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  #151  
Old 09-22-2019, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Jane Elliot View Post
You would think that anyone could make a Gin & Tonic, wouldn't you? Unless it's one of the bartenders at my local pool hall. First time I ordered a G&T she reversed the ratios. All the gin and a couple shots of tonic. I've never ordered another.
Hi, sorry to trouble you ... but I think we were served each other's drinks by mistake.
  #152  
Old 09-22-2019, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Sazerac Rye is made by the Heaven Hill distillery, which makes my favorite bourbon. I tried the rye and did not like it at all — sipped some on the rocks and just said “...that ain’t right.”

I’ve gone back to Old Overholt (aka “Old Overcoat”), which was the one rye available before rye started to come back into fashion about ten years ago.

Tell me, Dear Abby, am I a lost cause?
You good by me. (There were two others available in the early 2000s before the whole rye-going-big thing; I know, because I was interested in ryes at that time and had a hell of a time finding 'em: Jim Beam rye in the yellow label and Wild Turkey rye, along with Old Overholt. They were all really decent whiskeys for the price. About $12-$15/fifth in 2003 for any of those three. Far better than the bourbons in the same price range, IMHO. I still love the Old Overcoat.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-22-2019 at 08:00 PM.
  #153  
Old 09-22-2019, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
You good by me. (There were two others available in the early 2000s before the whole rye-going-big thing; I know, because I was interested in ryes at that time and had a hell of a time finding 'em: Jim Beam rye in the yellow label and Wild Turkey rye, along with Old Overholt. They were all really decent whiskeys for the price. About $12-$15/fifth in 2003 for any of those three. Far better than the bourbons in the same price range, IMHO. I still love the Old Overcoat.)
ETA: Oh, and I seem to recall Rittenhouse Rye also being available around the same time, a little pricier in the high teens or low 20s c. 2004/5. But, yeah, it was tough to find anything else.
  #154  
Old 09-23-2019, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Old friend of mine attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in the early Ď80s. Genesee Cream Ale was worshipped like a god. I couldnít figure it out, either.

Probably because it was difficult to obtain. I think Vernorís Ginger Ale is a special treat here in the East, but it would be totally common in Ann Arbor. This would also explain the 1970s craze for the pigswill that is Coorís beer, which was really hard to find east of the Mississippi.
I don't know... college students are notoriously vocal yet ignorant about beer. When I was in college, the local Texas beers were revered way above what you'd have thought beers of that caliber would be. I mean, Lone Star is as generic of a light American lager as they come, and Shiner Bock is basically the same thing with a touch of dark malt to give it color. It's not a bock, it's not more alcoholic, and while it's not bad, per-se, it's not terribly good either.

Yet you'd have thought it was brewed on Mt. Olympus by Dionysus himself (with help from Silenus), and then brought to earth by Zeus in a golden barrel for the mortals lucky enough to live in Texas to quaff. And people I know STILL opt for it when there's loads of better beer out there these days.
  #155  
Old 09-23-2019, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
This afternoon was the first time I made Manhattans with Wild Turkey Rye. A dangerous choice. This sumbitch I'm sipping is wicked smooth. Made 4 to 1 with Dolin sweet vermouth, dash of Angostura bitters and a spoonful of the juice from the cherry jar. Luxardo, of course.

My usual ryes for cocktails are Pikesville, Sazerac and Crown Royal Northern Harvest. All the same and yet all so different. Now Wild Turkey rye goes into the mix.

Oh, and the ideal Manhattan also has to have a random cat hair or 3 land in it before you can finish it. Try to get that level of service at a bar!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Sazerac Rye is made by the Heaven Hill distillery, which makes my favorite bourbon. I tried the rye and did not like it at all — sipped some on the rocks and just said “...that ain’t right.”

I’ve gone back to Old Overholt (aka “Old Overcoat”), which was the one rye available before rye started to come back into fashion about ten years ago.

Tell me, Dear Abby, am I a lost cause?
Old Overholt is my go to rye. It's pretty mild for rye, but the price cannot be argued with. I also like the Wild Turkey rye as well as Dickel for less expensive options. All three are unique flavor profiles and all work well straight or in a Manhattan. And Dolin is our favorite line of vermouths. We like the sweet red for Manhattans, the dry white for martinis and the sweet white for summer vodka martinis (add a bit of citrus bitters or orange twist).

Edited to add: Wouldn't ask for any of these drinks at the Red Lobster. Now the room is spinning round like the blades of a helicopter.

Last edited by wguy123; 09-23-2019 at 09:35 AM.
  #156  
Old 09-23-2019, 11:44 AM
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In the early 2000s, my father gave my wife and I gift cards that were good at the local mall. The two of us and a friend went shopping to redeem them. We all came to the realization that this mall no longer catered to our age bracket, so we went to a Red Robin in the mall to redeem our gift cards for cocktails. I had never been to a Red Robin before (or since), but it is a fairly typical Bennigan's, TGI Friday, Chili's type mall restaurant chain. My wife and friend ordered what ever silly oversized cocktails that were pictured on the menu. I could see the bar back from my seat, and saw they had Bushmills (my go to whiskey at the time).

