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Old 06-12-2019, 04:25 PM
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WHy do old people....


Does anyone have any theories on why elderly people do certain things? Its got me wondering why 1. Why do the elderly go to bed so early and 2. Why do they drive so slow.
Anyone?
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Old 06-12-2019, 04:37 PM
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1. I go to bed early because I get sleepy. I did this when I was younger, too, so no help there. My elderly neighbor stays up all night and sleeps until noon. I dated a guy years ago when I was young and he was old (in his 60s), and he also stayed up all night. So maybe your question is a generalization that doesn't apply all that much.

2. I don't drive slowly. I usually go the speed limit if there are people around. On the open highway, if there's no one around, I will definitely exceed the speed limit. I must be good, because I've only gotten two speeding tickets in my life, hehe.
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Old 06-12-2019, 05:09 PM
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As far as driving slowly, perhaps they feel less-confident due to aging reflexes, senses, reaction times, etc. Slower driving would be a natural result of this.
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Old 06-12-2019, 05:12 PM
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I dunno, why do younger people stay up so late? Maybe because they like to party, they have a lot of things to do, they have a lot of energy, and/or they have small kids, so late at night when the kids are asleep is precious adult time. All of those explanations are less likely to be true as one ages. Though I agree with Thelma Lou, I'm not sure how valid the generalization is.

Likewise, why do young people drive fast? Maybe because they are reckless and/or in a hurry. Those explanations are less likely to be valid for older folks. Anyway, if someone is to the point where their vision and reflexes are noticeably compromised, they may drive slowly to compensate.

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Old 06-12-2019, 05:22 PM
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Back when my dad was teaching me how to drive, in the 70's, he said "Always watch out for guys who drive with their hat on. They all learned to drive in the 30's and 40's, and if they're on the freeway at 45 miles per hour, they feel like they're burning up the road."

He also taught me how to parallel park in a van: Drive past the parking space until you're clear past it, and then keep going until you find a diagonal parking space.
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Old 06-12-2019, 05:36 PM
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Back when my dad was teaching me how to drive, in the 70's, he said "Always watch out for guys who drive with their hat on."
My grandfather did this, and he was a notorious speed demon who (according to family legend) was once clocked doing 90 mph on the East Side Drive in Manhattan.
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Old 06-12-2019, 05:51 PM
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The answer to every "Why do old people...?" question is "Because they're old."
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Old 06-12-2019, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
My elderly neighbor stays up all night and sleeps until noon. I dated a guy years ago when I was young and he was old (in his 60s), and he also stayed up all night.
My grandmother stayed up until midnight when she was still alive. She worked as a nurse's aide at a hospital before she retired, so she was used to the late night schedule and just continued it after retirement.
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Old 06-12-2019, 06:03 PM
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Back when my dad was teaching me how to drive, in the 70's, he said "Always watch out for guys who drive with their hat on. They all learned to drive in the 30's and 40's, and if they're on the freeway at 45 miles per hour, they feel like they're burning up the road."
Funny that you say that. I bought a convertible sports car (a Miata) a few months back (a slightly early midlife crisis, perhaps), and I find that having the top down encourages me to drive slower on the freeway. Having the wind blowing through your hair at 55 on the back roads is fun. Having a 70 mile per hour wind blowing through your hair starts to become kind of unpleasant.

Last edited by WildaBeast; 06-12-2019 at 06:06 PM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 06:07 PM
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I probably qualify as "old" by the standards of some of you young whippersnappers here, and I don't do any of those things. I do tend to have less stamina and hence get tired more easily than when I was younger, but I've always been a night person so my "old age" thing is to sleep late and continue staying up until all hours.

As for driving, I've always believed that most speed limits are absurdly low and I simply drive for the conditions -- conditions meaning both weather and other safety factors. I'll cheerfully do 80 km/h in a 50 zone under normal conditions, or 120+ on freeways, but slow right down on a wet rainy night or certainly in snowy winter weather. And I won't exceed 40 km/h, the posted limit, going through a school zone on a school day. In short, long experience has taught me to be a competent fast driver but also a conservative one in responding to conditions. Never had an accident in more than 40 years of driving (probably longer -- I've lost track).

