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Old 02-01-2019, 08:46 PM
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Anyone here ever get pre-diabetes blood sugar levels?....


My blood sugar is now at about 105 to 106. My doctor said I was still OK, but I'm creeping up over the last two years (I was at 90 about 3 years ago). I just crossed 100 for the first time. I'm still about 20 away from diabetes (125 is the line).

If you've gotten to pre-diabetes, were you able to push it back below 100 with just diet & stuff? I hate the thought of changing what I eat, although I guess I have no choice. I don't want to become a diabetic.

Anyone on here deal with this before?
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:57 PM
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Same here - almost a mirror image. My blood sugar used to be in the high 80s. Now it's in the 97-107 range. I'm hoping cutting carbs out of my diet, and exercise, will do the trick.
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Old 02-01-2019, 10:38 PM
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Not me, but my best friend. He was diagnosed as pre-diabetic and thru diet and exercise his numbers went back down below that mark. Caveat: he is maybe 6-2 and weighs about 160. He treats himself to two beers and one pizza per week, that's about it.
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Old 02-01-2019, 10:59 PM
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I'm different I guess, I've officially been pre-diabetic for nearly fifteen years. I constantly run on the high end of the normal range. Blood sugar typically runs between 100 and 110.
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Old 02-01-2019, 11:29 PM
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I have been running just over 100 for the past several years. Both of my older brothers are diabetic so I expect I may be crossing that line before long.
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Old 02-02-2019, 12:13 AM
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A few years ago I was creeping up over 100 and made something of an effort to limit my carbs. I didn't cut them out, just chose less pasta and more salads for lunch. No warning signs since. I recognize this may not work for everyone.
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:10 AM
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Yep. I was creeping up towards the diabetic line for a while.

I have (so far) managed to keep mine in check by diet. I have also been exercising off and on, though lately it's been more off than on.
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:32 AM
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Yes.
Lost thirty pounds and got my numbers back on line.
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:12 AM
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I was pre-diabetic for a few years and didn't do anything about it. Went to full blown diabetes. My fasting glucose was up to 15 mmol/l or so and my A1C was around 8 or 9. I started light exercise and was on metformin for 1 1/2 years or so. Brought my fasting glucose down to 6mmol/l and A1C to 6 or so with that plus slight diatery changes (cut out pop, cut down on bread and cereal).

In October I had to go off the metformin to do blood tests for another issue. I was worried about my blood sugar getting out of control so did some poking around. I'd heard of intermittent fasting helping with glucose control so figured I'd try it for the 3 weeks I had to be off metformin.

Making no changes in my diet other than the eating window I ended up with a slightly higher fasting glucose of 7.5mmol/l but a lower overall average on my readings. Doctor approved continuing going without metformin and my last A1C was 5.8.

Im still eating pasta l, potatoes or rice every day. I have the occasional piece of bread. I stay away from both fast food and restaurant food as much as possible as I find that their food spikes my glucose more than homemade does. I do have the occasional pizza but I'll have two pieces instead of a whole 12".

Little sacrifices but they add up. I'm kicking myself that I didn't start when the warning signs first presented. I might have been able to indulge a bit more now if I'd done something then.

Last edited by Cyros; 02-02-2019 at 11:13 AM.
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TSBG View Post
A few years ago I was creeping up over 100 and made something of an effort to limit my carbs. I didn't cut them out, just chose less pasta and more salads for lunch. No warning signs since. I recognize this may not work for everyone.
Gonna try to do that myself. More salads, more veggies, more healthy fruits, less junk. I jog 2-3 miles about 2 to 3 times a week. I'm not in bad shape. I just need to cut back on some things in my diet to keep this from becoming diabetes. At least, that's my current talking points. We'll see if I can control this with diet.
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:56 AM
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IIRC, pre-diabetes is reversible via diet and exercise, but full-blown Type II diabetes is not, right?
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Old 02-02-2019, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
IIRC, pre-diabetes is reversible via diet and exercise, but full-blown Type II diabetes is not, right?
Type 2 can often be managed with diet and exercise alone (no meds). Type 1 - in which the pancreas makes zero insulin - is not reversible.


