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  #151  
Old 04-15-2018, 09:44 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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And a story about another family whose son died, and the way the night unfolded:

A father goes to watch his son play for Humboldt. Then, a phone call – Scott Thomas says as soon as he saw the team's bus, he knew his son was dead

Quote:
Scott Thomas says he knew when he saw the wreckage of the bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos that his 18-year-old son Evan had died.

Thomas played hockey as a teen for the Moose Jaw Warriors and knows the pecking order on a hockey bus: rookies in the front, vets in the back.

Evan, who was a right winger, had only started playing for the Broncos this season.

"When we pulled up and saw the front of the bus was gone, my head knew, right there," he said in an interview.

...

It says something about the tight-knit hockey community in Saskatchewan that he caught a ride from Saskatoon to Nipawin with the family of Declan Hobbs, the starting goaltender for the Hawks. The two boys had played hockey together and their parents became friends.

The trip north was uneventful until they reached Melfort, about 70 kilometres southwest of Nipawin. Declan phoned his parents and was put on speakerphone, not knowing that Thomas was in the car.

"He said, 'Mom, Dad, you might as well turn around and go home, there's been a bad bus accident and the game's been cancelled. The Humboldt bus has been hit by a semi, and it's bad,'" he said.

"So we take off and as we're driving, one ambulance comes flying by, a second ambulance comes flying by, a third ambulance comes flying by. So we knew it was bad."

...

"You're at the church and most of the families are there. All the veterans' parents start getting phone calls, we got your boy, come to the hospital. You get a little deeper and at the end of the night it's mostly the rookies' parents there," he said.

"And then of course the police had the conversation with us."

The coroner met with the families on Saturday at the local funeral home, briefing them on what was known at that time.

"The coroner said 'Be prepared, some of your sons aren't going to look like what they used to look like,'" Thomas said.

He said they identified Evan by a small birthmark on his right cheek.

"I kissed him, kept telling him I loved him. That's probably all I said to him."
  #152  
Old 04-15-2018, 09:58 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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A story about the impact on the first responders. Remember, this isn't the big city where anonymity is common; these are volunteer firefighters and EMTs who live in the same small towns. And hockey tends to be be big among firefighters and police; they tend to have played hockey when they were young, and have their kids in hockey. Everyone knows everyone. And then you get called to a horrific accident where you know victims ...

For first responders, Humboldt Broncos crash was 'just too close to home'

Quote:
The scene of Friday’s Humboldt Broncos bus crash has been described as “chaos” and a “valley of death,” where moans of the injured pierced the air and young players everywhere were covered in blood.

But for the paramedics, firefighters and police officers arriving on the scene, it was a work site, requiring them to set emotions aside in an effort to save lives.

...

Jessica Brost, a paramedic from nearby Nipawin who was among the first on the scene, knew as soon as she got the call about the accident that it was the bus carrying the Broncos to their game in Nipawin that night.

It was “just too close to home, especially in Saskatchewan,” where everyone is either a billet, obsessed with hockey, or the parent of a teenage hockey player, she said in an interview.

...

John McPhaden, a Tisdale crane operator, was called to the crash scene Friday to help with the “poor young fellows” who had not survived. He used his crane to hoist the bus’s roof, torn off on impact with the tractor-trailer, so that the first responders could reach the four or five bodies buried beneath the debris.

On Monday, McPhaden said he didn’t feel changed by what had happened; he felt sorrow for the dead – and for the living, saddled with memories they may never be able to shake.

“The poor first responders, them guys — they were the ones getting the people out of there, they were the one who were making the decisions — and that’s the story you should be writing about,” he said.

Brost, the paramedic, is experiencing symptoms she never has before in her career. “There’s just times where you just start shedding tears, it’s kind of difficult to concentrate, (you) can’t hold a thought,” she said. “It’s remaining raw… I don’t see that healing anytime, or that open rawness closing up anytime soon.”
  #153  
Old 04-15-2018, 10:18 AM
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Here's a few stories from Christie Blatchford. By way of background, she's a hard-bitten, investigative reporter from Toronto, who writes for the National Post, one of the two major national papers. And yet, she's always had a soft spot for Saskatchewan for some reason, which shines through in these columns she's written.

The first one highlights how the billeting works, and shows why the team of kids from away becomes a team of local kids.

Christie Blatchford: In the midst of tragedy, Humboldt families stand together after devastating bus crash

Quote:
HUMBOLDT, Sask. — Like the fields that surround this place, where the sun catches the frost and shines up the brown heads of last season’s crops, the people of this little town, long and low in the way of Prairie towns, seem lit from within.