As for the warning about drivers wearing a hat, this is very true -- and they are usually driving a Buick and doing 10 or 20 under the limit and hunched over the wheel like they were desperately scanning the road for a lost contact lens -- or, frighteningly, perhaps just trying to see the road -- but the hat these geezers are wearing is usually a fedora. It does not apply to drivers like me who will frequently wear a baseball cap. One of these days, if I'm really feeling ornery, I'm going to put it on backwards!
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Old 06-12-2019, 06:17 PM
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I was stuck behind the triple threat earlier today, a guy with a hat driving a Prius with a Florida license plate.
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Old 06-12-2019, 06:24 PM
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I'm 65. I usually head back to the bedroom around 8:30. But I get up at 5 for work, so there ya go. And even on my days off, I tend to wake before 6, so by 9 in the evening, I'm tired. I've been a morning person all my life.

As for driving, I make sure I do the limit in certain areas because the Sheriff and the state police lie in wait. Feel free to pass me. And if it's dark and rainy, I'll be taking my time - light reflecting off the wet road obscures the lane marks and I'd rather go slower than risk a head-on or a side-swipe. Yes, I stay to the right when it's an option. If it's a single lane road, I'm sorry, but I'm not going to speed up because you're in a hurry.

I can't count the number of times someone whipped around me, sometimes on the shoulder, only to be sitting at the next light when I get there.
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:03 PM
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I'm pushing 70 and I never go to sleep before 2:00 am, and I still drive faster than I should.
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:41 PM
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One "why do old people" question I have is, why do old people drive gigantic cars?
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:45 PM
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I'm 72, stay up to 2:00 AM to watch movies or work on the computer. Ex race car driver and I drive as fast as I need to. I own the on-ramp a few houses away from my home. Don't try to follow me when I'm feeling frisky. Out the drive way, nail it, no brakes, hard right - damn!

Dennis
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:03 PM
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I was stuck behind the triple threat earlier today, a guy with a hat driving a Prius with a Florida license plate.
I firmly maintain that Buicks are far worse. Old guy with hat + Prius is at least aware that he's in the 21st century, even if he's not the speediest thing on the road. Old guy with hat + Buick thinks it's still 1940. He'll pull up at a self-serve and angrily honk his horn demanding that someone come out and "fill 'er up with ethyl".
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:28 PM
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I have yet to see something that old people do that other non-old people don't also do.

Drive slow? check
Go to bed early? check
Wake up early? check
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:30 PM
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I have yet to see something that old people do that other non-old people don't also do.

Drive slow? check
Go to bed early? check
Wake up early? check
Have you ever seen a younger person driving a Buick Roadmaster? I haven't.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:32 PM
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I firmly maintain that Buicks are far worse. Old guy with hat + Prius is at least aware that he's in the 21st century, even if he's not the speediest thing on the road. Old guy with hat + Buick thinks it's still 1940. He'll pull up at a self-serve and angrily honk his horn demanding that someone come out and "fill 'er up with ethyl".
Or, worse, he'll angrily honk his horn and demand that Ethel come out!
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:39 PM
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Ethel doesn't pump gas, but Fred and Ricky will be out in a minute.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:54 PM
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Have you ever seen a younger person driving a Buick Roadmaster? I haven't.
I haven't either. But I haven't seen an old person driving one either. So my statement holds true.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:59 PM
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Have you ever seen a younger person driving a Buick Roadmaster? I haven't.
I don't know about Roadmasters, but I have seen college students driving Buicks. However, the Buick is usually very old, and has (a) a lot of rust and peeling paint, (b) at least one broken taillight patched with red tape, and (c) stickers on the back with the names and/or logos of various rock bands.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:03 PM
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I don't know about Roadmasters, but I have seen college students driving Buicks. However, the Buick is usually very old, and has (a) a lot of rust and peeling paint, (b) at least one broken taillight patched with red tape, and (c) stickers on the back with the names and/or logos of various rock bands.
Yeah i drove my Dad's old Lesabre when i was a teenager. The reason i asked about Roadmasters is because those fuckers are boats. Freaking huge.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:07 PM
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Does anyone have any theories on why elderly people do certain things? Its got me wondering why 1. Why do the elderly go to bed so early and 2. Why do they drive so slow.
Anyone?
This kind of shit again? Here's a question: why do people feel that it's okay to stereotype older people, but get their panties in a twist over generalities made about other groups of people?
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:16 PM
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I don't know about Roadmasters, but I have seen college students driving Buicks. However, the Buick is usually very old, and has (a) a lot of rust and peeling paint, (b) at least one broken taillight patched with red tape, and (c) stickers on the back with the names and/or logos of various rock bands.
We need to get our terminology straight here. What you've described is not "a Buick" but "a jalopy". A proper Buick in the context and vernacular of this thread must be (a) in relatively good shape, regardless of age, and (b) driven by an old geezer wearing a fedora. A former Buick that has been re-purposed by hippies is no longer a Buick, any more than the psychedelic vehicle in which Ken Kesey and his band of hippies traveled the country getting wasted on LSD could be called "a school bus".
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:22 PM
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This kind of shit again? Here's a question: why do people feel that it's okay to stereotype older people, but get their panties in a twist over generalities made about other groups of people?
The positive thing about a thread that tries to stereotype a particular group is that members of that group can refute the stereotypes. At least, those that aren't true. But some are (cite: Buick, old geezer, fedora).

