?
So if you closed off one slit for ten days. The result would look like a single slit experiment. But then swap slits and wait ten days. The cumulative result would look like a double slit experiment?
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Old 07-11-2019, 09:14 PM
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Really? That is a great tidbit of information I have not come across. But I think that reinforces that it is not a wave effect. How can yesterdays photon, determine todays photon behavior, so it appears as if it is interfering or reinforcing in a wave like manner?
Yes, really. I'm not sure if the one photon per day experiment has been tried, but experiments have been done with a slow enough rate that only one photon would be in the apparatus at a time. It sounds more like it confirms a wave property - it's one photon acting like a wave, interfering with itself.
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Old 07-11-2019, 09:17 PM
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So if you closed off one slit for ten days. The result would look like a single slit experiment. But then swap slits and wait ten days. The cumulative result would look like a double slit experiment?
No. It would look like two overlapping single slits (or as if you moved the single slit). Even with one photon per day, it matters if there are two slits.
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Old 07-11-2019, 09:28 PM
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No. It would look like two overlapping single slits (or as if you moved the single slit). Even with one photon per day, it matters if there are two slits.
Wow. Thank you for these bits of information. I will look into this aspect more. Can you point me in the direction of an article about how the photons are generated and counted?
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Old 07-11-2019, 10:21 PM
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You just need a feeble enough source. Keep turning it down (or stick absorbing stuff in the way) until the average rate is low enough. You can make a detector out of any device that registers individual photons. Any modern digital camera has a quantum efficiency high enough to work. You don’t need photomultiplier tubes anymore. You could perform the experiment at home with no expensive gear.
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Old 07-12-2019, 07:28 AM
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Frankly, these are the fundamental aspects of the double slit experiment, covered by any introductory book on quantum mechanics, or any general-public explalanation of the experiment. Including the wikipedia entry for "Double-slit experiment".
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Old 07-12-2019, 09:46 AM
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And a "feeble enough" light source doesn't need to be very feeble at all. Even if you've got a whole lot of photons per second, well, it takes light a whole lot less than a second to make it all the way through your apparatus, and clear the way for the next one.
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Old 07-12-2019, 10:09 AM
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If you want to give particles always well-defined trajectories and be compatible with the predictions of quantum mechanics, it is possible, and you will end up with something like this for the double-slit experiment:

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/...fig1_226707799
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