They are so full of love and kindness it is almost ridiculous.

From all corners of Saskatchewan and beyond, people were making their way to Humboldt on Sunday.

...

When Linsey gave up the farm he ran near Spalding with his dad and uncle — they were ready to retire and the farm was just too big for one man — he and Tracy decided to move to Humboldt, where she already worked for the local health centre.

As Tracy remembers it, when they broke the news to their four boys, the kids said, “We’ll move, but we’re getting a Bronco.”

...

Their littlest boy, Brock, was just a baby when they moved in. He’s five now, and as Tracy said, his whole life, there’s always been a Bronco in the house.

...

Devin and his wife Rene have two daughters, but they’ve had Broncos in the house for as long as anyone can remember. Two of their three charges – Logan Hunter and Adam Herold – were killed in the crash, and they headed to Saskatoon Sunday to be with the boys’ parents.

On their doorstep was a tray of home-baked cookies, flowers and a card: Everyone here looks after someone who looks after someone else.

...

Saskatchewan is unusual, if not unique, in that most of its junior teams (including Humboldt’s) are, like the Roughriders football team, community-owned; there is no single private owner. In these small towns — populations range from almost 6,000 to about 3,500 — the hockey team is everything, permeates every aspect of daily life.

...

The catastrophe has knocked the stuffing out of people here. Tracy and Linsey aren’t sure now if they’ll want to get a Bronco next year (the team’s season is over, and Matt was in his last year). It’s too soon to know, Tracy said.

But like their billet sons, they are resilient. And like Rene Cannon just next door, who told CBC Radio, “We aren’t built not to get attached.”

Attaching is what they do in Humboldt. They know grace here.
  #154  
Old 04-15-2018, 10:26 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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Christie Blatchford: Devastated Humboldt comes together to mourn the loss of what could have been

Quote:
Even a man of the cloth, Pastor Sean Brandow, was lost.

“This is the valley of death, this is the valley of darkness,” he remembered Sunday night, as he told an enormous crowd of the broken at a vigil at Elgar Peterson Arena what he saw at the scene of the terrible crash that has devastated this small Prairie town.

Brandow is the team pastor for the Humboldt Broncos, the junior hockey club which was essentially destroyed Friday evening when the team bus and a tractor-trailer collided at the intersection of two rural highways.

...

But Brandow’s children insisted they had to go, so they arrived in their car, not far behind the bus, at the terrible scene.

“It was a scene I never wanna see again,” Brandow said. “Sounds I never wanna hear again – groaning, panic, stress and pain and nothing but darkness…all I saw was fear, and I had nothing. I’m a pastor; I’m supposed to have something.”

He was one of the religious leaders who organized and spoke at the vigil, held at the Broncos’ home rink.

Despite a star-studded array of political and hockey visitors, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, only team officials, Humboldt Mayor Rob Muench and clergy spoke at the service. It was as low-key and unfussy a vigil as can be imagined in the modern world, with the best seats in the rink reserved for the town’s minor hockey league players. Yet all the right notes were hit.

...

Towards the end of the vigil, the shattered townspeople were invited to sing along with Araba Quaye, a beautiful local singer.

They tried mightily, and a few managed a line or two through swollen eyes.

But for most, it was an effort beyond them. A pastor may need only 15 hours to find his feet; the flock needs a little longer.
  #155  
Old 04-15-2018, 10:32 AM
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And her column on the misidentification: Christie Blatchford: Families at hospital and morgue with boys they thought were their sons

Quote:
HUMBOLDT, Sask. — It is such an exquisitely sweet detail, boyish and endearing and wrenching all at once.

In their Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League playoff fever, the Humboldt Broncos had not only dyed their hair bright blond, but also had painted their toenails in alternating team colors, yellow-green-yellow.

Xavier Labelle and Parker Tobin were both about six feet tall, and according to their online player profiles, weighed within five pounds of one another. They were both 18. And they both had the bright hair and painted toenails.

And yet this delightful silliness may have contributed to the dreadful mistake that emerged Monday, first in a Saskatchewan RCMP press release and later in a press briefing by a Saskatchewan Justice spokesman.

Two of the players in the catastrophic crash last Friday had been misidentified — the wrong names attached respectively to the wrong person and body.

...

On Sunday, Xavier’s big brother Isaac posted a picture of the two of them on Instagram, saying they were “best friends, teammates, allies, brothers… I love you so much and I’m sorry.”