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Old 06-12-2019, 10:20 PM
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Neither of those is in our gene pool; we tend to go vampire as we age and drive even faster. My Dad, mid 70s when he died, usually slept 5 hours a day from say 4am to 9am and as for speed -------- Mario Andretti would have been proud of him.

I'm a kid; just in my 60s. But I got almost-busted in VA last year for 105 in a 55 zone (don't ask -- I didn't know they trapped tunnels) and I'm just home from work a bit ago. So..........
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:38 PM
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I'm a kid; just in my 60s. But I got almost-busted in VA last year for 105 in a 55 zone (don't ask -- I didn't know they trapped tunnels) and I'm just home from work a bit ago. So..........
Well, I agree, 60s is just a kid. But man, 105 in a 55 -- that's 50 Murkin mileage units over the limit. Here in Ontario, 50 km/h over the limit (31 mph over the limit in Murkin mileage units) means being charged under "stunt driving" laws primarily enacted to combat street racing, which entails:

- immediate roadside license suspension -- police relieve you of your license on the spot

- car is towed away from the scene and impounded for at least a week

- $10,000 fine

- probably enough demerit points to have an interview to explain why your license shouldn't be suspended for even longer, if it's not automatic, and insurance rates go through the roof

My goodness, some of you younger oldsters, by implication of being part of a nominal "seniors" demographic, make the rest of us feel like kids again!
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:41 PM
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Maybe the thing about old people driving big cars was true at one time, like with my grandparents' generation, and my theory and my theory is that they grew up at a time when a bigger car was considered more prestigious. But I'm not sure if it's true anymore with my parents' generation, who are now in their late 60s and 70s. They own two Ford Focuses. And as I understand it the Kia Soul is actually pretty popular with older folks now.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:48 PM
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1. Not all old people do. Conversely, some people go to bed early their whole lives.

2. Not all old people do. Those who do are conscious that their eyesight, hearing and reflexes aren't what they used to be, but refuse to stop driving.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:52 PM
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Why do old people mack so hard?
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:24 PM
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I can't count the number of times someone whipped around me, sometimes on the shoulder, only to be sitting at the next light when I get there.
I notice this all of the time. I have seen younger more aggressive drivers - almost always male (stereotype) - forcing their way around people on a highway in bumper to bumper traffic. Dude you are literally only 10 feet further and those 872 other cars are still in front of us.
I am 53 - but stay up too late. I don't drive as fast as I used to but then again I am a much better driver (safer overall) than I ever was. I am not the slowest car on the round and tend to keep up with the smarter drivers who don't blow by people. In my 25 years of driving - mostly 15-19k miles per year - i have only gotten 2 speeding tickets.
I talk with younger workers at my current employer - very large multinational govt contractor - and I am constantly hearing about how many times they get pulled over. Some seem to think that expensive speeding tickets - and the resulting expensive insurance - are a part of life. I got news for them.
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Old 06-13-2019, 04:16 AM
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My Grandpa drove really s...l...o...w on most roads and ohmygodhowfast?! on motorways. He learned in not very good old cars, with poor braking and steering, hence the slow, but also remembered the days when there was no speed limit (or at least, everyone acted as though there wasn't one) on motorways, when they were the new super fast roads with few cars around much of the time and getting the highest speed possible was basically a challenge.

