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Old 07-14-2019, 08:54 PM
purplehorseshoe is offline
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Best way(s?) to re-heat leftover ribeye (med. rare)


Hey, maybe someone here has some ideas. I love fatty beef like ribeyes, cooked medium rare. But unlike leaner meats, which are damn tasty served cold & sliced thinly, leftover fat-marbled meat is pretty unappetizing.

What are some ways to deal with leftovers so they're palatable again? I've experimented with tossing slices in a hot pan with ... various stuff ... like Worcestershire sauce and onions, but the technique needs improvement.

I'd love some sweet-spicy Asian flavors to mix things up, maybe.

Anyone here re-heat leftover meat, something other than a microwave?
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Old 07-14-2019, 08:56 PM
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I've yet to reheat a steak that didn't cook it too much. I'm also interested if better meat-cookers have a better idea.
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Old 07-14-2019, 09:13 PM
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Microwave.

Power level three.
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Old 07-14-2019, 09:28 PM
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I've used leftover ribeye to make Philly cheesesteaks with what, at least to me, was good results.
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Old 07-14-2019, 10:05 PM
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I've had prime rib that was left over from Christmas that I vacuum sealed to keep longer. when I pulled them out, I thought, "what the hell" and just tossed the bag into a pot of cold water and put it on the stove. I took it out when the water was at a light simmer and it was perfect. It didn't keep all of its red medium rare color, but it was tender and juicy.
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Old 07-15-2019, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turner View Post
I've had prime rib that was left over from Christmas that I vacuum sealed to keep longer. when I pulled them out, I thought, "what the hell" and just tossed the bag into a pot of cold water and put it on the stove. I took it out when the water was at a light simmer and it was perfect. It didn't keep all of its red medium rare color, but it was tender and juicy.
I was going to suggest sous vide but that's similar enough to what you described. However, a simmer is probably too hot. Shoot for 130-140 degrees.
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Old 07-15-2019, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by jnglmassiv View Post
I was going to suggest sous vide but that's similar enough to what you described. However, a simmer is probably too hot. Shoot for 130-140 degrees.
Yeah, if you aren't using a circulate, might be easier to heat up the water until it gets to 140, turn off the heat, and drop the steak in just to reheat it. You don't even really need a vacuum seal, just a ziploc bag.
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Old 07-15-2019, 11:53 AM
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Heat up beef broth on the stove. Using tongs, lower the steak into the boiling broth for a bit. It won't stay medium rare, but it won't be dried out.
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Old 07-15-2019, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by enalzi View Post
Yeah, if you aren't using a circulate, might be easier to heat up the water until it gets to 140, turn off the heat, and drop the steak in just to reheat it. You don't even really need a vacuum seal, just a ziploc bag.
Thinking about it some more, I'd heat the water maybe 10-15 degs hotter and put everything in a small cooler.
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Old 07-15-2019, 12:40 PM
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I would trim off as much fat as possible and use the meat in a frittata.
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Old 07-15-2019, 01:14 PM
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I've reheated steaks in an oven at 200 or 250 just long enough to warm it to the bare minimum...not quite fresh off the grill quality, but not bad at all, and it doesn't seem to make it too done for me.
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Old 07-15-2019, 01:56 PM
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Leftover steak can be thinly sliced and used in a steak salad, it’s great with some red onion, blue cheese crumbles and pieces of pear.
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Old 07-15-2019, 03:03 PM
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Another vote for sous vide
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Old 07-15-2019, 03:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I would trim off as much fat as possible and use the meat in a frittata.

Or steak nachos.

But, in reality, leftover ribeye is as rare in our house as leftover wine. We tend to finish what we started.
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Old 07-15-2019, 03:29 PM
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I've had good luck trimming off the fat, and simply microwaving it for a few seconds.
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Old 07-15-2019, 03:44 PM
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Thinly slice it while cold, grill in a hot cast iron pan with onions (and optionally, peppers and mushrooms), cover with provolone cheese and load onto a toasted, lightly-mayoed hoagie roll. A top notch homemade Philly cheesesteak.