Monday, Isaac posted again for the first time since his brother’s announced “death,” saying, “All I can say is miracles do exist. My deepest condolences to the Tobin family.”

...

Monday, [Rene Cannon, billet mom] tweeted a picture of Xavier, and said, “We know that our ray of light is someone else’s shattering darkness. Our hearts are still broken at the loss of two of our boys and for the other family and billet family involved. We are grateful for the gift of being able to say all the words we thought we’d never say.”

The Tobin parents, originally from Newfoundland but now living in Alberta, would have gone through the same terrible whipsaw, but in reverse.

...

Unmentioned by either Justice or hospital officials is the fact, as the National Post has learned, that so great was the trauma inflicted to those who died and those who were most gravely injured that they were effectively rendered unrecognizable.

It was hard to imagine how things could get worse for this poor team and town, but they have.
  #156  
Old 04-15-2018, 10:45 AM
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An article about the subdued visit by the Prime Minister:

Why Justin Trudeau was a quiet face in the crowd in Humboldt – Politician visits to the site of a tragedy require a sensitive touch, showing leadership and compassion without making themselves the centre of attention
  #157  
Old 04-15-2018, 10:50 AM
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A photo gallery from one of the billet homes, with three players. Only one, Xavier Labelle, survived.

‘If it’s in the pantry, it’s free game’: Photos from a billet home in Humboldt – A billet mom’s photos offer a look at the home life of three Humboldt Broncos players
  #158  
Old 04-16-2018, 12:04 AM
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Given how Saskatchewan people feel about Trudeaus, he needed to tread very carefully.
  #159  
Old 04-19-2018, 11:30 AM
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The GoFundMe campaign ended up at $15,185,400, the second-highest total ever.
  #160  
Old 04-20-2018, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by borschevsky View Post
The GoFundMe campaign ended up at $15,185,400, the second-highest total ever.
That's absolutely amazing, considering that the initial goal was something like $200,000. It just kept increasing.

Here's a minor update on the investigation. Not much news yet except that it will still take a while to complete, and police are not releasing any interim information. One piece of news is that the truck driver was new on the job, and had only been driving for the company for two weeks. The article also contains the most informative annotated aerial picture of the site that I have yet seen.

It was speculated earlier in this thread that the truck probably ran the stop sign, and its momentum is what carried all the wreckage into the northwest corner of the intersection. That was my theory, too, but this may not be so clear if the truck driver has not yet been charged, and police are not saying what he told them. I'm wondering if the truck may have stopped at the sign, then proceeded because the stand of trees obscured the driver's view of the bus. Perhaps the bus, swerving or even out of control, hit the slow-moving truck west of the intersection, which would have knocked everything into the northwest corner just as we see.
  #161  
Old 04-20-2018, 05:49 PM
Gorsnak Gorsnak is offline
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If you're at the stop sign, the trees do not impinge on your visibility to the south at all. Cite: saw a video taken by a guy driving a rig down that road posted on Facebook. Also, you can see perfectly well in that aerial photo that you're well past the line of trees when you are at the stop sign. I can't fathom how the wreckage ends up where it is if the truck isn't moving a lot faster than it would be if it was pulling out from a complete stop. However, I will defer to the actual investigators when they release their findings.
  #162  
Old 04-20-2018, 06:46 PM
ssgenius ssgenius is offline
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Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
That's absolutely amazing, considering that the initial goal was something like $200,000. It just kept increasing.

Here's a minor update on the investigation. Not much news yet except that it will still take a while to complete, and police are not releasing any interim information. One piece of news is that the truck driver was new on the job, and had only been driving for the company for two weeks. The article also contains the most informative annotated aerial picture of the site that I have yet seen.

It was speculated earlier in this thread that the truck probably ran the stop sign, and its momentum is what carried all the wreckage into the northwest corner of the intersection. That was my theory, too, but this may not be so clear if the truck driver has not yet been charged, and police are not saying what he told them. I'm wondering if the truck may have stopped at the sign, then proceeded because the stand of trees obscured the driver's view of the bus. Perhaps the bus, swerving or even out of control, hit the slow-moving truck west of the intersection, which would have knocked everything into the northwest corner just as we see.
This same article says that the RCMP have got a similar bus and B-train truck and are going to use them to reconstruction the accident.

Then the article says (except for the collision aspect).

I know its dangerous and a bit morbid but the 10 year old part of me would like to see that the carnage of such a reconstructed accident. (Even using stunt drivers, it would be a dangerous feat)

To a certain extent, this was the immovable object against the irresistible force.