Fortunately, when he did finally crash and lose his licence, he managed to do it in a solo accident with little injury. It was so obviously gonna happen at some point- I mean, when he crashed, he was on a totally different road to the one he thought he was on, and tried to go straight on when the road didn't. He was never going to give up the licence voluntarily.
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Old 06-13-2019, 05:34 AM
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I'm an old guy and I'll answer some of the questions, for me anyway.

Starting with the OP...
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuntanLotion View Post
Why do they drive so slow.
Anyone?
Because I possess a rare ability. I have the cognitive and reasoning capacity to understand time and distance calculations -- and apply that to the urban environment. Many of the young are not mentally capable of grasping how little time is gained by frantically speeding to the next light, or freeway exit. Adding traffic to this, the time gained is effectively nil.

I drive the speed limit at all times (in the slow lane). I have discovered an amazing device which renders almost all delays, traffic, and weather problems moot. It's called an alarm clock.

Quote:
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One "why do old people" question I have is, why do old people drive gigantic cars?
Because the aforementioned mental incompetents aren't able to grasp stopping distances either. And they tailgate us relentlessly in some vain hope that we'll join them on the short bus.

After trying for several months to commute in the little Toyota, I finally gave up. The constant fire-breathing idiots 2 feet off my bumper finally got to me. I said "fuck it" and am now commuting in my 8000 lb. diesel pickup. They can learn physics by bouncing off of it for all I care.
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Old 06-13-2019, 05:53 AM
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One "why do old people" question I have is, why do old people drive gigantic cars?
One theory: They saved well for retirement and can now afford luxury cars, which tend to be bigger cars. Bigger cars are also easier to get in/out of, which is a valuable feature for old folks.
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Old 06-13-2019, 06:54 AM
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I'm an old guy, 73. I work all night, and catch a few hours of sleep now and then throughout the day.

I tend to drive fast, usually exceeding the speed limit (traffic and weather permitting).

The biggest car I've ever owned was a PT Cruiser.
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:09 AM
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Q: Why do old people have slower reflexes?

A: Not all old people! Some young people have bad reflexes! Quit stereotyping!


As many people get into their senior years, getting a proper night of sleep can be difficult. They often don't get enough "deep sleep" cycle time. That's the likely reason for an earlier bedtime than they had in younger days, they're just more tired.

Last edited by CarnalK; 06-13-2019 at 07:10 AM.
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:58 AM
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One theory: They saved well for retirement and can now afford luxury cars, which tend to be bigger cars. Bigger cars are also easier to get in/out of, which is a valuable feature for old folks.
My theory has always been that, due to the decline in various cognitive and physical functions, older people gravitated towards large, big framed vehicles as a way to feel safer and more secure on the road.
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:06 AM
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Most current old people grew up with big cars too and may instinctively think that's what a "real" car is.
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:20 AM
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One of the (relatively few) nice things about getting old is that you no longer care what the young whipper-snappers think about you. You don't like my hat, or the fact that I stay under the speed limit, or what time I go to bed? Whatever, sonny - I'm too deaf to hear you anyway.

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Old 06-13-2019, 08:24 AM
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I'm old and I've never driven. I'd ask you why young people walk so damn slowly, but I know the answer: It's hard to walk and talk or text at the same time. BTW, why can't young people put that damn device down for five minutes?

I've always gone to bed early. Nothing about the late night life interests me, and I love the early morning, when the day is still new. Getting out for that first cup of coffee and a long walk makes the day better.
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:33 AM
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I'm old and I've never driven. I'd ask you why young people walk so damn slowly, but I know the answer: It's hard to walk and talk or text at the same time. BTW, why can't young people put that damn device down for five minutes?
.
Back in your day, people didn't walk and talk?
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:41 AM
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I’m in my 40’s, but to me a 1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V is the epitome of a luxury car. I hope they bring back the old Luxo-barges by the time I’m 60.

