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  #101  
Old 08-17-2019, 09:01 AM
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Note that PB is actually filmed in Manchester. A local entrepreneur who worked briefly on the set, now has a stall selling sausages called "Porky Blinders"

https://ilovemanchester.com/porky-bl...s-in-the-city/

Last edited by bob++; 08-17-2019 at 09:02 AM.
  #102  
Old 08-17-2019, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangahyando View Post
Don't think attempts by me at direct linking, would work; but if one Googles "British money slang monkey pony", various items come up to suggest that it's largely a Cockney thing, and is indeed reckoned to be derived from Indian banknotes and their artwork, when we ruled there: "pony" = 25 pounds / rupees, "monkey" = 500 pounds / rupees. (The "hits" thus made by Googling, imply that this falls under Cockney rhyming slang; but the monkey and the pony are nothing to do with words rhyming.)
Heyer uses the terms "monkey"'and "pony" in her books, set in the Regency period, which were meticulously researched. The terms are used by upper class characters. I doubt that Cockneys in 1820 would ever have £25, let alone £500, so I'd go with the Indian origins, not Cockney slang.
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Last edited by Northern Piper; 08-17-2019 at 12:20 PM.
  #103  
Old 08-17-2019, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by MrAtoz View Post
What about "Tuppence"?

Agatha Christie had a detective character whose nickname was Tuppence. In one book, one of the clues that a letter supposedly from her was a forgery was the fact that the forger had spelled the signature as "Twopence" rather than "Tuppence."
I just read that book yesterday!
  #104  
Old 08-17-2019, 02:09 PM
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BTW, something else the UK minted during the 19th century was "fractional farthing" coins. They were mainly used in some of the colonies, but, yeah, 1/960 of a pound wasn't small enough in those places, and they minted 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4 farthing coins:

http://www.royalmintmuseum.org.uk/co...ngs/index.html
  #105  
Old 08-17-2019, 02:46 PM
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Pre-independence India had a similarly complex system

3 pies = 1 paisa
4 paise = 1 anna
16 annas = 1 rupee

Now it’s just 100 (new) paise = 1 rupee

For a while after the currency was ended, the term “anna” was used as a way of stating fractions or percentages. So “four Anna’s” was a quarter of a rupee so it meant 35 percent of whatever you were talking about.
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  #106  
Old 08-17-2019, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
For a while after the currency was ended, the term “anna” was used as a way of stating fractions or percentages. So “four Anna’s” was a quarter of a rupee so it meant 35 percent of whatever you were talking about.
I assume a typo for 25%. Otherwise can you explain the reasoning?
  #107  
Old 08-17-2019, 03:52 PM
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You’re correct. Typo
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  #108  
Old Yesterday, 12:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertDog View Post
I remember reading as a kid a story where a young child was digging for pirate treasure in the garden with a trowel. His grandfather came upon him an on finding out what he was up to, managed to drop a crown and scuff enough dirt over it so the tyke could find it. It was a very big thrill to him but I have no idea any more what the period of the story was nor what class they might have been. I presume upper as they had a garden you could wander around in.
I read that story! It was in a school reader, about Grade 6. But I remember it a bit differently; it was a half crown, and there were several kids, and when the adult realized that the boy was going to share it with the other kids, he dropped a second half crown, to ensure everyone would get something.
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