The closest incident I can think in the movies is the old TV movie Duel.

Part of this (and the Southwest incident) is that in both cases, everything was going relatively normal and in the matter of a few seconds, it went really bad without warning. This is the sort of terrifying part of it, is that there was no malicious intent in either case.

The good and bad of this is that in both cases is there will be problems identified and in some cases some over restrictive legislation. I have seen this before in that sometimes there can be an over reaction.

Case in point was the having the airline passengers passengers stay in seats for the last 30 minutes of flights after 9/11.
  #163  
Old 04-20-2018, 07:02 PM
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One other point I sort of find fascinating is that the 24 year old female trainer was travelling with a bunch of athletic 16 - 20 year olds who to put it mildly would be quite interested in girls at that age.

Interestingly enough, the initial impression that I would have would be that this girl travelling with a bunch of teenage boys could be the subject of their affections and could be in danger that way.

In reality, more often than not, the team treats her as more of a sister than a potential conquest and she is actually quite safe with all those teenage guys around her. (Not to mention the coaches)

The picture of her in the team photo just looks hilarious. She just looks so tiny compared with the roughly 6 ft tall players (Mind you, they have their skates on).

Not to mention that she is the one who the players come to to help improve their skills and to get patched up after the bumps and bruises.
  #164  
Old 04-21-2018, 08:55 AM
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Here's a CTV article, with the complete video of the press conference from the Assistant Commissioner, F Division: Semi in intersection at time of Humboldt Broncos bus crash: RCMP.

He mentions that the tracking computers from both vehicles have been taken to California for analysis. The results of those "black boxes" should provide considerable assistance in understanding exactly what happened.

One of the surviving players has given an interview of what he remembers: Humboldt crash survivor heard a scream, saw the truck and everything went black:

Quote:
He heard the bus driver scream, saw the truck and then everything went black.

That’s what Ryan Straschnitzki, who plays defence for the Humboldt Broncos, remembers of the tragic bus crash that killed 15 people in a small Saskatchewan town.

“I just remember sitting there on my phone and all of a sudden our bus driver screamed ‘woah!’ and a semi-truck pulled up in front of us,” he told KiSS 92.5’s Roz and Mocha from his hospital bed in Saskatoon.

“After that I just blacked out and a couple minutes later I woke up. (I) ended up outside the bus, staring directly at the bus. Saw a couple teammates lying in front of me … It was a terrible experience.”
  #165  
Old 04-23-2018, 08:08 PM
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and a bit of good news: the last two Broncos who were in critical condition have been upgraded to "serious", meaning that the hospital staff no longer think their injuries are life-threatening.

They probably still have a long way to go, but still, good!

Six still in hospital.

https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/mobile/...-sha-1.3898157
  #166  
Old 05-05-2018, 08:59 AM
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Interview with the pregnant driver who witnessed the crash: 'I want to be able to hug the families and say sorry': Key witness recounts Humboldt Broncos bus crash

She explains that she was in her car with her two young sons, driving eastbound and was stopped at the intersection (which would be facing towards the west-bound semi). She saw the Broncos bus coming northbound, at normal highway speed. Then:

Quote:
In the shoulder lane of Highway 335 in Saskatchewan, Kelsey Fiddler's hands trembled on the steering wheel of her red Buick Century. Behind her in the snowy ditch, a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos lay on its side in the snow next to an overturned semi-trailer.

Fiddler, 34, said she had to swing her vehicle away in time to avoid being sandwiched by the crash between a Charlie's Charters bus en route to a game in Nipawin, Sask., and a semi-trailer about 30 kilometres north of Tisdale, Sask. on April 6.

...

After the impact, she said a bystander pulled a long steel beam from underneath her vehicle.
She and her family are very lucky...

Quote:
She said she was interviewed by a police officer, who noticed her heavy breathing.

Fiddler had started having contractions every 15 to 20 minutes.

The officer asked paramedics to check on her, she said.

They rushed toward her with a stretcher, took her pulse and were concerned she was going into premature labour.

Even so, she refused to take up space on an ambulance meant for the victims.

"I said 'No, I don't think I will accept that,'" Fiddler said.

"I can take myself to the hospital. Just go help those people there. They need you more than I do."

Fiddler drove herself and her sons 20 minutes north to the Nipawin hospital.
Later on, the Nipawin hospital sent her to Saskatoon, and the ambulance picked up one of the injured Broncos:

Quote:
"I started to wonder who this person was because he had blond hair," she said.

