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  #51  
Old 07-14-2019, 06:24 PM
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The Wings of the Dove, by Henry James. Read this in college. Main characters are a couple who want to marry, but don't have enough money. They decide to have the man court and marry the woman's wealthy cousin, Milly, who is (conveniently for them) dying. To be fair, they don't hasten her death, at least not intentionally, but she thinks her husband truly loves her. She finds out differently.

I plowed through the novel, eagerly awaiting the scene where Milly finds out about the plot, and then the scene where she confronts them. They're both "offstage". The author never shows them happen. I was seriously annoyed.
  #52  
Old 07-14-2019, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by MacSpon View Post
I may be way off base here (not having read GoW), but is it possible that the Three Amigos were satirising this speech?
I always thought it was. I read GoW long before TTA's was made.
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Old 07-14-2019, 08:53 PM
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It's been decades since I read it, but (I think it was) From Russia With Love, there was a Russian agent with poisoned daggers in her shoes. She kicked Bond in the shin and he got dosed with a lethal poison, and the book ended with him lying on the floor of the train, dying...
  #54  
Old 07-15-2019, 02:39 AM
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Originally Posted by TroutMan View Post
Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy might be stretching the definition of "classic," but it's over 50 years old and his books are destined to be classics, so I'm going with it.

The entire novel is already WTF, with the main plot of a brother and sister in Appalachia who have a baby together. The brother abandons the baby in the woods after birth, telling his sister it died in childbirth, and the sister eventually learns the truth and goes in search of it.

After plenty of disturbing and WTF events, it ends with
SPOILER:
the baby being eaten alive by a trio of murderers, who are either real men, manifestations of biblical reapers, or a projection of the brother himself. This is followed by the brother talking to blind man, then watching the man walk into a swamp where he will surely die, and the brother thinking "someone should tell a blind man about a swamp before sending him that way."
A truly unsettling book - McCarthy starting to find his voice with it. Long time since I read it but I recollect the whole book really built tension toward the ending, there was a feeling that something truly horrible was going to happen - the man walking toward the swamp did feel like it had crossed over into the supernatural, which was effective for the book.

Heard a few people complain about the ending of The Road - written when McCarthy was famous so far higher readership, a counterpoint to Outer Dark. The ending appears very deus ex machina, a ray of hope appears out of nowhere to shine light on a hellscape of pain and torment. I think, though, that it is consistent with the subtext of the book where the child is holy or like an angel. But if you are just turning the pages of it then it would be like WTF just happened there?
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethilrist View Post
It's been decades since I read it, but (I think it was) From Russia With Love, there was a Russian agent with poisoned daggers in her shoes. She kicked Bond in the shin and he got dosed with a lethal poison, and the book ended with him lying on the floor of the train, dying...
It's a hotel in Paris, I believe, rather than the train, with French security there. And if I recall correctly, the next Bond begins with M having a conversation about Bond's recovery and how lucky it was that there happened to be a doctor who knew and recognized the symptoms of the exact poison used.

So it's a cliffhanger ending, but one that's resolved in the next book (if a bit quickly and lightly). I guess i don't see the WTF.
  #56  
Old 07-15-2019, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Evelyn Waugh’s A Handful of Dust certainly contains a WTF ending, but it’s not an annoying one. It’s the most gloriously horrifying ending in all 20th century literature.
Yes, I'd say it's more "holy fuck" than "what the fuck?".
  #57  
Old 07-15-2019, 02:06 PM
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Speaking of Cormac McCarthy...


Quote:
Originally Posted by TroutMan View Post
Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy might be stretching the definition of "classic," but it's over 50 years old and his books are destined to be classics, so I'm going with it.

The entire novel is already WTF, with the main plot of a brother and sister in Appalachia who have a baby together. The brother abandons the baby in the woods after birth, telling his sister it died in childbirth, and the sister eventually learns the truth and goes in search of it.

