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  #51  
Old 11-29-2019, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by PhillyGuy View Post
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Here, 92 is written jiǔ shí èr, which translates as “nine ten Three”.
But that's just wrong. In Chinese èr means 'two'. Three is san. I know practically no Chinese at all and even I know that. (Thinking of the fiddle called "er-hu," which has 2 strings.)
  #52  
Old 11-29-2019, 07:19 PM
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There must be an explanation for this, and IMO that is the pace of change required. Children aren't going to learn two ten four when their parents still say twenty-four.
Language changes. If we don't destroy ourselves (and I doubt we will), there eventually will be parents saying twenty-four when their kids say something else.

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This looks like a solution in search of a problem.

I know I'm terrible at math, but that didn't stop me from knowing what a million is, or the 12 times table.
The science linked from the link in the OP doesn't claim that a subtle language change would help with knowing what a million is. Nor did it claim that it would help with learning times tables. They did, however, claim a relationship to estimating ability. Whether that has a bit to do with your being "terrible at math," I, of course, have no idea.

This couldn't be the the difference between becoming an acclaimed number theorist, and being terrible at math. But there could be a modest relationship.
  #53  
Old 11-30-2019, 01:46 AM
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Originally Posted by PhillyGuy View Post
Language changes. If we don't destroy ourselves (and I doubt we will), there eventually will be parents saying twenty-four when their kids say something else.
Totally, but language (English, anyway) generally evolves because the kids want a cooler way to say something, not because someone comes up with a grand and unifying simplification.

I'd put money on a transformation like "twenty-four" -> "two dozen" -> "twozen" -> "tzen" way before we get to "two ten four"

I mean, as long as we're simplifying, why not just recite the digits? People already sort of do that in some contexts, and leaving out unnecessary information is a natural way for language to evolve. You just stop saying the part that's unnecessary and eventually only stodgy old people say that.
  #54  
Old 11-30-2019, 02:24 AM
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^See also: vocabulary

CMC fnord!
  #55  
Old 12-02-2019, 03:15 PM
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In my bilingual home (English and Korean), we often say numbers in Korean simply for clarity. It's easy to mishear "fifteen" and "fifty", but hard to mistake "ship-o" and "o-ship" (literally ten-five and five-ten).

Where things get interesting is telling time. If the clock says 7:45, I automatically say "quarter til eight". And other colloquialisms like "ten past ...", "half past ...", "five til ...", etc. My kids understand me, but their friends think I'm weird. I've been asked the time, look at my phone which shows "15:47" and say "quarter til four", they look at my phone and hear my words and were none the wiser.

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Originally Posted by Kimera757 View Post
I know I'm terrible at math, but that didn't stop me from knowing what a million is, or the 12 times table. My real problem is I don't have a "blackboard" in my head so I can confidently multiply by 2.2 without screwing up. (I can do that on paper no problem, of course.) I don't think this would improve math marks or learning at all.
I multiply by 2.2 in my head thus: double the number, then add ten percent. For example, 79 kg converts to 79 times 2 is 158 plus 16 is 174.
  #56  
Old 12-02-2019, 11:26 PM
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When I multiply, divide, or otherwise mentally manipulate multi-digit numbers, also by hand, of course I use base-10 and memorized information like the multiplication table, but I do not read the numbers out or otherwise translate them to a particular language. I propose that kids' "feel" for such things has more to do with the amount of practice than with any effect due to their native language.

One tangential observation on "four-and-twenty" versus "twenty-four": if your native language is something like Arabic, your sense for whether the number is "backwards" may be reversed? Any personal experiences?
  #57  
Old 12-04-2019, 11:23 AM
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Incidentally, another difference is that Mandarin cuts out the unnecessary "and" that languages like English and German include.
So English "Two hundred and twenty three" is just "Two hundred two ten three"
The "and" is added by the speaker. IIRC the "correct" way to say a number is to only us "and" with a decimal or fractional part of a mixed number.
  #58  
Old 12-04-2019, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Pleonast View Post
I multiply by 2.2 in my head thus: double the number, then add ten percent. For example, 79 kg converts to 79 times 2 is 158 plus 16 is 174.
The Fahrenheit/Celsius conversion is similar: F>C is (F-32)*1.8; C>F is (C*1.8)+32. 1.8 can be approximated by doubling the number then subtracting 10%.
  #59  
Old 12-05-2019, 11:52 AM
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The Fahrenheit/Celsius conversion is similar: F>C is (F-32)*1.8; C>F is (C*1.8)+32. 1.8 can be approximated by doubling the number then subtracting 10%.
I always did the estimation as F->C: F-30 then halve (your F to C should have divided by 1.8; C-> F: Double then add 30
  #60  
Old 12-05-2019, 12:04 PM
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I always did the estimation as F->C: F-30 then halve (your F to C should have divided by 1.8; C-> F: Double then add 30
You're right, typo
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