"I remember the guy said that he must've got hurt from playing hockey and he was complaining about sore shoulders. That's when I started to pray for him and cry for him, knowing that he didn't know what was going on."
The story indicates that she is one of the main witnesses whom the Mounties have interviewed.
  #167  
Old 05-09-2018, 09:11 AM
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A story about Kaleb Dahlgren: seriously injured but gradually recovering:

Injured Humboldt Broncos player can’t recall bus crash

Quote:
Humboldt Bronco forward Kaleb Dahlgren remembers putting on his suit during the bus ride to a playoff game, returning to his seat and asking his friend and teammate, Nick Shumlanski, to point out his family’s house along the highway.

Other teammates joked that they weren’t interested.

"Nobody cares," chirped goalie Parker Tobin, prompting the whole bus to burst out laughing.

Dahlgren retorted that he cared and everyone roared with laughter again.

"After that, I tossed on my headphones because I wanted to get into the zone," he told The Canadian Press. "I put on my headphones and that’s the last thing I can remember.

"Four days later, I wake up in the hospital."

...

"I remember waking up and looking at my parents and saying, ‘Am I dreaming?"’

No, responded Mark and Anita Dahlgren.

"Did we win our game?" asked Kaleb, who suffered a fractured skull, a puncture wound in his head, a brain injury, two broken vertebrae in his neck and four others in his back.

...

Dahlgren also has a long recovery ahead: six to eight weeks for the vertebrae to heal, three to six months for the brain injury, and another year or two before his brain fully recovers.

He said that before he was released from hospital, he had a visit from a first responder who treated him at the crash site.

"He said I was helping everybody," said Dahlgren. "When he showed up on the scene, I was trying to make sure people were OK. I was going person to person just to see how they are doing.

"I have no recollection of that at all."

Soon afterward, he was put on a stretcher and sent to hospital.
  #168  
Old 05-09-2018, 09:14 AM
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And a story about Xavier Labelle, the one who was misidentified as having died in the wreck, with a cheerful looking photo as he does rehab:

Labelle family 'forever grateful' for support following Humboldt Broncos bus crash

Quote:
The family of an 18-year-old who survived last month’s Humboldt Broncos bus crash is “learning to navigate new horizons” with each day following the tragedy.

Xavier Labelle, an 18-year-old from Saskatoon, continues to heal from multiple injuries and undergo physiotherapy at City Hospital’s rehab centre following the April 6 crash.

“We are forever grateful for the love, prayers, and support shown towards our family, and our Bronco family, by the many people in our community and around the world that have been touched by this tragedy. We have been deeply moved by your generosity and kindness,” the Labelle family — father Paul, mother Tanya, son Isaac, daughter Viviana and Xavier — wrote Monday in a statement.
  #169  
Old 05-09-2018, 09:20 AM
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And discussion is starting about how to divide the GoFundMe money:

Humboldt Broncos donation fund should be split evenly, family of injured player says

Quote:
At least one family whose son was injured in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash says the millions raised by a GoFundMe campaign should be split evenly among the survivors and the families of those killed.

...

“I just say divide it, but that’s just me,” said Tom Straschnitzki, whose son Ryan was paralyzed from the chest down. “That’s my opinion.”
But a US lawyer has weighed in and said most of it should go to the families of the deceased, and the rest divvied up according to the severity of the injuries.

Quote:
A U.S.-based lawyer said he has suggested the team appoint an administrator and community advisory committee.

“The first step should be for the administrator to draft a protocol that details the eligibility criteria and the methodology for calculating individual awards,” said Ken Feinberg, who has dealt with similar funds for victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and the Boston Marathon bombing.

...

Once they received input, the administrator and committee could decide how much would go to each victim without involving the courts, he said.

In the U.S., Feinberg said it is the law that 75 per cent of any money is split equally among families of those who have died. The rest goes to the injured.

He said those who are the most seriously hurt, particularly if they are in a coma or are paralyzed, receive more.
Nice of him to weigh in and instruct the rubes in Saskatchewan on how our legal system should operate.
  #170  
Old 05-09-2018, 09:30 AM
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I thought the same when I read his opinion. I think the fine people of Humboldt can find their own solution. They have not made a misstep, in handling the tragedy nor the intense media attention that follows such an event.
  #171  
Old 05-11-2018, 08:45 PM
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Yin and Yang, Life and Death

Here's a couple of stories about one of the survivors, Kaleb Dahlgreb. He's the one who had a skull fracture and a brain injury, as well as fractured vertebrae. The family doctor who was telling his parents about the brain scans was crying, saying it was really bad. He actually had "5C" embedded in his skin, from where his head collided with a seat number.