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Old 06-13-2019, 09:01 AM
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Back in your day, people didn't walk and talk?
Yes, but only to other people who were actually physically present and walking with them. Back then, if yo heard someone talking to someone who wasn't there, you thought "Crazy person." Today, you think "Cell hone addict."

Last edited by Annie-Xmas; 06-13-2019 at 09:01 AM.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:02 AM
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The answer to every "Why do old people...?" question is "Because they're old."
No, the answer is the same as the answer to all those "Why do young people . . ?" questions; which is that just about always lots of them don't.


I am 68. stay up way too late, strongly prefer to drive small cars except when I need to drive the work van because otherwise the load won't fit, and have to be careful to restrain myself in order not to get speeding tickets. Occasionally I just feel like driving slow on the back roads but if so I'll pull over and get out of the way -- unless the reason that I'm driving slow is that I know something about the road that I suspect the driver of the car behind me doesn't; such as, there may be a large wide piece of farm machinery around this blind curve.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:06 AM
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Does anyone have any theories on why elderly people do certain things? Its got me wondering why 1. Why do the elderly go to bed so early and 2. Why do they drive so slow.
Anyone?
Please, sir/madam, before we go any further would you care to define "elderly"? It may go a long way in aiding our understanding of your question.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:13 AM
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My Grandpa drove really s...l...o...w on most roads and ohmygodhowfast?! on motorways.
Yeah, mine too. When I was 16, my family went to L.A. for a cousin's wedding. My grandparents lived in the Pasadena area, and the wedding was at Newport Beach, about an hour away. This was in 1987, so Grandpa was... 72 at the time.

Anyway, I decided to ride with my grandparents going home. It was Newport Beach on a Saturday afternoon, and the town was jam-packed with kids my age leaving the beach. And here I was in my grandparents' car, driving the couple-of-miles stretch to get to the freeway, doing five or ten under the speed limit, holding up an endless line of cars behind him. I was laying down in the back seat of the car, dying of embarrassment.

Then he got on the freeway, and floored it. The speed limit was still 55 at the time, and he did 80 the whole way home. Now I was thinking "alright Grandpa!"
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:19 AM
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Location: Peak District, England
Posts: 2,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Jackson View Post
Please, sir/madam, before we go any further would you care to define "elderly"? It may go a long way in aiding our understanding of your question.
I can report that the OP forgot that she posted her question, and wandered off to the mall, where she was apprehended "accidentally" shoplifting Depends.

She's back home safely now, and will be sure to answer your query after a nice nap and some tea.
  #49  
Old 06-13-2019, 11:05 AM
xizor's Avatar
xizor is offline
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Join Date: May 2000
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 5,413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambivalid View Post
My theory has always been that, due to the decline in various cognitive and physical functions, older people gravitated towards large, big framed vehicles as a way to feel safer and more secure on the road.
Hmm, my theory has always been that older people choose cars that are easier to get in and out of. And those tend to be cars with bigger doors, hence bigger cars in general.
  #50  
Old 06-13-2019, 11:53 AM
kopek is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Southwestern PA
Posts: 14,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
Well, I agree, 60s is just a kid. But man, 105 in a 55 -- that's 50 Murkin mileage units over the limit.
Readers Digest version; being from a clan of gearheads we have tended to notice a lack of speed traps in tunnels and like places and sometimes in light traffic we tend to ..........

I was on my bigger bike, conditions were perfect, it was one of the long tunnels down towards VA Beach and I opened it up a bit. As I exited (at like 60?) Mr Policeman fell in behind with his lights on so I nicely pulled over and cooperated I was honest that I was somewhere north of the C-note, that I didn't know they had traps in the tunnels, and that I was somewhat embarrassed. He liked my bike, liked the fact that I had full safety gear on, and that I didn't make any excuses. He let me off with a VERY stern warning. \(*o*)/

As we were parting he asked me if I had any questions; I couldn't help myself. I had to ask if they had gotten around to trapping bridges in the state yet.

Like I said, we all tend towards a little fast.
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