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Old 02-02-2019, 12:23 PM
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My wife and I were both there. I exercise and she more watches her diet. If we combined the two we could be even better but ------ we're old and kinda set in our ways.
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Old 02-02-2019, 12:46 PM
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IIRC, pre-diabetes is reversible via diet and exercise, but full-blown Type II diabetes is not, right?
To keep things in perspective, if you are pre-diabetic, you probably have some damage to your pancreas, and that damage is permanent.

If you lose some weight and get your diet under control so that what's left of your pancreas doesn't have to work so hard, then your body will be able to regulate its blood sugar properly even with a bit of damage.

If you damage your pancreas so much that your blood sugar ends up in the full-blown Type II diabetic range, then getting your diet under control and losing a lot of weight might get you back out of the diabetic range, or it might not. It depends on a lot of things, like how much damage you've done to your pancreas and how much of your body's resistance to insulin is caused by fat accumulation and how much is due to other things like genetics.

Personally, I think it is very important to keep in mind that if you "cure" yourself of diabetes (by getting your blood sugar back under control) you are never truly cured, at least not in the sense of having your pancreas recover. Once those insulin-producing cells in your pancreas die off from over-stress, they are gone forever. They never grow back. Ever. In a sense, you will always be diabetic.
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Old 02-02-2019, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by engineer_comp_geek View Post
To keep things in perspective, if you are pre-diabetic, you probably have some damage to your pancreas, and that damage is permanent.

If you lose some weight and get your diet under control so that what's left of your pancreas doesn't have to work so hard, then your body will be able to regulate its blood sugar properly even with a bit of damage.

If you damage your pancreas so much that your blood sugar ends up in the full-blown Type II diabetic range, then getting your diet under control and losing a lot of weight might get you back out of the diabetic range, or it might not. It depends on a lot of things, like how much damage you've done to your pancreas and how much of your body's resistance to insulin is caused by fat accumulation and how much is due to other things like genetics.

Personally, I think it is very important to keep in mind that if you "cure" yourself of diabetes (by getting your blood sugar back under control) you are never truly cured, at least not in the sense of having your pancreas recover. Once those insulin-producing cells in your pancreas die off from over-stress, they are gone forever. They never grow back. Ever. In a sense, you will always be diabetic.
Thanks, good points. Just hope I can keep this from crossing that line. Appreciate everyone's responses. Gives me hope that I can control this myself.
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Old 02-02-2019, 02:40 PM
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Diagnosed with "Metabolic Syndrome" so I decided to lose weight by not being a compulsive overeater for the first time in my life. Stopped eating/drinking some of the worst things, but for the most part I "simply" exercised more than I felt like while eating less than I felt like. Forever.
Lost 60 pounds in less than a year, got my levels down to normal/acceptable. Without feeling particularly deprived of eating pleasure, I've kept 50 of those 60 pounds off for four years now. I'm 68. It's required a lot of attention, but hasn't been difficult, much to my continuing surprise.

It can be done.

Last edited by TreacherousCretin; 02-02-2019 at 02:40 PM.
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Old 02-03-2019, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by TreacherousCretin View Post
Diagnosed with "Metabolic Syndrome" so I decided to lose weight by not being a compulsive overeater for the first time in my life. Stopped eating/drinking some of the worst things, but for the most part I "simply" exercised more than I felt like while eating less than I felt like. Forever.
Lost 60 pounds in less than a year, got my levels down to normal/acceptable. Without feeling particularly deprived of eating pleasure, I've kept 50 of those 60 pounds off for four years now. I'm 68. It's required a lot of attention, but hasn't been difficult, much to my continuing surprise.