And yet, he's now up and about, in physio rehab and back home with his parents. His brain seems to be healing. He's been back in contact with the support group he founded for kids with diabetes, like him. He wants to be on the skates by this summer.

And, he's been accepted by York University in Toronto on a hockey scholarship, starting in the fall.

The long road home: Humboldt Broncos' Kaleb Dahlgren alive, and thankful

Humboldt Broncos’ Kaleb Dahlgren joining York University hockey team

And then an interview with the family of Adam Herold, who died in the crash:

Herolds open their doors and their hearts

Quote:
A four-hour visit to Herold Farms begins with a handshake and ends with a hug.

The moment that you meet Russ Herold and his wife of 26 years, Raelene, these high school sweethearts feel like lifelong friends. Their lives, torn apart by the Humboldt Broncos’ bus crash, are an open book.

Oftentimes, they marvel at how complete strangers — from all over North America, and even the world — have reached out with remarkable acts of kindness. Yet, the Herolds are the same way, welcoming a reporter and photographer to their 3,600-acre farm, and opening their hearts.

There was only one proviso when the interview was scheduled. Russ asked if we could chat in the cab of his John Deere tractor. It is seeding season, after all.

To someone utterly unacquainted with life on the farm, the stairs to the cab of a 37,000-pound behemoth look like Mount Everest. The tires are taller than anyone who drives the tractor.

After eventually, clumsily, ascending to the cab and occupying a perch to the left of Russ, he says: “That’s where Adam sat.”

...


Neighbours have pitched in to help with day-to-day matters, and to assist on the farm when needed. People are still bringing food or lending an ear.

“It’s overwhelming that so many people will stop what they’re doing and do things for Adam,” Raelene says.

At times, each day can seem overwhelming. The family is at the stage in which it is dealing with all the firsts, one by one — Adam’s birthday … the first seeding season without him … Mother’s Day on Sunday … an eventual visit to the family’s cottage near Katepwa Lake … hockey season …

The Herolds will spend Mother’s Day at the Montmartre home of Raelene’s parents, Lawrence and Carol Englot.

Then everyone will move on to the next day, and the next one, and the one that follows. Small steps. Lots of hugs. And so many memories to share, cherished recollections that provide comfort.

“As a parent, you always think that your kid is a good kid,” Raelene says, “but Adam really was a good kid.”

After meeting the Herolds, it is easy to understand why.
  #172  
Old 05-11-2018, 09:25 PM
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Thank you, so much for sharing that, I’ve got tears in my eyes. What a long road he has ahead of him, but what great news! One day at a time.
  #173  
Old 05-11-2018, 10:06 PM
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Indeed, thank you for all these posts, very appreciative.
  #174  
Old 05-11-2018, 10:13 PM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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An injured player attending the funerals, that's going to be traumatic for him.
I can't find the article now, but at the time of the funerals, one of the players in hospital said that the hardest thing was not being able to go to the funerals and say good-bye.
  #175  
Old 07-06-2018, 07:49 PM
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Update: After a lengthy investigation, earlier speculation here about what likely happened seems to have been confirmed. The truck driver has been charged with 16 counts of dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing death and 13 counts of dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing bodily injury. None of the specific evidence has been made public, but it suggests that the truck just blew through the stop sign.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskat...info-1.4736826
  #176  
Old 07-06-2018, 08:16 PM
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Update: After a lengthy investigation, earlier speculation here about what likely happened seems to have been confirmed. The truck driver has been charged with 16 counts of dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing death and 13 counts of dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing bodily injury. None of the specific evidence has been made public, but it suggests that the truck just blew through the stop sign.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskat...info-1.4736826
I was just thinking about this again the other day, wondering about the survivors and if there was any explanation. Thanks for the update.
  #177  
Old 07-07-2018, 01:23 AM
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It's a shitty situation for everyone. There was no malice.

He blew a stop sign. How bad do you think he feels?

I am sad for everyone.
  #178  
Old 09-14-2018, 06:54 PM
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The Season Starts...

'It's quite amazing': Hockey night in Humboldt a country-wide affair

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HUMBOLDT — On a chilly, overcast day in Humboldt, 160 nights after bus and semi collided at a rural Saskatchewan intersection, two groups of boys pulled on their jerseys and played hockey.

Before this wee miracle of a game, Humboldt Broncos players passed through a dressing room door with a sign above the frame — a message from Darcy Haugan to his team.