After plenty of disturbing and WTF events, it ends with
SPOILER:
the baby being eaten alive by a trio of murderers, who are either real men, manifestations of biblical reapers, or a projection of the brother himself. This is followed by the brother talking to blind man, then watching the man walk into a swamp where he will surely die, and the brother thinking "someone should tell a blind man about a swamp before sending him that way."
'Blood Meridian has its own 'WTF' ending as well.
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Old 07-17-2019, 08:46 PM
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It's been a good long while since I read GOW, but isn't the girl's name Rose of Sharon?
  #59  
Old 07-17-2019, 09:13 PM
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It's been a good long while since I read GOW, but isn't the girl's name Rose of Sharon?
Yes, but Rosasharn is how her name is pronounced in Okie, and is what the family called her.

Last edited by Colibri; 07-17-2019 at 09:14 PM.
  #60  
Old 07-18-2019, 01:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Sefton View Post
Bernard Malamud's novel, The Natural, has a lot in common with the movie. But in the end of the novel, Hobbs accepts a bribe and throws the last game.
Malamud apparently liked the movie, but said that it wasn't his novel: https://www.sbnation.com/2013/2/12/3...uthor-reaction

The novel's ending is really sad especially in comparison with the triumphant ending of the film.
Roy Hobbs sees a newsboy selling a paper with a headline saying that he might have thrown the game. The boy begs Hobbs to say it isn't true, but unfortunately, he can't:
"When Roy looked into the boy's eyes he wanted to say it wasn't but couldn't, and he lifted his hands to his face and wept many bitter tears."

Last edited by gkster; 07-18-2019 at 01:05 AM.
  #61  
Old 07-18-2019, 02:55 AM
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Originally Posted by gkster View Post
Malamud apparently liked the movie, but said that it wasn't his novel: https://www.sbnation.com/2013/2/12/3...uthor-reaction

The novel's ending is really sad especially in comparison with the triumphant ending of the film.
Roy Hobbs sees a newsboy selling a paper with a headline saying that he might have thrown the game. The boy begs Hobbs to say it isn't true, but unfortunately, he can't:
"When Roy looked into the boy's eyes he wanted to say it wasn't but couldn't, and he lifted his hands to his face and wept many bitter tears."
Hobbs in the book is also less likable and more insolent than in the movie.
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  #62  
Old 07-18-2019, 02:26 PM
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I liked the ending of Moby Dick


Ahab, who thinks he's invincible, learns that he is mortal and vulnerable. Then, he dies.

Re The Stand

It's been a while since I read it. I remember it as 'After sending good men on a mission, the Lord decides to kill them and everybody else in Vegas'
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  #63  
Old 07-19-2019, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Ethilrist View Post
It's been decades since I read it, but (I think it was) From Russia With Love, there was a Russian agent with poisoned daggers in her shoes. She kicked Bond in the shin and he got dosed with a lethal poison, and the book ended with him lying on the floor of the train, dying...
He got better...
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  #64  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:10 AM
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It's been a while since I read it. I remember it as 'After sending good men on a mission, the Lord decides to kill them and everybody else in Vegas'
I was living in Boulder, Colorado, when the book came out. I liked the fact that all the good people went to Boulder, and all the bad people went to Las Vegas.
  #65  
Old 07-19-2019, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by gkster View Post
Malamud apparently liked the movie, but said that it wasn't his novel: https://www.sbnation.com/2013/2/12/3...uthor-reaction

The novel's ending is really sad especially in comparison with the triumphant ending of the film.
Roy Hobbs sees a newsboy selling a paper with a headline saying that he might have thrown the game. The boy begs Hobbs to say it isn't true, but unfortunately, he can't:
"When Roy looked into the boy's eyes he wanted to say it wasn't but couldn't, and he lifted his hands to his face and wept many bitter tears."
"Say it isn't so, Joe..."
"I'm afraid it is, kid."

Art imitating Life.
(Or maybe Art imitating Art as there's some doubt the "original" quotation is any more genuine than the one in the novel.)
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