It can be done.
That must be hard to do at any age. But in your 60's, maybe even harder, as you've had a lifetime to develop those overeating habits that you had to overcome. I'm 52. Not looking forward to changing my diet. But I'd rather do it now than after I've crossed the magic "125" line.
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Old 02-03-2019, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
Same here - almost a mirror image. My blood sugar used to be in the high 80s. Now it's in the 97-107 range. I'm hoping cutting carbs out of my diet, and exercise, will do the trick.
I took my A1c down from 7 to 5.3 doing exactly that, sans exercise. Lost 60 pounds too. So, yes.
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Old 02-03-2019, 02:35 PM
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That must be hard to do at any age. But in your 60's, maybe even harder, as you've had a lifetime to develop those overeating habits that you had to overcome. I'm 52. Not looking forward to changing my diet. But I'd rather do it now than after I've crossed the magic "125" line.
Although it certainly wasn't easy, it wasn't nearly as difficult as I'd feared and expected it to be.
When the doctor gave me her diagnosis and explained what it meant, I chose to simplify the equation to a choice: For the first time in my life, lose a LOT of weight NOW, or become diabetic. That metaphoric gun to my head gave me will power I'd never had before.
I was fortunate that my diet was already fairly healthy- my problem had always been how much I would put away, and how fast.

One has to remain vigilant, forever. Four years later I'm still amazed by how much my body wants to regain weight, and how VERY quickly it can do so. I still weigh myself every single morning.
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Old 02-03-2019, 10:00 PM
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My blood sugar is now at about 105 to 106. My doctor said I was still OK, but I'm creeping up over the last two years (I was at 90 about 3 years ago). I just crossed 100 for the first time. I'm still about 20 away from diabetes (125 is the line).

If you've gotten to pre-diabetes, were you able to push it back below 100 with just diet & stuff? I hate the thought of changing what I eat, although I guess I have no choice. I don't want to become a diabetic.

Anyone on here deal with this before?
Uh, I am not a doctor, but I have had diabetes for years. 125 is quite high for a fasting level. Anything above 100 is considered diabetes:
https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/how-s...cts-diabetes#1

I don't know where you are getting those numbers, but you need to check into that. It sounds like VERY old advice. Many years ago the assumed level was higher than 100, but I don't think the cutoff was ever as high as 125.

All this assumes we are talking about a fasting sugar level. The 2 hour number is useful, but very dependent on what you eat.
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Old 02-04-2019, 02:26 PM
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Blood sugar, I can't tell you, but my A1C was tested at 6.4 in November after years in the low 6s, so I started an Atkins-style low-carb diet (and I started a thread here somewhere about the constipation that it triggered) just before Thanksgiving. I haven't had a follow-up test yet (I asked for one on 2/1, but my doctor specified the test had to be at least three months after I started taking Metformin), but I have managed to drop around 30 pounds. Amazing what doing without pasta, potatoes, tomato sauce, corn, and flour can do.
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Old 02-04-2019, 08:20 PM
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In about 2000, I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic. My glucose was about 6 x 18 = 108 (you have to multiply by 18 to convert the Canadian measure--mmole/liter--to US--mg/centiliter). I lost 30 lb, then gained back around 10 and finally in 2005, the glucose hit 8 x 18 =144. I didn't know about A1C in those days, so I don't know the numbers. In 2005, I started metformin. Without further dieting, I lost 20 lb in the ensuing year. That weight loss is a known side-effect of metformin; my doctor says the mechanism is not known. I then stabilized at that weight and the glucose stabilized around 108 and the A1C around 6%. Around 2011, I decided that while you can't go off eating cold turkey, you can go off noshing between meals. I did and gradually lost another 40 lb. Which I have mostly kept off, although I am currently 5 lb above my minimum--too much holiday and vacation (3 weeks in Barbados) eating. Currently my A1C is around 5.5% and my doctor is quite pleased. He has stopped doing glucose tests, feeling that A1C is more important. It is a measure of what percentage of hemoglobin is bound in a complex with glucose and measures long term glucose concentration.

What I have is not pancreatic disease; just metabolic disease which means my body does not react properly to insulin. But I still produce plenty of insulin. Oh, and I have never gone through the pin prick and paper tape business since that is really necessary only when you are taking insulin.
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Old 02-04-2019, 09:18 PM
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Uh, I am not a doctor, but I have had diabetes for years. 125 is quite high for a fasting level. Anything above 100 is considered diabetes:
https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/how-s...cts-diabetes#1

I don't know where you are getting those numbers, but you need to check into that. It sounds like VERY old advice. Many years ago the assumed level was higher than 100, but I don't think the cutoff was ever as high as 125.