“It’s a great day to be a Bronco, gentlemen,” reads the sign, green with white letters. From that little message came a walk to the ice surface, a sold-out arena, a national television audience, a hockey game.

Haugan, the Broncos’ head coach and general manager, used that phrase almost daily before he died in the April 6 crash that killed 16 people on the Broncos’ bus.

A little more than five months later, the Broncos — rebuilt the best they could, in the tight time frame they were given — played their season opener against the Nipawin Hawks, losing 2-1 in a tightly-played scrap. The night closed with a powerful post-game ceremony, filled with tears and memories.
Quote:
But Nipawin is the best of all possible opponents, Broncos’ forward Brayden Camrud — a crash survivor — said prior to the contest. The Hawks were Humboldt’s playoff foe when the collision happened near Nipawin, and that place became a hasty gathering point through a horrible night.

“They did a fantastic job of honouring us, wearing our helmets, having a small tribute for us (in the wake of the crash),” Camrud said. “They showed up at the hospital that night in Nipawin, too, and a lot of guys took it upon themselves to go out of the way to do small things. Playing specifically against Nipawin is going to be special.”

Two players on that April 6 bus suited up for the Broncos Wednesday night. Brayden Camrud and Derek Patter dressed across from each other. Each occupied the centre stall on his own side of the room, flanked by five per side.

A new coach, Nathan Oystrick, walked on the floor between those two walls. New players populated the room.

As puck-drop neared, players skated to the spotlight one by one. They saved Camrud and Patter for last. Fans rose to their feet. Patter put his right arm around Camrud’s shoulder, and Camrud his left arm around Patter.

Eight more of last year’s survivors congregated on the ice.

From there, Patter and Camrud went to centre ice for the ceremonial faceoff. Tyler Smith, who emerged from that crash, dropped the puck, flanked by the whole crew. They all enjoyed one more moment on the ice — one last moment on the ice — as the arena got louder, louder, louder.

Then a moment of silence for the 16 who didn’t make it, broken by quiet sniffles, up, down, left, right, everywhere. At the back of the arena, a woman stood by, tissue packages in hand for bystanders to take as needed — a nice little Humboldt touch in a city accustomed to tears.
  #179  
Old 09-14-2018, 07:02 PM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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The President of the Broncos, Kevin Garinger, who was such a rock through it all, announced last month that he was stepping down as President, but will stay on the board.

Humboldt Broncos president Kevin Garinger steps down: ‘I have to take some time’

Quote:
Kevin Garinger, the man who shepherded the Humboldt Broncos and much of the hockey world through the darkest period in the history of Canadian sports, stepped down after one year as president of the Saskatchewan Jr. League team at its annual meeting on Tuesday night. When Garinger, who is also the director of education for the local public school board, assumed the volunteer position a year ago, he did so on the proviso that he would do it for just one year. But he could not have imagined that year would be the most difficult of his life.

When the Humboldt Broncos step on the ice for the first day of training camp on Friday, almost five months after the bus crash that killed 11 players and five members of the team’s support staff, they will do so without Garinger holding down an official role. It’s likely he would have given up his presidency anyway, but the emotional energy and the toll it has taken on him made the decision an easy one.

“I have to take some time for myself,” Garinger said. “That may sound selfish, but it’s something that is a necessity for me.”

If it is indeed selfish – and it isn’t – Garinger has earned the right to think about himself for the first time in months. He was the face of the franchise in the days after the crash, facing the crush of international media attention, tending to the players who had survived the tragedy and making arrangements on the fly. The record donations that poured in from the GoFundMe effort after the crash had to be managed. Garinger attended all but a couple of the 16 funerals and those he didn’t were only because they conflicted with other Bronco funerals. He did it all while mourning the loss of all of the people with whom he had a working relationship and while dealing with the death of Lukan, who had come to live with Garinger and his wife when he joined the Broncos last season.
  #180  
Old 01-27-2019, 09:45 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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There was a significant development in this case earlier this month. The driver of the semi pled guilty to all counts: 16 counts of dangerous driving causing death and 13 counts of dangerous driving causing bodily harm. Sentencing will be later this week.

Truck driver in fatal Humboldt Broncos crash pleads guilty

Quote:
During Tuesday’s hearing, Mr. Sidhu stood before the judge and said, "I plead guilty, your honour.”

Outside the court, his lawyer said Mr. Sidhu wanted to avoid delaying the case further.

Mr. Sidhu advised me: 'I don’t want to make things any worse. I can’t make things any better, but I certainly don’t want to make them worse by having a trial,' ” Mark Brayford said.