EDIT: This is pretty much what I do with all leftover steak. So I don't have any other tried and true options to offer. Maybe a stir fry?

Last edited by DrCube; 07-15-2019 at 03:46 PM.
  #17  
Old 07-15-2019, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I would trim off as much fat as possible and use the meat in a frittata.
The external, easily trimmed fat isn't the problem so much as the intramuscular marbling.
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Old 07-15-2019, 06:31 PM
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Rib eye hash. Seriously.

Dice potatoes, onion and what ever you like. Cut fat off of steak for the grease. Heat up fat in pan and remove. Cook up potato mix, and add cubed left over steak to heat.

Wonderful stuff. I've done this using left over prime rib for guests the next morning.
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Old 07-15-2019, 08:36 PM
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Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
Another vote for sous vide
and another about 130 or less should do it. IME, 129=rare 132=medium rare 135=medium. If you don't have. A sous vide cooker, do it old school - heated water in an insulated cooler - like a small Igloo. It will hold pretty close to the target temp long enough to warm your steak.

Last edited by jasg; 07-15-2019 at 08:39 PM.
  #20  
Old 07-15-2019, 11:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
Thinly slice it while cold, grill in a hot cast iron pan with onions (and optionally, peppers and mushrooms), cover with provolone cheese and load onto a toasted, lightly-mayoed hoagie roll. A top notch homemade Philly cheesesteak.

EDIT: This is pretty much what I do with all leftover steak. So I don't have any other tried and true options to offer. Maybe a stir fry?
Yeah, make those peppers jalapenos(canned or fresh), and you have my preferred recipe.
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Old 07-16-2019, 05:41 AM
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Here’s how I reheat med-rare beef in any form. First, and importantly, warm the meat to room temperature. It’s extremely easy to over cook it with reheating, if you’re start from fridge chill! Second, slice the meat thin ish. Not cold cuts thin, but not thick slabs either!

Next prepare all the side dishes, while bringing almost to a boil, either thinned gravy (possibly leftover?), or Au Jus. Just before serving simply dunk the meet slices into the heated gravy/au jus, briefly and then immediately plate.

Personally I wait till I have everything else plated before I dunk the leftovers into the reheating sauce. This works remarkably well, the beef is delicious and not even a titch over cooked.

Try it for yourself and see.
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Old 07-16-2019, 06:22 AM
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It's even easier than Sous Vide, you don't need to get the meat up to its original cooking temperature, just warm enough that it's at serving temperature. Just get your hot tap water to as hot as it will go first, then fill up a pot with hot water and drop your steak in inside some sort of waterproof pouch. Leave it in there 5 - 10 minutes and it will be ready to eat.

Last edited by Shalmanese; 07-16-2019 at 06:22 AM.
  #23  
Old 07-16-2019, 07:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elbows View Post
Hereís how I reheat med-rare beef in any form. First, and importantly, warm the meat to room temperature. Itís extremely easy to over cook it with reheating, if youíre start from fridge chill! Second, slice the meat thin ish. Not cold cuts thin, but not thick slabs either!

Next prepare all the side dishes, while bringing almost to a boil, either thinned gravy (possibly leftover?), or Au Jus. Just before serving simply dunk the meet slices into the heated gravy/au jus, briefly and then immediately plate.

Personally I wait till I have everything else plated before I dunk the leftovers into the reheating sauce. This works remarkably well, the beef is delicious and not even a titch over cooked.

Try it for yourself and see.
That's what I was trying to say less eloquently above. When I was a cook in a restaurant, that is how we heated meat for use on our steak and cheese sandwiches and for our steak salads. The meat was the left over cuts of prime rib from dinner the night before. You're correct that the meat should be cut thin and heated just before its plated.
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