Me: "I'll have a Bushmills and soda."
Waiter: "Bush milk?"
Me: "No, Bushmills. It's whiskey. I can see the bottle. Bushmills and soda."
Waiter: "Oh, OK." He starts to walk away, "What kind of soda?"
Me (flabbergasted by the question): "Soda, soda, plain soda."
My Wife: "Club Soda."
Me: "Club Soda."
Waiter: "Oh, OK." He starts to walk away, "Do you want them in the same glass?"
Me: "I want a whiskey and soda. It's a regular drink. Bushmills is the kind of whiskey I want. Bushmills and soda."

The waiter leaves, we all say how weird that was, a few minutes later he comes back with our drinks. My friends get neon colored fishbowls, I get a rocks glass with no ice, and flat soda.

Me: "I have never done this before. This is not the drink I ordered. I just want a whiskey and soda. It has three ingredients. Two are in the name of the drink."
Waiter: "What's the other ingredient?"
Me: "Ice."
Waiter: "Sorry, new bartender."

I watch as the bartender makes my drink. She takes a lowball glass, adds soda from the gun (they are clearly out of CO2), tops it off with Bushmills, adds ice spilling the drink all over the bar, hands it to waiter.

Waiter: "Here you go."
Me: "It's one of the simplest drinks in the world. Put ice in a glass, add a measure of whiskey, top off with soda. Why do you even carry whiskey? Just get me a Bushmills, on the rocks. OK?"
Waiter: "OK."
Me (as he starts to walk away): "Rocks means 'Ice'."
  #157  
Old 09-23-2019, 11:59 AM
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Can there be a simpler drink to make?! A glass of good gin, so little vermouth that it actually measures out as 1 bottle cap's worth, and an olive or two does the trick.
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  #158  
Old 09-23-2019, 12:08 PM
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A BOTTLE CAPís worth of vermouth? Are you INSANE?
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  #159  
Old 09-24-2019, 10:25 PM
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I think I just threw up a little in my mouth...

While we're at it, how much olive juice does everyone here put in a dirty martini? I like it used sparingly, like vermouth should be, but apparently some bartenders don't like how that leaves these crazy huge appletini glasses looking half-empty, so they pour the rest of the jar in there. Hork.
  #160  
Old 09-24-2019, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Esprise Me View Post
I think I just threw up a little in my mouth...

While we're at it, how much olive juice does everyone here put in a dirty martini? I like it used sparingly, like vermouth should be, but apparently some bartenders don't like how that leaves these crazy huge appletini glasses looking half-empty, so they pour the rest of the jar in there. Hork.
Agree with your hork.

For vermouth, I was always a proponent of the 5-1 ratio.

For a dirty martini, I always added a teaspoonful, unless specifically directed otherwise by the customer.
  #161  
Old 09-24-2019, 10:58 PM
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Drop olive into martini glass. Pour a finger +/- of olive juice. Pour martini.
  #162  
Old 09-25-2019, 03:26 AM
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Today I tried this.

Seems Sprecher is jumping on the hard seltzer craze. Carbs a bit higher than most hard seltzers.

Didn't taste terrible. Taste and consistency like the very end of an Old fashioned. You know, when the ice has melted and watered down the last of your drink. Like teasing your palate with flavor that just isn't there anymore.

Wouldn't dream of drinking this again. Not by itself, anyway. But it actual would be good to use as the press when making Old Fashioneds.

And it still was better than the "Old Fashioned" cocktail I was served in phoenix.
  #163  
Old 09-29-2019, 03:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
I learned many years ago never to order a martini unless I am in New York, Chicago, or San Francisco.

And NEVER ask for one outside the U.S. You should be drinking the local concoctions anyway.
Went to a company dinner and my boss at the time asked me if I wanted a cocktail. I asked him what he was drinking - it was something ginger-ale colored, with ice, in an old-fashioned glass, with an extra-long toothpick threaded with an olive or two.

He told me it was a martini. I declined.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anny Middon View Post
That's the classic Brandy Alexander. I'm pretty sure the classic Grasshopper isn't an ice cream drink, either. But the supper club version of these is sometimes as ice cream drinks.
Any time we took my grandmother out for dinner, she asked for a Brandy Alexander. Most bartenders had no idea what she wanted. When she did get one, it was normally with cream, not ice cream. When she got the question, "ice cream or cream", she knew she hit the jackpot. She also chose ice cream and would make them at home with ice cream.

Went to the new Mexican restaurant and ordered a margarita, on the rocks. Nope. No chance. Most of the locals had only had frozen margaritas and did not know that on the rocks is possible. Only us (American) and one coworker (Italian) knew that there are different ways to serve a margarita.

I went to that Mexican restaurant twice, but no more. I have heard from others is the only safe bet is to order a bottle of beer and ask them to bring it you unopened. They can't even pour beer.
  #164  
Old 10-06-2019, 05:41 PM
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In The Firm Gene Hackman's character laid bare the evil in his nature by ordering a martini on the rocks.

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