“He wanted the families to know that he’s devastated by the grief that he’s caused them and he’s overwhelmed by the expressions of sympathy and kindness that some of the families and players have expressed to him, in spite of the fact their grief is entirely his fault.”

...

Scott Thomas, whose 18-year-old son, Evan, died in the crash, said the guilty plea confirmed what he had always believed.

“It was my opinion right from the first moment of the accident that he blew through that stop sign,” Mr. Thomas said in an interview. “It was definitely a sense of relief. It just confirmed everything that I knew in my mind – that he was responsible for it.”

Mr. Thomas said Mr. Sidhu’s sentence is less important than the fact that he pleaded guilty.

“Whatever that number is, I think the most important thing is that he stood up and admitted responsibility for what he did.”
  #181  
Old 01-27-2019, 10:05 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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And a couple of columns from Christie Blatchford, outlining the results of an engineering survey of the intersection, and some of the legal principles that the driver could potentially have relied upon:

Trucker in Humboldt crash had a defence, but he chose to do the right thing

Stark acceptance of responsibility by Humboldt crash trucker is something rarely seen now
  #182  
Old 01-27-2019, 01:07 PM
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Leaffan Leaffan is offline
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It's hard to read that without tearing up.

Your second link doesn't appear to go anywhere.
  #183  
Old 01-27-2019, 01:11 PM
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Northern Piper: your second URL is bad.

Does Canada have mandatory minimums or sentencing guidelines restricting the sentence which can be imposed?
  #184  
Old 01-27-2019, 01:27 PM
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I don't want this to come across wrong, but I have this curious mix of gratitude and pride towards Mr. Sidhu for his guilty plea. Thank you, Mr. Sidhu, for accepting responsibility for your actions.
  #185  
Old 01-27-2019, 02:59 PM
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I don't want this to come across wrong, but I have this curious mix of gratitude and pride towards Mr. Sidhu for his guilty plea. Thank you, Mr. Sidhu, for accepting responsibility for your actions.
Agreed. As the article states he could have fought this for a number of reasons. He did the honourable thing and saved the families the grief of a drawn-out trial.
  #186  
Old 01-27-2019, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
I don't want this to come across wrong, but I have this curious mix of gratitude and pride towards Mr. Sidhu for his guilty plea. Thank you, Mr. Sidhu, for accepting responsibility for your actions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Agreed. As the article states he could have fought this for a number of reasons. He did the honourable thing and saved the families the grief of a drawn-out trial.


Compassion; I left out compassion: I feel compassion for Mr. Sidhu now.
  #187  
Old 01-27-2019, 03:29 PM
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I don't want this to come across wrong, but I have this curious mix of gratitude and pride towards Mr. Sidhu for his guilty plea. Thank you, Mr. Sidhu, for accepting responsibility for your actions.
Accepting responsibility in this way will definitely be a mitigating factor in sentencing.
  #188  
Old 01-27-2019, 04:00 PM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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Sorry for the bad link:

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/chr...arely-seen-now
  #189  
Old 01-27-2019, 04:06 PM
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Compassion; I left out compassion: I feel compassion for Mr. Sidhu now.
Yeah, me too. He didn't purposely do this. It's gotta hurt like hell for him.
I know he's guilty, but...
  #190  
Old 01-27-2019, 05:34 PM
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Does Canada have mandatory minimums or sentencing guidelines restricting the sentence which can be imposed?

The offence is "Dangerous operation of a motor vehicle", Criminal Code, s. 249.

https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/...ction-249.html

There are no minimum sentences. For dangerous driving causing bodily harm, the maximum is up to 10 years.

For dangerous driving causing death, the maximum is 14 years.

We don't have sentencing guidelines in the same way as in the US. Instead, sentences can be appealed by either Crown or defence, and the appellate courts in each province have a supervisory jurisdiction to ensure that the same sentencing principles are applied, within a range of acceptable sentences.
  #191  
Old 01-27-2019, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by PastTense View Post
Northern Piper: your second URL is bad.

Does Canada have mandatory minimums or sentencing guidelines restricting the sentence which can be imposed?
A somewhat similar case (albeit with fewer casualties, though I don't think that's legally relevant) a few years back resulted in concurrent 3-year sentences. A semi piled into the back of a line of vehicles stopped in a construction zone, killing 3 people. The driver pled guilty to 3 counts of dangerous driving causing death, saying that he had zoned out and didn't see the construction signs. I think it's plausible to expect a similar sentence in this case.
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