All this assumes we are talking about a fasting sugar level. The 2 hour number is useful, but very dependent on what you eat.
http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-bas...loc=db-slabnav

The fasting blood glucose of 100-125 is considered pre-diabetes. I'm at 106 for fasting blood glucose, in the low end of pre-diabetes.
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Old 02-06-2019, 04:21 PM
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If you damage your pancreas so much that your blood sugar ends up in the full-blown Type II diabetic range, then getting your diet under control and losing a lot of weight might get you back out of the diabetic range, or it might not. It depends on a lot of things, like how much damage you've done to your pancreas and how much of your body's resistance to insulin is caused by fat accumulation and how much is due to other things like genetics.

Personally, I think it is very important to keep in mind that if you "cure" yourself of diabetes (by getting your blood sugar back under control) you are never truly cured, at least not in the sense of having your pancreas recover. Once those insulin-producing cells in your pancreas die off from over-stress, they are gone forever. They never grow back. Ever. In a sense, you will always be diabetic.
This is really good information. I was "pre=diabetic" a few years ago. While I managed to knock my blood-sugar levels back down, I was never terribly worried because I was under the mistaken impression that diabetes was defined simply by a blood-sugar measurement. That is, I thought that if I became "diabetic," I could just get the numbers back down and become "not diabetic any more."

Of course, it doesn't work like that. Once you've lost the ability to produce insulin you may not gain it back. I was unaware of this fact and I'm sure many others are as well. If this were common knowledge, I think people would be much less cavalier about it.

Last edited by Wheelz; 02-06-2019 at 04:22 PM.
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Old 02-08-2019, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by survinga View Post
http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-bas...loc=db-slabnav

The fasting blood glucose of 100-125 is considered pre-diabetes. I'm at 106 for fasting blood glucose, in the low end of pre-diabetes.
Thanks
I was being treated for high cholesterol when the latest levels were published (in the early 00s as I remember) and tipped over from "at-risk" to "early diabetes". My sugars were running around 100 at the time, but one visit I was at-risk and the next no longer. Clearly my understanding was that pre-diabetes = early diabetes. When that happened my insurance started covering my visits and testing under a diagnosis of diabetes. Fortunately, I have never hit 125 fasting. But the numbers are clearly trending upward so some day.....
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Old 02-09-2019, 04:44 PM
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I haven't researched the subject, but the channels we watch seem to have an inordinate number of commercials for diabetes medicines. So I'm curious:

Quote:
Originally Posted by engineer_comp_geek View Post
To keep things in perspective, if you are pre-diabetic, you probably have some damage to your pancreas, and that damage is permanent.
If we know that diabetes is caused by damage to the pancreas, why can't new, healthy, reproducing pancreas cells be grown from stem cells? (Or perhaps any remaining healthy cells in the pancreas?) If the damaged cells are not producing enough insulin, why can't new, healthy, reproducing pancreas cells be created through genetic modifications?
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Old 02-09-2019, 09:44 PM
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My wife hit over 125, and then started eating brown rice instead of white rice. That, and generally avoiding sweets (only a bite or two of a shared dessert) was all it took to get back towards the 100 range.
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Old 02-10-2019, 01:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
If we know that diabetes is caused by damage to the pancreas, why can't new, healthy, reproducing pancreas cells be grown from stem cells? (Or perhaps any remaining healthy cells in the pancreas?) If the damaged cells are not producing enough insulin, why can't new, healthy, reproducing pancreas cells be created through genetic modifications?
I don't know about genetic modifications, but research into using stem cells currently looks promising. The last I heard though, they were trying to determine if they could come up with something that would be safe enough to try a few human trials with. As far as I am aware, nothing has completed any of the first stage human trials at this point, so there's still a long way to go before this could potentially become a cure.
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Old 02-14-2019, 09:38 PM
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So, I had another blood lab last week, and now my blood glucose is 99. For the first time ever, I got an A1C, and it was 5.4, which is normal and not pre-diabetes.

I'm definitely in the high end of normal, but maybe it's not as bad as I was led to believe in January, when I had the 106 and didn't get an A1C.
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